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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 31, 2021 7:00pm-7:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news, broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines. countries around the world are seeing in the new year, with scaled back celebrations, as the omicron variant continues to drive up covid infections. entire neighbourhoods in the us state of colorado have been engulfed by flames as wildfires force tens of thousands to leave their homes. the nhs warns of significant pressure in the coming weeks, as covid infections in the uk reach a new high. the staff that are at work will be caring for more patients, trying to do more to cover for their missing colleagues, working extra hours,
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starting early and finishing late. the pressure will be immense. and mourners in south africa have been paying their respects to the late archbishop desmond tutu. hello and welcome. new year celebrations have begun across the world. this is the how hong kong rang it in. for, three, two, one. happy new year. so it's now 2022 in much of asia, while people in africa and europe are just a few hours away from seeing the new year arrive too. however, in many places the celebrations will be somewhat muted as governments
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try to discourage crowds coming together to celebrate 2022, in order to counter the spread of covid—19. in london, the mayor, sadiq khan, has urged people to stay home, or to exercise caution if they do head out tonight. it's really important, if you've not got a lateral flow test at home and you're not vaccinated, you think very, very carefully about whether you go out tonight. it's possible to get a lateral flow test today from local pharmacists, from libraries. i checked this morning. there were a lateral flow tests available in some local pharmacies where i live and also my local library was providing tests this morning. check, if you've not got a flow test, where you can get one, from your local pharmacy today before you go out. if you are going out, please do a lateral flow test before you go out because you may have the virus and not show symptoms. how would you feel if you went out and passed on the virus or you brought it home? when you come home, if not tonight and tomorrow, do another lateral flow test,
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because you may have caught the virus. it's really important we recognise this variant is spreading very, very fast and it's doubling at exponential rates. 0k, and for people at home watching the tv tonight, what can they expect? how can they enjoy their new year? can ijust say, tonight's live spectacular show will be the best ever. the only way to really appreciate it is by watching on bbc one. you'll have 13 minutes of brilliance. live performances, looking back at the defining moments of 2021. we're going to be showcasing some of the brilliant things happening in 2022. it's going to be brilliant. that was the mayor of london, sadiq khan. jean mackenzie is in trafalgar square.in central so, the mayor telling us a bit about what we can expect tonight. yeah as we've been — what we can expect tonight. yeah as we've been hearing, _ what we can expect tonight. yeah as we've been hearing, for— what we can expect tonight. yeah as we've been hearing, for the - what we can expect tonight. yeah as we've been hearing, for the second. we've been hearing, for the second yearin we've been hearing, for the second year in a row, the huge public
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fireworks display on the river thames has been cancelled. the plan instead was to have a more intimate celebration here in trafalgar square, a party for key workers and members of the public but ultimately the omicron cases started to go up and the mayor of london sadiq khan decided that this was also too risky so they cancelled that and they've closed the whole of trafalgar square off to stop people even being able to congregate here and instead they are holding a light show that is going to be broadcast on tv at midnight. the message is that it's going to look better from home than from the ground. people being urged to stay at home and watch it on tv. this doesn't stop people from london and in england from going to pubs and in england from going to pubs and bars because there are no limits on socialising here. if you follow me around you can see the christmas markets here this evening and there are still lots of people out enjoying themselves, starting to celebrate. it doesn't necessarily
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look that different from any other night of the year but the one difference is how warm it is. there's is not what it should feel like on the 31st of december. the hope is that many people will choose to celebrate outdoors instead. the advice to those heading indoors, though, is to take a lateral flow test before they head out. the weather doesn't _ test before they head out. the weather doesn't seem right, does it? thank you. the scottish capital edinburgh normally marks the new year with its traditional hogmanay celebrations. our scotland correspondent james shaw is there. what would hogmanay normally look like and what can we expect this year? like and what can we expect this ear? ~ �* , , ., year? well if i'd been standing in this location _ year? well if i'd been standing in this location alongside _ year? well if i'd been standing in this location alongside edinburgh castle two years ago you would have seen a huge display of fireworks set off at midnight, a spectacular display visible around the city and beyond butjust look at how desolate the scene is now. the castle itself
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is barely lit up, no one here at all. it's possible that people may turn up later on. that certainly happened last year, when there were strict controls in place. people just come to the castle esplanade to celebrate in a kind of informal way. people will be celebrating around the city. it looks quite bleak here but people are out on the streets. you can socialise although you can only have three households in your group and you have to keep separate from other groups. nightclubs are essentially closed because dancing is not allowed. in no way will this be like the hogmanay that many of us are used to in scotland, notjust into any bread but in towns and cities all over the nation, celebrations will be more muted in a way that people hoped might be avoided but here we are again. another hogmanay that is being seriously affected by coronavirus
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restrictions. seriously affected by coronavirus restrictions-_ seriously affected by coronavirus restrictions. ., ~ ., , _ restrictions. thank you, happy new year and thank _ restrictions. thank you, happy new year and thank you _ restrictions. thank you, happy new year and thank you very _ restrictions. thank you, happy new year and thank you very much. - it's feared that some scots will take advantage of the variations in covid restrictions between the different nations of the uk, and travel to england to see the new year in there. olivia richwald is in the english town of carlisle, just eight miles from the the border with scotland. i'm going to let you explain where you are and what is likely to happen. you are and what is likely to ha en. ~ �* . , ~' ., happen. well i'm in carlisle, known as the border— happen. well i'm in carlisle, known as the border city. _ happen. well i'm in carlisle, known as the border city. in _ happen. well i'm in carlisle, known as the border city. in fact _ happen. well i'm in carlisle, known as the border city. in fact if - happen. well i'm in carlisle, known as the border city. in fact if you - as the border city. in fact if you were to leave now from carlisle uk and be in scotland, gretna, in 20 minutes. there's always been many scottish people who come here for nights out because it's got a vibrant nightlife. tonight is no exception. i've walked around the city centre and spoken to many scottish people. some were coming anyway but some have come to enjoy the more relaxed rules in place here. this is one of the many hospitality venues who have scottish
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people booked in. let's go inside and speak to a spokesman who works here, james, the restaurant manager. he is going to tell us about what they put in place here to keep people safe. hello, james. i have just introduced you. tell us what you put in place at the rest want to keep people safe. we you put in place at the rest want to keep peeple safe-— keep people safe. we have a table service, keep people safe. we have a table service. so — keep people safe. we have a table service, so the _ keep people safe. we have a table service, so the tables _ keep people safe. we have a table service, so the tables are - keep people safe. we have a table service, so the tables are well- service, so the tables are well segregated, there's no... everything is done _ segregated, there's no... everything is done through the tables and we have sanitisers stationed around the hoieh _ have sanitisers stationed around the hotel. , . , ,, �* have sanitisers stationed around the hotel. , ., , �* ., have sanitisers stationed around the hotel. , �* ., , ., have sanitisers stationed around the hotel. , ., ., ., hotel. james, you're a scotsman and ou cross hotel. james, you're a scotsman and you cross the — hotel. james, you're a scotsman and you cross the border _ hotel. james, you're a scotsman and you cross the border every _ hotel. james, you're a scotsman and you cross the border every day - hotel. james, you're a scotsman and you cross the border every day to - you cross the border every day to come and work here. how many scottish people do you think are in carlisle tonight? i scottish people do you think are in carlisle tonight?— carlisle tonight? i mean, we've noticed it _ carlisle tonight? i mean, we've noticed it over _ carlisle tonight? i mean, we've noticed it over the _ carlisle tonight? i mean, we've noticed it over the last - carlisle tonight? i mean, we've noticed it over the last couple i carlisle tonight? i mean, we'vel noticed it over the last couple of weeks. — noticed it over the last couple of weeks, since the regulations came in. just— weeks, since the regulations came in. just today i've had quite a few of my— in. just today i've had quite a few of my friends come over, having a drink_ of my friends come over, having a drink and — of my friends come over, having a drink and stuff and a night out. we've — drink and stuff and a night out. we've had _ drink and stuff and a night out. we've had people from glasgow and
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stuff like _ we've had people from glasgow and stuff like that over the last couple of days _ stuff like that over the last couple of days. they are getting away from what's _ of days. they are getting away from what's happening over the border. thank_ what's happening over the border. thank you. — what's happening over the border. thank you, james, i'll let you get back to work. you're very busy. they are closing busy tonight to try and avoid any major problems. they'll be closing before midnight so people like james can go out and enjoy themselves. we've seen quite a few police patrolling around carlisle. they say that so for everything seems very calm and everyone seems to be in a celebrate removed. thank ou. to be in a celebrate removed. thank you- happy — to be in a celebrate removed. thank you- happy new _ to be in a celebrate removed. thank you. happy new year _ to be in a celebrate removed. thank you. happy new year to _ to be in a celebrate removed. thank you. happy new year to you. - to be in a celebrate removed. thank you. happy new year to you. thank you. to america. authorities in colorado say it's still too early for residents to return to their homes after sudden wildfires destroyed 500 homes. tens of thousands of people were evacuated as the fires tore through suburban areas. the fast—moving blazes hit boulder county, north of denver. despite the huge scale — and suddeness — of the fires,
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so far there have been no reported fatalities, something the state's governor descibed as a "miracle". some 30,000 people were told to leave their homes on thursday when a state of emergency was declared. while previous fires in colorado have been in rural areas, these latest blazes have been burning in more suburban parts of the state. winds of up to 105mph fanned flames across the region amid a historic drought. at least some were sparked when power lines were toppled by strong winds, and they have quickly become the most destructive wildfires in the state's modern history. weather experts spoke of their disbelief that such a large fire could have taken hold in the winter. jared polis, the governor of colorado said the speed of the fire took communities by surprise.
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this is in the blink of an eye. this was a disaster in fast motion. all over the course of half a day, nearly all the damage. many families having minutes, minutes to get whatever they could, their pets, their kids into their car and leave. dan depaemela re lives in lewisville, colorado. he and his wife managed to evaucate to longmont yesterday. it happened rather quickly, around noon, 12:30pm, my wife came to me and said she saw fire. i actually was sitting on my bicycle
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trainer and she saw smoke and we ran outside and thankfully our advantage point, we could see approximately where it had started. we live kind of on the top of a ridge, a mesa in lewisville. the smoke was pretty incredible. it was moving fast. the winds were quite strong at that point. so, we knew that it wasn't good. yeah, we've heard the sheriff say it was a really unusual burn pattern. have you ever seen anything like this? have you ever experienced past wildfires? i haven't specifically. i have grown up in the area my entire life, so i'm very familiar with the topography around there. from where it started i understood where the location was where it started and knowing the distance between where it started and where we were, there is nothing but grass, dry grass between. with those winds it was just that, a wildfire. nothing was going to stop it. there was nothing, no structures up until where we were that were going to stop this fire. in terms of the drought, we're hearing about this drought.
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you said it's been very dry. how unusual is that? it's becoming more and more common as the years go by. but this one was extraordinary. in our area in the lewisville, boulder county area, we've only had about one and a half inches moisture in the past six months. so, everything that has been growing through may and june, it has dried out completely since then and it's a tinder box, without a doubt. the pressure on the nhs in the uk has been brought into sharp focus by the latest official figures on staff absences related to covid. those absences in acute nhs trusts in england increased up by more than 40% during christmas week. an average of more than 25,000
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health workers were off sick or isolating every day. the rapid spread of the omicron variant is underlined by the latest estimates from the office for national statistics, which suggest thati in 30 people in the uk tested positive for covid in the period before christmas. our health correspondent katherine da costa reports. most nhs staff will be glad to see the back of 2021. nearly two years into this pandemic, many are exhausted. a spike in covid cases is driving a rise in staff sickness. in england, london is worst affected with about 4% of staff in acute trusts absent for covid—related reasons in the week before christmas, up nearly 60% on the week before. many feel it's impacting on patient care. the staff that are at work will be caring for more patients, trying to do more to cover for their missing colleagues, working extra hours, starting early, finishing late. the pressure will be immense.
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in the latest infection survey from the ons, infections increased across the uk to their highest level on record in the week to christmas eve. in england, one in 25 had the virus. in scotland, wales and northern ireland it was one in a0. infections doubled in a week in london. one in 15 tested positive. but there were big rises too in the north—west, yorkshire and the humber and west midlands. other regions weren't far behind. statisticians say infections are twice the level they were this time last winter in england because they're being fuelled by the more infectious omicron variant. across all age groups we are seeing increases but particularly driven by those young age groups, we've seen increases among school—age children fairly recently, particularly from nursery through to primary. but we are now seeing infections among older age groups as well, so young adults from the mid—20s to the mid—30s, but spreading
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right the way up to increases now in the over 70s, although they remain the lowest group to be infected. there's more encouraging news on boosters. new uk data suggests a booster shot is 88% effective at preventing people ending up in hospital due to omicron. after a huge push, all uk nations say they've hit the target of offering all adults a third dose by the end of the year. i would just say to people again, there's 1.5 million slots out there over the next few days. there's plenty of opportunities. there is mobile vaccination units, there's gps vaccinating, there's all sorts of ways to get vaccinated. just please come forward and help yourself. but also, help reduce that burden on the nhs. and now, this. a second antiviral pill has been approved by the uk regulator. in trials, pfizer's paxlovid drug offered nearly 90% protection from severe illness and death among vulnerable adults. there's a glimmer of hope for the new year.
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vaccines and new treatments should help protect the most at risk from serious illness. but there are huge uncertainties. if there is a sharp rise in hospital admissions, health leaders say ministers will have to act fast. katharine da costa, bbc news. let's recap our top stories. countries around the world are seeing in the new year, with scaled back celebrations, as the omicron variant continues to drive up covid infections. entire neighbourhoods in the us state of colorado have been engulfed by flames as wildfires force tens of thousands to leave their homes. the nhs warns of significant pressure in the coming weeks, as covid infections in the uk reach a new high. a 15 year—old boy has been arrested on suspicion of murder following the death a teenager in croydon in south london last thursday. there was another fatal stabbing
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that evening when a 16 year—old boy was killed in hillingdon in west london. it brings to 30 the number of teenage homicides in london this year — surpassing the peak of 29 in 2008. in south africa, thousands of people have been waiting in line to pay their final respects to the late archbishop desmond tutu, whose body is lying in state for a second day ahead of the state funeral tomorrow. the archbishop, who played a leading role in the battle against racial segregation and the apartheid regime, died on sunday at the age of 90. our south africa correspondent nomsa maseko reports from cape town. the clergy, anglican churchwardens and a marching band lining the streets as a guard of honour for archbishop desmond tutu.
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the outspoken priest who became one of the world's great moral voices lying in state for a second day in a plain, pinewood coffin, in accordance with his wishes. thousands of people have been flocking to st george's cathedral to pay their last respects. one man hitchhiked for more than 1,000 kilometres just for this moment. it's a memory that i will live for for the rest of my life and ijust hope, as he said, in his words, he said, south africa, you must be careful — if you don't live according to those values, you might bite the dust. archbishop tutu campaigned against white minority rule and worked hard to unite a deeply divided nation. the arch, as he was known fondly, was also a family man.
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my my parents relationship was strong and loving. they talked about loving each other. they would say, you are so handsome, you are so beautiful, you smell delicious... he would say ooh, you smelled expensive! the globally revered anti—apartheid icon's sendoff will be held at the cathedral he called home for many years, to the sounds and hymns he chose ahead of his funeral. it's the time for new year resolutions — but they're often quickly abandoned. according to yougov, 16% of britons will make a resolution — but only 31% of those end up sticking to them in 2021. as many embark on new year's resolutions tomorrow, let's take a moment to chat about the best ways to keep them.
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joining me now from south london is the behavioural psychologist, jo hemmings. jo, jo, thank you forjoining us on bbc news. i suppose the first thing is the resolution itself. yes, so, the thing to do with a resolution is to make sure that it's achievable. a lot of people fail because they set expectations that are not attainable. probably to go for one resolution rather than multiple. i think particularly we've had a rough two years, so a lot of people have recognised certain vulnerabilities and strengths that they didn't know they had. we've tested our resolve over the last two years. my feeling is, go in with intention rather than a resolution, so you capitalise if you like on the strengths you know you like on the strengths you know you had. if you're feeling vulnerable, don't be hard on yourself, giving yourself something
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tough to try and achieve when actually, you know, our resolve has been tested really to the limit over the last couple of years anyway. many people at the first stumbled give up. many people at the first stumbled cive u -. , , ,., give up. yes, there is something called quitters — give up. yes, there is something called quitters days, _ give up. yes, there is something called quitters days, which - give up. yes, there is something called quitters days, which i - give up. yes, there is something | called quitters days, which i think is the third friday injanuary, next year, on the 17th of january. is the third friday injanuary, next year, on the 17th ofjanuary. more than half of people who have made a resolution quit, give up, by the 17th of january. and resolution quit, give up, by the 17th ofjanuary. and it's resolution quit, give up, by the 17th of january. and it's usually because they're setting themselves these really hard to achieve goals. it's better to take something that is goal oriented. if you say, i want to drop a gene size byjune, that's better than saying i want to lose 20 lb of weight. reward yourself with small steps along the way, that's also helpful because if you land
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yourself with a gigantic resolution or several, especially after the time we had, perhaps next year more than ever, they are destined to fail. it's about self—care. do things that make you feel good. you may have recognised over the last year or two what helps you to relax, what helps you to feel at ease and gives you comfort. resolve to do more of that rather than the hardcore resolutions that people set themselves in previous years. talking about the previous years, have you had a sense of how the pandemic will change the type of resolutions that people are going to make? i resolutions that people are going to make? ., ., ., ., make? i feel that a lot of them will be more coming — make? i feel that a lot of them will be more coming from _ make? i feel that a lot of them will be more coming from an _ make? i feel that a lot of them willj be more coming from an emotional base rather than a practical one. i think we've learned to cherish what we took for granted once. people say they will keep in touch with people more, keep in contact with friends
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and family. a lot of kindness, perhaps looking at their community and seeing what they can do. in a way, ratherthan and seeing what they can do. in a way, rather than going for selfish resolutions, we've gone for outward looking resolve or intentions, where we've learned something about ourselves that perhaps we didn't have that challenge before, to recognise. have that challenge before, to recognise-_ have that challenge before, to recognise-— have that challenge before, to recoanise. ., ., ., , recognise. thanks for “oining us. ha - recognise. thanks for “oining us. happy new * recognise. thanks for “oining us. nappy newvear. _ countries across the world having been ringing in the new year. we are going to leave you with a look at some of those celebrations, starting in sydney. jazzy music.
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1812 overture. upbeat music plays. pop music plays.
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sunday's premier league match between southampton and newcastle at st mary's has been postponed due to ongoing covid cases and injuries in the newcastle squad. eddie howe's team did not have the required number of players available for yesterday's scheduled game with everton, and that's still the case, forcing sunday's game to be called off. here's ourfootball reporter simon stone. this had been kind of flagged up by eddie howell earlier this week this had been kind of flagged up by eddie howe earlier this week when he suggested that newcastle were struggling for players after the manchester united game. they had a midweek match called off
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and i think it was just a matter of time and the premier league agreeing to grant a request from newcastle. so that brings to 17 now games that have been called off across six match rounds going back into the middle of december. the premier league obviously are trying to sort this matter out. it's not easy. they have already announced new dates for three of those games in the middle ofjanuary. maybe we will be in a better place by then, but it's definitely an unstable situation at the moment. chelsea's match with liverpool on sunday is one of eight games still on over the next three days, butjurgen klopp is expecting to lose three players who are waiting for pcr results which he fears will be positive. it has felt like a lottery in the morning, when you stand there and wait for the result. it was pretty much day
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by day, always one case, and today another one. we have got to wait. the boys are not even in yet so we have to wait, but in this moment, probably not, but we don't know how we will look in a few hours. thomas tuchel has responded to striker romelu lukaku's comments in an interview in which he said he was "not happy" with his situation at chelsea. it's understood the striker spoke three weeks ago, but it's not gone down well with his boss. i don't like it, of course, because it brings noise that we don't need and is not helpful, but on the other side we don't want to make more out of it than it actually is. you know very well how it is, it is very easy to take lines out of context. it is very easy to shorten lines, make headlines, and then later realise that it's not so bad and may not be what he meant. but let's be honest,
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we don't like it, i don't like it, because it's noise that we don't need. we need a calm environment and focus and it doesn't help. manchester city defender joao cancelo says he suffered cuts to the face after attempting to fight off a gang of robbers at his home. cancelo posted an image of his injuries on instagram, claiming "four cowards" took all his jewellery and left him with a facial injury. he will be part of the squad for city's game against arsenal on new year's day. former england all—rounder adam hollioake has been drafted into england's coaching team for the fourth test, which starts in sydney on tuesday evening uk time. england are without four coaches who are isolating, including head coach chris silverwood. australia batter travis head has tested positive for covid
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and will miss the test. he'll remain in melbourne and isolate for seven days in line with health requirements. we'll have more sport for you later on the bbc news channel. this is bbc news. the headlines — countries around the world are seeing in the new year with scaled—back celebrations as the omicron variant continues to drive up covid infections. entire neighbourhoods in the us state of colorado have been engulfed by flames as wildfires force tens of thousands to leave their homes. the nhs warns of significant pressure in the coming weeks as covid infections in the uk reach a new high. the stuff that artwork will be doing more to finish carrying and covering for their callings and starting early and finishing

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