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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 28, 2021 2:00pm-2:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news, this broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the world. our top stories. the hospitality sector welcomes the decision not to impose further covid restrictions in england before the new year, but ministers are watching the data carefully and urge people to take extra care over the festive period. so, be cautious, take a lateralflow test before you go out. go to well ventilated areas. in the united states, people without covid symptoms can end their isolation period earlier — from 10 days to five, amid a surge in cases. more young children are being forced to work on the streets, as afghanistan's humanitarian crisis deepens — we'll bring
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you a special report from kabul. it's all over — australia thrash england to win the ashes, after the tourists collapsed in melbourne. and coming up in the next 15 minutes, we'll be speaking to former england cricketer monty panesar. hello and welcome. people in england are being urged to take care in the run up to new year's eve after the government decided not to bring in further covid rules. ministers are keeping the decision under close review — but say the early indications are that the omicron variant is not leading to the same level of serious disease as previous waves. the government is to wait untiljanuary before re—evaluating the situation. but scotland, wales and northern ireland have all introduced further
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restrictions this week. people in wales and scotland are living with curbs on hospitality, including the closure of nightclubs and all three nations have imposed restrictions on social mixing indoors. in the united states, health officials have halved the recommended isolation time for people with asymptomatic covid—i9 from 10 to five days, amid a surge in cases. france and germany have both re—introduced tougher coronavirus restrictions. the french government has stopped just short of a stay—at—home order, but working from home will now be compulsory. demonstrations have taken place across eastern germany overnight against the new measures there. our first report is from our correspondent sophie hutchinson. a vaccination centre in lambeth, in london. among the boroughs worst affected by omicron in the uk. staff here say there is no
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shortage of demand forjabs. i'm a i'm a schoolteacher, i've got to go back. i'm a schoolteacher, i've got to go back. there are zero mitigations in class. and... i don't want to get sick, you know, i am 57. i am quite frightened about that. i don't want to pass it on to my loved ones. it's really important because i am a recently retired senior head of education at university college. so, i preach it took my staff so i jolly well have to do it as well. if you see what i mean. unlike the rest of the uk, which has increased restrictions, the government in england is relying on vaccinations to get the country through the latest wave of covid. at the moment, we don't think that the evidence supports any more interventions beyond what we have done, but obviously we have to keep it under very close review, because if it is the case and we start to see a big increase in hospitalisations, then we would need to act further, and that's why we have to keep it under close review. so, what is the data the government is monitoring? in particular it is around the most vulnerable groups. london, the epicentre
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of the uk omicron outbreak, has seen some rises in infections in older people and hospitalisations, but figures for intensive care are still below any worrying threshold. cases are still rising. i think suggestions a few days ago that we might have actually started to peak i think was probably not borne out yesterday. but on the other hand, cases aren't increasing as rapidly as they were a week or so ago. i think we can be fairly certain that they are not doubling every couple of days now. the hospitality sector has described the decision not to add further measures as a lifeline for pubs, bars and clubs. it also says allowing people to go out on new year's eve signals better times ahead. it's notjust about new year's eve for us. it's bigger than that. it's the start of a recovery and we believe we have created safe environments for people to come out and socialise. and we think it's the best scenario,
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given the fact that if we'd have closed, we would potentially have seen more house parties and more illegal events, which would have been counter—productive. but there are concerns about the wider impact of omicron on the nhs. hospital leaders say while many people are coming into hospital with covid but not because of covid, staff are also getting infected. it's very clear as soon as you get omicron circulating significantly amongst the community, of course it will be circulating amongst nhs staff. we are now having to redeploy staff to fill gaps that are being left in critical and essential services by staff who are off with covid—related absences. along with vaccinations, the government in england is urging people to remain cautious and if possible, to celebrate outside on new year's eve. it will assess whether more restrictions are needed injanuary. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. health officials in the us have halved the recommended isolation time for people with asymptomatic covid—i9 from 10 to five days.
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the centers for disease control says this must be followed by five days of wearing a mask around others. the measure is expected to alleviate disruptions caused by staff shortages in many areas because of infections. professor of medicine dr peter chin hong explained why the government thinks the reduction in us isolation rules is possible. i think there's several reasons that went into this recommendation. the first is that overall, we are not in the same place that we were in the fall of 2020, when these guidelines were last updated. we've had vaccines since then. more therapeutics. so, if you think about that generation time, the time when you're infected and the time when you're most likely to transmit, if you think about alpha, that is said to be five days. delta, four days. and omicron is thought to be three days. and even if we get a transmission, we have, you know, monoclonal
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antibodies, we have increasing oral options that are going to be away in days and we are more comfortable with treating covid. new restrictions come into effect in germany today. demonstrators took to the streets in towns across eastern germany overnight to protest against the new rules. they include a limit on private gatherings to ten vaccinated people and the closure of all night clubs. students of all ages will have to wear masks in school, and sports competitions will be held behind closed doors. unvaccinated people are already banned from much of public life and only two are allowed to meet in private. the french government has defended the introduction of new coronavirus measures as "proportionate". employees will be expected to work from home more — and bars and cafes will only serve customers who are seated at tables. and there are plans to exclude people who aren't vaccinated from some entertainment venues,
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even if they have a negative covid test. back to the uk, and the health minister gillian keegan has been speaking about the government's decision not to introduce further restrictions in england. she was asked what people should do over new year. we've always said act cautiously, since this new variant came amongst us, and it is highly infectious, many people will know somebody who is caught this over the christmas period. so do be cautious, take a lateral flow test before you go out. go to well ventilated areas, i've been to a couple of outdoor parties, actually, people have moved things to outside. sojust be cautious, but you know, do try to enjoy yourself as well. that is the uk government advice and message. our political correspondent lone wells gave us this assessment of the government's thinking. we are seeing the four nations in the uk all really interpreting
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the data we are seeing in different ways. uk ministers have said in england while hospitalisations are rising, they're not yet at a level they think warrant introducing any further curbs. scientists have said they are still relatively numbers of vaccinated people needing intensive care, stressing the need, of course, for vaccinations, but experts have been warning today that the cases alone, even if they don't translate into hospitalisations, could cause other types of chaos. the chief executive of nhs providers has warned it could be those staff shortages in the nhs that start to become the bigger problem, rather than the numbers of people needing care. so, as you say, england now on quite a divergent path, with the other nations, taking precautions to curb the rising cases, even if they aren't necessarily translating into rising hospitalisations. if this different approach in england pays off, borisjohnson could have that news welcomed, particularly by his own mps, who will welcome keeping the economy open. if it doesn't pay off and admissions
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continue to rise in the new year or staff shortages risk overwhelming the nhs, he could face being accused of putting politics above public health by some of his critics. let's talk more about the restrictions in wales now — dave chapman is from uk hospitality cymru. thanks for being with us. remind us, because it gets confusing, the different restrictions in different parts of the uk. what's the situation in wales as far as hospitality is concerned? currently, ni . htclubs hospitality is concerned? currently, nightclubs are _ hospitality is concerned? currently, nightclubs are closed _ hospitality is concerned? currently, nightclubs are closed and _ hospitality is concerned? currently, nightclubs are closed and the - nightclubs are closed and the equivalent businesses that do similar things, they're restricted. there is no dancing allowed, music is restricted to the background. there's an entrance policy, table service, six to a table. overall, quite a lot of restrictions that will definitely impact more businesses than in england for
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instance. 50 businesses than in england for instance. ., ., ., , . ., , instance. so a lot of restrictions as ou instance. so a lot of restrictions as you say _ instance. so a lot of restrictions as you say compared _ instance. so a lot of restrictions as you say compared to - instance. so a lot of restrictionsl as you say compared to england instance. so a lot of restrictions - as you say compared to england where there are almost none, really. how do you feel about that? is there the prospect of people coming from wales over the border to england, especially over the new year, to go to nightclubs and so on? i especially over the new year, to go to nightclubs and so on?— to nightclubs and so on? i think it's distressing _ to nightclubs and so on? i think it's distressing that _ to nightclubs and so on? i think it's distressing that we've - to nightclubs and so on? i think it's distressing that we've seen | to nightclubs and so on? i think| it's distressing that we've seen a big change in the uk policy. when we were discussing this with governments only a week or so before christmas the very strong message was an attempt to get alignment. now we're seeing four home nations that really have different policies, different restrictions in place. that causes customer confusion. not only is it an economic hit for us, as we go over the border we aren't sure, people don't know which one to apply, and we have to become the police in that circumstance. 50. police in that circumstance. so, what would _ police in that circumstance. so, what would you _ police in that circumstance. so, what would you like to see? fewer restrictions in wales or more in england? restrictions in wales or more in encland? �* , , restrictions in wales or more in encland? h , '. restrictions in wales or more in encland? h , m england? it's very difficult because it's a public—
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england? it's very difficult because it's a public health _ england? it's very difficult because it's a public health missions, - england? it's very difficult because it's a public health missions, to - england? it's very difficult because it's a public health missions, to do | it's a public health missions, to do with the sage numbers, government policy and interpretation. what we have here is a big hit on the economic impact on the industry. that's a huge factor now. through the 21 months there's been financial alignment if not restriction alignment. we've had fulham in the past which is worth about 450—500 million pounds a month to our businesses —— microwave had furlough in the past. that amounts to about 60 million in britain forfour — five weeks. we can see the economic hit and just around the corner, if businesses survive, we have a terrible april coming with a rise in business rates, to 50% and vat, 20%, national insurance rises, food energy inflation, so businesses are really struggling and i can see the impact on sustainability and job numbers here. impact on sustainability and “0b numbers head
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impact on sustainability and “0b numbers here. ~ , ., numbers here. when you say, should businesses survive, _ numbers here. when you say, should businesses survive, is _ numbers here. when you say, should businesses survive, is that _ numbers here. when you say, should businesses survive, is that because l businesses survive, is that because you think that some won't? for instance night club closing in wales. at what would be one of their busiest times of the year. it’s wales. at what would be one of their busiest times of the year.— busiest times of the year. it's fair to say that _ busiest times of the year. it's fair to say that virtually _ busiest times of the year. it's fair to say that virtually all _ busiest times of the year. it's fair to say that virtually all of - busiest times of the year. it's fair to say that virtually all of the - busiest times of the year. it's fair to say that virtually all of the bar| to say that virtually all of the bar members, the openings are at the end of a piece of string of the 21 months they've dealt with severe financial difficulties, lost their cash reserves, borrowed a lot of money, paying it back now and a real hand to mouth existence. i think that has its impact as well on mental health and anxiety and other areas. it's a serious time for us and we've got to look at the inevitability that some businesses won't go through with that and that some people won't have jobs as we get towards the spring. bill some people won't have 'obs as we get towards the spring._ get towards the spring. all right, thanks for talking _ get towards the spring. all right, thanks for talking through - get towards the spring. all right, thanks for talking through that. l as the humanitarian crisis in afghanistan deepens this winter, many families are having to take drastic action just to survive.
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hundreds of thousands of children already had to work in the country, now even more parents are being forced to send their kids out into the streets to earn money. secunder kermani and camera journalist malik mudassir sent this report from kabul. wherever you go in this city, you see children working. wafting incense into cars... ..picking through rubbish. even when billions were pouring into this country, many children had to help provide for theirfamilies. now amidst an economic collapse, the number is growing. child coughs. it is sam, and 13—year—old pervez is getting ready for work. he and his young cousins only started polishing shoes in the last few months.
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his father spends his day waiting for work as a labourer on the corner of the road. in the past, he earned just enough to get by. translation: i come here every day, but don't even earn ten afghani. - i can't even afford a piece of bread for lunch. it is the same for everyone here. pervez and his cousins walk the streets, sticking together in case other boys start fights with them. business is slow. with no customers, the boys take a break at a playground in the centre of kabul.
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they still have big dreams for the future. what do you want to do when you are older? when school starts again, will you go back to school or will you just carry on working? the boys walk past the city's kebab vendors... ..and the displays on kabul�*s flower street, as well as civil servants demanding unpaid salaries, and huge queues outside banks. have you had lunch today? why? so what will you do now? eventually they buy a single piece of bread to share between them.
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soon after, they find a customer too. translation: from morning - to evening, most of those coming to my shop just want to shine shoes orare begging. maybe 150 people like that come here every day. the money pervez earns will help feed his family today. but food prices are rising. and the rent is overdue. are you happy you're helping yourfamily? secunder kermani, bbc news, kabul. uk energy company bosses have been setting out some proposals to stop household gas and electricity bills rising further, as the price of gas continues to spike. representatives of the energy industry had talks with government ministers yesterday.
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our business correspondent simon browning has more details. simon, did they come up with any solutions, any sort of helpful people? solutions, any sort of helpful --eole? ~ �* . , solutions, any sort of helpful ..eole? . �* ., , ., people? we've heard this morning from energy _ people? we've heard this morning from energy uk. _ people? we've heard this morning from energy uk, from _ people? we've heard this morning from energy uk, from the - people? we've heard this morning from energy uk, from the boss . people? we've heard this morning i from energy uk, from the boss there who was at the meeting with government yesterday and she talked about some of the ideas coming up in the meeting with government. one of the meeting with government. one of the core ideas and aims for them is to maybe try and cut or reduce the amount of vat that customers pay on energy bills amount of vat that customers pay on energy hills which would effectively work as a cash saving for the amount of money we are paying in direct debits for what are really spiking gas and illiteracy bills at the moment. the other idea is that the energy industry would like to see the government and treasury provide an enormous loan of billions of pounds to cover some of these huge spikes in prices for wholesale gas. the idea is that the government would give the money over and it would give the money over and it would stop an enormous spike in bills, that customers are paying now
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and then the money would be repaid over time back to the government through a slow increase in customer bills rather than a big price spike which is what is feared customers will pay in the coming months. that's because wholesale gas prices across europe and notjust the uk are spiking as economies around europe are rebounding after a series of lockdowns and there is so much demand to power economies again. the government have said that they are speaking to the energy industry. they won't comment on the proposals put forward, saying they are talking to industry to ensure they protect the needs of uk consumers. shill the needs of uk consumers. all ri . ht, the needs of uk consumers. all right, thank you. teenagers whose parents smoke are four times more likely to take up smoking, according to a new government campaign. doctors have urged parents and other caregivers to give up. in a new film issued by the nhs, health experts discuss the link between adult smoking and children taking up the habit. tim muffet has the story.
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our children are watching what we do much more than they're listening to what we say. so if we say to them "don't smoke cigarettes" and we're smoking ourselves, our behaviour is going to have a much greater impact. a new film from the nhs aimed at parents who smoke. and so, why do children seem to take up the behaviour of adults around them? despite a huge drop in smoking over the past 50 years, around one in eight adults in the uk still smoke, according to the office for national statistics. new research shows that teenagers whose parents or caregivers smoke are four times as likely to take it up. smoking as a habit is something that can be passed down through families. so the additional motivation to quit for parents will be knowing that if they do that they can substantially reduce the risk of their own children taking up smoking. this campaign is targeting conventional smoking rather than vaping.
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electronic cigarettes are widely seen as a safer alternative, although most do contain nicotine, which is addictive. the pandemic has also affected smoking habits. there have been higher rates of quitting but also higher rates of relapse, and signs of an increase in smoking among younger people. if you want to quit smoking, for your family or for your health, you are not alone. campaigners point out it's a new year's resolution that will also bring huge benefits to others. tim muffett, bbc news. in cricket, australia has successfully retained the ashes, winning the third test against england in melbourne. in what was a dominating performance, australia's fast bowlers ripped through england's batting order to win by an innings and 1a runs. the victory means australia has an insurmountable 3—0 lead in the best of five test series, retaining the ashes once again.
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yeah, everything has gone to plan. it feels, you know, our bowlers have been fantastic, i haven't even felt like there's been one session that it has got away from us. yeah, it'sjust, it's what dreams are made of, the way we played. everyone in the dressing room is gutted. you know, that's not a good enough performance and we all know that. we need to put some pride back into the badge and make sure we come away from this tour with something. it's as simple as that. cannot really add any more. let's pick over what's gone wrong for english cricket. former england international cricketer monty panesar is with me now. good to have you with us. what has gone wrong?— good to have you with us. what has one wron: ? . ., ., ., gone wrong? thanks for having me on the show. i think _ gone wrong? thanks for having me on the show. i think what's _ gone wrong? thanks for having me on the show. i think what's gone - gone wrong? thanks for having me on the show. i think what's gone wrong l the show. i think what's gone wrong is basically being through the whole
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year. joe root is averaging 61 with the bat and the other top seven are averaging 22, so they haven't really beenin averaging 22, so they haven't really been in a position to supportjoe root through the 15 test matches that they've had this year. it becomes a repeated pattern, then. when they're in a tough situation in australia they don't have the preparation for it. it goes way back when they had their rotation, the rest and rotation policy and they gave the selector role to chris silverwood, which i think is too big for him. i haven't had enough runs, you know. not enough runs. unfortunately the bowling unit —— and fortunately the bowling unit did well butjoe root can't save england in every test match. joe well but joe root can't save england in every test match.— in every test match. joe root would sa that if in every test match. joe root would say that if they _ in every test match. joe root would say that if they win _ in every test match. joe root would say that if they win the _
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in every test match. joe root would say that if they win the next - in every test match. joe root would say that if they win the next two - say that if they win the next two test matches they will at least salvage some pride but that looks like a tall order in itself, doesn't it? ., ., �*, like a tall order in itself, doesn't it? ., , it? yeah, look, that's very difficult — it? yeah, look, that's very difficult for _ it? yeah, look, that's very difficult for them. - it? yeah, look, that's very i difficult for them. somehow it? yeah, look, that's very - difficult for them. somehow they've got to find a way, how to play on the bouncy pitches, especially the length australia bowled at, unbelievable. the second indigenous player to play for australia. in 2018, touring england with an average side. that's a great landmark for people in australia. his length was relentless and that in english conditions doesn't bounce as high. itjust goes past the stumps. they aren't used to that and that's another issue. people talking about the pictures in england, should they be flat —— the pitches. should the county game last for three or four days? that doesn't
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happen as often as it needs to. they need to find a method to counteract the venom, the bounce and the seam movement of the australian fast bowlers and they've got to do it quickly because some of these players, their careers have been on the line and that's a very difficult place for any player to be. so, let's hope that in the next test match they can perform better. monty, we have a minute before we say goodbye to viewers on bbc world. let me ask you, is it frustrating notjust let me ask you, is it frustrating not just for the england let me ask you, is it frustrating notjust for the england fans but also for the australia fans? they aren't really watching competitive matches at the moment? it is very frustrating- — matches at the moment? it is very frustrating. we _ matches at the moment? it is very frustrating. we get _ matches at the moment? it is very frustrating. we get up _ matches at the moment? it is very frustrating. we get up and - matches at the moment? it is very frustrating. we get up and we - matches at the moment? it is very frustrating. we get up and we see | frustrating. we get up and we see how england are batting and then we see how india bat against south africa. keeping their hands close to their body, if there's any seam movement, not chasing the ball. they've shown the discipline and played more white all cricket than
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england do. the issue of white ball cricket i don't think is the issue. —— white ball cricket. it's how to deal with the conditions. i feel they aren't applying themselves as they aren't applying themselves as they should do and maybe they can learn from watching the indian test series, how they are playing against seam bowling and hopefully we can see some of that in the fourth test match by the england batsmen. in terms of the rest of the series, how do you see going? the terms of the rest of the series, how do you see going?— do you see going? the rest of the series, do you see going? the rest of the series. again. _ do you see going? the rest of the series, again, i— do you see going? the rest of the series, again, i expect— do you see going? the rest of the series, again, i expect jimmy - series, again, i expectjimmy anderson or stuart broad to come back and the bowling department will always be very competitive. there will be questions about the batting. guys making mistakes now, are they willing to learn on the tour? you've got to acclimatise and adapt your game. that's a skill that every international cricketer must have.
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this is a chance for some of the younger players to show that, to show that they can adapt and change their game plan and show character and resilience. someone likejimmy anderson... and resilience. someone like jimmy anderson---— and resilience. someone like jimmy anderson---_ and resilience. someone like jimmy anderson... , �* ., ., , anderson... monty, i'm going to stop ou, we anderson... monty, i'm going to stop you. we have — anderson... monty, i'm going to stop you. we have to _ anderson... monty, i'm going to stop you, we have to say _ anderson... monty, i'm going to stop you, we have to say goodbye - anderson... monty, i'm going to stop you, we have to say goodbye to - anderson... monty, i'm going to stop you, we have to say goodbye to the i you, we have to say goodbye to the bbc world viewers. so sorry to have interrupted you, there! continue your thoughts on how you see the rest of it going. we your thoughts on how you see the rest of it going-— rest of it going. we saw jamie anderson _ rest of it going. we saw jamie anderson bowling _ rest of it going. we sawjamie| anderson bowling unbelievably rest of it going. we sawjamie - anderson bowling unbelievably well on conditions that were safer board to the —— that were favourable to the seam bowling. it's because he has plenty of character and toughness as an international cricketer which hopefully some of the other players can learn from him and understand. i hope they can turn it around. it's difficult when the momentum is against you but it would be great for england to win some sessions and hopefully get a win because that's vital for the bigger
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decisions that may take place after this series is over. let me ask you about what graham gooch, the former england captain and about what graham gooch, the former england captain— england captain and great batsman in his time said- — england captain and great batsman in his time said. he _ england captain and great batsman in his time said. he has _ england captain and great batsman in his time said. he has said _ england captain and great batsman in his time said. he has said there - england captain and great batsman in his time said. he has said there is - his time said. he has said there is a deeper reason for this and that's the decline of the county game in england meaning there aren't long matches. too emphasis on one—day matches, meaning that batsmen don't grow up learning to be really patient at the crease and taking their time to build an innings, even if it's very slow and defensive. do you agree?— if it's very slow and defensive. do ou aree? ., ., , , ., you agree? yeah, i absolutely agree with graham — you agree? yeah, i absolutely agree with graham gooch _ you agree? yeah, i absolutely agree with graham gooch there _ you agree? yeah, i absolutely agree with graham gooch there because i with graham gooch there because batsmen, if they don't learn how to batsmen, if they don't learn how to bat and actually how to construct an innings and hat all day or for long parts of the first innings then they won't understand how to build that at test level. then it comes down to
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the pitches, there's too much seam movement and they don't play enough four day cricket in august and july because it is packed with other scheduling. they've been allocated £1.73 scheduling. they've been allocated £1.3 million from the hundred and i hope the ecb will put some pressure on the counties to use some flatter pitches so we can see some spinners getting into the game as well as batsmen, especially younger batsmen learning to bat for the day which is required at test level, and the coaching also. they say that some of the techniques we are seeing from some of the batsmen coming through, making the game more difficult than it is. maybe coaching is another area to have a look at.- area to have a look at. great to talk to you _ area to have a look at. great to talk to you and _ area to have a look at. great to talk to you and get _ area to have a look at. great to talk to you and get your- area to have a look at. great to l talk to you and get your thoughts area to have a look at. great to - talk to you and get your thoughts on what's going wrong with english cricket. let's hope england can
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bounce back in the last matches of the ashes series. many thanks. the weather now. some exceptionally mild air over the next couple of days with temperatures over parts of england set to surge as high as 17 degrees compared to the average of eight. the england temperature record is 17.7 so it's going to be close to hitting those record levels. today the best bright weather is across scotland and northern ireland. some patchy rain slow to clear from eastern coastal counties. eventually this evening the rain is going to clear. then we get heavy rain moving into the south—west overnight. behind the band of rain we start getting the exceptionally mild air with temperatures 1a in plymouth by the end of the night. tomorrow this band of rain pushing north and east.
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behind the rain we will see

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