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tv   The Papers  BBC News  December 27, 2021 11:30pm-12:00am GMT

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no new covid restrictions are to be introduced in england before the new year despite a record number of cases on christmas day. the government says people should remain cautious and that the situation is being monitored carefully. america's top health body has halved the recommended isolation period for americans with asymptomatic covid from ten days to five. it comes as a surge in cases causes travel chaos and threatens wider social disruption. france has become the latest european country to tighten restrictions in the face of rapidly rising cases. employees are being told to work from home at least three days a week where possible. cape town's city hall has been bathed in purple light to honour archbishop desmond tutu, south africa's anti—apartheid leader, who died on sunday.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are sian griffiths, who's the education editor at the sunday times, and james moore, the chief business commentatorfor the independent. welcome to you both. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the daily telegraph says there won't be any new restrictions that would spoil new year's eve. staying with covid rules, the i says there'll be no new restrictions before next year. meanwhile the guardian says england goes it alone as extra measures are rejected before the new year. the daily mail calls it boris�*s new year cheer as new year's eve parties get the go—ahead. the times — there won't be any curbs on new year's eve parties. the mirror leads with "where's the prime minister" amid the record covid cases.
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and that's your lot for the moment. we will start with the daily telegraph because we have got on the front page to very happy looking clubbers from wigan on boxing day who probably will be out again on new year's eve and there will be a lot of nightclub owners, bar owners and people in hospitality who will feel very pleased as well.- feel very pleased as well. that's riuht. feel very pleased as well. that's right- that _ feel very pleased as well. that's right. that very _ feel very pleased as well. that's right. that very jolly _ feel very pleased as well. that's right. that very jolly picture - feel very pleased as well. that's right. that very jolly picture on i right. that veryjolly picture on the front page there is also in the daily mirror and is apparently a tradition in wigan of getting clammed up for tradition in wigan of getting clammed upfora tradition in wigan of getting clammed up for a night out on boxing day. in it we can's clubs and restaurants. i think of course the hospitality industry will be delighted, this comes after boris johnson met with chris whitty and patrick vallance today, the chief medical officer and chief scientific officer, and look to the data and
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decided that for england, noted restrictions on socialising were needed before the new year. that complete puts him out of step with the other uk nations. scotland, wales, northern ireland have brought in restrictions on socialising before what is going to be and what is always one of the busiest and most sociable knights of the year, new year's eve, when traditionally people go out and party until after midnight. alcohol flows and many strangers are usually met. so it's quite a gamble. it seems the prime minister has taken this because it does, against the background of rising covid cases and rising hospital admissions. rising covid cases and rising hospitaladmissions. i rising covid cases and rising hospital admissions.- rising covid cases and rising hospital admissions. rising covid cases and rising hosital admissions. ~ ., , ., hospital admissions. i know you were not sideways — hospital admissions. i know you were not sideways when _ hospital admissions. i know you were not sideways when you _ hospital admissions. i know you were not sideways when you got _ hospital admissions. i know you were not sideways when you got covid, - not sideways when you got covid, james. this is different, omicron. the evidence is building that it's milder and it's not putting people in hospital to the same extent as the other variants.— in hospital to the same extent as the other variants. that's correct. i was unlucky _
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the other variants. that's correct. i was unlucky enough _ the other variants. that's correct. i was unlucky enough to - the other variants. that's correct. i was unlucky enough to get - the other variants. that's correct. i was unlucky enough to get covid when _ i was unlucky enough to get covid when it_ i was unlucky enough to get covid when it first landed so we did not have _ when it first landed so we did not have any— when it first landed so we did not have any vaccines or anything like that and _ have any vaccines or anything like that and it — have any vaccines or anything like that and it really was quite unpleasant also have to say it was the sickest i have been for a long, lon- the sickest i have been for a long, long time — the sickest i have been for a long, long time. the thing with omicron is even it— long time. the thing with omicron is even if it— long time. the thing with omicron is even if it is— long time. the thing with omicron is even if it is milder, it's spreading as of— even if it is milder, it's spreading as of the — even if it is milder, it's spreading as of the clip that it becomes a manner— as of the clip that it becomes a manner of— as of the clip that it becomes a manner of maths. so let's say you put half _ manner of maths. so let's say you put half as— manner of maths. so let's say you put half as we people in the hospital— put half as we people in the hospital or put people in at half the rate — hospital or put people in at half the rate of the delta. if you are infected — the rate of the delta. if you are infected twice as many as delta come you get— infected twice as many as delta come you get the _ infected twice as many as delta come you get the same result and that's the danger here. that's what the government is doing here is such a gamble _ government is doing here is such a gamble. england is now out of step with scotland, northern ireland and wales _ with scotland, northern ireland and wales. they are seeing the same data but are _ wales. they are seeing the same data but are drawing diametrically different conclusions from it. just a minute pick _ different conclusions from it. just a minute pick you up on that. do you think the rules north of the border into portland and indwells wales are sensible? can you be fined for going into work but not fine for going in a pub quiz met you can see at a
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table in scotland and not get omicron. do they make sense or are they really of stricken people getting on with their lives in the british economy? j getting on with their lives in the british economy?— getting on with their lives in the british economy? i would be inclined towards caution, _ british economy? i would be inclined towards caution, and _ british economy? i would be inclined towards caution, and the _ british economy? i would be inclined towards caution, and the reason - british economy? i would be inclined towards caution, and the reason i'm| towards caution, and the reason i'm inclined _ towards caution, and the reason i'm inclined towards caution is because at every— inclined towards caution is because at every stage in the past, we have seen _ at every stage in the past, we have seen the _ at every stage in the past, we have seen the government in england or the british— seen the government in england or the british government which looks after england, acting like and it's proven— after england, acting like and it's proven to — after england, acting like and it's proven to be a false economy. the economy— proven to be a false economy. the economy has taken a bigger hit through acting late in the longer lockdowns and it has through just acting _ lockdowns and it has through just acting immediately and saying let's 'ust acting immediately and saying let's just knit— acting immediately and saying let's just knit this one in the bud now was unknown when people have been arguing _ was unknown when people have been arguing for— was unknown when people have been arguing for a circuit breaker can be 'ust arguing for a circuit breaker can be just a _ arguing for a circuit breaker can be just a sort— arguing fora circuit breaker can be just a sort of— arguing for a circuit breaker can be just a sort of nip it in the bud and the nhs — just a sort of nip it in the bud and the nhs has had this for two years running _ the nhs has had this for two years running now. you do have to wonder how long _ running now. you do have to wonder how long can— running now. you do have to wonder how long can it take this. i know the independent, my own paper, we askedm _ the independent, my own paper, we asked... but— the independent, my own paper, we asked... �* ., , the independent, my own paper, we asked... �* , ., ., ., asked... but it was sick a lot of businesses _ asked... but it was sick a lot of businesses if _ asked... but it was sick a lot of businesses if they _ asked... but it was sick a lot of businesses if they locked - asked... but it was sick a lot of| businesses if they locked down. asked... but it was sick a lot of - businesses if they locked down. and what the prime minister and health are terry are saying is the
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definitive data and when he did know this is going to put the nhs beyond what it can deal with them at the moment, at the moment and we have to be very cautious, there is not evidence of that.— evidence of that. you state definitive _ evidence of that. you state definitive data. _ evidence of that. you state definitive data. i— evidence of that. you state definitive data. i mean - evidence of that. you state i definitive data. i mean there evidence of that. you state - definitive data. i mean there is a lot of— definitive data. i mean there is a lot of data — definitive data. i mean there is a lot of data out there already. by the time — lot of data out there already. by the time you get what a lot of backbench tory mp seven say, by the time you _ backbench tory mp seven say, by the time you get this definitive data, it may— time you get this definitive data, it may he — time you get this definitive data, it may be too late already. and we are in _ it may be too late already. and we are in a _ it may be too late already. and we are in a very — it may be too late already. and we are in a very bad situation. that's why this — are in a very bad situation. that's why this virus has been doing things. — why this virus has been doing things, it's been playing silly devils— things, it's been playing silly devils for such a long time and has come _ devils for such a long time and has come out — devils for such a long time and has come out with curveballs at every stage _ come out with curveballs at every stage. that caution i think would be the wiser— stage. that caution i think would be the wiser thing. as i said, this thing — the wiser thing. as i said, this thing is — the wiser thing. as i said, this thing is nasty. it's killing people and it's— thing is nasty. it's killing people and it's killing people still and it's people in hospital still. the -ite raises _ it's people in hospital still. the -ite raises the _ it's people in hospital still. tue: —ite raises the concern that people in hospitals, there are not significant numbers of people in hospital but the problem is that
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nurses, doctors, auxiliary staff in our hospitals are often isolating. and i wonder when you look at that front—page in the independent what you make of the breaking news in america that they have have isolation from ten days to five days because they see this problem on the horizon? , ., , because they see this problem on the horizon? , ,, , , ., horizon? yes, i think this is a loomin: horizon? yes, i think this is a looming problem. _ horizon? yes, i think this is a looming problem. it's - horizon? yes, i think this is a i looming problem. it's obviously horizon? yes, i think this is a - looming problem. it's obviously a problem that's already affecting hospitals especially in london, with thousands of staff are off sick or isolating. it's a problem it's going to hit schools when they go back next week. and union leaders are already warning that they are expecting a shortage of teachers, not enough teachers to be able to keep all the classrooms open and warning that some your groups may have to be sent home. and obviously if you kept that isolation period because if you cut it from ten days to seven days or five days, you reduce the absence rate in schools and hospitals and in any other
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industry and that means that you are not going to have that staff shortage problem. the government has said it's actually asked retired teachers to come back and man the classrooms in january to try and keep schools fully open. and i don't know whether that contingency plan is only one or if they have others with staff shortages will be one of the major problems in the new year in terms of keeping key industries and activities going. so it's not just the idea that with the nhs it may be overwhelmed, it's things like schools and markets anything more you might have a staff shortage problem because of rising infection rates and because people are isolating. rates and because people are isolatina. �* , rates and because people are isolatina. �*, ., rates and because people are isolatina. �* , ., ., ., rates and because people are isolatina. �*, ., ., ., i. isolating. there's a lot of young eo - le isolating. there's a lot of young peeple who _ isolating. there's a lot of young people who work _ isolating. there's a lot of young people who work at _ isolating. there's a lot of young people who work at our - isolating. there's a lot of young | people who work at our hospitals isolating. there's a lot of young - people who work at our hospitals and work in our schools. my son was through covid within four or five days and tested negative for the second five days and was a somatic. i suppose it's about using your common sense here if we can get people back into the workplace and
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they don't pose a risk and they are wearing a mask and being sensible, is that a way to go? jt wearing a mask and being sensible, is that a way to go?— is that a way to go? if you took my --eole is that a way to go? if you took my peeple who _ is that a way to go? if you took my people who are — is that a way to go? if you took my people who are vaccinated - is that a way to go? if you took my| people who are vaccinated and they are wearing a mask, and the science says do— are wearing a mask, and the science says do it _ are wearing a mask, and the science says do it sounds like they've got some _ says do it sounds like they've got some scientific backing to do it, then— some scientific backing to do it, then by— some scientific backing to do it, then by all— some scientific backing to do it, then by all means consider this. because — then by all means consider this. because obviously staffing is going to be one — because obviously staffing is going to be one of the big problems for some _ to be one of the big problems for some i_ to be one of the big problems for some i noticed with interest that new york— some i noticed with interest that new york is pursuing a much tougher vaccination _ new york is pursuing a much tougher vaccination mandate than we have here at _ vaccination mandate than we have here at the — vaccination mandate than we have here at the same time. so there is that as _ here at the same time. so there is that as welt — here at the same time. so there is that as well. the vaccination mandates here i think cover care homes _ mandates here i think cover care homes and — mandates here i think cover care homes and the nhs. in new york, they have moved _ homes and the nhs. in new york, they have moved it out to the private sector as — have moved it out to the private sector as well.— have moved it out to the private sector as well. the isis there were 12,000 sector as well. the isis there were 12.000 jingle _ sector as well. the isis there were 12.000 jingle jabs _ sector as well. the isis there were 12,000 jingle jabs on _ sector as well. the isis there were 12,000 jingle jabs on christmas i sector as well. the isis there were i 12,000 jingle jabs on christmas day. —— the ice says. credit to all those who are out helping people get jabbed. it shows a message is getting through. i wonder again looking at what is happening in new
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york what you make of a much tougher line from city leaders and government officials who are running out of patience with people who are not vaccinated.— not vaccinated. yes, we have even here already _ not vaccinated. yes, we have even here already have _ not vaccinated. yes, we have even here already have said _ not vaccinated. yes, we have even here already have said to - not vaccinated. yes, we have even here already have said to care - here already have said to care workers that they need to be jabbed him nhs —— workers that they need to be jabbed him nhs -- nhs workers that they need to be jabbed him nhs —— nhs staff need to be chapels of that line is also being pursued here but i think one of the big gaps in our vaccination programme is that children are not being vaccinated at the moment and i think that is something that will need to be addressed. that question of five and i2 need to be addressed. that question of five and 12 euros, with and we vaccinated and it's hard to imagine that you would have compulsory vaccinations for children. but nevertheless just giving the go ahead and given the green light for sugar to be vaccinated... thea;r ahead and given the green light for sugar to be vaccinated. . ._ sugar to be vaccinated... they do have compulsory vaccinations, i sugar to be vaccinated... they do i have compulsory vaccinations, don't we? . have compulsory vaccinations, don't we? , , ., ., ., we? , yes, we do have other compulsory _ we? , yes, we do have other compulsory vaccinations - we? , yes, we do have other compulsory vaccinations and | compulsory vaccinations and certainly things like staff working in care homes or in hospitals where
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there are very vulnerable people, it's a pretty compelling argument that staff duty to be vaccinated. the only problem then you have of course is that you end up maybe having staff shortages again because the staff who refuse to be vaccinated will then have to leave theirjobs. so it's not an easy one. the vaccination rates are hot your. never people coming forward to get an event the boosterjab, the third jabbed, is very hot and i think the government has been and has done really well at getting the vaccination programme out and accelerating it. that's all been very positive. i still think that one of the reasons that england is not putting in place the same restrictions as scotland and wales and is holding back at the moment on further curbs on socialising is because of political pressure on borisjohnson from because of political pressure on boris johnson from his because of political pressure on borisjohnson from his own tory backbench who have made it very clear that they do not want to see further curbs on the economy. and
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there was that rebellion not so long ago with about 100 mps on that front. . �* , , ., front. that's interesting to me, james met _ front. that's interesting to me, james met with _ front. that's interesting to me, james met with your _ front. that's interesting to me, james met with your business i front. that's interesting to me, i james met with your business had on with her tory say they don't want for the measures but of course there are a pro—business party and what the experts in london tell us is it 90% of those receiving intensive care are the unvaccinated. so where you stand when people say it's my personal choice not to have a vaccine when that does have an impact on the virus going around and around and people losing their livelihoods? jt’s around and people losing their livelihoods?— around and people losing their livelihoods? it's a very difficult balancin: livelihoods? it's a very difficult balancing act. _ livelihoods? it's a very difficult balancing act, this _ livelihoods? it's a very difficult balancing act, this one. - livelihoods? it's a very difficult i balancing act, this one. because in new york— balancing act, this one. because in new york they have gone a lot stronger _ new york they have gone a lot stronger. i have to... have to say you increasingly feel, i don't know, you increasingly feel, idon't know, whether— you increasingly feel, i don't know, whether i_ you increasingly feel, i don't know, whether i increasingly feel i'm running — whether i increasingly feel i'm running out of some patients are people _ running out of some patients are people who won't get vaccinated because — people who won't get vaccinated because it is safe, it is effective.
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you are — because it is safe, it is effective. you are not— because it is safe, it is effective. you are notjust because it is safe, it is effective. you are not just saving or helping yourself _ you are not just saving or helping yourself and keeping yourself clear of infection, you are doing it for all the — of infection, you are doing it for all the people around you. so, yeah, i all the people around you. so, yeah, i have _ all the people around you. so, yeah, i have to _ all the people around you. so, yeah, i have to admit i'm queasy about mandates — i have to admit i'm queasy about mandates because this is a person's health— mandates because this is a person's health and _ mandates because this is a person's health and there is an issue of civil liberties here. but at the same — civil liberties here. but at the same time, i feel like i'm civil liberties here. but at the same time, ifeel like i'm running out of patience with people who won't _ out of patience with people who won't get — out of patience with people who won't get a safe effective jabbed and prevent them from spreading something which is literally killing people _ something which is literally killing people and has killed hundred thousand or whatever message you use in this— thousand or whatever message you use in this country. thousand or whatever message you use in this country-— in this country. people do find it difficult talk about _ in this country. people do find it difficult talk about and - in this country. people do find it difficult talk about and they i in this country. people do find it difficult talk about and they are | difficult talk about and they are cautious because there are a minority who cannot have a vaccine but an awful lot who could probably who should to protect themselves and protect the economy. let's talk about the telegraph because the other main story which i think a lot of papers have sort of puzzled over today as to whether it was their lead is this extraordinary story
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about our gas bills going through the roof quite literally. they could be doubling according to the telegraph. a story that £1200 bill could go over £2000 nearly. yes. telegraph. a story that £1200 bill could go over £2000 nearly. yes, the telea-rah, could go over £2000 nearly. yes, the telegraph. the _ could go over £2000 nearly. yes, the telegraph, the express, _ could go over £2000 nearly. yes, the telegraph, the express, many - could go over £2000 nearly. yes, the telegraph, the express, many of i could go over £2000 nearly. yes, the telegraph, the express, many of the | telegraph, the express, many of the come of the times of up of the story on the front page. the warnings are into papers, not even that the bills will double to around £2000 with a can even trouble. and this is a story that it's because of its soaring gas prices. today, the business secretary met with the energy regulator and also representatives of energy companies and i think the chiefs of the energy companies were really asking the government now to intervene, to try and find some way that they have of the companies and suppliers, don't have to pass on some of the soaring cost to consumers. i think 26
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suppliers have already gone bust in this situation over the past few months. the problem of course is that we are in the winter, we are already seeing people popping up on television screens and saying they're having to choose between things like feeding their family and heating their homes which is not a position that any government wants to be in. and there is a possibility i think that the government could set up a £20 million fun. that's one of one of the paper is and the suppliers could dip into that fun to try and keep energy prices down for consumers and they could repay that fund over about ten years to the government. a lot of talks coming on. ., .,, government. a lot of talks coming on. ., , on. the yorkshire post as we dip into the regions, _ on. the yorkshire post as we dip into the regions, and _ on. the yorkshire post as we dip into the regions, and the - on. the yorkshire post as we dip into the regions, and the front . on. the yorkshire post as we dip i into the regions, and the front page of the yorkshire post pick up the same story and in fact they quote steven fitzpatrick the chief executive of a gas supplier saying there could be an enormous crisis for 2022. there could be an enormous crisis for2022. because there could be an enormous crisis for 2022. because what people might
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have missed is the fact that the price cap which is in place of the moment comes to an end in april. actually it does not come to an end, it's being _ actually it does not come to an end, it's being reset in april, so every six months. _ it's being reset in april, so every six months, ofgem looks of the energy market and holds a process and sets _ energy market and holds a process and sets a — energy market and holds a process and sets a cap but it sets the cap base _ and sets a cap but it sets the cap base to what the market will bear. and what — base to what the market will bear. and what we have seen with the gas crisis _ and what we have seen with the gas crisis is the — and what we have seen with the gas crisis is the cap is from a market point _ crisis is the cap is from a market point is — crisis is the cap is from a market point is actually too low. so energy companies — point is actually too low. so energy companies are losing money now by supplying _ companies are losing money now by supplying us with energy. so looking at the _ supplying us with energy. so looking at the market, ofgem will have to raise _ at the market, ofgem will have to raise the — at the market, ofgem will have to raise the cap because that's the way it works _ raise the cap because that's the way it works also it's linked to the market — it works also it's linked to the market. and you may well see energy bills from _ market. and you may well see energy bills from 1278 to £2000, maybe even more _ bills from 1278 to £2000, maybe even more and _ bills from 1278 to £2000, maybe even more. and the energy industry certainly— more. and the energy industry certainly is getting quite frustrated as it does not think there — frustrated as it does not think there is— frustrated as it does not think there is another urgency in government and does not think there is urgency— government and does not think there is urgency at no ofgem to address this issue — is urgency at no ofgem to address this issue. which is going to come
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and bite _ this issue. which is going to come and bite the government because we will start— and bite the government because we will start seeing those bills coming in april— will start seeing those bills coming in april when the cap is reset and redone again, it's going to look quite _ redone again, it's going to look quite nasty. redone again, it's going to look quite nasty-— quite nasty. we don't want is a double whammy. _ quite nasty. we don't want is a double whammy. we don't i quite nasty. we don't want is a i double whammy. we don't want a quite nasty. we don't want is a - double whammy. we don't want a cold snap where everyone is turning on their bowlers and their radiators and heating their homes on the same time. and then you're supposed interestingly has a side bar here that january is interestingly has a side bar here thatjanuary is going interestingly has a side bar here that january is going to be interestingly has a side bar here thatjanuary is going to be quite balmy, and i mean the weather is going to be quite balmy. 15 celsius printed on new year's eve which would be a ten year record. this is a aood would be a ten year record. this is a good new _ would be a ten year record. this is a good new story _ would be a ten year record. this is a good new story on _ would be a ten year record. this is a good new story on the _ would be a ten year record. this is a good new story on the front i would be a ten year record. this is| a good new story on the front page of that yorkshire post. two richards at 15 degrees on new year's eve would be amazing. it is normally about seven or 8 degrees. and i think there will be really good news as well for cold water from resident to plunge on new year's day. and maybe they won't either bubble hats on the run of the sea on new year's day because it willjust be such a
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warm and warm air around them that they will be able to some around quite happily. i think it's a really nice story for so i will be swimming on new year's day and quite coldwater so i'm looking forward to this. ., ., �* ., this. you won't need the goose fat this. you won't need the goose fat this ear. this. you won't need the goose fat this year. james _ this. you won't need the goose fat this year. james is _ this. you won't need the goose fat this year. james is grimacing i this. you won't need the goose fat this year. james is grimacing at i this. you won't need the goose fat | this year. james is grimacing at the very thought of it as he would not be out in the bible how can i do i take it, james? j be out in the bible how can i do i take it, james?— be out in the bible how can i do i take it, james? i exercise using my wheelchair- — take it, james? i exercise using my wheelchair- i— take it, james? i exercise using my wheelchair. i have _ take it, james? i exercise using my wheelchair. i have a _ take it, james? i exercise using my wheelchair. i have a scale. - take it, james? i exercise using my wheelchair. i have a scale. i- take it, james? i exercise using my wheelchair. i have a scale. i go i wheelchair. i have a scale. i go from _ wheelchair. i have a scale. i go from teacher to with a sort of sleeves — from teacher to with a sort of sleeves to _ from teacher to with a sort of sleeves to warmers which i'm at the moment for— sleeves to warmers which i'm at the moment for the cycling jacket over the top _ moment for the cycling jacket over the top and at 15 degrees i'm thinking _ the top and at 15 degrees i'm thinking that's almost t—shirt whether— thinking that's almost t—shirt whether to go and exercise in. it would _ whether to go and exercise in. it would be — whether to go and exercise in. it would be quite nice, but i do... 15 degrees _ would be quite nice, but i do... 15 degrees on — would be quite nice, but i do... 15 degrees on the ist ofjanuary, global— degrees on the ist ofjanuary, global warming, degrees on the ist ofjanuary, globalwarming, he does degrees on the ist ofjanuary, global warming, he does feel a bit unnatural— global warming, he does feel a bit unnatural and you could feel ever so slightly— unnatural and you could feel ever so slightly scared about that. it unnatural and you could feel ever so slightly scared about that.— slightly scared about that. it seems a lona wa slightly scared about that. it seems a long way from _ slightly scared about that. it seems a long way from where _ slightly scared about that. it seems a long way from where we - slightly scared about that. it seems a long way from where we are i slightly scared about that. it seems| a long way from where we are today
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where it certainly was not 15 degrees today. look at the front page of the guardian quickly because of a story about healthy food or the fact we don't eat healthy food. obesity plan not enough to beat the junk food culture and there is going to be a 9pm watershed on ads for unhealthy food.— unhealthy food. that's right. the government _ unhealthy food. that's right. the government agreed _ unhealthy food. that's right. the government agreed this - unhealthy food. that's right. the government agreed this earlier. unhealthy food. that's right. the i government agreed this earlier this year, a 9pm watershed on tv ads on junk food and also a band on paid for online advertising of unhealthy foods and drinks. this is an interesting story and the health editor at the guardian has obviously got a leech report which is actually written by the government poz �*s on obesity research unit and it says that these efforts with the watershed, the man on all advertising, are actually not enough to address britain's really rather critical obesity crisis now. we have got one and 311 euros leaving primary school obese or overweight. probably does not seem to be getting better. in fact obesity has been
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linked to doing badly if you contract covid as well. it affects health and so many different kinds of ways. this report is saying much more radical action is needed, things like maybe a tax on unhealthy foods, a higher tax on things like fats and so one in foods. and i think schools can do a lot more as well. we have school dinners. is there an argument for having free school dinners for all primary schoolchildren making sure that those school dinners include a lot of vegetables and so on and the children can access them and eat them and so that at least one meal a day, every child is eating healthy. some would argue that what you spent on that you save at the other end as of the healthier they don't cause as much on the nhs. very quickly, link that story is news and telegraph at the bottom here that if you smile when you eat your vegetables, your broccoli and your carrots, cherry
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pick up on that and might be more inclined to eat vegetables, healthy vegetables. inclined to eat vegetables, healthy venetables. , ._ inclined to eat vegetables, healthy venetables. , , , ., ., vegetables. they say smile, you are on camera and _ vegetables. they say smile, you are on camera and it _ vegetables. they say smile, you are on camera and it would _ vegetables. they say smile, you are on camera and it would need - vegetables. they say smile, you are on camera and it would need to i vegetables. they say smile, you are i on camera and it would need to smile when you _ on camera and it would need to smile when you have got kale. and look at advertising _ when you have got kale. and look at advertising and what do you see? you see smiling _ advertising and what do you see? you see smiling people with the advertiser's product because they know— advertiser's product because they know it _ advertiser's product because they know it works. and i think if we try and smile — know it works. and i think if we try and smile when we got the broccoli in front of— and smile when we got the broccoli in front of us and if we smile when we have _ in front of us and if we smile when we have got— in front of us and if we smile when we have got the swede and the kale and things— we have got the swede and the kale and things like that, it may make our children watch. they do observe adults _ our children watch. they do observe adults they— our children watch. they do observe adults. they pick up a lot of cues from _ adults. they pick up a lot of cues from adults— adults. they pick up a lot of cues from adults which we may not see and we might— from adults which we may not see and we might not notice what they do. so there _ we might not notice what they do. so there is— we might not notice what they do. so there is a _ we might not notice what they do. so there is a strong case that we should — there is a strong case that we should smile not what we are having a bacon— should smile not what we are having a bacon sandwich and i know they are very appetising that we should smile when we _ very appetising that we should smile when we have the kale. how very appetising that we should smile when we have the kale.— very appetising that we should smile when we have the kale. how many of ou smiled when we have the kale. how many of you smiled at — when we have the kale. how many of you smiled at through _ when we have the kale. how many of you smiled at through gritted - you smiled at through gritted teeth when you were served swede over christmas dinner? if you are like me you probably did. james, lovely to
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have both of your company this evening. that you very much for being along. that's it for the papers this hour, good night. hi there, good evening. i'm chetan pathak with your sports news. we start with today's only premier league game, at stjames' park, where newcastle were ultimately denied a priceless win in their fight for survival as an out—of—sorts manchester united snatched a 1—1 draw. our sports correspondent katie gornall was watching. for manchester united, it had been a while. a covid outbreak at the club meant that this was their first match in more than two weeks. in that time, newcastle have played three games, and lost them all. festive cheer has been hard to come by here, but where there is allan saint—maximin, there is hope. and with united's defence scrambling, he'd soon send st james' park rocking.
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united's new manager was not impressed. even the great ronaldo looked rusty. united needed a response in the second half. still they had to rely on their goalkeeper. but chances were coming. eventually cavani took one, an equaliser united barely deserved. it would get worse for newcastle as their star player departed early. but they refused to be beaten, battling to the end. they finished with a point. it could've been more. newcastle may be rooted in the relegation zone, but they have spirit, as how. katie gornall, bbc news. well, that point moves newcastle off the bottom of the table at least, but they remain two points from safety. after the game, manager eddie howe was left thinking about what could've been. very frustrated, i thought. can't praise the players enough for an excellent performance. in and out of possession, i thought we were very good tonight. a lot of good individual performances, as well, so really pleased. it's just... you know, we deserved to win,
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and you're left with that horrible feeling of not accomplishing what you deserved to get, so... but, yeah, very pleased with the players. still have steps to go. i mean, today was not a step forward. with regard to a good result maybe, but not in regard to our performance. we need to get more physical, we need to decrease the number of giveaways and unforced errors when we were in possession of the ball. and, yeah, those steps of development we need to take. well, bournemouth are top of the championship tonight after they beat qpr to get their first win in seven games. it was qpr's first match for over three weeks because of covid, and they fell behind to dominic solanke's first—half header, which proved to be the only goal of the game. earlier, west brom lost ground in the championship title race. a terrible mix—up between defender cedric kipre and keeper samjohnstone handed the championship's bottom side, derby county, a vital1—0 win.
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colin kazim—richards with the winner. well, the premier league's released its latest figures showing a record 103 players and staff tested positive for covid in the seven days up to and including boxing day. some managers have questioned why games are still going ahead at speed. watford have only held one full training session in over two weeks, and their last three games have been called off because of covid in their squad. their manager cladio ranieri's been talking ahead of tomorrow's game against west ham. it's a bad moment now. it's a bad moment because the players can't train properly. and i hope nobody will suffer some injury, because you know when they don't train and they are right at the end, it's very difficult to play. but that's it. they are like a formula 1 car. and when you don't make any training session, it's difficult. it's difficult, and i hope, i cross
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my fingers nobody has some injury. there was one match in rugby union's premiership. harlequins moved up to third in the table after they beat northampton saints by a1—27 in the big game at twickenham. quins were 21—7 down at the end of the first half, but came from behind to comfortably win it in the end. louis lynagh finishing off the pick of their six tries. it was a good day all round for harlequins fans. earlier, their women's side comfortably beat wasps by 29—5. heather cowell scoring the pick of the quins tries. brilliant run, almost the entire length of the pitch. it was the first premier 15s match to take place at the ground. there were no fans at the welsh grand national for the second year in a row. the welsh government's introduced covid rules which prevent more than 50 spectators attending a sporting event. only five horses finished a gruelling race which was won by the 13—2 shot i will do it, ridden by sam sheppard and trained by sam thomas.
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the defending champion gerwyn pryce survived a huge scare to reach the last 16 of the pdc world darts championship at alexandra palace. the world number one was taken all the way to a sudden death leg by belgium's kim huybrechts. the ice man kept his cool though as he took out 76 to set up a meeting with the netherlands�* dirk van duijvenbode in the next round. that is all your sport for now. van duijvenbode in the next round. you can follow day three of the third ashes test in melbourne tonight over on the bbc sport website and bbc radio five live, but from me and the team, goodnight. hello there. some wet weather in prospect for some of us on tuesday. some windy weather in places as well as an area of low pressure slides its way eastwards. rain to start off across northern ireland and southern scotland, certainly across parts of england and wales. some low cloud, mist
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and fog around as well, but that rain will tend to clear eastwards through the day. brighter skies following on behind. i think the best of the afternoon sunshine for northern ireland and scotland. relatively light winds in the north, but gusts of 40—50 mph for some western and southern coasts, maybe even a little stronger than that in the most exposed places. 12 degrees across south wales and southern england, just 5—6 across northern scotland, so still quite a range in temperatures for the time being. and then as we head through tuesday night into wednesday, after a drier, quieter interlude, we see more rain pushing in from the south—west. temperatures — ten degrees in plymouth, two in aberdeen. the coldest weather still to be found across the north of the uk, but the milder weather will spread northwards as we head towards the end of the week, exceptionally high temperatures with some rain at times.
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this is bbc news — i'm christian fraser with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. no new coronavirus restrictions in england before the new year — despite record numbers of cases. the health secretary urges people to remain cautious. we will watch the situation very carefully and should, in the future, we need to act, of course, we will not hesitate to do so. america's leading health body halves the recommended isolation period for patiemnts with asymptomatic covid — from ten days to five. in france — home working will become mandatory for at least three days per week — as the rapid rise of omicron cases continues. cape town's city hall is bathed in purple light — to honour archbishop desmond tutu, south africa's anti—apartheid leader, who died on sunday.
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and — missing for almost a week — a happy ending

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