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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 25, 2021 8:00pm-8:21pm GMT

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. queen elizabeth speaks about her personal grief over the death of her husband prince philip in her christmas day message, saying there was "one familiar laugh missing", amid the continuing impact of the pandemic. that mischievous, inquiring twinkle was as bright at the end as when i first set eyes on him. but life, of course, consists of final partings, as well as first meetings. and as much as i and my family miss him, i know he would want us to enjoy christmas. a 19—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of trespassing windsor castle grounds, the official residence of queen elizabeth. members of the royal family have been informed.
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in his christmas message, pope francis highlighted the tragedies in yemen and syria which he said are being passed over in silence. the archbishop of canterbury justin welby has called for compassion towards refugees in his christmas sermon. and lift off! the world's most powerful telescope has blasted into space, soon to offer unprecedented images of the universe. and the former england and yorkshire captain ray illingworth has died at the age of 89. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the queen has spoken movingly
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in her christmas day message about her grief at the death of her husband, prince philip. she said there was "one familiar laugh missing", and expressed empathy with other families who'd lost loved ones this year. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. windsor castle on christmas morning. the royal standard signifying that the queen was in residence. merry christmas. the prince of wales and duchess of cornwalljoined the congregation for morning service. the queen did not attend as a precaution against covid, according to officials. from the very first moments of the queen's broadcast, there was a keen sense of the loss she has felt over the death of prince philip last april, after their 73 years of marriage. although it is a time of great happiness and good cheer for many, christmas can be hard for those who have lost loved ones.
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this year, especially, i understand why. but for me, in the months since the death of my beloved philip, i have drawn great comfort from the warmth and affection of the many tributes to his life and work from around the country, the commonwealth and the world. his sense of service, intellectual curiosity and capacity to squeeze fun out of any situation were all irrepressible. that mischievous, inquiring twinkle was as bright at the end as when i first set eyes on him. she spoke about the happiness she gained from seeing members of her family embracing the roles and values which meant so much to her, and she recalled how her husband's work on the environment was being taken forward. i am proud beyond words that his pioneering work has been taken on and magnified by our eldest son charles, and his eldest son william, admirably supported by
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camilla and catherine, while covid again means we cannot celebrate quite as we may have wished. there was a passing reference to covid and a look ahead to the platinum jubilee. but this above all was a broadcast from a wife mourning her husband. there would still be joy at christmas, the queen said, even with one familiar laugh missing. so a very personal message from the queen at the end of a sad and in some ways rather troubling year, with the death of her husband and difficulties within the royal family. the year has also ended with concerns about her own health, concerns which the palace does its best to downplay, preferring instead to look ahead to next year and the platinum jubilee. meanwhile, police say a 19—year—old man has been arrested after breaking into the grounds of windsor castle, where the queen is spending christmas.
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earlier, we heard from our royal correspondent sarah campbell who gave us more details. approximately 8:30am, the police, thames valley and the met police arrested 19—year—old man who was found within the grounds of windsor castle. building on the estate and i quote that security processes were triggered within moments of the man entering the grounds according to police though as i say, the man is now in custody, a 19—year—old man in possession of an offensive weapon at windsor castle. pope francis has called for more dialogue and warned against a tendency to withdraw during the coronavirus pandemic. here's the pope addressing a crowd at saint peter's square during his christmas day speech. translation: sisters and brothers, what would our world be _ like without the patient dialogue
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of the many generous persons who keep families and communities together. in this time of pandemic, we have come to realise this even more. our capacity for social relationships is sorely tried. there is a growing tendency to withdraw, to do it all by ourselves, to stop making an effort to encounter others and do things together. on the international level too, there is the risk of avoiding dialogue, the risk that this complex crisis will lead to taking short cuts, rather than setting out on the longer path of dialogue. yet only those paths can lead to the resolution of conflicts and to lasting benefits for all. the archbishop of canterbury has used his christmas sermon to preach a message of support to volunteers helping refugees. the most reverend justin welby
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was speaking at canterbury cathedral this morning. the christmas story shows us how we must treat those who are unlike us, who have far less than us, who have lived with the devastating limits of war and national tragedy. there have been the volunteers who have been on my mind, welcoming and caring for refugees arriving on the beaches so close to this cathedral, and they do one thing, save life at sea. it is not politics, it is simply humanity. the former england test cricket captain, ray illingworth, has died. he was 89 and had been undergoing treatment for oesophageal cancer. he had a 15—year test career, playing 61 times for england. he also captained yorkshire during a period where the county dominated domestic cricket. he played a pivotal role
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as a coach and selector for england in the 1990s. well, let's speak to huw turbervill, who's the editor of the cricketer. he joins us live from south london. a sad day for cricket. how do you think he will be remembered among friends and colleagues? i think he will be remembered among friends and colleagues?— friends and colleagues? i think he will be remembered _ friends and colleagues? i think he will be remembered as _ friends and colleagues? i think he will be remembered as one - friends and colleagues? i think he will be remembered as one of - will be remembered as one of england's best captains. we had a poll in the magazine a few years ago and he came second behind mike brearley. he will be remembered for leading england in australia on one of their most triumphant tours in 1970-71, a of their most triumphant tours in 1970—71, a brilliant man manager who got the best out of geoffrey boycott, who averaged 94 on that trip, and jon snow, his fast bowler, who was tricky i needed a bit of man management but railing with got the best out of him. i think also he will be remembered as a pioneer when it came to cricket rights. when i interviewed him for my book, he gave me chapter and verse on his two
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ashes tours, one in 62—63, an unhappy trip for him, he called it the sussex tour, the amity is dominated, they had the use of all the cars and ending with was called off his sick bed to field for colin cowdrey who wanted to take his wife to the cinema. but eight years later, he led that triumphant trip to australia, and it was a complete reverse. he will be remembered also as a brilliant, shrewd spin bowler. he hated giving away runs, a bit like james anderson these days. and a very good batsman, another tee. he opened some times for england, he was that good. but a brilliant captain. he had to leave yorkshire to go and get captaincy experience at leicestershire, and led them to the county championship in 1975. and then for yorkshire, he came out of retirement at the age of 50 to captain them again and even then, his bowling was so accurate, he could land it on a sixpence. find his bowling was so accurate, he could land it on a sixpence. and in terms of the _ could land it on a sixpence. and in terms of the legacy _ could land it on a sixpence. and in terms of the legacy he _ could land it on a sixpence. and in terms of the legacy he leaves, - could land it on a sixpence. and in
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terms of the legacy he leaves, i i terms of the legacy he leaves, i mean, obviously a shining career, as you have picked out some highlights, there. in terms of the legacy that he leaves, what will his impact be on cricket as a whole, do you think? well, he was one of the four great yorkshireman, and sadly three have died now, brian close, fred trueman and him and the remaining one is geoffrey boycott. they have been the pivotal figures geoffrey boycott. they have been the pivotalfigures in geoffrey boycott. they have been the pivotal figures in yorkshire cricket since the war, certainly up to the michael vaughan era, anyway. he was also an administrator and he did not have such a successful time as england's supremo. he demanded absolute power, a bit like chris silverwood has done as coach now and he did pick some good players like craig whyte but he also strangely overlooked star players like angus fraser and jack russell. it was not a successful period for england. they lost in australia in 94—95, and in south africa the following winter and he found it a really gruelling trip, he was in his mid—60s by then. it was a real shame he was not given
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that england supremojob it was a real shame he was not given that england supremo job earlier. he might have got the best out of that 19805 might have got the best out of that 1980s teen, ian botham, allan lamb, david gower, brilliant individuals and he might have been the man to give them the discipline, that side, and they would have achieve more success. ., ~' and they would have achieve more success. ., ~ , ., ., ., , success. thank you for “oining us. and sharing * success. thank you for “oining us. and sharing yourh success. thank you forjoining us. and sharing your thoughts - success. thank you forjoining us. and sharing your thoughts and . and sharing your thoughts and memories of railing with, there. —— ray lingmerth. the biggest space telescope ever constructed has been launched into orbit. the james webb telescope is on board a european ariane rocket which took off from french guiana. it's the successor to the hubble telescope, and designed to beam back unprecedented images of the universe. it's the most powerful ever built and the developers hope it will reveal stars and galaxies from the birth of the universe, as well as distant planets which could provide evidence of life beyond earth. and we have engine start. and lift—off. the start of a blockbuster
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astronomy mission. james webb begins a voyage back to the birth of the universe. inside this rocket is the biggest telescope ever sent into space. punching a hole through the clouds. 20 seconds into the flight... this is the james webb space telescope. it's a successor to hubble, but 100 times more powerful. after three decades in the making, and a cost of $10 billion, it's finally on its way. we've never attempted anything like that in space before. we're going to be entering a whole new regime of astrophysics. a new frontier. and that is what gets so many of us excited about james webb space telescope. this space telescope is a feat of engineering. at its heart is a 6.5 metre—wide mirror, made up of 18 hexagonal segments, each coated in a layer of gold. its size means it can detect the incredibly faint light coming from the most distant stars.
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it also has a huge sun shield, about the size of a tennis court. it's made up of five layers, each as thin as a human hair, and this protects the telescope from the heat and light of the sun. sitting a million miles away from the earth, the telescope will give us our deepest ever view of the cosmos. from seeing the birth of the very first stars and galaxies, to revealing new planets in far—flung solar systems. what excites me is making discoveries, things we haven't thought about. and there's a whole history of astronomy that shows how, when we've looked at the new universe in a new way, we discover things we hadn't thought about. and there's something really exciting about doing that. to get into space, the telescope is so big, it's been folded up to fit inside the rocket. the most challenging part is getting it to unfurl. it's been practised here on earth, and that's hard enough. there are 300 points
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where it could go wrong, but if anything fails in space, the telescope is too far away to be fixed. this is the most ambitious space telescope ever built. now its mission has finally begun and our view of the universe is about to be transformed. rebecca morelle, bbc news. france has broken its daily record for covid infections. the country saw over 100,000 cases reported in the last 24 hours, with the 0micron variant making up for the majority. president biden has commended americans for their strength in the face of the covid—19 pandemic, urging "hope and renewal" during the holiday season. in his first christmas address as president, mr biden praised "the enormous courage, character, resilience, and resolve" of those who serve "in ways big and small." the message comes as the us continues to be rocked by deep political divisions and record inflation.
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the eruption of the cumbre vieja volcano in the canary islands has finally come to an end, three months after it began spewing ash and lava. no one was injured during the 85—day ordeal on the spanish island of la palma. but the volcano destroyed more than 1,300 homes, churches, and schools, and submerged hundreds of hectares of farmland. the canary islands regional security chiefjulio perez expressed relief and hope as he broke the news. translation: what i want to say toda can translation: what i want to say today can be — translation: what i want to say today can be said _ translation: what i want to say today can be said with _ translation: what i want to say today can be said with just - translation: what i want to say today can be said with just four i today can be said with just four words. the eruption is over. it is an emotional relief but i think we can add one more word to the message. the word hope. because we can now focus all our energy on the reconstruction of the island. and before we go, here in the uk, it's officially a white christmas! reports of snow have been confirmed in the yorkshire dales in england,
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and in parts of scotland, including here in the village of insh in the highlands. there was even evidence that santa paws had visited the village of torphins, in aberdeenshire, as you can see here! you're watching bbc news. in the queen's christmas day broadcast this afternoon, she spoke for the first time in some detail about the loss of her husband, prince philip, who died in april. the monarch poignantly reflected on a year of personal grief, saying there was "one familiar laugh missing" amid the continuing impact of the coronavirus pandemic. she remarked how his "mischievous, enquiring twinkle" was as bright at the end as when she first set eyes on him, as she empathised with families who had lost loved ones this year. here is the queen's full christmas message. band plays the national anthem
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the queen: he is someone who doesn't take easily to compliments. but he has, quite simply, been my strength and stay all these years. and i, and his whole family, and this, and many other countries, owe him a debt greater than he would ever claim or we shall ever know.
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although it's a time of great happiness and good cheerfor many, christmas can be hard for those who have lost loved ones. this year, especially, i understand why. but, for me, in the months since the death of my beloved philip, i have drawn great comfort from the warmth and affection of the many tributes to his life and work from around the country, the commonwealth and the world. his sense of service, intellectual curiosity, and capacity to squeeze fun out of any situation were all irrepressible. that mischievous, enquiring twinkle was as bright at the end as when i first set eyes on him. but life, of course, consists of final partings as well as first meetings, and as much as i and my family miss him, i know he would want
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us to enjoy christmas. we felt his presence as we, like millions around the world, readied ourselves for christmas. while covid again means we can't celebrate quite as we may have wished, we can still enjoy the many happy traditions, be it the singing of carols, as long as the tune is well known, decorating the tree, giving and receiving presents, or watching a favourite film, where we already know the ending. it's no surprise that families so often treasure their christmas routines. we see our own children and their families embrace the roles, traditions and values that mean so much to us, as these are passed from one generation to the next, sometimes being updated for changing times. i see it in my own family, and it is
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a source of great happiness. prince philip was always mindful of this sense of passing the baton — that's why he created the duke of edinburgh's award, which offers young people throughout the commonwealth and beyond the chance of exploration and adventure. it remains an astonishing success, grounded in his faith in the future. he was also an early champion of taking seriously our stewardship of the environment, and i am proud beyond words that his pioneering work has been taken on and magnified by our eldest son charles and his elder son william, admirably supported by camilla and catherine, most recently at the cop climate change summit in glasgow. next summer, we look forward to the commonwealth games.
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the baton is currently travelling the length and breadth

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