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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 25, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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hello. the prince of wales and the duchess of cornwall have led members of the royal family to church at st george's chapel in windsor castle this morning. the queen did not attend the traditional christmas service, a precaution due to the rise in covid cases. she'll be spending the day at windsor with prince charles, camilla and other members of herfamily. the queen's speech — broadcast later today — is expected to be a personal reflection on a difficult year, following the death of her husband, prince philip. nicholas witchell reports. morning service at windsor castle.
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members of the royal family, though not the queen, joined the congregation at st george's chapel. happy christmas. merry christmas. the royal party was led by the prince of wales and the duchess of cornwall, who arrived on foot. the queen's christmas broadcast — at three o'clock this afternoon — will be an unusually personal one. she's expected to reflect on the death of her husband, prince philip, earlier this year. in his christmas message from canterbury cathedral, the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, reflected on the impact of the pandemic. we all face uncertainty, uncontrollability and unpredictability. whether we are working in sage or the cabinet, to each one of us, from huge companies to those who are sleeping rough. at the vatican, pope francis spoke about the importance of dialogue.
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he urged world leaders to engage with each other — to solve problems and prevent conflicts. nicholas witchell, bbc news. volunteers are working at vaccination centres across england today, as the push continues to give every adult a booster by the end of the month. the nhs says it expects thousands of people to receive theirjab on christmas day. vaccination centres are closed in northern ireland, scotland and wales. as ministers consider whether tougher restricions whether tougher restrictions are needed in england, the roman catholic archbishop, cardinal vincent nichols, has urged them not to close places of worship. emily unia reports. redbridge town hall in east london is one of a small number of vaccination centres in england that opened this morning, on christmas day, to help bolster the booster programme. day, to help bolster the booster programme-— day, to help bolster the booster rouramme. . . ., ., day, to help bolster the booster rouramme. . . ., programme. fantastic idea to save so many lives- — programme. fantastic idea to save so
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many lives- my _ programme. fantastic idea to save so many lives- myjob. _ programme. fantastic idea to save so many lives. myjob, i— programme. fantastic idea to save so many lives. myjob, i am _ programme. fantastic idea to save so many lives. myjob, i am in _ programme. fantastic idea to save so many lives. my job, i am in contact i many lives. my 'ob, i am in contact with customers— many lives. myjob, i am in contact with customers all _ many lives. myjob, i am in contact with customers all the _ many lives. myjob, i am in contact with customers all the time. - many lives. myjob, i am in contact with customers all the time. so - many lives. myjob, i am in contact with customers all the time. so i i with customers all the time. sol have _ with customers all the time. sol have got— with customers all the time. sol have got to — with customers all the time. sol have got to keep myself safe, keep my customers safe. it is have got to keep myself safe, keep my customers safe.— my customers safe. it is family time, my customers safe. it is family time. the _ my customers safe. it is family time, the time _ my customers safe. it is family time, the time you _ my customers safe. it is family time, the time you want - my customers safe. it is family time, the time you want to - my customers safe. it is family i time, the time you want to spend with your— time, the time you want to spend with your loved _ time, the time you want to spend with your loved ones. _ time, the time you want to spend with your loved ones. it _ time, the time you want to spend with your loved ones. it is- time, the time you want to spend with your loved ones. it is often. time, the time you want to spendl with your loved ones. it is often in times_ with your loved ones. it is often in times like — with your loved ones. it is often in times like that _ with your loved ones. it is often in times like that that _ with your loved ones. it is often in times like that that we _ with your loved ones. it is often in times like that that we get - with your loved ones. it is often in times like that that we get to - with your loved ones. it is often in| times like that that we get to think through— times like that that we get to think through the — times like that that we get to think through the real— times like that that we get to think through the real priorities, - times like that that we get to think through the real priorities, and - times like that that we get to think through the real priorities, and the real priorities — through the real priorities, and the real priorities are _ through the real priorities, and the real priorities are that _ through the real priorities, and the real priorities are that you - through the real priorities, and the real priorities are that you want - through the real priorities, and the real priorities are that you want to| real priorities are that you want to protect— real priorities are that you want to protect yourself _ real priorities are that you want to protect yourself and _ real priorities are that you want to protect yourself and you _ real priorities are that you want to protect yourself and you want - real priorities are that you want to protect yourself and you want to l protect yourself and you want to protect — protect yourself and you want to protect your _ protect yourself and you want to protect your loved _ protect yourself and you want to protect your loved ones. - protect yourself and you want to protect your loved ones. the - protect your loved ones. the government _ protect your loved ones. the government wants _ protect your loved ones. government wants to offer protect your loved ones.- government wants to offer all protect your loved ones— government wants to offer all adults are boosted by the end of the year to tackle the spread of the omicron variant. —— make a booster. this pharmacy in london has been open since eight this morning, they have about 80 appointments blue box, but there is capacity for at least 400 other people to walk in from the streets and get a jabs. and there was a very personal reason for opening over the christmas break. i am very close to the owners of the shop, the original owner, he passed away from covid in january this year. and it was a horrible experience for his family. and his sons had been working very hard to
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make sure no on else goes through the same thing as they did. this new variant appears _ the same thing as they did. this new variant appears to _ the same thing as they did. this new variant appears to cause _ the same thing as they did. this new variant appears to cause mild - variant appears to cause mild illness, which health officials have described as a glimmer of hope. it is still spreading fast, though, prompting scotland, wales and northern ireland to introduce new restrictions. in his christmas message, the head of the catholic church in england called on the government to keep places of worship open. i government to keep places of worship 0 en. ~' government to keep places of worship 0 en. ~ ., ., government to keep places of worship oen. ~ ., ., ., government to keep places of worship 0 en. " ., ., ., ,., open. i think we are at that point of sa in: open. i think we are at that point of saying we _ open. i think we are at that point of saying we understand - open. i think we are at that point of saying we understand the - open. i think we are at that point. of saying we understand the risks, we know _ of saying we understand the risks, we know what we should do, most peopie _ we know what we should do, most peopie are — we know what we should do, most people are sensible and cautious. we don't need _ people are sensible and cautious. we don't need stronger impositions to teachers _ don't need stronger impositions to teachers what to do, we know. new restrictions — teachers what to do, we know. new restrictions for _ teachers what to do, we know. ii? restrictions for england, known as step two, could see pubs and restaurants serving customers outdoors only and a ban on different households mixing indoors. a decision on whether to bring england in line with the other uk nations could be taken early next week. emily unia, bbc news. one of the greatest scientific missions of modern times has taken
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a giant leap forward in the last hour, with the launch of the james webb space telescope. the $10 billion project has taken 30 years to reach this moment. the telescope was launched from kourou, in french guiana. it's the most powerful ever built, and the developers hope it will reveal stars and galaxies from the birth of the universe, as well as distant planets which could provide evidence of life beyond earth. our science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. and we have engine start. and lift—off. the start of a blockbuster astronomy mission. james webb begins a voyage back to the birth of the universe. inside this rocket is the biggest telescope ever sent into space. punching a hole through the clouds. 20 seconds into the flight... this is the james webb space telescope. it's a successor to hubble, but 100 times more powerful. after three decades in the making and a cost of $10 billion, it's finally on its way.
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we've never attempted anything like that in space before. we're going to be entering a whole new regime of astrophysics. a new frontier. and that is what gets so many of us excited about james webb space telescope. this space telescope is a feat of engineering. at its heart is a 6.5 metre—wide mirror, made up of 18 hexagonal segments, each coated in a layer of gold. its size means it can detect the incredibly faint light coming from the most distant stars. it also has a huge sun shield, about the size of a tennis court. it's made up of five layers, each as thin as a human hair, and this protects the telescope from the heat and light of the sun. sitting a million miles away from the earth, the telescope will give us our deepest ever view of the cosmos. from seeing the birth of the very first stars and galaxies, to revealing new planets in far—flung solar systems. what excites me is making
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discoveries, things we haven't thought about. and there's a whole history of astronomy that shows how, when we've looked at the new universe in a new way, we discover things we hadn't thought about. and there's something really exciting about doing that. to get into space, the telescope is so big, it's been folded up to fit inside the rocket. the most challenging part is getting it to unfurl. it's been practised here on earth, and that's hard enough. there are 300 points where it could go wrong, but if anything fails in space, the telescope is too far away to be fixed. this is the most ambitious space telescope ever built. now it's now its mission has finally begun and our view of the universe is about to be transformed. rebecca morelle, bbc news. finally, if you were dreaming of a white christmas, you need to be in scotland or the yorkshire dales.
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this is how things are looking in braemar and aboyne, in aberdeenshire. perthshire, the shetlands and parts of yorkshire are also enjoying festive weather. for the rest of us, it's something more traditional — rain. that's it from the newsroom for now. the queen's speech is on bbc one at 3pm. the next news on bbc one is at ten to midnight. enjoy the rest of your day. you're watching bbc news. pope francis has called for more dialogue and warned against a tendency to withdraw during the coronavirus pandemic. here's the pope addressing a crowd at saint peter's sqaure during his christmas day speech. translation: sister and brothers, what would our _
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translation: sister and brothers, what would our record _ translation: sister and brothers, what would our record of— translation: sister and brothers, what would our record of the - translation: sister and brothers, what would our record of the many| what would our record of the many generous people who keep families and communities together in this time of pandemic, we have come to realise this even more. our capacity for social relationships is sorely tried. there is a growing tendency to withdraw. to do it all by ourselves, to stop making an effort to encounter others and to do things together. on the international level too, there is the risk of avoiding dialogue. the risk that this complex crisis will lead to taking short cuts rather than setting out on the longer path of dialogue. yet only those paths can lead to the resolution of conflicts and to lasting benefits for all. the shadow of the omicron variant continues to loom large over christmas in many parts of the world. infections are on the rise — and the fallout is taking its toll.
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more than 4,000 flights that were scheduled for friday and saturday have been cancelled. many airlines blaming a lack of healthy staff. moshiri reports on the problems facing those trying to travel at this festive time. festivities may be going ahead this year, but millions are still having difficulty reaching their families. with the omicron variant surging quickly around the world, it's causing chaos within airlines, with crews testing positive or needing to isolate. in the us, united airlines and delta airlines already cancelled hundreds of christmas eve flights and warned of more cancellations throughout the weekend. i spoke to one passenger who is now forced to travel on christmas day. your grandmother is in bosnia, you haven't seen herfor years, but because of these flight cancellations the family reunion has been halted. what happened 7 so we were, unfortunately, in the airport and sitting there and waiting for our flight
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from orlando to charlotte and we got a notification that our flight from charlotte to munich had been cancelled. completely out of the blue. had no idea what was going on. we got no prior notice and we went ahead and, you know, we ran to the ticket counter and asked what to do and they said the best thing we could do still get on the flight to charlotte because our luggage was still being sent there on the aeroplane. the flight tracking firm flightaware has said more than 2,000 christmas eve flights have been cancelled globally. explaining their decision, delta airlines warned: in the us, in the us, daily omicron cases have risen beyond the peak of the delta wave and hospitals are quickly filling up. despite this, many are still taking the risk to reach their loved ones. i'm very scared to be
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flying, to be honest. i'm glad to see everyone looks pretty masked up. ijust hope people on the plane are respectful of those around them. fully vaxxed and boosted and all of that and i said, you know, i'm just so glad to be - back with people, doing what we do. it kind of feels good. i mean, i'm still worried - about the variant, omicron, and all that, but at the same time, i'm just like you know what? - let'sjust — let's get back. to living our lives a little bit. airlines are now calling for reduced quarantine for vaccinated staff, with delta's ceo asking for those experiencing breakthrough infections to isolate five days instead of ten. but in the meantime, many will still be struggling to make it home for the holidays. azadeh moshiri, bbc news. christmas celebrations have taken place in bethlehem, including an annual procession led by the head of the roman catholic church in the region. the events culminated in a mass at the church of the nativity, built on the spot where it's believed thatjesus was born. but for a second year running, the celebrations were without their usual international crowds
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because of a ban on foreign visitors, due to covid—19. staying in bethlehem, an exhibition has been taking place of photos tracing 70 years of history — and christmas events there. the pictures were taken from the 1950s onwards by one of the town's first official photographers — maurice michael — whose son later took up the same trade... as a bbc news cameraman. our middle east correspondent tom bateman has their story. in the story of christmas, the star is the one behind the camera. marise michael was one of the town's first official photographers. with his sonjimmy, he recalls christmas is passed.
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marise, christian palestinian watch the world change in front of his lens. his images caught moments in time in the holy land. but while the west bank went through war and political to malt, his was a job of documenting bethlehem's vip visitors, a town and its focus through the decades. and of course, every year, he captured christmas. stand and of course, every year, he captured christmas.— and of course, every year, he captured christmas. and hear my dad was filmin: captured christmas. and hear my dad was filming the _ captured christmas. and hear my dad was filming the celebration _ captured christmas. and hear my dad was filming the celebration and - captured christmas. and hear my dad was filming the celebration and here | was filming the celebration and here i am. he filmed while i was in the scouts. o, i am. he filmed while i was in the scouts. 0, here, this is at home with santa. oh, my god! i rememberi started working with him since i was 12, helping him down in the dark room developing the pictures. lanthem room developing the pictures. when m son room developing the pictures. when my son said — room developing the pictures. when my son said to _ room developing the pictures. when my son said to me _ room developing the pictures. when my son said to me that _ room developing the pictures. when
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my son said to me that he _ room developing the pictures. when my son said to me that he want to be a photographer, itold him, no, no, try another life. but instead, he fallowed his dad. jimmy went on to become a veteran middle east cameraman with the bbc. capturing the region's epic moment and living its turbulence. this the region's epic moment and living its turbulence.— its turbulence. this is in libya coverina its turbulence. this is in libya covering the _ its turbulence. this is in libya covering the refugees - its turbulence. this is in libya covering the refugees taking l its turbulence. this is in libya - covering the refugees taking boats to europe. this is in egypt. this is in syria up there. this to europe. this is in egypt. this is in syria up there.— in syria up there. this christmas, an exhibition _ in syria up there. this christmas, an exhibition of— in syria up there. this christmas, an exhibition of his _ in syria up there. this christmas, an exhibition of his pictures - in syria up there. this christmas, an exhibition of his pictures is - an exhibition of his pictures is taking place in bethlehem. covid is again hitting this town based on tourism. but these pictures of the past keep people's faith and their hope shining. do you like his pictures? does he shoot as well as you?
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you are watching bbc news. the latest headlines on bbc news... the queen is expected to give a very personal christmas message this year — her first since the death of her husband prince philip. and lift off. a rocket carrying a space telescope that could transform our understanding of the unified mac universe has launched from the european space centre. let's get more on our top story... queen elizabeth will spend christmas day at windsor castle with a smaller group of family members than in previous years. charlotte gallagher reports from windsor castle. merry christmas here from windsor where the queen will be spending christmas. she wanted to have sand ring him —— she want to be at sandringham having her big traditional christmas, but last week that was cancelled and the decision was made to stay here because of the omicron variant. we think there are a couple of reasons behind that
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firstly, she always wants to be seen doing the right thing and setting an example and perhaps having a large family gathering, plus the crowds that come to sandringham to see the queen might not have been seen as a good thing. also she is 95 and has beeniu good thing. also she is 95 and has been ill recently. so the last thing that her family would have wanted is for her to catch coronavirus over christmas. but she does have some family with her. prince charles and his wife camilla, prince edward and his wife camilla, prince edward and his family and the duke and duchess of gloucester. they are here and we saw them going to church earlier. we have not seen the queen yet, we think she has gone to a private service at her private chapel within the grounds of the castle and we will not see her until the message later on today. that message is going to be a very personal one. she will be reflecting on what has been an incredibly difficult year for her and people right across the world with the loss of her husband and april, i think a lot of us will remember those absolutely heartbreaking pictures of her sat
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alone at his funeral. it has been a really, really tough year for the queen and that is why i'm sure her family really wanted to be with her today. next year is going to be a huge event for her. it it's her platinumjubilee. 70 huge event for her. it it's her platinum jubilee. 70 years on the throne, an incredible amount of time. and we know there are going to be lots of events planned for that and also there is going to be events in spring to remember prince philip and his life. the queen announced that yesterday, so she will want to be in the best help to do as many of those events as possible. so fingers crossed the pandemic has quieted down by then. that crossed the pandemic has quieted down by then-— down by then. that was charlotte galla . her. down by then. that was charlotte gallagher. let's _ down by then. that was charlotte gallagher. let's get _ down by then. that was charlotte gallagher. let's get more - down by then. that was charlotte gallagher. let's get more on - down by then. that was charlotte gallagher. let's get more on that revolutionary james webb telescope. joining me from baltimore — where mission control is — astronomer, professor garth illingworth. he has been involved in the webb project at various stages. he describes the new telescope as, hubble on steroids. tell us more. certainly. this last
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hour has just been amazing. absolutely flawless launch, went up on time, looked beautiful and then it went through all the motions exactly as the flight director says. everything is going great. it separated out and then the solar array came out that provides the power and the telescope is now power positive, as they say. it is powered by the sun. and now it is embarking onjourney to its by the sun. and now it is embarking on journey to its orbit. by the sun. and now it is embarking onjourney to its orbit. one by the sun. and now it is embarking on journey to its orbit. one and a half million kilometres. it is on journey to its orbit. one and a half million kilometres.— half million kilometres. it is an amazin: half million kilometres. it is an amazing achievement. - half million kilometres. it is an amazing achievement. when . half million kilometres. it is an l amazing achievement. when you half million kilometres. it is an - amazing achievement. when you began work on this project back in the mid—19 80s, what was the concept? what were you hoping would be achieved and how does it look now after that 30 plus year period? looking back now and seeing your
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handy reach fruition. eight looking back now and seeing your handy reach fruition.— handy reach fruition. eight is amazing- — handy reach fruition. eight is amazing. what _ handy reach fruition. eight is amazing. what we _ handy reach fruition. eight is amazing. what we could - handy reach fruition. eight is amazing. what we could see j handy reach fruition. eight is - amazing. what we could see back then was a big telescope in space far away from earth, it was going to be cooled by the universe and would reveal dramatic insights in the infrared, longerthan reveal dramatic insights in the infrared, longer than wavelength. we drew up some sketches, but what has actually flown today is so dramatically different. the telescope itself is very similar. six and a half metres. it is going to be cold when it is out in the orbit. the concept that has been realised by what is happening now. there is a wonderful sort of continuity to all of this. the telescope is an instrument we associate with the renee sounds —— the renaissance and the reawakening of the heavens. week kind of loss that and then there is a more
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general understanding of our place in the universe. but the telescope has not the change that much. one great discovery is still giving so much centuries later.— great discovery is still giving so much centuries later. exactly, you are exactly — much centuries later. exactly, you are exactly right. _ much centuries later. exactly, you are exactly right. all _ much centuries later. exactly, you are exactly right. all we _ much centuries later. exactly, you are exactly right. all we have - are exactly right. all we have done... all i should say, is we have scaled it up immensely. we're going to have an incredibly cold telescope and we are going to work in a regime which is invisible to us in our eyes and practically impossible to work from from the earth and then we are going to look back through, essentially, all of time to win the very first stars and galaxies formed and how they grew into the magnificent galaxies like our milky way today. it is notjust that. we are also going to be exploring planets around nearby stars and try to understand their origins and whether they have a light. this is an amazing telescope. as you say,
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hubble on steroids. it definitely is. ~ , , hubble on steroids. it definitely is. , , �* is. well, it is your phrase, but i'm only quoting _ is. well, it is your phrase, but i'm only quoting you- _ is. well, it is your phrase, but i'm only quoting you. but _ is. well, it is your phrase, but i'm only quoting you. but it _ is. well, it is your phrase, but i'm only quoting you. but it is - is. well, it is your phrase, but i'm only quoting you. but it is a - is. well, it is your phrase, but i'm only quoting you. but it is a great| only quoting you. but it is a great way of summing it up. you are always restless, you wanted the next thing because that is the nature of discovery. what is it you want, the result you are most keen to see at this stage however long you have to wait from them for the james webb telescope? it wait from them for the james webb telesco e? , ., , wait from them for the james webb telesco e? , . , ., , telescope? it is really the earliest calaxies. telescope? it is really the earliest galaxies- when — telescope? it is really the earliest galaxies. when hubble _ telescope? it is really the earliest galaxies. when hubble revealed l telescope? it is really the earliest i galaxies. when hubble revealed the universe was just filled with these faint little dots of galaxies when the first deep images were taken in the first deep images were taken in the mid—19 90s, a long time ago. and so it then became very clear that to explore these and go back right in time to the very beginning of galaxies wejust had time to the very beginning of galaxies we just had to have a big telescope like web. so it is to everyone's credit that the resources were put there, the amazing
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engineering teams were assembled and that people were just focus and worked on this to make this a reality. as we saw in the launch today. and absolutely amazing launch. , ., today. and absolutely amazing launch. ., ., launch. does a telescope have a lanned launch. does a telescope have a planned life _ launch. does a telescope have a planned life span? _ launch. does a telescope have a planned life span? is _ launch. does a telescope have a planned life span? is there - launch. does a telescope have a planned life span? is there an i planned life span? is there an objective of how long you expect it to stay up and operational for? we are to stay up and operational for? - are hoping that it will last at least ten years and so... hubble lasted longer, but there could be service. web is way away from the moon, impossible to service and so the fuel that it carries on board, the fuel that it carries on board, the propellant that keeps it in its orbit around this place called l2 1,000,000 and a half kilometres away is really the limiting life of the telescope. and so we are planning, hoping that we will have ten years and maybe we will get lucky and it will be longer. you never know what things in space. it is a tough
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environment. it things in space. it is a tough environment.— things in space. it is a tough environment. , , ., , environment. it must be the longest wait a dad has _ environment. it must be the longest wait a dad has had _ environment. it must be the longest wait a dad has had for _ environment. it must be the longest wait a dad has had for a _ environment. it must be the longest wait a dad has had for a newborn. i wait a dad has had for a newborn. congratulation on your happy event today. congratulation on your happy event toda . . ~ congratulation on your happy event toda . ., ,, ,., congratulation on your happy event toda . . ~' ,. , congratulation on your happy event toda. ., , . congratulation on your happy event toda. . , . . congratulation on your happy event toda. .mg , . ~ ., today. thank you very much. and a treat today. thank you very much. and a great christmas _ today. thank you very much. and a great christmas present _ today. thank you very much. and a great christmas present to - great christmas present to astronomers and to the future of everybody on the planet. hubble has been wonderful. james webb will be even greater. terrific, merry christmas. thank you very much and merry christmas to you and everybody. the impact of super typhoon rai is being felt all the more acutely today as families face christmas in the wake of disaster. the un says 3 million people are in need of assistance. tanya dendrinos reports. it is one of the largest christian nations in the world, but on one of the most important days of the religious calendar, the philippines is reeling. last week, super typhoon rai devastated the country's south—eastern islands, many have lost everything. translation: it will be a sad christmas. i we have no party food but at least we are alive. it is better than welcoming
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christmas with a dead loved one. we thank god that our family and our community were spared. the un says that 3 million people are in need of assistance, among them around 1 million children. translation: it is difficult, it is difficult because - we don't have a food. we are just begging. rai has been the most powerful storm to hit the philippines this year, claiming at least 375 lives. scientists say climate change is causing typhoons to become more powerful and strengthen more rapidly, an ominous warning for action, with no stopping the force of mother nature. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. thank you very much. you are watching bbc news, don't forget the queen's speech a little later today.
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hello, and merry christmas from everybody here at bbc weather. we know of course what adds a little bit of extra meteorological magic to christmas is some snow. that is lacking for much of the uk today. for many it is just a continuation of the rather grey and damp weather we have seen of late. but we have seen snow, and it is officially a white christmas. in the shetland, parts of central and eastern scotland and into the higher parts of the pennines and yorkshire dales as well there will be one or two flurries out of their on through this afternoon. away from some sunny spells in northernmost part of scotland, it is a mostly cloudy christmas day and there is some quite heavy rain through parts of south—west southern england into wales and northern ireland is turning particularly wet for the rest of the day. and it is a strengthening east or south easterly wind adding an extra bite to proceedings today, pardon the pun. because this is what it might
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say on the thermometer, but when you factor in the strength of that wind, and particularly through northern and eastern parts of the uk, look at the difference it makes. it will feel like it is at or even below freezing. it is still mild in the south—west. this rain not moving very much during daylight hours. it does march further north and east tonight into boxing day across of wales, england, still there in northern ireland. as it runs into cold air across northern england first, then southern and central scotland, you will see that rain turning to snow, particularly into the hills. that is where we are going to be seeing frost as we started start boxing day. there could be some typical conditions on the higher routes across northern england, southern and central scotland for a time on boxing day, with snow falling and their wind blowing it about as well. we could see some snow to relatively low levels for a time, but as it moves further north through scotland tomorrow, mostly in the hills will have the snow. the far north is still seeing some sunny spells. elsewhere, there will be quite a few heavy showers moving on through northern ireland, wales and england.
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but brightening up towards the south—west on through the afternoon and temperatures, well, a little bit higher, but still feeling colder because of the wind. and here is a look at boxing day evening. some clearer spells down towards the south and south—west, but you can see elsewhere eight lot of cloud, still some showers or outbreaks of rain around. we have had a battle between that mild and the cold air for christmas weekend. beyond that though, it is very clear that it is the mild air that winds, with areas of low pressure coming in, bringing spells of wind and rain, but pushing mild air, even very mild air in places, right across the uk.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... a rocket carrying a space telescope that could transform our understanding of the universe has just launched from the european space centre in french guiana. the james webb space telescope aims to see deeper into space and to picture the very first stars.
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volunteers in england help give vaccines in the race to fight the surging omicron variant in the country. the government is offering every adult a booster by the end of the month. pope frances has delivered his traditional christmas day urbi et orbi message to the world. he deplored the �*immense tragedies' in yemen and syria which he said were �*being passed over in silence' millions around the world face travel disruption over christmas, as the surge in omicron variant cases sees thousands of flights cancelled due to staff shortages. airlines say they're contacting those passengers affected, before they arrive at the airport. now on bbc news, sporting world. hi there, my name is
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clare balding, and i'm a television and radio broadcaster, mainly in sport,

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