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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 21, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the prime minister borisjohnson says there will not be any new coronavirus restrcitions in england before christmas. it comes as chancellor rishi sunak announces a £1 billion grant for the struggling hospitality sector. we've responded, i think, generously today, the grants we've outlined, up to £6,000, are comparable to the grants we provided for hospitality businesses when they were completely closed earlier this year. but scotland's first minister, announces tighter covid rules, saying all outdoor events will be limited, to just 500 people, from boxing day. this well of course make sports matches including football effectively spectator free over this
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three week period, a situation similar to that and wales from boxing day. and there are there are further covid restrictions expected in wales, as a minister calls for the uk government, to restart the furlough scheme. meanwhile as 0micron spreads rapidly across america, president biden, prepares to ramp up, the federal government's response. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. borisjohnson has confirmed there'll be no further covid restrictions put in place before christmas. he said there currently isn't enough evidence on the severity of the 0micron variant, while the hospitalisation rate and the impact
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of the booster roll—out, didn't justify tougher measures. however, the prime minister says situation is finely balanced and remains difficult across the country, infgection rates at an all—time high, and he did not rule out tighter restrictions after the festive period. more on that in a moment, but let's take a look at the rest of the day's developments. the chancellor rishi sunak has announced a £1 billion fund to help businesses hit by the rise in covid cases, including the leisure and hospitality sector. it comes as the uk records the third highest number of daily cases in the pandemic— since the start of mass testing. nicola sturgeon has announced fresh restrictions for scotland that will come in from boxing day. edinburgh's hogmanay street party has been cancelled and football matches will be effectively spectator—free. the welsh government has also banned spectators from sports events — with ministers warning more restrictions will be needed to keep the country safe. around the globe — us presidentjoe biden will be outlining additional plans to tackle the spread of the 0micron later today. new zealand has pushed back plans to allow quarantine—free
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travel for residents returning from australia. and the world health organization urges people to cancel some holiday plans as the 0micron variant spreads globally. more on those stories in a moment — but first — let's speak to our political correspondent iain watson. so, watson. ian, no more restrictions before the so, ian, no more restrictions before the 25th of december. so we can all rest easy up to christmas day, but what about beyond that?— what about beyond that? well, far less certain _ what about beyond that? well, far less certain beyond _ what about beyond that? well, far less certain beyond that, - what about beyond that? well, far less certain beyond that, clive, i what about beyond that? well, far| less certain beyond that, clive, but borisjohnson is a bit under pressure on two fronts for members of his own cabinet and many conservative backbenchers who went into rule out any further restrictions until there is more solid data on this severity of omicron. he's been under pressure from other backbenchers saying, for goodness' sake, just make a decision, tell people they can go ahead for their christmas plans. a little bit more certainty tonight. no more restrictions in england
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before christmas day. that's been very clear. some mps will welcome at least that degree of certainty. but he's also said there isn't enough evidence of hospitalisations on the severity of omicron to justify it at this stage bringing in any more restrictions. therefore, the implication is that should that evidence arrives, we could be facing restrictions in england after christmas day. he said he's not reeling that out, and it's interesting he also emphasised that the situation is still finely balanced and urged people to exercise caution over the christmas period. this would seem to point to any new restrictions being put off until next week. if these are legally enforceable restrictions, he had to recall parliament, so he has the option to issue guidance, which isn't legally binding, and that would avoid a potential clash with his mps, but certainly members of his mps, but certainly members of his cabinet have been saying to him what they really want to find outcome if you're going to take decisions which could potentially close down swathes of the economy
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for weeks or longer is to be absolutely clear that hospitalisations would be putting the nhs under threat, and they are sceptical about introducing new measures until that data is there. we were told by professor chris whitty, of course, when he appeared before a committee of mps that that kind of data was more likely to come next week or the week after, so for that reason, borisjohnson has been able to delay any decision and avoid another clash with some members of his own cabinet in the process. but there is quite a stark contrast between that and what we are seeing from the administrations in scotland and wales, of course, where they are saying, 0k, and wales, of course, where they are saying, ok, no more restrictions before christmas, but in the case of wales, nightclubs closing down pretty soon afterwards, those public events, the cancellation of the celebrations in edinburgh, and so far, downing street are resistant to tell us the kind of measures they would consider. plenty of
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speculation, but not confirming the kind of measures they would impose should it be proven that omicron is a serious threat and is pushing up hospitalisation rates. qm. a serious threat and is pushing up hospitalisation rates.— hospitalisation rates. 0k, our olitical hospitalisation rates. 0k, our political correspondent - hospitalisation rates. 0k, our political correspondent there. help for england's hospitality and entertainment sectors has been announced by the chancellor — as they struggle with cancellations and closures due to the 0micron variant. rishi sunak says a 1—billion—pound fund will cover grants of up to 6—thousand pounds per premises. we've responded, i thank you a generously today, the grants that we've outlined, up to £6,000 are comparable to the grants that we provided for hospitality businesses when they were completely closed earlier this year. so there is a benchmark for you. also it's important to remember that we have support already in place that lasts all the way to next spring, so for example, reduced rate of vat for the hospitality and tourism sectors, and this year, they are benefiting from the 75% discount on their business
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rates bill. those types of things last all the way to next march to support the industry. for people watchin: support the industry. for people watching this — support the industry. for people watching this and _ support the industry. for people watching this and thinking - support the industry. for people watching this and thinking what | support the industry. for people i watching this and thinking what can they do— watching this and thinking what can they do to — watching this and thinking what can they do to plan their holiday period. _ they do to plan their holiday period, can you rule out any further tightening — period, can you rule out any further tightening of the new year? | tightening of the new year? i absolutely appreciate people's frustration with all of this. i prefer people to use prime minister spreads yesterday, unfortunately we are dealing with an enormous amount of uncertainty at the moment, and for the prime minister said is that we are reviewing the data day by day, hour by hour, keeping the situation under constant review but cannot rule anything out. the chance that they're — cannot rule anything out. the chance that they're speaking _ cannot rule anything out. the chance that they're speaking to _ cannot rule anything out. the chance that they're speaking to simon - cannot rule anything out. the chance that they're speaking to simon and l that they're speaking to simon and jack, the bbc�*s business correspondent. joining me now is rain newton—smith, chief economist at the confederation of british industry. the major lobby group for industry. thank you forjoining us. £6,000 per premises per business, a grant fund of about a billion. is that enough,
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do you think?— do you think? love, ed will certainly — do you think? love, ed will certainly provide _ do you think? love, ed will certainly provide some - do you think? love, ed will i certainly provide some crucial breathing space for our pubs, cafes, restaurants, leisure as we head into these crucial winter months. i think, is that enough? that really depends on what happens from here. i think we have seen some direct grants, that was the mechanism that was used in previous lockdowns and i think it's a recognition by government that what we have seen in recent days has felt like a lockdown by stealth for so many businesses out there, but i think if we do see more restrictions, we are going to need to see more support, but i think it has given some important breathing space and support to cash flow for some of the hardest hit businesses, but i don't think it's job done yet. 50 businesses, but i don't think it's job done yet-— businesses, but i don't think it's job done yet. so that it breathing sace as job done yet. so that it breathing space as a _ job done yet. so that it breathing space as a result _ job done yet. so that it breathing space as a result of— job done yet. so that it breathing space as a result of this - space as a result of this announcement, but the prime minister has made it clear, the government has made it clear, the government has made it clear, the government has made it clear it reserves the right, if the facts change, to
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introduce tighter restrictions that will be after christmas day, so before new year, potentially, if new restrictions come in, then the treasury has got to step in at some as well. there has to be more money. i think if we do see my restrictions, we do need to see further support. we might need to see a time—limited job support scheme, again, particularly if you're asking businesses to close their doors for a period of time. i think how has to come first. we do need to balance that. we've got to try and keep our economy is open as possible. that's the easiest way for businesses to trade their way out of where we are now. one of the things we hear from where we are now. one of the things we hearfrom businesses right now where we are now. one of the things we hear from businesses right now is clarity on what is going to happen in the coming weeks. it's really hard if you are a pub and have a wedding booked in for the 27th of december. should you buy the
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supplies you need to host that event now? 0rshould supplies you need to host that event now? or should you hold off? it's those clarity of what will happen in the next few days, which is crucial. i think also thinking about some of the sectors which may not be so much in our sites every day but are so important to our wider economy, like aviation and travel, they have been facing restrictions for almost two years now. i think some of them are feeling pretty desperate now that we are seeing continued international restrictions, and yet we haven't seen any additional supports in place for that sector at the moment. when welsh minister has said the furlough scheme has got to come back. i furlough scheme has got to come back. ~ , , , , , furlough scheme has got to come back. ~ , , ,, , ., ., back. i think it businesses do have to close their— back. i think it businesses do have to close their doors, _ back. i think it businesses do have to close their doors, we _ back. i think it businesses do have to close their doors, we will- back. i think it businesses do have to close their doors, we will need | to close their doors, we will need to see a version of the furlough scheme for those businesses that are really affected. i think it should be time—limited, the labour market it is in a different place than where we where at the beginning of the pandemic. vacancies are at all—time highs. we don't have the worries have seen double digit
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unemployment which we had early on in the pandemic. if we do ask businesses to shut their doors, what's most important is we protect the jobs that depend on those businesses.— the jobs that depend on those businesses. ., ., ,, businesses. 0k, reina newton smith, thank ou businesses. ok, reina newton smith, thank you for— businesses. 0k, reina newton smith, thank you forjoining _ businesses. 0k, reina newton smith, thank you forjoining us. _ joining me now is the ceo of best western hotels great britain tim rumney. they're a group of around 300 independently run hotels across the country, employing about ten thousand people. hello to you. thank you for being with us. £6,000, as i wasjust saying, to a rep from the cbi. £6,000 per premises, ora saying, to a rep from the cbi. £6,000 per premises, or a £1 billion fund. do you think that is enough? 0ur fund. do you think that is enough? our members are telling us that's like a _ our members are telling us that's like a dead — our members are telling us that's like a dead cracker on christmas day _ like a dead cracker on christmas day it— like a dead cracker on christmas day. it doesn't go anywhere near enough — day. it doesn't go anywhere near enough to— day. it doesn't go anywhere near enough to cover the financial impact that the _ enough to cover the financial impact that the last three weeks has had an hour businesses. we operate 300 hotels in — hour businesses. we operate 300 hotels in great britain. there are significant —
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hotels in great britain. there are significant businesses that have very high— significant businesses that have very high costs. so for £6,000 to be the compensation for everything that has been _ the compensation for everything that has been happening in terms of cancellations and customers just has been happening in terms of cancellations and customersjust not turning _ cancellations and customersjust not turning up— cancellations and customersjust not turning up over the last three weeks is not _ turning up over the last three weeks is not enough for our sector. we need to— is not enough for our sector. we need to see _ is not enough for our sector. we need to see more.— is not enough for our sector. we need to see more. interesting, what kind of clientele _ need to see more. interesting, what kind of clientele would _ need to see more. interesting, what kind of clientele would you - need to see more. interesting, what kind of clientele would you be - kind of clientele would you be getting in the run—up to at british hotels? getting in the run-up to at british hotels? ~ , , ., hotels? well, this is the time of ear hotels? well, this is the time of year where _ hotels? well, this is the time of year where hotels _ hotels? well, this is the time of year where hotels make - hotels? well, this is the time of year where hotels make the - hotels? well, this is the time of. year where hotels make the money that provides the cash flow to get them _ that provides the cash flow to get them through the first quarter of them through the first quarter of the new— them through the first quarter of the new year, which is always very challenging. we would be having christmas parties, we would be having — christmas parties, we would be having accommodation associated with christmas _ having accommodation associated with christmas breaks. we have chris would _ christmas breaks. we have chris would have been year package. we have had _ would have been year package. we have had months and months where the corporate _ have had months and months where the corporate market has not returned to pre—pandemic levels, and lee also,
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as rain— pre—pandemic levels, and lee also, as rain was— pre—pandemic levels, and lee also, as rain wasjust saying, we need some _ as rain wasjust saying, we need some clarity, we need some planning, because _ some clarity, we need some planning, because every year, the hotels have to plan _ because every year, the hotels have to plan for— because every year, the hotels have to plan for the quieter period of the new year. at the moment, yes, some _ the new year. at the moment, yes, some financial assistance in place, we've _ some financial assistance in place, we've got— some financial assistance in place, we've got a — some financial assistance in place, we've got a reduction in vat, but we went— we've got a reduction in vat, but we went to _ we've got a reduction in vat, but we went to see — we've got a reduction in vat, but we went to see that go beyond the ist of april— went to see that go beyond the ist of april into the middle of summer. ithink— of april into the middle of summer. i think we _ of april into the middle of summer. i think we have seriously got to look at — i think we have seriously got to look at bringing back the furlough scheme, — look at bringing back the furlough scheme, because all the good work that chancellor has done for the last two— that chancellor has done for the last two years is going to be undone if we are _ last two years is going to be undone if we are now laying off staff because _ if we are now laying off staff because we cannot provide work for them _ because we cannot provide work for them and _ because we cannot provide work for them and we need to protect our cash in order— them and we need to protect our cash in order to _ them and we need to protect our cash in orderto make them and we need to protect our cash in order to make our business viable and sustainable. how in order to make our business viable and sustainable.— and sustainable. how would you characterise _ and sustainable. how would you characterise how _ and sustainable. how would you characterise how the _ and sustainable. how would you | characterise how the government and sustainable. how would you - characterise how the government has handled the situation in the last two or three weeks since the onset of omicron and where you feel the hospitality and business sector has
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featured in the government's thinking? i featured in the government's thinkina ? ~ featured in the government's thinkin: ? ~ , featured in the government's thinkinu? ~' , ., featured in the government's thinkinu? ~' , thinking? i think they have been behind the _ thinking? i think they have been behind the curve _ thinking? i think they have been behind the curve all— thinking? i think they have been behind the curve all the - thinking? i think they have been behind the curve all the way - thinking? i think they have been l behind the curve all the way along for the _ behind the curve all the way along for the last three weeks. i think the customers, our clients have been ahead _ the customers, our clients have been ahead of— the customers, our clients have been ahead of the — the customers, our clients have been ahead of the game. they have recognised that the messaging around the variance means that they are very nervous to go into environments where _ very nervous to go into environments where they— very nervous to go into environments where they think they mean catch covid, _ where they think they mean catch covid, our— where they think they mean catch covid, our premises are very, very safe, _ covid, our premises are very, very safe, but— covid, our premises are very, very safe, but the — covid, our premises are very, very safe, but the relentlessness messaging of the government and of the scientific adviser is means that people _ the scientific adviser is means that people are — the scientific adviser is means that people are understandably nervous, and we _ people are understandably nervous, and we recognise that. the next messaging of saying that things are open but _ messaging of saying that things are open but not providing supports has led to— open but not providing supports has led to a _ open but not providing supports has led to a lots of concern within our industry— led to a lots of concern within our industry because we still have to keep—
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industry because we still have to keep those premises open. we staff to provide _ keep those premises open. we staff to provide a service, but we are not seen _ to provide a service, but we are not seen the _ to provide a service, but we are not seen the customers come through the dool’, _ seen the customers come through the door, and _ seen the customers come through the door, and we — seen the customers come through the door, and we are not seen the financial— door, and we are not seen the financial support that makes that viable _ financial support that makes that viable so — financial support that makes that viable. so ultimately, our businesses, or hotels are going to be asking — businesses, or hotels are going to be asking the question, is it worth staying _ be asking the question, is it worth staying open? these are family—run businesses — staying open? these are family—run businesses that have been going for generations. it's notjust a question— generations. it's notjust a question of people losing theirjobs and finding ajob question of people losing theirjobs and finding a job in another sector. these _ and finding a job in another sector. these are — and finding a job in another sector. these are viable businesses that need _ these are viable businesses that need to— these are viable businesses that need to continue, but we cannot go on with— need to continue, but we cannot go on with this — need to continue, but we cannot go on with this lack of clarity and lack— on with this lack of clarity and lack of— on with this lack of clarity and lack of planning. it's notjust on with this lack of clarity and lack of planning. it's not just for the next — lack of planning. it's not just for the next few days up until christmas day, it's_ the next few days up until christmas day, it's christmas day and beyond. it's day, it's christmas day and beyond. its the _ day, it's christmas day and beyond. its the first — day, it's christmas day and beyond. it's the first quarter of next year, and ultimately, further than that, to allow— and ultimately, further than that, to allow our businesses the confidence to know that if they keep operating, _ confidence to know that if they keep operating, they are going to be able to stay— operating, they are going to be able to stay viable. we operating, they are going to be able to stay viable-— to stay viable. we will have to leave it there. _
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to stay viable. we will have to leave it there. ten _ to stay viable. we will have to leave it there. ten from - to stay viable. we will have to leave it there. ten from the l to stay viable. we will have to i leave it there. ten from the best western hotels group in great britain, thank you forjoining us today, thank you. britain, thank you for “oining us today, thank you.— the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister borisjohnson says there will not be any new coronavirus restrcitions in england, before christmas. it comes as chancellor rishi sunak announces a billion pound grant, for the struggling hospitality sector. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon announces new covid restrictions, and says all outdoor events will be limited to just 500 people from boxing day. mind that story now. scotland's first minister — nicola stugeon — has announced new restrictions, due to the surge in 0micron cases. the number of people allowed to socialise both, indoors and outdoors, will be limited — which means scaling back new year's celebrations and attendance at sports events.. let's hear the key bits of that announcement.
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from the 26th of december, inclusive of that date, for a period up to three weeks, we intend to place limits on the size of large public events that can take place. this does not apply to private life events such as weddings. for indoor extending events, the limit will be 100. indoor seated events, 200. for outdoor events, 500 seated or standing. physical distancing of one metre will be required at physical events. this will make sports matches, including football, spectator free. it will also mean, unfortunately, the large—scale hogmanay celebrations, including that plant here in our capital city, will not proceed. —— celebrations, including that planned here in our capital city, will not proceed. i know how disappointing that will be to those looking forward to these events and for the organisers of them. the opposition conservatives called for an easing of the covid household contact isolation rules, to reduce the staffing pressure on services.
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the first minister said this last week — the first minister said this last week. businesses are already bleeding every 24 hours counts. so will the _ bleeding every 24 hours counts. so will the first minister tell us today— will the first minister tell us today when the first grants will start _ today when the first grants will start to — today when the first grants will start to reach businesses? will it be before — start to reach businesses? will it be before christmas her into the new year? _ be before christmas her into the new year? secondly, the first minister explained — year? secondly, the first minister explained in her statement that hundreds of services have been cancelled — hundreds of services have been cancelled due to staff absences and similar— cancelled due to staff absences and similar pressures on our emergency services _ similar pressures on our emergency services and — similar pressures on our emergency services and others. these concerns last week— services and others. these concerns last week that self isolation guidance for household contacts would _ guidance for household contacts would lead to these challenges. while _ would lead to these challenges. while well—intentioned in seeking to limit the _ while well—intentioned in seeking to limit the spread of the virus, it could _ limit the spread of the virus, it could ruin _ limit the spread of the virus, it could ruin our economy and public services _ could ruin our economy and public services -- — could ruin our economy and public services —— grind them to a halt. let's speak to our scotland correspondent andrew kerr. andrew, christmas is sort of 0k. new year celebrations, not so good. that's right. christmas is safe in
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scotland. that was announced by the first minister yesterday but that confirmation in england today. significant new restrictions after christmas and fortunately for people, the most significant being the cancellation of edinburgh's massive new year's celebration on the streets of edinburgh. in fact, all big events from boxing day, those 200 seated indoor areas cannot go ahead. the football will be taking place behind closed doors, the winter break may have to move to accommodate this celebration. this will last for three weeks. new restrictions, one metre social distancing rule, returning alcohol being served at tables once again, who knows what it means for nightclubs at this point. hospitality industry say they are devastated by this news. they wonder
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if they will survive into the new year. we have heard of that £i year. we have heard of that £1 billion from the chancellor. that's £82 million from scotland. it was actually announced earlier in the week. that works about £6,800 per business. a bit better than what we have been hearing in england. they still need more money to help these businesses in trouble. {lilia still need more money to help these businesses in trouble.— businesses in trouble. 0k, andrew, thank ou businesses in trouble. 0k, andrew, thank you for— businesses in trouble. 0k, andrew, thank you for that. _ the mayor of london sadiq khan, who outlined the problems facing public services in his city, due to frontline staff shortages. here's what mr khan had to say earlier. since the start of this month, we have seen an increase in the number of positive cases by more than 250% in relation to hospital admissions and increase of almost 70% since the start of december. the number of positive cases is only going in one direction, and the real concern we
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have which is the immediate concern is the impact it has on staff absences from the nhs, think hospitals, ambulances, gps, after consulting with colleagues in the nhs, the fire service, and the met police service, we realise that if it where to go on the same trajectory, the graph, we would have many public services collapsing. we remove all the silos and have a strategic, and control in the centre and speaking all the time about what each part of the london ecosystem is doing and how we help each other. last year, we had fire fighters helping the ambulance service drive ambulances. but you will be aware of the course of the next few weeks, we need to make sure becky's is collected. we need to make sure ambulances can continue to work. that's why it's important to keep an eye on staff absences, because what we don't want us any part of the
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system collapsing. we are on the cusp of certain parts of the furniture in london which looks after our city being on the cusp of collapse. after our city being on the cusp of colla se. ~._ ., after our city being on the cusp of collase. ~._ ., ., ., ., borisjohnson says all options are being reviewed "hour by hour," but he's so far held back from any additional restrictions, to combat the spread of the 0micron variant. in london last week, staff absences rose from 1,900 on monday, to 4,700 by thursday. that's according to nhs providers. our health correspondent, dominic hughes, now reports on what factors may help policy makers decide, what to do next. thank you for being with us. how difficult is your sector, as it were, finding this whole thing? b5 were, finding this whole thing? is he can were, finding this whole thing? sis he can hear, the figures are quite stark. the increase in the number of patients and number of cases, but also the impact that that is having on staff. at the moment, certainly
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in london and some other areas, things are very, very difficult, and looking forward, it set to get very difficult for everybody and significantly worse than it already is. ~ ., ., significantly worse than it already is. . . ., significantly worse than it already is. what do you make of the pie minister. _ is. what do you make of the pie minister, boris _ is. what do you make of the pie minister, boris johnson, - is. what do you make of the pie minister, boris johnson, saying| is. what do you make of the pie - minister, boris johnson, saying that minister, borisjohnson, saying that there will not be any more restrictions before christmas? the government _ restrictions before christmas? tue: government has restrictions before christmas? tte: government has to restrictions before christmas? t“t9: government has to do restrictions before christmas? tt9 government has to do thinks restrictions before christmas? t“t9 government has to do thinks is right, but what we would ask the government to make sure it is doing is basing its decisions on the evidence, the data that it can see, both but i'm kind that spread and the impact it's having on people and the impact it's having on people and the impact it's having on the nhs alongside the pressure is that already existed in the nhs both in terms on the calling services from increase patient numbers, but also the impact that the reduced numbers of staff are having and the sickness and absence among staff. shire of staff are having and the sickness and absence among staff.— and absence among staff. are you then saying _ and absence among staff. are you then saying that _ and absence among staff. are you then saying that the _
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and absence among staff. are you then saying that the evidence - and absence among staff. are you then saying that the evidence of l then saying that the evidence of three record days of coronavirus infections, because of the omicron variant, and the last three days, four days, that statistics are not have been taken into account enough, comedy thing? t have been taken into account enough, comedy thing?— comedy thing? i would hope that they are bein: comedy thing? i would hope that they are being taken _ comedy thing? i would hope that they are being taken into _ comedy thing? i would hope that they are being taken into account - comedy thing? i would hope that they are being taken into account but - comedy thing? i would hope that they are being taken into account but it - are being taken into account but it does feel, the evidence always says make decisions early. that is what we would ask, that we don't leave it to the last minute to have absolute proof of what is happening and to be absolutely sure about what is going to happen. i personally think that at the moment we are pretty clear what is happening and we are pretty clear about what is going to happen. everybody needs to ask the government to really act as quickly as it can on the evidence it has. whatever that evidence is showing them, the scientists will be giving them, the scientists will be giving them the right advice. flan them, the scientists will be giving them the right advice.— them, the scientists will be giving them the right advice. can you paint a icture, them the right advice. can you paint a picture, patricia _ them the right advice. can you paint a picture, patricia of _ them the right advice. can you paint
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a picture, patricia of what _ them the right advice. can you paint a picture, patricia of what it - them the right advice. can you paint a picture, patricia of what it is - a picture, patricia of what it is like and some of the more overcrowded a&e i see you's units and the hospitals in england. —— icu. and the hospitals in england. -- icu. ~ :, �* :, , :, icu. we don't need to focus on emergency _ icu. we don't need to focus on emergency departments. - icu. we don't need to focus on emergency departments. we l icu. we don't need to focus on - emergency departments. we need to remember that the impact is across all of the secondary. it's in the community, mental health services, gp practices. but to move to your points, we know it there are a queuing ambulances. we know that people cannot get ambulances in time because they are so delayed. many of them are queuing or have sickness absence problems themselves and don't have enough staff. the emergency departments are overflowing. they've got too many patients in them for the number of beds. we cannot discharge patients “p beds. we cannot discharge patients up into the community because the service is in the community. and in social care already fall and act capacity. there are many places
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where particularly in london at the moment but spreading, as i say, where the capacity is breaking points now, and tomorrow days that we delay and continue to try to operate, the more difficult to get. we will have to end it there. thank you from the royal college of nursing. you are watching bbc news. a man has pleaded not guilty, to murdering the conservative mp, sir david amess. ali harbi ali, who's 25 and from north london, is accused of the stabbing,during a constitutency surgery in leigh—on—sea in essex, in october. at a hearing at the old bailey, he also denied preparing acts of terrorism. the date for his trial has been set for the 21st of march. details have emerged of the hours leading up to the biggest single loss of life in the english channel. at least 31 people died last month after their small boat capsized off the french coast. the bbc investigation has now identified 20 of those on board, all of whom were
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from iraqi kurdistan. 0ur breaking messages from those on the vessel paint a picture of total desperation. bbc�*s persian has the details. it was an overcrowded boat at the mercy of the channel's freezing water. 29 lives were lost that night and i bbc investigation has identified 20 of them, all from iraqi kurdistan. from the testimonies and messages to their friends and families, we can also piece together their tragic last few hours. this is the voice of 30—year—old... nearly five hours after the boat set off on its journey. nearly five hours after the boat set off on itsjourney. within 15 minutes of the message, the boat had completely submerged. 0nce
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minutes of the message, the boat had completely submerged. once in water, people desperately tried to contact friends. phones fall into the water before passengers can send the details. just hours later, all but two of at least 31 people are dead. through emergency response details, our investigation concludes that the boat was in french waters when it sank. in kurdistan, family still cannot find closure. this man lost his entire family on that boat. his wife and three children, the youngest of which is only seven years old. the french authorities have recovered their bodies. but he is still clinging to a desperate hope they might return. translation: now, i still don't believe it. they could be in a camp or a hospital. i don't believe anyone until i see it
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with my own eyes. if they bring the bodies, i will check all of them to know. but until then, bodies, i will check all of them to know. but untilthen, i bodies, i will check all of them to know. but until then, i want to believe that. t know. but untilthen, i want to believe that.— believe that. i went to kylie to find out what _ believe that. i went to kylie to find out what drives _ believe that. i went to kylie to find out what drives people . believe that. i went to kylie to find out what drives people to | believe that. i went to kylie to - find out what drives people to make these deadlyjourneys. this is the makeshift camp where most of those who are on the boat lived. this man and a group from around and say taking aboutjanie is playing and a group from around and say taking about janie is playing with death. when i ask about what is his plan, he says that there is a dinghy here, he is going to try tojump on it and try his chance to cross to the uk. this couple nearly died on their previous attempt to cross. she says she is doing this for her baby. translation: we says she is doing this for her baby. translation:— says she is doing this for her baby. translation: we will try again. our life here in this _ translation: we will try again. our life here in this cold _ translation: we will try again. our life here in this cold isn't _ translation: we will try again. our life here in this cold isn't far - life here in this cold isn't far better from life here in this cold isn't far betterfrom being in the life here in this cold isn't far
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better from being in the sea. life here in this cold isn't far betterfrom being in the sea. if life here in this cold isn't far better from being in the sea. if my baby was born, it would've been more difficult, but now i carry him or her with me, if i die, the baby dies at detail. tt’s her with me, ifi die, the baby dies at detail. �* , : her with me, ifi die, the baby dies at detail. �* , ., :, ., at detail. it's hard to imagine the level of desperation _ at detail. it's hard to imagine the level of desperation that - at detail. it's hard to imagine the level of desperation that drives i level of desperation that drives people to deadlyjourneys, but we don't much hope for a betterfuture, the loss of life isn't going to end. that report from the bbc�*s persian service there. much more coming up. stay with us now. high clive. today we see a lot of cloud across the country. that cloud, i think, for many of us is going to stay put overnight, and that will keep many areas frost free. that said, we've still got temperatures well down below freezing at the moment and some of the steeper scottish valleys. certainly across time attempt at the moment —7, it could be called by the end of the night. tomorrow, changes
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in the weather, an area of low pressure pushing a ban of rain in from the west. so fairly quickly we will see that cloud picking up with outbreaks of rain arriving in nail in northern ireland along with strengthening lands. eventually to the day, cloud and rain will spread its way northwards in these rates. out elsewhere, few breaks, a bit of frost, certainly in scotland and some of those deeper valleys. as we go through the latter part of the deck and the rain starts to move into some of those present scottish valleys, you can imagine things turning quite icy. there may be a speu turning quite icy. there may be a spell of freezing rain here, so some pretty nasty conditions possibly building up on the roads as we had to tomorrow evening across parts of scotland. that's the latest. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. the prime minister borisjohnson says there will not be any new coronavirus restrcitions in england, before christmas. it comes as chancellor rishi sunak announces a billion pound grant, for the struggling
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hospitality sector. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon announces new covid restrictions, and says all outdoor events will be limited to just 500 people from boxing day. further covid restrictions are expected in wales too — as a minister calls for the uk government to restart the furlough scheme. and as omicron spreads rapidly across the us — president biden prepares to ramp up the response there. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, celtic have called upon the spfl to bring forward the league's winter break
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and reschedule matches after new covid measures affecting sport were announced by first minister nicola sturgeon. it means there will effectively be no fans at the old firm match on the 2nd of january at celtic park. it'll be one of many top tier games in scotland with reduced crowds of 500 spectators. sporting events in the country will effectively be free of fans for up to 3 weeks from the 27th of december to halt the spread of coronavirus. st mirren have also requested their matches against celtic and rangers be postponed, following further positive covid tests. they're in discussions with the spfl. wales had already made the decision to ban spectators from sunday to attempt to control the virus. nicola sturgeon's announcement comes just a day after the premier league in england opted not to enforce a break on fixtures over the festive season. mangers have been speaking about that today. and one of them, chelsea manager thomas tuchel, who was critical of the decision not to postpone his side's weekend game against wolves, was asked if he was disaapointed with the decision. i don't want to give anybody the impression that i have a solution. i don't have a solution for the league in general. it was like my thoughts
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in general. it was like my thoughts in my speech was particularly for the last two days around the wolverhampton game and come to the wolverhampton game and come to the wolverhampton game, the my concern. it is the same concern because like it is the same concern because like i said, the guys are still out. liverpool assistant manager pep ljinders meanwhile says it's absurd that they have to play two games in four days, given the club is dealing with covid cases and injuries. he also questioned why the premier league's decision was left to club officials and not those with greater knowledge of the virus. for me, they are not the managers. the experts of the scientists and the doctors. we should follow their guidelines and they should be asked in the pre—really should ask them, not the managers, they should ask them. it all comes from position number one above everything. if there's one common behaviour in this pandemic over the last years that we
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always acted too late. always. and that we were from one health crisis into another. australia have added uncapped fast bowler scott boland to their squad for the third ashes test in melbourne. boland comes in as cover, while fellow pacemen pat cummins and josh hazelwood also return. as for england — they'll need to re—group after going 2—nil down yesterday. but england coach chris silverwood is sticking by his selections and would pick the same teams again. the experience that we are having, i was happy with the skill set but it's always going to be a divided opinion. you pick a team and not everyone agrees with you. i've got no problem with that. i think, you look at what we have in this test and i think it's very good. so, i have no problem with that, to be honest. a judge has found the former
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jockey graham gibbons was responsible for the fall that left fellow jockey freddy tylicki paralysed from the waist down. the high court ruled that gibbons' actions were reckless. the incident at kempton in october 2016 left freddy paralysed after his horse was brought down by the horse ridden by graham gibbons. the stewards on the night ruled the incident to be accidental. howeverjudge karen walden—smith ruled that, on the balance of probabilities, gibbons's actions during the race were "undertaken in reckless disregard for the safety of mr tylicki". formula 1 driver nicholas latifi has revealed he received death threats after crashing out of the abu dhabi grand prix. his wreckage meant a safety car had to be deployed, ultimately taking away the sizable gap lewis hamilton had built up over rival max verstappen. verstappen went on to win the race and the championship, after catching up with hamilton behind the safety car. latifi says he was shocked by the scale and tone of the hate and abuse he received.
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he added that he had expected some of it so deleted social media apps off his phone immediately after the race. we'll have more for you in sportsday at half past six. a three million pound fund is being made available to clubs and venues in wales — after it was announced all sporting events would be held behind closed doors from boxing day. the welsh government said the spectator ban would apply to all indoor, outdoor, professional and community sports events. one of the events is the welsh grand national at chepstow. it'll take place without spectators for the second successive season. let's talk to phil bell, executive director of the racecourse. thank you forjoining us. not good news. terrible news. iterr; news. terrible news. very disappointing, _ news. terrible news. very disappointing, to - news. terrible news. very disappointing, to be - news. terrible news. very. disappointing, to be honest. news. terrible news. very- disappointing, to be honest. i
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thought rather deflated. we've been working on it all day trying to resolve and that the customers know in the suppliers no that in the last 2436 hrs that it was going that route, saddle a bit of time to get my head around it but in reality, when you wake up after a good nights sleep a look at what has happened, it is very disappointing. for the second year running, it's the biggest race in wales and the traditional social event for people in this region and not necessarily just racing fans. friends and family for christmas celebration in the open air and it's a huge blow that it's not taking place.— it's not taking place. hard but do ou it's not taking place. hard but do you understand _ it's not taking place. hard but do you understand why _ it's not taking place. hard but do you understand why it _ it's not taking place. hard but do you understand why it is - it's not taking place. hard but do - you understand why it is happening? we do, we've worked with the welsh government very closely throw covid—19 and we've been very generous given some grants for the
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racecourses for wells. and we understand where they are coming from. particularly in the political argument about it. they have deemed this to be the case will accept that at the moment and we are talking to them about a compensation package as well for loss of revenue. we just hope it is not co—on too long. haifa hope it is not co-on too long. how much money _ hope it is not co-on too long. how much money is — hope it is not co-on too long. how much money is gone _ hope it is not co—on too long. how much money is gone up in smoke than? we've solved around 6000 tickets of room £35 each. and around 800 hospitality packages around mark, different price ranges. significant amounts of revenue there. never comes to the races, they might have a drink and have a bet, so that revenue is all gone. that £3 million package, we would receive a
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considerable amount. do you believe then that the articular amount. do you believe then that the particular interests _ amount. do you believe then that the particular interests of _ amount. do you believe then that the particular interests of your _ amount. do you believe then that the particular interests of your sector - particular interests of your sector will get the kind of attention that perhaps they may not be getting throughout this pandemic? that is one of our aims _ throughout this pandemic? that is one of our aims down _ throughout this pandemic? that is one of our aims down here - throughout this pandemic? that is one of our aims down here is - throughout this pandemic? that is one of our aims down here is to i throughout this pandemic? that is | one of our aims down here is to get horse racing higher up the agenda. we have known for its rugby team and its football side and at the most popular levels of sport. butjockeys and trainers well on the national stage, john bowen, james bowen, jockeys, williams won the welsh national and they are doing very well. it is very encouraging that we've now got an all party group in the senate to be able to discuss horse racing and we've also got the short term issue with the welsh national, we do hope longer—term, we
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are seeing a little bit higher up the pecking order. we bring a lot of people into the country for visiting it for tourism. and hopefully, there is a bit of light at the end of the tunnel for the longer—term. phil. tunnel for the longer-term. phil, aood luck tunnel for the longer-term. phil, good luck to _ tunnel for the longer-term. phil, good luck to you _ tunnel for the longer-term. phil, good luck to you and _ tunnel for the longer-term. phil, good luck to you and all- tunnel for the longer-term. phil, good luck to you and all the - tunnel for the longer—term. phil, good luck to you and all the staff there. executive of the race course. thank you for that. court papers show the uk health security agency first heard about discrepancies in covid pcr test results at a laboratory one month before stopping nhs tests from being processed there. thousands of people in south west england — whose tests were processed by the the immensa lab in wolverhampton — were wrongly told they didn't have coronavirus, and are likely to have then spread it to others. our health correspondent, matthew hill, reports. her grandmother died after contracting covid—19 at this care home in gloucestershire. other residents got it for members of staff while given the all clear in
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wolverhampton.— staff while given the all clear in wolverhampton. staff while given the all clear in wolverhamton. , wolverhampton. untilthen, we 'ust thou~ht wolverhampton. untilthen, we 'ust thought she — wolverhampton. untilthen, we 'ust thought she would i wolverhampton. untilthen, we 'ust thought she would pull i wolverhampton. untilthen, we 'ust thought she would pull through e wolverhampton. until then, we just thought she would pull through and| thought she would pull through and get moved and that would be that. i cannot answer honestly whether other people died but i do know other residents were affected and contracted covid—19 as a part of this. contracted covid-19 as a part of this. ~ :, _ , , , :, this. went to the system set up to hrotect this. went to the system set up to protect your _ this. went to the system set up to protect your safety _ this. went to the system set up to protect your safety first _ this. went to the system set up to protect your safety first snow - this. went to the system set up to | protect your safety first snow there was a problem? they started processing nhs testing on the 2nd of september but from day one, they were giving out false negatives and an estimated 43,000 until the health security agency stopped them from processing nhs tests on the 12th of october. these government court documents showed that on the 14th of september, the you uk was informed of an unusual spike and people testing positive and lateral flow tests but then negative on pcr. but instead of closing the lad then, took a month to discover that there was a technical issue and had to stop them from processing samples.
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some experts say that delay costs scores of lives.— scores of lives. this should have been flagged — scores of lives. this should have been flagged very _ scores of lives. this should have been flagged very soon - scores of lives. this should have been flagged very soon after - scores of lives. this should have been flagged very soon after it l been flagged very soon after it started to arise and then there should've been procedures in place to at least let people know what was going but from the point, they give no result and how quickly it would turn around. there were no checks to see how compared with other labs and thatis how compared with other labs and that is something that has since
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changed. that is something that has since chan . ed. :, , that is something that has since chanced. :,, i. that is something that has since chanced. :,, ,, . that is something that has since chanced. :,, i. ., :, changed. people, you and me on twitter who _ changed. people, you and me on twitter who are _ changed. people, you and me on twitter who are finding _ changed. people, you and me on twitter who are finding this - changed. people, you and me on twitter who are finding this stuff| twitter who are finding this stuff out and — twitter who are finding this stuff out and tweeting about it and eventually government spoke out and when did _ eventually government spoke out and when did we become reliant on citizens— when did we become reliant on citizens to _ when did we become reliant on citizens to check the companies unaccredited with a hunch for contracts _ unaccredited with a hunch for contracts are delivery. we unaccredited with a hunch for contracts are delivery.- unaccredited with a hunch for contracts are delivery. we do not know what _ contracts are delivery. we do not know what exactly _ contracts are delivery. we do not know what exactly went - contracts are delivery. we do not know what exactly went wrong i contracts are delivery. we do not know what exactly went wrong in j know what exactly went wrong in these labs, but they were caught in an inquiry by the agency. they say they cannot comment while the inquiry goes on all those affected were contacted as soon as possible. but the question remains whether or not that could or should have happened much earlier. the prime minister borisjohnson says there will not be any new coronavirus restrcitions in england, before christmas. it comes as chancellor rishi sunak announces a billion pound grant, for the struggling
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hospitality sector. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon announces new covid restrictions, and says all outdoor events will be limited to just 500 people from boxing day. ajury in new york is considering its verdict in the sex trafficking trial of the british socialite, ghislaine maxwell. in its closing argument, the prosecution called her a "sophisticated predator who had willingly assisted in abuse committed by the late paedophile, jeffrey epstein. gillaine maxwell denies the charges against her. barbara plett usher is following developments. jurors have to decide which version of events to believe. the prosecution has argued that ghislaine maxwell was crucial tojeffrey epstein's operation. they say that she made the teenagers feel comfortable. she was posh, smiling, age acceptable, a cover really for mr epstein's behaviour, and that she knew exactly what she was doing when she sent them into a massage room with him. the defence says, "no, she didn't know because mr epstein kept secrets from her. and in fact, she's being
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punished for his crimes. she's a scapegoat." the other issue is the credibility of the four women who have accused ghislaine maxwell of complicity in the abuse. the defence says they didn't mention her alleged role in their initial interviews with law enforcement, and they're only doing so now because they're motivated by money. the prosecution says the similarities in their stories actually show the playbook by which ms maxwell operated to recruit and groom them, and that, in fact, these women had already received payouts from jeffrey epstein estate. so if their motivation was money, they wouldn't have gone through the hell of testifying at this trial. we don't know how long it's going to take for the jury to come back with a verdict, but we may get one by christmas, which is ghislaine maxwell's 60th birthday. what's thought to be the largest divorce settlement in british legal history has been agreed. a high courtjudge has awarded 725 million dollars to princess haya ofjordan,
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in a long—running dispute with herformer husband, the ruler of dubai. the princess fled to britain with her children in 2019, saying she was in fear of her life. our security correspondent, frank gardner told us more about the settlement. this is pretty much the culmination of a long—running court battle between where the worlds richest men who was up for the huge racing world and for dubai and the prime minister of the united emirates and the youngest of the six wives, not ex—wife who is the daughter of the king of hussein ofjordan. she fled to britain with her two children sing she was terrified. she was getting some very sinister things. a gun was placed in her room with a bullet on it. a helicopter landed on the wall of her palace with someone saying he had orders to take her to a prison out in the desert. all
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because she said she had discovered what happened to two other daughters of the rule of dubai could been abducted and now, he has denied this by the high court here and britain stood the soap. it didn't help her case that she had an affair with her bodyguard and when that was discovered, he was understandably very angry and wrote a poem called you lived, you died and he interpreted that as a death threat. she fled to britain where she continued to get threats from anonymous people saying that we can reach you wherever. she took the case to court to try to safeguard and put in place that she has now today. huge financial settlements to safeguard her security and that of her two children because she worries that harm will come to her and they will be abducted. i've only ever wished to provide for my children and i have nothing more to say about this case.
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tens of thousands of people who tested positive for coronavirus will be self—isolating away from friends and family over christmas — be it abroad, in student accomodation or in a quarantine hotel. it can be a lonely time, but two men from northern ireland who have to isolate in barcelona after testing positive for covid, are determined to make the most of their experience by walking 15 kilometers in their tiny hotel rooms, all in aid of charity. they've called it a room—a—thon. let's talk to andrew mcanallen. and also i'm joined by his friend ryan harling, who is isolating in a separate room — they both were in the city for a work trip. 0k, ok, who's idea was it to do this? 0k, who's idea was it to do this? it was an idea that we were kind of
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sprawling into making and so at the end of ourtrip, sprawling into making and so at the end of our trip, with the cooperation and brand organisations, we found out we were positive. when we went to the quarantine area, we were there for eight weeks of confinement to the hotel rooms. and i thought, how do we make the biggest impact with the smallest space and we decided that because our health service is under such scrutiny this year, especially in ireland, and me is an organisation of northern ireland, we have been struggling and that is really where the idea came around. and this
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seemed like the best way to go of it. it seemed like the best way to go of it. :, :, , :, seemed like the best way to go of it. it works, no question about that and you are — it. it works, no question about that and you are taking _ it. it works, no question about that and you are taking part _ it. it works, no question about that and you are taking part in - it. it works, no question about that and you are taking part in this. - it. it works, no question about that and you are taking part in this. lay| and you are taking part in this. lay out exactly what it is that you do when you're doing your room —athon. by when you're doing your room —athon. by being the dauphin sea world. and walking _ by being the dauphin sea world. and walking down the room for hours and i've walking down the room for hours and i've been— walking down the room for hours and i've been enjoying the podcast and plenty of— i've been enjoying the podcast and plenty of music than just six tested by friends, — plenty of music than just six tested by friends, walking on sunshine etc. it's by friends, walking on sunshine etc. it's really— by friends, walking on sunshine etc. it's really been phenomenal and for the public — it's really been phenomenal and for the public. and now, we are on the bbc and _ the public. and now, we are on the bbc and so — the public. and now, we are on the bbc and so it's all a bit surreal. yet, _ bbc and so it's all a bit surreal. yet, it — bbc and so it's all a bit surreal. yet, it has _ bbc and so it's all a bit surreal. yet, it has been good. how bbc and so it's all a bit surreal. yet, it has been good.- bbc and so it's all a bit surreal. yet, it has been good. how far do ou yet, it has been good. how far do you think you've _ yet, it has been good. how far do you think you've walked _ yet, it has been good. how far do you think you've walked then, - you think you've walked then,
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andrew? t you think you've walked then, andrew? s �* : s you think you've walked then, andrew? ~' �* . ,, ., andrew? i think i've walked above 14,000. 15 — andrew? i think i've walked above 14,000. 15 k _ andrew? i think i've walked above 14,000. 15 k is — andrew? i think i've walked above 14,000. 15 k is our _ andrew? i think i've walked above 14,000. 15 k is our goal _ andrew? i think i've walked above 14,000. 15 k is our goal and - andrew? i think i've walked above 14,000. 15 k is our goal and we i 14,000.15 k is our goal and we actually came out 19,000 set ups and £1900 that we have been trained to do for that philosophy and negative covid—19 situations and that, that is the method to the madness. t5 a is the method to the madness. is a brilliant method and i wonderful madness because you have raised so much money and ijust madness because you have raised so much money and i just wonder, madness because you have raised so much money and ijust wonder, given the situation again, would you do it? this the situation again, would you do it? : , the situation again, would you do it? ~ , ., , ,., y the situation again, would you do it? y- the situation again, would you do it? y the situation again, would you do it2 y ., it? as in the opportunity to come to barcelona to — it? as in the opportunity to come to barcelona to raise _ it? as in the opportunity to come to barcelona to raise funds? _ it? as in the opportunity to come to barcelona to raise funds? raising i barcelona to raise funds? raising funds by walking _ barcelona to raise funds? raising funds by walking of _ barcelona to raise funds? raising funds by walking of steps - barcelona to raise funds? raising funds by walking of steps in - barcelona to raise funds? raising funds by walking of steps in your| funds by walking of steps in your own room was blue and a heartbeat. to walk the four and a day and i guess, we could make it harder and
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i'm certainly open to it. we will keep on pushing, for sure because for a great cause and yes, thankfully we are feeling healthy being double faxed and so, yeah. that is actually the main thing that you two guys are ok, given that you self—isolate. andrew, final question. ijust wonder if self—isolate. andrew, final question. i just wonder if this self—isolate. andrew, final question. ijust wonder if this is something that you will recommend to anyone else who is having the self—isolate is going to christmas? i don't know what it is, but i always have good ideas when i'm in the shower. and i called o'brien in his hotel room and we were both in separate rooms and we said, this idea obviously, we'rejust doing it, but it's an idea that could be spread and maybe the room —athon idea to catch on but i say that with the understanding that we are quite
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lucky and being double vaccinated and if there's any message, that would like to get out as part of this campaign, it's to get out there, get you so vaccinated and get yourself boosted and we can slow the spread for this christmas. teetett yourself boosted and we can slow the spread for this christmas.— spread for this christmas. well done and it's great — spread for this christmas. well done and it's great to _ spread for this christmas. well done and it's great to talk _ spread for this christmas. well done and it's great to talk to _ spread for this christmas. well done and it's great to talk to you - spread for this christmas. well done and it's great to talk to you both. . and it's great to talk to you both. thank you forjoining us. what's being described as the largest ever fossil of a giant millipede, has been discovered by chance, on a beach in northumberland. analysis by cambridge university suggests the creature was more than two and a half metres long, and may have hunted other animals forfood around 326 million years ago. then, the north—east of england, would have had a tropical climate. dr neil davies from cambridge university told us more about the discovery. discovered by chance. we were out on the beach,
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just looking around at the rocks for a bit of a geological holiday, and as the sun was setting we saw that there was a boulder that had fallen from the cliff face, split down the middle. and then just looked inside and realised there was a big fossil there. so i went back the following morning and, yeah, we realise that it was a gigantic millipede in the middle of this rock. because we knew there were these large millipedes around at the time because they've left trackways and there are small fragments of these fossils. it's just very rare to find a whole one. so we didn't really believe what it was to begin with. so we took photos and sent them around various experts, and then realise that, yes, it is indeed to this giant millipede. so we got permission and then went back and collected it later on in the year. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. yes, it has been a lovely still end to the day across east sussex for the setting sun on the horizon and with this weather watch picture sent us the last half hour or so, you can
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see a sun pillow. the sprayed area just going to the sky above the sun there. the satellite picture has a lump of cloud that is off to the west of this is an area of low pressure that is going to be coming over the next 24 hours and bring a change to our weather patterns. for the time being, we have a lot of cloud across the country and across the central and eastern england will bring the frost, temperatures do not have to fall very fast before we see a frost because just above freezing. in some of the deeper values in scotland, temperatures at —80 degrees the moment sets a cold night already here. looking at the weather charts and wednesday, we see the weather system moving in off the atlantic and rain develops quite quickly northern ireland by strengthening winds. these will bring in some mild air in the rain tends to spread its way northwards and eastward through the day and i think it's going to be pretty cloudy but there will be some brighter spells for a time to be pretty cloudy but there will be some
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brighter spells for a time at least across eastern england. as we get into wednesday evening and with deeper values in scotland, temperatures could actually be below freezing and so we could have some very icy conditions for a time with them the roads in scotland. that is something to bear in mind and low pressures and south—westerly winds, patch us to start but we're looking at another cloudy day and heaviest and most persistent across western areas. in my temperatures of 13 degrees. colderairand areas. in my temperatures of 13 degrees. colder air and for shetland, in the far north of scotland, colder air will be there. and we have cloudy weather moving in so pretty grey day with mist and fog patches, another band of rain pushing and to the south and some thatis pushing and to the south and some that is quite heavy. with temperatures still on them outside for the time of year. now, into friday, and from fred and saturday,
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christmas day. gift of your contrasts over the half of the uk and is that colder air press to move in we have increasing muscle sunshine and for some, it is possible to see a white christmas and some that rain bumps into that clear from the south and you may see a bit of snow across the hills. that the latest.
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at six: christmas is not cancelled, says the prime minister, but he's not ruling out new restrictions in england after that. boris johnson says the situation remains finely balanced but there's not enough evidence to justify any tougher measures before christmas. but in scotland big new year's eve parties are cancelled as tighter restrictions are announced from boxing day. none of these are being proposed lightly, but we do consider them necessary to help stem the increasing cases, safeguard health and protect the nhs, the emergency services, and the economy. wales and northern ireland will considerfurther wales and northern ireland will consider further measures tomorrow. meanwhile, there was for help of across the uk. the chancellor unveils a £1 billion fun for the
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hospitality and leisure sectors, already losing

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