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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 20, 2021 10:00am-11:31am GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the uk government is being urged to set out plans to tackle surging cases of coronavirus, sources tell the bbc three options forfurther restrictions in england are being looked at. it comes as governments across the world look to bolster restrictions, amid fresh warnings over the rapid spread of the omicron variant. more pressure on the british prime minister, borisjohnson, over whether he broke lockdown rules — a picture is published of him at a gathering in the garden of 10 downing street. this is a workplace, and it is consistent, exactly what you see as consistent,
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with the rules that applied to workplaces. a plea for urgent supplies in the philippines, as the number of people killed by super typhoon rai rises to more than 200. chile picks a left—wing candidate as its youngest ever leader, beating a far—right rival in an incredibly polarising election. 19—year—old tennis star emma raducanu has been named bbc sports personality of the year — following an incredible year that saw her become britain's first women's grand slam singles champion in 44 years. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. borisjohnson is facing calls to bring in tighter measures over the christmas period to stem the rapid rise in cases of the omicron variant of coronavirus.
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scientists say urgent action is needed to stop a rapid influx of patients into hospital. but the prime minister is facing strong oppostion on further restrictions from within his own party. the prime minister is reportedly meeting advisers today and civil servants have prepared a menu of three options for covid restrictions ranging in severity. though it is not clear exactly what those options are. yesterday there were 82,886 new coronavirus cases recorded in the uk and over the last week a record number of daily cases have been recorded on several occasions. the leading infectious disease expert in the us, anthony fauci, has warned that christmas travel will increase the spread of the 0micron coronavirus variant meanwhile israel has banned its citizens from travelling to the united states without special permission.
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and germany has implemented a ban on most travellers from the uk entering the country has come into force. only german citizens are allowed to travel to the the country from the uk, and they will need to quarantine for m days. france introduced similar restrictions on saturday. record numbers of people are continuing to come forward for their booster vaccine, with just days to go before christmas. but daily covid cases have also reached record highs. many are wondering if further restrictions are needed in england to slow the spread of 0micron. the health secretary, sajid javid, hasn't ruled out possible new measures. there were no guarantees in this pandemic, he said. devolved administrations are also getting additional covid funding. the uk government said it would double the amount available to help administrations take precautions they feel necessary to keep people safe.
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but the first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, said on twitter that they needed much more action and support urgently from the uk government. the rapid spread of the 0micron variant has seen london declare a major incident. hospital staff absences in the capital are on the rise. if you look in london, which is the epicentre of where the 0micron variant is, we are getting a very significant increase in staff absences. so last week, staff absences in londonjumped from 1900 at the beginning of the week, to a700 by the thursday of last week, and we know it's gone up since. so we are coming under real pressure in terms of the number of staff we have got off work. and that means, given how busy we are with all the other things, that means we are under very, very significant pressure. there are concerns, too, about pressure on schools in the new year, with staff shortages. from today, the government is urging former teachers to apply to join the workforce from january.
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there is still uncertainty over how much serious illness will be caused by the 0micron variant. any decisions about further restrictions will need to be weighed against the cost to the economy, society and wider mental health. helena wilkinson, bbc news. the uk prime minister is facing fresh questions about alleged breaches of lockdown rules at downing street. the guardian newspaper has published this photograph showing borisjohnson and members of staff with wine and cheese in the number ten garden in may last year. at the time, in england, you could only meet one other person, in an outdoor public place, if you kept two metres apart. a government spokesperson has described the event as a "wo k r meeting"
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0ur chief political correspondent, adam fleming, told us the latest on what's being said at westminster about the calls to bring in tighter measures over the christmas period. civil servants have prepared a menu about future covid restrictions in england. it has been described as low, medium or high. we do not know the details of what is in each category but we know ministers have yet to choose an option. they are waiting for more conclusive data about how the 0micron wave is progressing, how serious it is and how many people could end up in hospital as a result. the government has also been given scientific advice from the search committee at the end of last week and those minutes and those papers were published on saturday and they show you what a range of scenarios are being presented to
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ministers up deal with the rising cases. scientists are not there are lots of uncertainties. it seems to me as far as ministers are concerned the data and projections are too uncertain for them to pick from that menu of three options.— uncertain for them to pick from that menu of three options. another day, another photograph _ menu of three options. another day, another photograph about _ menu of three options. another day, another photograph about an - menu of three options. another day, i another photograph about an apparent gathering in downing street. how damaging is this one? it is gathering in downing street. how damaging is this one?— damaging is this one? it is a very aood damaging is this one? it is a very good question — damaging is this one? it is a very good question because _ damaging is this one? it is a very good question because the - damaging is this one? it is a very - good question because the government is sticking to this slain that this government gathering of the prime minister and his wife and ministers in may 2020 was within the rules because these were work colleagues or people who live in downing street having a drink as part of their working day, which was not restricted as part of the rules in place at the time. that is an interpretation that was shared this morning by the deputy prime minister dominic raab. the
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morning by the deputy prime minister dominic raab— dominic raab. the number 10 garden there is used — dominic raab. the number 10 garden there is used for— dominic raab. the number 10 garden there is used for work _ dominic raab. the number 10 garden there is used for work meetings. - there is used for work meetings. they— there is used for work meetings. they were — there is used for work meetings. they were throughout the day to which _ they were throughout the day to which the — they were throughout the day to which the picture relates and as with many— which the picture relates and as with many places of work, particularly if you can think how hard _ particularly if you can think how hard they— particularly if you can think how hard they are working under the various— hard they are working under the various pleasures of the week, they would _ various pleasures of the week, they would sometimes have a drink, and that is— would sometimes have a drink, and that is what— would sometimes have a drink, and that is what you can see. that is primarily— that is what you can see. that is primarily after the work meetings of the day _ primarily after the work meetings of the da . . , primarily after the work meetings of the da . ., , ., �* , the day. that is the government's interpretation _ the day. that is the government's interpretation of _ the day. that is the government's interpretation of the _ the day. that is the government's interpretation of the rules - the day. that is the government's interpretation of the rules having | interpretation of the rules having been followed but public opinion might take a different view because people were going through quite a hard time at that time and as the politics it is another opportunity for labour to make the allegation that there is one rule for the rest of us under different role for the people who the rules. here is the shadow chancellor. we people who the rules. here is the shadow chancellor.— shadow chancellor. we need leadership — shadow chancellor. we need leadership from _ shadow chancellor. we need leadership from this - shadow chancellor. we need - leadership from this government instead _ leadership from this government instead of hiding away, not attending cobra meetings and breaking their own rules. it is very difficult _ breaking their own rules. it is very difficult for — breaking their own rules. it is very difficult for the prime minister to show— difficult for the prime minister to show the — difficult for the prime minister to show the leadership this country
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requires — show the leadership this country requires when people rightly conclude that the prime minister thinks _ conclude that the prime minister thinks it— conclude that the prime minister thinks it is— conclude that the prime minister thinks it is one rule for him and another— thinks it is one rule for him and another for— thinks it is one rule for him and another for everybody else. so, yes, the other question _ another for everybody else. so, yes, the other question will _ another for everybody else. so, yes, the other question will be _ another for everybody else. so, yes, the other question will be does - another for everybody else. so, yes, the other question will be does this. the other question will be does this gathering in may 2020 get added to the list of other alleged gatherings that are being investigated by the senior civil servant sue gray is her inquiry very much focused on claims around christmas parties last year rather than summer gatherings? dr leon danon is an expert in infectious disease epidemiology and modelling at bristol university. he sits on spi—m, the scientific pandemic influenza modelling group, which reports to sage, the government's scientific advisors. he is speaking in a personal capacity. let's talk about the modelling because the decisions is based on
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modelling. talk us through what is the worst case scenario and what assumptions that is based on. the worst case — assumptions that is based on. tue: worst case scenario, assumptions that is based on. tte: worst case scenario, up assumptions that is based on. t"te: worst case scenario, up to assumptions that is based on. t'te: worst case scenario, up to 6000 deaths i think a day, that is based on some pessimistic scenarios on severity rates and probably realistic interpretations of the number of the doubling of cases and how that is going to go over time, and what is uncertain are the severity rates but it is important to note that the doubling is pretty well understood at the moment and consistent over the last two to three weeks so every time we allow that doubling to happen we are kind of hoping that the severity is going to drop by a factor of two. so even
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if the severity is lower than these kind of bad outcomes that we are seeing we are expecting it to be quite low at the number of cases in hospitals and the number of deaths is going to stay current, constant, so a situation. t is going to stay current, constant, so a situation.— so a situation. i want to ask about what might _ so a situation. i want to ask about what might be _ so a situation. i want to ask about what might be the _ so a situation. i want to ask about what might be the best _ so a situation. i want to ask about what might be the best case - so a situation. i want to ask about. what might be the best case scenario as 0micron is, as you said, the body was less severe, and if the boosters get rolled out, what would be the best case scenario? the get rolled out, what would be the best case scenario?— get rolled out, what would be the best case scenario? the figures you auoted are best case scenario? the figures you quoted are probably _ best case scenario? the figures you quoted are probably reasonable, i quoted are probably reasonable, about 600 cases a day or 600 deaths about 600 cases a day or 600 deaths a day. the severity would have to be much lower than what we are seeing in south africa and expecting to see here for best case scenario, for the number of hospitalisations to be
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flat. this is on the back of usual winter pressures on the nhs and the delta variant circulating in the country. there is very little headroom for the number of severe cases to go up. headroom for the number of severe cases to go uo— cases to go up. they appear to be discussin: cases to go up. they appear to be discussing a _ cases to go up. they appear to be discussing a menu _ cases to go up. they appear to be discussing a menu of _ cases to go up. they appear to be discussing a menu of three - cases to go up. they appear to be | discussing a menu of three options ranging in increasing severity of how to deal with this latest outbreak. what would be those options? t outbreak. what would be those 0 tions? ., �* outbreak. what would be those otions? ., �* ~ ., ., outbreak. what would be those otions? ~ ., ., ., options? i don't know. i am not lookin: options? i don't know. i am not looking at— options? i don't know. i am not looking at that _ options? i don't know. i am not looking at that in _ options? i don't know. i am not looking at that in lots _ options? i don't know. i am not looking at that in lots of - options? i don't know. i am not looking at that in lots of detail. | looking at that in lots of detail. we are looking at what we expect people to do over the coming couple of weeks and we are looking at
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trying to assess people's behaviour over christmas to get some of these unknown factors but we haven't got the specific scenarios that you are talking about. the specific scenarios that you are talking about-— the specific scenarios that you are talking about. the specific scenarios that you are talkinuabout. ., , ., , , talking about. what should people be doinu ? t talking about. what should people be doing? try to — talking about. what should people be doing? try to take — talking about. what should people be doing? try to take as _ talking about. what should people be doing? try to take as many _ doing? try to take as many precautions _ doing? try to take as many precautions as _ doing? try to take as many precautions as possible. in| doing? try to take as many . precautions as possible. in the survey we have been running at bristol it shows people are taking things quite seriously. 80% of people who responded had said they are going to take some sort of precautions over christmas. last year we looked at how households with next and so that if we allowed lots and lots of mixing between her we would potentially have quite bad outcomes in terms of the number of cases. this year it is a similar kind of scenario but at least we have some things at our disposal, lateral flow tests. nearly 50% of the population is boosted. notjust
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double vaccinated. there are some things in our favour. double vaccinated. there are some things in ourfavour. unfortunately the 0micron variant is spreading so quickly that people are at risk and people are taking it seriously. unfortunately we are a bit tight for time. t unfortunately we are a bit tight for time. , . i unfortunately we are a bit tight for time-_ i am _ unfortunately we are a bit tight for time._ i am sorry - unfortunately we are a bit tight for time._ i am sorry not| time. i understand. i am sorry not to be able — time. i understand. i am sorry not to be able to _ time. i understand. i am sorry not to be able to ask— time. i understand. i am sorry not to be able to ask you _ time. i understand. i am sorry not to be able to ask you more - to be able to ask you more questions. news just newsjust in, moderna announcing preliminary booster data and they have updated their strategy to address the 0micron variant. quite a lot of data coming out from moderna but the headlines probably are that a booster dose of the moderna vaccine appears to increase 0micron neutralising antibody levels
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approximately 80 threefold, which would suggest that he booster dose of the moderna vaccine does a pretty good job of helping to protect against severe disease from 0micron. moderna has also said it is going to continue to deliver an 0micron specific variant vaccine that it expects to put into clinical trials in the early 2022, so moderna working on an 0micron specific variant vaccine that it hopes to put into clinical trials early in the new year. i will bring you more news on that as i get it. a new covid drug designed to reduce the risk of vulnerable patients needing hospital treatment will be offered on the nhs in england from today.
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sotrovimab is an antibody given as a transfusion to treat people in high risk groups. it will be offered initially in england, before being rolled out across the uk. high—risk individuals will be offered this new infusion in addition to the oral tablets they are already being offered to reduce the chance of developing severe disease. the headlines on bbc news... the uk government is being urged to set out plans to tackle surging cases of coronavirus. sources tell the bbc three options of increasing levels of severity have been prepared. it's as governments across the world look to bolster restrictions, with fresh fears over the rapid spread of the 0micron variant. a photo has been published of british prime minister, borisjohnson, his wife and staff members gathering in the garden of 10 downing street during a nationwide lockdown. ministers say no rules were broken.
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totte n ha m tottenham hotspur�*s european campaign for the season is over. this is after uefa awarded a 3— victory in the final europa conference league group match on monday. spurs were unable to fulfil the fixture on december the 9th due to a number of covid—19 cases in the squad and as a result they finished third in the group. rennes top it. tottenham hotspur�*s european campaign for the season is over. the leading infectious disease expert in the united states, dr anthony fauci, has warned that christmas travel will increase the spread of the 0micron covid—19 variant, even among the fully vaccinated. dr fauci said that on current trends the spread of 0micron could put
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serious stresses on us hospitals. governments in europe are also watching the rapid spread of 0micron and debating the introduction of further restrictions to keep the infection rates low. mark lobel reports. testing times in florida — for those waiting to find out if they have the virus. the southern state's republican governor has rejected federal mask and vaccine mandates as its health department reports a doubling of infections and higher hospitalisation rates over the past week. it's going to make an inconvenience but, i mean, florida's not been good about the mask mandate. so, you know, these are the consequences. it's crazy. i wish people got vaccinated. we have so many people in this country who are eligible to be l vaccinated who have not yet been vaccinated, and that's _ going to be a real problem| for stress on the hospitals. there's a surge in new york, too.
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new reported case on a 70 average — astounding growth. this is the area obviously of tremendous concern. but again, we have tools to fight back. president biden is set to address americans on tuesday to unveil new measures to defeat the growing 0micron threat. germany has become the latest european country to ban most travellers from britain to try to slow the spread of the 0micron variant. from monday, german nationals and residents will still be allowed to enter from the uk if they have a negative test and quarantine for two weeks — regardless of whether they have been vaccinated. as covid surges across europe, one of the many protests against state action to combat the pandemic took place in greece. here, not everyone is a believer in the power of vaccines. in a country with a comparably low vaccination rate and fines for over 60s who avoid the jab
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from next month. at this vigil in austria, people mark over 13,400 covid deaths there. as it's announced their lockdown for the unvaccinated will ease for the holiday season as cases fall. but a full lockdown remains under way in the netherlands — until at least mid january. and it's already proving tough for some. translation: i hope that we will tackle it well and in a month - we are further when that booster campaign gets going a bit. but you sometimes miss the long—term vision — that is frustrating. you can no longer plan ahead. that is annoying, i think. but planning ahead remains difficult. with studies into the severity of the new variant ongoing and signs surges are beginning to dissipate in a few countries. the global picture remains mixed. mark lobel, bbc news.
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the netherlands hasjust gone back into a full national lockdown to prevent the spread of the 0micron variant. 0ur correspondent anna holligan has more from the hague. so, this is usually one of the busiest crossroads in the hague. it would normally be teeming with cyclists. and you can see there is some traffic but not many places for people to go. all of the schools have been closed early for christmas, people are being asked to work from home, bars, restaurants, nonessential shops are all closed, so no christmas shopping or hot chocolate in the cafes around here for at least another month now. how are people responding? well, with frustration and resignation, actually. there are so many people heading into work todayjust to throw away all the food in restaurants, like this one behind me. they were hoping to make up for some of the losses incurred during the last year over christmas, which is normally their busiest time of year. and that's not happening now. there is also frustration because they saw princess amalia, the heir to the dutch
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throne, celebrate her 18th birthday a few weeks ago. and there are actually a lot of people here saying, "well, if amalia can have 21 guests at her birthday party, why can't we come together at christmas?" it's becoming increasingly clear, right across the continent, that coming together is going to be riskier and harder than anyone would have wished for. and here in the netherlands, the extra consternation that the booster programme has been relatively slow to roll out. so, at the moment, only about 9% of people have had their boosterjabs, and along with that it's the fact that the dutch don't really like chaos. the very fact that these restrictions are being introduced, last minute, a few days away from christmas, really underlines the urgency here, and the concerns about the unknowns about omicron transmissibility and its potential to possibly evade the existing immunity we have all built up. the death toll from the strongest typhoon to hit the philippines this year has surpassed 200.
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typhoon rai has left survivors pleading for urgent supplies of drinking water and food. the philippine red cross describe the scene in some coastal areas as "complete carnage" — after the destruction of homes, hospitals and schools. our correspondent howard johnson is in the capital, manila. scenes of utter devastation. is up—to—date with what you are hearing. up-to-date with what you are hearinu. ~ ., ., ., , up-to-date with what you are hearin. _ . ., ., ., , , hearing. what we are hearing is this bi icture hearing. what we are hearing is this big picture emerging. _ hearing. what we are hearing is this big picture emerging. it _ hearing. what we are hearing is this big picture emerging. it hit - hearing. what we are hearing is this big picture emerging. it hit the - big picture emerging. it hit the philippines on thursday, the typhoon, and we are hearing people's stories. moving across the country and each of those landmasses having their own emergencies so it is like nine national disaster rolled into one. people need fuel, water, food, one. people need fuel, water, food, on different islands and because of the complicated geography the
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philippines has more than 7000 islands and they are very hard to get to and some of them have lost electricity supplies, internet connections, so we are really only now beginning to see the full extent of the damage caused by the storm. what was surprising about it was how it sustained its power and dumped a lot of water on all of these islands. one by one. never really letting up until it left the philippine area of responsibility. more than 200 people have died. is that figure expected to rise? the number is that figure expected to rise? t“te: number is expected to rise because we are only slowly beginning to hear from each of the different provinces. we know it hit one island first that has pictures where you can see absolute devastation. two people on the island, according to one news source, it has not been verified, died of dehydration. this
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humanitarian crisis is now emerging where people need these supplies. we have heard over the weekend the international federation of the red cross are hoping to raise $20 million to support the release effort and today we had the british government are donated nearly $1 million to support that. we are seeing the philippine red cross helping to hand out aid to supply shelters to people and also we are hearing from the philippine president who committed $40 million to help with the relief effort. howeverjohnson thank you for that update. chile has elected the left—wing candidate gabriel boric as their new president. the former student activist won 55% of the vote, well ahead of his far—right rival, jose antonio kast. our south america correspondent katy watson sent this report. within minutes of polls closing,
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the fans started gathering. the victory was quick and definitive. boric�*s supporters filled the streets of central santiago, happy their man had won. my daughter will grow up in a freer country, this woman told me. with rights for women, better education, we want chile to flourish in freedom. and for 11—year—old amelia, who can't even vote... because he wants to do good things for chile, like protecting the animals, the environment. and the children that is so important for chile. speaking to the nation, gabriel boric promised to lead for everyone. translation: i know that
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in the coming years - chile's future is at stake. so i guarantee you that i will be a president that looks after democracy and not risk it, that takes care of what he says, that always looks for unity, that will attend to people's needs every day, that firmly stands up against the privilege of the few, and work every day for the chilean families to have a good quality of life. for many, this is a natural conclusion of the past few years. it was 2019 that protest took over the streets of chile. it began with a rise in transport costs, but they evolved to challenge the deep inequalities in a country known for its economic stability. one year later, chileans voted to rip up its old dictatorship—era constitution and write a newer, more inclusive one. but these elections also revived coast of chile's dictatorship past. those on the left voted to ensure jose antonio kast would lose,
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a man who talked fondly of former dictator augusto pinochet. paz marquez is 18 and trying to get to university to study medicine. her whole family voted for kast. she is worried about a future under boric, a man she thinks is influenced by communists. it is a view shared by her mum. translation: i don't like his ideas, l he is charming, but there is no way| there will be stability with him. there are lots of scars in the country, but, unfortunately, the dictatorship was necessary because of the communists. this is a new era for chile, and a very different kind of president — a 35—year—old former student leader who is now the leader of his own country. his biggest challenge will be to unite the millions of chileans who voted for the other side. katie watson, bbc news in santiago. pro—beijing candidates have swept to victory in hong kong's controversial legislative council election. only 30% of voters cast their ballots in the first poll
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since broad changes were made to hong kong's political system. the chief executive, carrie lam, is travelling to beijing monday — to hold three days of meetings with the chinese central government. our correspondent danny vincent explained what we can expect from the meeting. well, there is not a huge level of transparency when it comes to the chinese communist party and the decisions and the meetings that are taking place. but commentators expect... well, some commentators are predicting that carrie lam may be meeting even with xi jinping, the president of china. of course, there is a chief executive election early next year, in march next year, and it's possible that she might be getting feedback or discussing perhaps her future as the leader of hong kong. what we do know is that the election that took place yesterday, in many ways the result wasn't really a surprise.
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of course, most of the pro—democracy candidates that usually would stand in an election like this were simply not able to stand, partly because of electoral reform which meant that only patriots could be eligible to stand in the election, but also due to the fact that because of the national security law a number of pro—democracy leaders have either fled the city or are facing trial for violating this law. qatar's sovereign wealth fund is to invest £85 million into rolls—royce's uk scheme to build many nuclear power stations in the uk and these sites are around a tenth of the size of traditional
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reactors. —— mini nuclear. they said it is a clear vote of confidence in nuclear innovation and follows the £210 million of government investment in reactors. this is a big part of government plans to create and deploy more home—grown, affordable clean energy. another bit of news, if you are planning to visit the natural history museum in london in the uk, it has been forced to close its doors, this is from tomorrow, because of front of house shortages as a result of covid—19. the museum in south kensington in london will remain closed for one week from tomorrow, in the hope that staffing levels will have recovered.
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basically, people have either got covid or heart having to isolate because they come into contact with someone —— they are having to isolate. they have been impacted by infections and isolation requirements and the museum has said it is not a decision they have taken lightly but the safety of staff and visitors must come first point that they say that if you have booked tickets for any of the exhibitions for those dates they will be cancelled and refunded. the headlines on bbc news... the uk government is being urged to set out plans to tackle surging cases of coronavirus. sources tell the bbc three options forfurther restrictions in england are being looked at. it comes as governments across the world look to bolster restrictions, amid fresh warnings over the rapid spread of the omicron variant. more pressure on the british prime minister, borisjohnson, over whether he broke lockdown rules — a picture is published of him
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at a gathering in the garden of 10 downing street. this is a workplace, and it is consistent, exactly what you see as consistent, with the rules that applied to workplaces. a plea for urgent supplies in the philippines, as the number of people killed by super typhoon rai rises to more than 200. chile picks a left—wing candidate as its youngest ever leader — beating a far—right rival in an incredibly polarising election. 19—year—old tennis star emma raducanu has been named bbc sports personality of the year after becoming britain's first women's grand slam singles champion in 44 years. there have been protests in more than 100 polish towns and cities against a controversial bill that both the us and the european union say would restrict media freedom. many fear that the government will use the legislation, which was unexpectedly passed by parliament on friday, to silence critics. sylvia lennon spence reports.
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protesting outside the presidential palace to protect press freedom. a message echoed across dozens of polish cities after rules were surprisingly rushed through parliament on friday to restrict foreign ownership of media channels. these pictures were broadcast on tv, on a channel not run by the state but owned by the us media company happen! discovery which is at the centre of the controversy. a news channel critical of the government it is feared could be silenced under the proposals. translation: tt is the proposals. translation: it is not only about _ the proposals. translation: tt 3 not only about this channel is about the future of free speech in poland and that means it is about the future of our democracy. demonstrators are calling for this
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man, the polish president andrzej dudz, to veto the law, something he has hinted he would do in the past. otherwise protesters fear it will lead to a poll on's free media being bought off or destroyed and worse. translation: tlefii bought off or destroyed and worse. translation:— bought off or destroyed and worse. translation: . ., ., translation: next will come into net censorship and — translation: next will come into net censorship and attempt _ translation: next will come into net censorship and attempt to _ translation: next will come into net censorship and attempt to extinguish l censorship and attempt to extinguish all independent sources of information but we will not allow that to _ information but we will not allow that to happen and return to those times— that to happen and return to those times when we had to a broken signal of radio— times when we had to a broken signal of radio free — times when we had to a broken signal of radio free europe. but times when we had to a broken signal of radio free europe.— of radio free europe. but the nato member state's _ of radio free europe. but the nato member state's government, - of radio free europe. but the nato member state's government, run | of radio free europe. but the nato l member state's government, run by the right—wing populist law and justice party, insisted the new law was needed to protect against russian and chinese influence over polish media. others say it is part of the eu member's authoritarian agenda, with washington saying the bill would undermine freedom of expression, we can media freedom and unload foreign investor confidence, concerns shared by the european commission. according to tbn 24, more than 1.5 million poles have
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signed a petition against the changes that could cost the channel its very existence. the decision about what happens next now rests with the president. sudan's health ministry says more than a hundred people have been injured in demonstrations against october's coup. security forces fired tear gas in the capital, khartoum, to clear crowds from the streets. protesters in cities across sudan called for an end to the military�*s involvement in politics. hundreds of thousands marched through khartoum. sunday marked the third anniversary of the huge demonstrations that led to the overthrow of omar al—bashir. the bbc�*s anita nkonge explains what's behind the protests. the sudanese youth are ready to take over, they are ready to take their place, they are ready to run this country. why killing them instead of let them
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take care of this country? every week in sudan, this happens. protests organised online using the hashtag sudancoup. at least 44 people have been killed since they started two months ago. to understand why they are happening, we need to go back to 2019. the year started with a massive popular uprising that saw the long term dictator omar al—bashir kicked out by the army. the protests continued and eventually a deal was done that saw this man, general abdel fattah al—burhane, share power with a civilian cabinet led by this man, abdallah hamdok. but two months ago, he staged a coup and he was arrested. the civilian led government was dissolved. then, a month later, the prime minister was reinstated and a deal was done that would supposedly see elections take place in 2023. but the agreement sees an expanded and continuing role for the military.
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pro—democracy activists are unhappy. many of them, mostly young protesters, say young protesters, say the deal is a sham and that hamdok betrayed them. he made a deal with the military so they can remain in powerfor longer. honestly, we don't know what is actually behind this so people are quite upset and shocked at what they have done because they think it is more to bless the troops. so is that fair? why did abdallah hamdok make the deal? prime minister hamdok signed this deal with the military in large part so he could prove to be a mediating influence within two very maximalist camps, you know, the military on one side who want to consolidate ongoing control of society, and on the other side, you have the civilian protesters who are on the streets, have been very brave and faced down bullets. they also have shown little interest now in negotiating with the military, allowing them to have any space at the table. protests have achieved dramatic
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change in sudan before. for these protesters, taking to the street seems the only option. as the omicron variant continues to spread rapidly in the uk, the number of nhs workers off sick with covid in london has more than doubled in four days. on saturday, the mayor of london, sadiq khan, declared a "major incident". we've been hearing from staff on the frontline, about how the surge of cases is impacting healthcare across the country. at the moment, what we are currently dealing with is the same wave of covid and other problems in the nhs we have been dealing with since july. and that is before this wave of omicron cases is going to hit because it takes about a week to ten
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days for hospital admissions to peak after infection speak and we are very worried about what is to come. it feels like groundhog day, i feel we are _ it feels like groundhog day, i feel we are back in february 2020, looking — we are back in february 2020, looking at— we are back in february 2020, looking at london and thinking, gosh. _ looking at london and thinking, gosh, they're having a tough time, we are _ gosh, they're having a tough time, we are ok — gosh, they're having a tough time, we are ok at the moment. it is going to happen _ we are ok at the moment. it is going to happen to— we are ok at the moment. it is going to happen to us and ijust hope we can keep _ to happen to us and ijust hope we can keep enough staff fit to work to keep providing a safe service. staff sickness _ keep providing a safe service. staff sickness increases as we have seen over the _ sickness increases as we have seen over the bridge, sickness increases as we have seen overthe bridge, i sickness increases as we have seen over the bridge, iworry sickness increases as we have seen over the bridge, i worry about how we provide — over the bridge, i worry about how we provide even the basic safe service — we provide even the basic safe service for— we provide even the basic safe service for the patient we already have _ service for the patient we already have in_ service for the patient we already have in hospital. at service for the patient we already have in hospital.— have in hospital. at the moment, --eole have in hospital. at the moment, people are _ have in hospital. at the moment, people are feeling _ have in hospital. at the moment, people are feeling quite - have in hospital. at the moment, people are feeling quite fatigued | people are feeling quite fatigued and stressed. _ people are feeling quite fatigued and stressed, a _ people are feeling quite fatigued and stressed, a lot— people are feeling quite fatigued and stressed, a lot of— people are feeling quite fatigued i and stressed, a lot of ambulances queueing — and stressed, a lot of ambulances queueing and _ and stressed, a lot of ambulances queueing and calls— and stressed, a lot of ambulances queueing and calls waiting - and stressed, a lot of ambulances queueing and calls waiting in - and stressed, a lot of ambulances queueing and calls waiting in the i queueing and calls waiting in the communitv _ queueing and calls waiting in the community. there _ queueing and calls waiting in the community. there has— queueing and calls waiting in the community. there has been- queueing and calls waiting in the community. there has been a i queueing and calls waiting in the | community. there has been a lot queueing and calls waiting in the i community. there has been a lot of absences _ community. there has been a lot of absences come _ community. there has been a lot of absences come up _ community. there has been a lot of absences come up to _ community. there has been a lot of absences come up to 15% _ community. there has been a lot of absences come up to 15% a - community. there has been a lot of absences come up to 15% a quarterl community. there has been a lot of. absences come up to 15% a quarter of our fleet— absences come up to 15% a quarter of our fleet was — absences come up to 15% a quarter of our fleet was off _ absences come up to 15% a quarter of our fleet was off the _ absences come up to 15% a quarter of our fleet was off the road _ absences come up to 15% a quarter of our fleet was off the road recently. i our fleet was off the road recently. if people _ our fleet was off the road recently. if people are — our fleet was off the road recently. if people are not— our fleet was off the road recently. if people are not sensible, - our fleet was off the road recently. if people are not sensible, not - if people are not sensible, not getting — if people are not sensible, not getting jabs. _ if people are not sensible, not getting jabs. we _ if people are not sensible, not getting jabs, we are _ if people are not sensible, not getting jabs, we are worried . if people are not sensible, not . getting jabs, we are worried that if people are not sensible, not - getting jabs, we are worried that if a lot of— getting jabs, we are worried that if a lot of people _ getting jabs, we are worried that if a lot of people become _ getting jabs, we are worried that if a lot of people become seriously. a lot of people become seriously unwelcome _ a lot of people become seriously unwelcome there _ a lot of people become seriously unwelcome there will— a lot of people become seriously unwelcome there will not - a lot of people become seriously unwelcome there will not be - a lot of people become seriously. unwelcome there will not be many medical—
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unwelcome there will not be many medical resources— unwelcome there will not be many medical resources to _ unwelcome there will not be many medical resources to help - unwelcome there will not be many medical resources to help people i unwelcome there will not be many. medical resources to help people in an emergencv _ medical resources to help people in an emergencv l— medical resources to help people in an emergency-— an emergency. i want to bring you words from _ an emergency. i want to bring you words from the _ an emergency. i want to bring you words from the opposition - an emergency. i want to bring you words from the opposition leader| words from the opposition leader here in the uk, sir keir starmer, who has been giving us his thoughts about the conservative handling of the rise in omicron cases. the scientist and _ the rise in omicron cases. the scientist and public _ the rise in omicron cases. t“te: scientist and public are very concerned by the growing numbers and we have a government that is hinting at further restrictions but it is more concerned and tied up with party management at the moment than it is with public health. i think what we want and what the public wants is a prime minister with a plan and a grip. the question on my lips and i think the public lips this morning is, where is the prime minister? ~ . . this morning is, where is the prime minister? ~ ., ., , ., this morning is, where is the prime minister? ~ ., ., ., minister? what are you calling for? we have made _ minister? what are you calling for? we have made it _ minister? what are you calling for? we have made it clear— minister? what are you calling for? we have made it clear to _ minister? what are you calling for? we have made it clear to the - we have made it clear to the government that we stand ready to support further measures if necessary, i made that clear to the prime minister last week and i make it clear again today but it is for the prime minister to come up with a
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plan, with support for schools, businesses etc, so the ball is in his court but where is he? i think this obsession with party management rather than public health is the wrong priority at the wrong time. you would support new measures if necessary but what is that? a circuit breaker? would labour support that? we circuit breaker? would labour support that?— circuit breaker? would labour su ort that? ~ ., ., support that? we will look at what the government _ support that? we will look at what the government puts _ support that? we will look at what the government puts forward - support that? we will look at what the government puts forward but i support that? we will look at what . the government puts forward but they have to come up with a plan because whatever the measures are, they need to be economic support for businesses, we need to know there is clarity that we can get schools open when the new term starts. those are the priorities. but we say to the government, get on with bring forward that plan. we will look at it and as we have done throughout the pandemic and with the votes last week, we will support it if it is the right plan in the public interest.— if it is the right plan in the ublic interest. ., , , ., , public interest. cases are rising, we are seeing — public interest. cases are rising, we are seeing it _ public interest. cases are rising, we are seeing it each _ public interest. cases are rising, we are seeing it each day - public interest. cases are rising, we are seeing it each day more. public interest. cases are rising, - we are seeing it each day more cases than before so has government been too slow on this?— too slow on this? throughout the andemic too slow on this? throughout the pandemic my _ too slow on this? throughout the pandemic my strong _ too slow on this? throughout the pandemic my strong feeling -
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too slow on this? throughout the pandemic my strong feeling is i too slow on this? throughout the | pandemic my strong feeling is the government has been too slow but here we are, with eight variant everybody is very concerned about, and what i want to see is a government under prime minister that gets a grip and put forward a plan that hopefully we can all get behind. but where is he? there is a vacuum leadership at the moment. the infighting is going on in the tory party, when the focus should be on the public interest and public health. ~ ., , ., , the public interest and public health. ~ ., , ., health. we have christmas and new year coming — health. we have christmas and new year coming so _ health. we have christmas and new year coming so if _ health. we have christmas and new year coming so if you _ health. we have christmas and new year coming so if you were - health. we have christmas and new year coming so if you were prime i year coming so if you were prime minister, what kind of restrictions would you put in place question or any? are you happy with meeting in large groups? t any? are you happy with meeting in large groups?— any? are you happy with meeting in large groups? i would be my cabinet toaether large groups? i would be my cabinet together and — large groups? i would be my cabinet together and having _ large groups? i would be my cabinet together and having a _ large groups? i would be my cabinet together and having a cobra - large groups? i would be my cabinet| together and having a cobra meeting which i would attend, with all four nations, to come up with a strong plan including the necessary support. we don't have access to all the information the prime minister and the government have they have that information and i think people are crying out for some leadership to say to the prime minister, where are you? come up with a plan, don't hint at restrictions, come up with a plan and let us see what the support
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is and as opposition, as we have said before, we say that if it is a plan we think it is right and in the public interest, we will support it and had made that clear to the prime minister and i make and had made that clear to the prime ministerand i make it and had made that clear to the prime minister and i make it clear again today. to minister and i make it clear again toda . ., , . ., minister and i make it clear again toda. . ., , today. to be clear, if christmas is this week, _ today. to be clear, if christmas is this week. you — today. to be clear, if christmas is this week, you are _ today. to be clear, if christmas is this week, you are content - today. to be clear, if christmas is this week, you are content with l today. to be clear, if christmas is i this week, you are content with the restrictions in place at the moment going into christmas? t restrictions in place at the moment going into christmas?— going into christmas? i want the prime minister _ going into christmas? i want the prime minister to _ going into christmas? i want the prime minister to come - going into christmas? i want the prime minister to come forward | going into christmas? i want the - prime minister to come forward with his plan with the necessary support, to tell us and the public what it is and if we think it is the right plan, we will support it. at the moment, my frustration that is the frustration i think of many people, the prime minister is completely absent. not attending meetings, not being out there, has got a grip, hasn't got a plan. and public health hasn't got a plan. and public health has to come first, not party management. d0 has to come first, not party management.— has to come first, not party management. has to come first, not party manauement. ., ., ., management. do you have a plan? you sa he management. do you have a plan? you say he doesn't — management. do you have a plan? you say he doesn't come _ management. do you have a plan? you say he doesn't come to _ management. do you have a plan? you say he doesn't come to you _ management. do you have a plan? you say he doesn't come to you and - say he doesn't come to you and labour have a plan? we say he doesn't come to you and labour have a plan?— say he doesn't come to you and labour have a plan? we are very concerned _ labour have a plan? we are very concerned about _ labour have a plan? we are very concerned about the _ labour have a plan? we are very concerned about the numbers, l labour have a plan? we are very i concerned about the numbers, we labour have a plan? we are very - concerned about the numbers, we have discussed it with the medical and scientific advisors but of course we don't have access to all the information about what support could go in so it really is the job of the
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government to come up with a plan. as the opposition, we have said we will be responsible, notwithstanding we are the opposition, it is the right plan we will support it, just as we did last week put it we wouldn't even have to plan b restrictions if the labour party hadn't acted in the public interest. i will continue to act in the public interest but we do need a prime minister who is present, who has got a grip and got a plan. tithe minister who is present, who has got a grip and got a plan-— a grip and got a plan. one other ruestion a grip and got a plan. one other question on _ a grip and got a plan. one other question on this _ a grip and got a plan. one other question on this photograph - a grip and got a plan. one other| question on this photograph that a grip and got a plan. one other - question on this photograph that has come from downing street the promised and staff socialising in what was reported to be may last year. what are your thoughts on that? , ,., , year. what are your thoughts on that? , ,., y ., ., ., ~ year. what are your thoughts on that? y y ., ., that? everybody will have looked at that? everybody will have looked at that photograph _ that? everybody will have looked at that photograph and _ that? everybody will have looked at that photograph and to _ that? everybody will have looked at that photograph and to suggest - that? everybody will have looked at that photograph and to suggest it i that? everybody will have looked at that photograph and to suggest it a | that photograph and to suggest it a work is meeting is a bit of a stretch by anybody�*s analysis. i think there are serious questions to be answered but look at the photo and ask yourself is that a work meeting going on or a social event? i think the answer is pretty obvious. , �* i think the answer is pretty obvious-— i think the answer is pretty obvious. , �* ., ., , , obvious. didn't have any meetings like that, any _ obvious. didn't have any meetings
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like that, any work— obvious. didn't have any meetings like that, any work meetings - obvious. didn't have any meetings like that, any work meetings or i like that, any work meetings or events like that last may? t like that, any work meetings or events like that last may? i look forward to _ events like that last may? i look forward to the _ events like that last may? i look forward to the day _ events like that last may? i look forward to the day when - events like that last may? i look forward to the day when i - events like that last may? i look. forward to the day when i meeting events like that last may? t trrrra; forward to the day when i meeting in the back garden of downing street but no, the labour party and the vast majority of the public were complying with the rules. alljoking apart, during that period there were funerals of people where very few people could go and mourn those who had tragically died. that is the contrast. that picture, which come is a real stretch to pretend it is a work meeting, against and up against pictures of those who have lost someone and not been able to even go to the funeral... that someone and not been able to even go to the funeral. . ._ to the funeral... that was the leader of _ to the funeral... that was the leader of the _ to the funeral... that was the leader of the opposition, - to the funeral... that was the leader of the opposition, sir i to the funeral... that was the i leader of the opposition, sir keir starmer. let's get more on the debate about whether more restrictions will be needed over the christmas period in england. earlier i spoke to the conservative mp for the cotswolds, sir geoffrey clifton—brown. i asked him if he supports additional measures. here we are about a week
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on from the vote in parliament on further measures and we have no better evidence than we had then. we simply don't know, and i respect what you're previous correspondent was saying, but we don't have the evidence that these omicron cases, particularly with the high level of vaccination we have got, are going to transmit into the huge number of hospital cases that she and others in the medical profession believe they might. at the moment, i wouldn't vote for further measures. don't ministers have to prepare for the worst? they can'tjust hope for the best? no, and there are a number of things going on, looking at treating a significant number of people at home to keep them out of hospital and make sure they are treated, and of course they can go to hospital if they get seriously ill. we are looking at urging medics and nurses to come back health profession if they are retired, at opening up more intensive care beds so there are things going on and we are looking
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at actively discharging people who are fit to be discharged from hospital before christmas. there are a lot of things going on, a lot of planning going on. but as you said in your last question, to shut down industries, to stop people meeting over christmas and all the medical problems that involves, i think it is notjustified at the moment. you were listening to the doctor along with me, who i think what everybody seems to agree is that we will not have a clear view of the data for a few weeks and the concern is that by then it will be too late, if we leave it until then to act, and our hospitals could be overwhelmed. i know they are not directly comparable but that is not what the data is coming out of south africa, the data from south africa is that the number of cases is now dropping, the severity of them
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is not as severe as delta and yesterday the number, thank goodness, of deaths was coming down, the number of hospitalisations was coming. i just don't think at the moment there is anyjustification for further measures. of course people must be sensible, they only need to meet where it is reasonable to do so and they must consider getting the vaccination. but i think we are asking the good sense of the british people to do that rather than further government edicts at the moment. i want to ask you a bit more generally if you don't mind, in the wake of the north shropshire by—election loss, the owen paterson affair, hundreds of mps including yourself rebelling, what are you making of all of this? is borisjohnson still up to thejob? we have clearly had a bad month, nobody would deny that and that the north shropshire result was anything but disastrous but we have been in these sort of situation before. i think what we are looking for now is borisjohnson
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to go away for christmas, get refreshed and get to know his new child and then come back in the new year and tell us how he will deal with these problems, get proper investigation into the parties and everything else and see if he can move forward and govern this country in a positive way, dealing with the really serious issues we face, how we deal with the backlog in the health service, how we reform social care, pay down the huge amount of debt we have paid in covid, these are serious issues and we will have to see if the prime minister can actually start to deal and resolve some of the problems. have you submitted a letter of no confidence in his leadership? certainly not. my whole tenure at the moment is that i want him to succeed so i shall be looking carefully to see what happens in the new year. that was the conservative mp sir geoffrey clifton—brown earlier. sky brown, a young british—japanese skateboarder who competes
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for great britain, took home the young sports personality of the year award at last night. sky is also the youngest professional skateboarder in the world. she has been celebrating her when. getting a trophy, it was just so cool. your speech was really lovely, sky. just remind us of all the things that are important to you when it comes to being recognised, because you feel like you want to inspire other girls and boys, too, don't you? yeah, i mean, since i started, like i said, my goal from the beginning is to inspire a little people around the world, especially girls. because i feel like they get scared sometimes. what do you think? scared of what? doing sport, or scared of doing things where they might get hurt and fall over? how does it work, do you think? scared, like... scared of doing what they want to do. like skateboarding, i mean, mostly boys do it. and, you know, going to a skate park you will see, yeah, mostly boys. and you might get
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a little bit intimidated. but, you know, we've got to get out and show that girls can do it, too. and in terms of how you started out, sky, you sort of taught yourself on youtube, didn't you? that's how it began for you? yeah, my dad helped me a little bit but a lot from watching youtube. it really helped and motivated me. sky brown. some tennis news to bring you, rafael nadal, the world number six, says he has tested positive for covid—19 in spain that is after playing in a tennis event in abu dhabi. we heard from emma raducanu earlier, who won the bbc sports personality of the year, and she is currently isolating in abu dhabi after testing positive for covid but now rafael nadal says he has tested positive after playing in that event in abu dhabi.
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the whistling voices of �*the clangers' from the classic 70s tv series is an instant reminder of childhood for many in the uk. the characters' unique language of high pitched cries, was actually translated into english as part of the script. now, creator oliver postgate's son daniel is crowdfunding to turn those scripts into a book. lucy vladev reports. quizzical whistle that is a clanger. and that is another clanger. they seem to have a piece of rope. with a distinctive sound and rather cheeky personalities, you can see why the clangers became such a firm favourite. now they seem to be having a bit of an argument about their piece of rope. the creation of oliver postgate and peter firmin, it shared the tales of creatures living on a star, far, far away. and it was a labour of love. in the age before green screens and special effects, many of the episodes were shot
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using trial and error. and — perhaps unexpectedly — there were also scripts. yes, including all the hoots and whistles, which oliver's son, daniel, is now trying to protect. people always used to wonder about what the clangers were actually saying on the tv show. because they were always written out in english, and that is what my dad used to whistle from. so, they were actually saying things to each other. now, thanks to crowdfunding, a special book is set to be made, including those stories, as well as analysis and anecdotes. now the work starts, really. i'm going to have to put my money... well, put my mouth where the money is, or rather start typing away, really, and... and getting deeply involved in what it's all about. meanwhile, the future looks bright, with the special exhibition in canterbury, and potential demand for more new series, it's hoped the magic of these
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friendly little creatures is there for to come. lucy vladev, bbc news. now the latest space tourist to visit the international space station has just returned to earth. here you can see the japanese billionaire yusaku maezawa after he landed in kazakhstan. he spent 12 days in space before returning in a russian soyuz space capsule. he is the first tourist russia has taken into space for more than a decade. the new spider—man film — no way home — has made nearly $590 million worldwide in its opening weekend. it's the third biggest debut in history, behind only two of the avengers films. the movie industry has been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic, and spider—man's distributor sony said its success showed the unmatched impact of a new release in the cinemas.
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you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello, again. there's quite a bit of a low cloud around today, and that cloud is thick enough to be producing some drizzle. but over the next few days, there will be less fog than we have seen and there will be more frost. as we see, the sky's clear by night. now, at the moment, high pressure's firmly in charge of our weather. there is not much wind around, just a bit of a breeze across the south—west of england and also the channel islands. and still a fair bit of cloud. but through the afternoon, we will see more of this cloud start to break up, some more of us will see some sunshine than we did yesterday, but there will still be a lot of cloud around. and our temperature range, four in the north to nine in the south—west. as we head on through the evening
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and overnight, there will still be some holes in that cloud. if anything, a few more developing. so we will see some patchy fog form, also some frost, and by the end of the night a new weak weather front will be introducing some rain across shetland. these temperatures are what we can expect in towns and cities, but wherever you see the blues, that is where you can expect some frost. so a cold start to the day tomorrow but, of course, where we have got the clear skies, we will have some sunshine, the fog slowly lifting. still a fair bit of cloud around, but generally for england and wales, more sunshine than today. a little bit more cloud for northern ireland and for scotland, with our temperature range, four to about 9 degrees. then, as we move from tuesday into wednesday, our high pressure starts to slide away and low pressure starts to show its hand coming in from the atlantic. we can see from the isobars that it is going to be windy in the west. so widespread frost to start the day, the cloud builds ahead of the rain coming in. as that rain bumps into that cold air, we will see a period of snow
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across parts of scotland, even at relatively low levels. further south, you can see it is still mild. nine in belfast, ten in the south—west. as we move from wednesday into thursday, the system will slowly move northwards, pushing that cold air into the far north of scotland. the mild airfollows on behind it across much of the uk, and temperatures are going to be higher during the course of thursday. so there goes the rain, pushing that cold air further north. we could see some snow on the hills in scotland for a time. behind it, it brightens up with some sunshine. but the temperatures will be noticeable. we have got ten, 11, 12, even 13 in the south. but cooler in the north.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11... the government is being urged to set out plans to tackle surging cases of coronavirus, sources tell the bbc three options of increasing levels of severity have been prepared. the downing street parties saga continues with a photo of the prime minister and others with wine and cheese in the number 0 garden during lockdown. ministers say no rules were broken. this is a workplace, and it is consistent, exactly what you see as consistent, with the rules that applied to workplaces. to suggest that is a work meeting is a bit of— to suggest that is a work meeting is a bit of a _ to suggest that is a work meeting is a bit of a stretch, by anybody's analysis — a bit of a stretch, by anybody's analysis. sol a bit of a stretch, by anybody's analysis. so i think there are very serious _ analysis. so i think there are very serious questions to be answered.
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shoppers avoided high streets and city centres on the weekend before christmas, according to new footfall figures — as hospitality businesses continue to ask for help to deal with the impacts of coronavirus. premier league officials will meet clubs later to consider pausing the season over the festive period, after a number of matches were cancelled because of covid cases. australia take a 2—0 lead over england in the ashes, after completing a 275 run victory in the second test in adelaide. borisjohnson is facing calls to bring in tighter measures in england over the christmas period to stem the rapid rise in cases of the omicron variant of coronavirus. scientists say urgent action is needed to stop a rapid influx of patients into hospital.
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but the prime minister is facing strong oppostion on further restrictions from within his own party. the prime minister is reportedly meeting advisers today and civil servants have prepared a menu of three options for covid restrictions ranging in severity. though it is not clear exactly what those options are. yesterday there were 82,886 new coronavirus cases recorded in the uk and over the last week a record number of daily cases have been recorded on several occasions. the leading infectious disease expert in the us, anthony fauci, has warned that christmas travel will increase the spread of the omicron coronavirus variant meanwhile israel has banned its citizens from travelling to the united states without special permission. and germany has implimented a ban on most travellers from the uk entering the country has come into force. only german citizens are allowed to travel
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to the the country from the uk, and they will need to quarantine for 14 days. france introduced similar restrictions on saturday. record numbers of people are continuing to come forward for their booster vaccine, with just days to go before christmas. but daily covid cases have also reached record highs. many are wondering if further restrictions are needed in england to slow the spread of omicron. the health secretary, sajid javid, hasn't ruled out possible new measures. there were no guarantees in this pandemic, he said. devolved administrations are also getting additional covid funding. the uk government said it would double the amount available to help administrations take precautions they feel necessary to keep people safe. but the first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, said on twitter that they needed much more action and support urgently from the uk government. the rapid spread of the omicron
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variant has seen london declare a major incident. hospital staff absences in the capital are on the rise. if you look in london, which is the epicentre of where the omicron variant is, we are getting a very significant increase in staff absences. so last week, staff absences in londonjumped from 1900 at the beginning of the week, to 4700 by the thursday of last week, and we know it's gone up since. so we are coming under real pressure in terms of the number of staff we have got off work. and that means, given how busy we are with all the other things, that means we are under very, very significant pressure. there are concerns, too, about pressure on schools in the new year, with staff shortages. from today, the government is urging former teachers to apply to join the workforce from january. there is still uncertainty over how much serious illness will be caused by the omicron variant. any decisions about further
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restrictions will need to be weighed against the cost to the economy, society and wider mental health. helena wilkinson, bbc news. borisjohnson is facing fresh questions about alleged breaches of lockdown rules at downing street. the guardian newspaper has published this photograph showing boris johnson and members of staff with wine and cheese in the number ten garden in may last year. at the time, in england, you could only meet one other person, in an outdoor public place, if you kept two metres apart. a government spokesperson has described the event as a "wo k r meeting" let's speak to our political correspondentjonathan blake, who is in westminster. the we will talk about that aspect in a moment- _ the we will talk about that aspect in a moment. first, _ the we will talk about that aspect in a moment. first, in _ the we will talk about that aspect in a moment. first, in the - the we will talk about that aspect in a moment. first, in the week. the we will talk about that aspect - in a moment. first, in the week when it is going to be christmas, everybody wants to know whether there will be new restrictions. what is being weighed up and when will we know? is the is being weighed up and when will we know? i . . ., , ., know? is the crucial question in
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government. — know? is the crucial question in government, and _ know? is the crucial question in government, and for— know? is the crucial question in government, and for all- know? is the crucial question in government, and for all of- know? is the crucial question in government, and for all of us, i government, and for all of us, really. — government, and for all of us, really. is — government, and for all of us, really, is whether omicron proves to be more _ really, is whether omicron proves to be more severe than other variants of the _ be more severe than other variants of the virus — be more severe than other variants of the virus so far that have circulated. we know that it spreads incredibly— circulated. we know that it spreads incredibly quickly, and incredibly widely — incredibly quickly, and incredibly widely. but as ministers have been again— widely. but as ministers have been again saying this morning, the crucial— again saying this morning, the crucial detail that we don't yet know— crucial detail that we don't yet know is— crucial detail that we don't yet know is how seriously ill people will get — know is how seriously ill people will get with the virus, and how many— will get with the virus, and how many more hospitalisations, potentially deaths, it will lead to. but, of _ potentially deaths, it will lead to. but, of course, we are at this point, — but, of course, we are at this point, just— but, of course, we are at this point, just a few days from christmas, where everyone wants to know _ christmas, where everyone wants to know what _ christmas, where everyone wants to know what is going to happen, if anything — know what is going to happen, if anything. will things change? well people's— anything. will things change? well people's plans be thrown into disarray. _ people's plans be thrown into disarray, orwillthey people's plans be thrown into disarray, or will they need to change — disarray, or will they need to change at _ disarray, or will they need to change at this point? what we do know— change at this point? what we do know is— change at this point? what we do know is that civil servants have prepared — know is that civil servants have prepared three different options for ministers _ prepared three different options for ministers to consider in terms of interventions, restrictions or potentially may be just at the level of guidance for the public at this point _ of guidance for the public at this point. they are categorised as low,
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medium _ point. they are categorised as low, medium and high, in terms of the severity— medium and high, in terms of the severity of— medium and high, in terms of the severity of the measures that may be prevented _ severity of the measures that may be prevented. but i would say at this point, _ prevented. but i would say at this point, it— prevented. but i would say at this point, it doesn't necessarily mean, 'ust point, it doesn't necessarily mean, just because there are options there for the _ just because there are options there for the prime minister, that he is going _ for the prime minister, that he is going to — for the prime minister, that he is going to take any of them. and it doesn't _ going to take any of them. and it doesn't necessarily mean that he will pick— doesn't necessarily mean that he will pick one of those three options off the _ will pick one of those three options off the shelf and go with it. it may be something in between, it may not be something in between, it may not be anything — be something in between, it may not be anything at all. but one thing, certainly. — be anything at all. but one thing, certainly, the labour leader keir starmer— certainly, the labour leader keir starmer is — certainly, the labour leader keir starmer is calling for, is some clarity— starmer is calling for, is some clarity on _ starmer is calling for, is some clarity on what, if anything, is going — clarity on what, if anything, is going to — clarity on what, if anything, is going to happen. we have made it clear to the few that we _ we have made it clear to the few that we stand _ we have made it clear to the few that we stand ready— we have made it clear to the few that we stand ready to _ we have made it clear to the few that we stand ready to support . that we stand ready to support further — that we stand ready to support further measures— that we stand ready to support further measures if— that we stand ready to support further measures if necessary, that we stand ready to support. further measures if necessary, i made _ further measures if necessary, i made that— further measures if necessary, i made that clear— further measures if necessary, i made that clear to _ further measures if necessary, i made that clear to the - further measures if necessary, i made that clear to the last - further measures if necessary, i| made that clear to the last week further measures if necessary, i- made that clear to the last week and make _ made that clear to the last week and make it _ made that clear to the last week and make it clear— made that clear to the last week and make it clear again _ made that clear to the last week and make it clear again today. _ made that clear to the last week and make it clear again today. but - made that clear to the last week and make it clear again today. but it - made that clear to the last week and make it clear again today. but it is. make it clear again today. but it is for the _ make it clear again today. but it is for the prime _ make it clear again today. but it is for the prime minister— make it clear again today. but it is for the prime minister to- make it clear again today. but it is for the prime minister to come - make it clear again today. but it is for the prime minister to come up| for the prime minister to come up with a _ for the prime minister to come up with a plan, — for the prime minister to come up with a plan, with _ for the prime minister to come up with a plan, with support - for the prime minister to come up with a plan, with support for- with a plan, with support for support— with a plan, with support for support for— with a plan, with support for support for schools, - with a plan, with support for. support for schools, businesses with a plan, with support for- support for schools, businesses etc, so the _ support for schools, businesses etc, so the ball— support for schools, businesses etc, so the ball is— support for schools, businesses etc, so the ball is in— support for schools, businesses etc, so the ball is in his _ support for schools, businesses etc, so the ball is in his court. _ support for schools, businesses etc, so the ball is in his court. where - so the ball is in his court. where is he? _ so the ball is in his court. where is he? i— so the ball is in his court. where is he? ithink— so the ball is in his court. where is he? i think this _ so the ball is in his court. where is he? i think this obsession- so the ball is in his court. where| is he? i think this obsession with party— is he? i think this obsession with party management, _ is he? i think this obsession with party management, rather- is he? i think this obsession with party management, rather than. is he? i think this obsession with - party management, rather than public health. _ party management, rather than public health. is— party management, rather than public health. is the — party management, rather than public health, is the wrong _ party management, rather than public health, is the wrong priority, - party management, rather than public health, is the wrong priority, at - health, is the wrong priority, at the wrong — health, is the wrong priority, at the wrong time. _
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that picture of borisjohnson in the downing street garden, it is the latest in a series of claims of what has been going on there. does that get added into the inquiry that is being done currently? quite possibly. — being done currently? quite possibly. yes- _ being done currently? quite possibly, yes. whether - being done currently? quite| possibly, yes. whether there being done currently? quite i possibly, yes. whether there is being done currently? qt, te: possibly, yes. whether there is any other evidence, or whether staff that are being spoken to, or will be spoken to in the course of that inquiry now led by the senior civil servant, to this point, we don't know. what can the picture tell us? according to the guardian it was taken in may of this year and shows the prime minister, his wife and other members of staff in downing street, enjoying a glass of wine, there was cheese as well, and the defence from the bertens of this was a work meeting is something that the deputy prime minister and justice secretary dominic rob this morning stuck to, and suggested in this context, no rules were being broken.
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number 10 — the garden i there is used for meetings. they were on throughout the day to which the picture relates. i as with many places of work, particularly when you think i about how hard they are working i under those pressures of the week, they would sometimes have a drink. that is what you can see there. that was primarily after the work meetings of the day. _ there is a debate about whether any rules were broken in the picture. frankly, for the government's critics and four others looking on at this, the details won't really matter, because, for a lot of people, itjust doesn't look good. to have the defence coming forward that this was a work meeting, which was of course happening at a time when people were living under very tight restrictions, and working, in some cases, an incredibly challenging circumstances, it certainly will be seized upon by labour and others to add to the narrative that the rules were, at the very least, not being scrupulously followed, at a time
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when many people were doing their best to do that. professor tim sharp is a member of the sage environment plan modelling group. he is speaking on a personal capacity. what do you think should be happening in terms of restrictions?— be happening in terms of restrictions? ., , ., .., restrictions? clearly, what we can see is a very _ restrictions? clearly, what we can see is a very rapid _ restrictions? clearly, what we can see is a very rapid doubling i restrictions? clearly, what we can see is a very rapid doubling rate, | see is a very rapid doubling rate, we can see the doubling is of infections, most people are much more aware of infections. anything we can do to reduce the number of contracts is really important. that is above and beyond. we know that vaccination is the most important countermeasure. above and beyond that, non—vital interventions, the types of restrictions that are important. reducing contact is properly the biggest one, making sure that people regularly test, so if they are positive then they can take themselves out of the equation.
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helping people to isolate if they do have a positive test, you know, for some people it is really challenging, in terms of the way that they work and so on. and all of the environmental mitigation is we know about, you know, distancing, having good ventilation, high face coverings, all of those things help. it's no one single thing which has an effect, it is accommodation or a series of things that makes the difference overall. tit series of things that makes the difference overall.— difference overall. in terms of whether measures _ difference overall. in terms of whether measures should i difference overall. in terms of whether measures should be. difference overall. in terms of- whether measures should be brought in through compulsion, or people doing it because they want to protect themselves, their loved ones and anyone else that they might come into contact with, what is your view on that? tt into contact with, what is your view on that? . ' . into contact with, what is your view on that? ., ' . ., . on that? it a difficult balancing act. what on that? it a difficult balancing act- what we _ on that? it a difficult balancing act. what we know _ on that? it a difficult balancing act. what we know is - on that? it a difficult balancing act. what we know is that i on that? it a difficult balancing i act. what we know is that mandating things is more effective, but there are lots of other challenges in terms of the economy, issues of mental health and so on. it is a genuinely difficult one to call.
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mandating things is more effective, but there are other knock—on effects that we are trying to balance here. what we are seeing currently is actually the real impact of an infection which is spreading as quickly as this omicron variant is. the latest we have heard, for instance, is that the natural history museum have had to close for a week because of an unprecedented impact on its staff through covid. so, even without enforced lockdowns, there is testing, people are aware of when there are cases and there are rules in place to make people stay at home in that context. so, are we kind of, in context, almost in a quasi—lockdown, in that people have to shut themselves away when they are affected?— have to shut themselves away when they are affected? lockdown is not a helful they are affected? lockdown is not a helpful term. _ they are affected? lockdown is not a helpful term, that _ they are affected? lockdown is not a helpful term, that is _ they are affected? lockdown is not a helpful term, that is part _ they are affected? lockdown is not a helpful term, that is part of - they are affected? lockdown is not a helpful term, that is part of the i helpful term, that is part of the problem here. it is taking measures
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to keep yourself and other people say. and there are a number of these. what is happening is that people generally come across the whole piece, in spite of everything else, most people have known what to do and have done the right thing. that is the vast majority. what you can see is a lot of people are seeing what is going on and making their own probably quite sensible decisions, do not go to that big office party, to reduce the number office party, to reduce the number of points of contact ahead of christmas. so, they can still do the things they need to do to see family and so on at christmas. that was the message from chris whitty last week, and it was really very clear. you know, you need to make the priorities. and most people are pretty smart and pretty sensible about doing that. the; t pretty smart and pretty sensible about doing that.— pretty smart and pretty sensible about doing that. as i said, your area of expertise _ about doing that. as i said, your area of expertise for _ about doing that. as i said, your area of expertise for the - area of expertise for the government's advisory panel is on environmental modelling. how much have things changed? it looks like
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you are going to correct me? yes. have things changed? it looks like you are going to correct me? yes, it is not modelling. _ you are going to correct me? yes, it is not modelling. although - is not modelling. although environmental modelling, it is that group, my particular area is looking at things to do with indoor spaces and ventilation, things of that nature. . ., , , nature. perfect, that is exactly what i nature. perfect, that is exactly what i was _ nature. perfect, that is exactly what i was wondering - nature. perfect, that is exactly what i was wondering about, i what i was wondering about, actually, on that front. because thatis actually, on that front. because that is a key part to any indoor spaces being as safe as they can be. how much do you think has changed since the start of the pandemic. well, in a sense, we were having very similar discussions this time last year, about people preparing for christmas and making sure that you are doing all the hygiene things we have known about all the time, there has been a greater emphasis, there has been a greater emphasis, there was this time last year, and increasingly with omicron, in terms of making sure that we have got good distancing and ventilation. having
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less people in a space makes ventilation less of a challenge, if you have less people, you don't need as much ventilation to reduce the transmission. ahead of that, making sure that spaces are not stuffy, that they are properly ventilated, open your windows every so often. it's difficult, because it is cold outside. it does mean opening all windows all the time, open them a bit every so often. it's the cumulative effect of lots of small things that make the overall distance. —— difference. no one thing will be a quick fix. tit distance. -- difference. no one thing will be a quick fix. in terms of any indoor— thing will be a quick fix. in terms of any indoor groupings, - thing will be a quick fix. in terms of any indoor groupings, what i thing will be a quick fix. in terms. of any indoor groupings, what you are talking about, it is going right back to the basics, as you say, where we were at the beginning, which is reducing the number of people inside enclosed spaces and having windows open. there has been talk about improving ventilation in buildings, through systems, filtration systems, has not been done on that front or is it still
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giving to the basics?- done on that front or is it still giving to the basics? there are a number of _ giving to the basics? there are a number of things _ giving to the basics? there are a number of things which - giving to the basics? there are a number of things which are i giving to the basics? there are a i number of things which are possible, number of things which are possible, number of things have been done. a lot of buildings which are mechanically ventilated, for example, there are ways of improving ventilation rates, stopping recirculation of air and so on. it is a little bit more challenging and spaces that are naturally ventilated, in which you need to open windows and vents. it is a little bit harder to work out how that works. you know, there will be support for things like co two metres, which will give people a sense of how well the space might be being ventilated, it helps them to control it, to a certain extent. one of the problems with ventilation as you can't see it and you can't feel it. in the same way that you can with thermal, with temperature, you know when you are hot and cold, but sensing ventilation is a much harder thing. so, it is helpful to have
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aids which would support people like that. . ~ aids which would support people like that. ., ,, , ., ., aids which would support people like that. ., ,, ., ., , that. thank you for “oining us, professor * that. thank you for “oining us, professor tim i that. thank you forjoining us, professor tim sharp. - that. thank you forjoining us, i professor tim sharp. restaurants that. thank you forjoining us, - professor tim sharp. restaurants and pubs are calling for more support from the government. the boss of pub chain greene king says winter bookings have been �*decimated' by the pandemic, with some of their branch bookings down by 70% or 80% compared to 2019. it comes as the chairman of the company that runs the real greek and franco manca restaurant chains says the chancellor �*needs to get his act together�* and announce further support �*within the next 24 hours�* joining me now is melanie brown, the owner of the laundry bistro in brixton, south london. she actually opened it in 2020. this weekend, she was forced to put a message out on social media saying it was likely they would be open over the weekend, but that would be the last services of 2021, most probably. let�*s talk to melanie now.
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thank you. i want to hear more in a moment about opening up in 2020, and everything starting to kick off. but first of all, in terms of where you are now, having to put that message out over the weekend, what is the situation? ., ., situation? yeah, we are feeling awfully sad _ situation? yeah, we are feeling awfully sad right _ situation? yeah, we are feeling awfully sad right now. - situation? yeah, we are feeling awfully sad right now. i - situation? yeah, we are feeling awfully sad right now. i mean, | situation? yeah, we are feeling| awfully sad right now. i mean, a combination of a lack of customers, staff testing positive for covid, it has meant that we have literally not been able to open our doors any longer. we were forced to close last night at 5.30. tt longer. we were forced to close last night at 550-— night at 5.30. it must be heartbreaking? - night at 5.30. it must be heartbreaking? yes, i night at 5.30. it must be heartbreaking? yes, it i night at 5.30. it must be. heartbreaking? yes, it is, night at 5.30. it must be - heartbreaking? yes, it is, because we have been _ heartbreaking? yes, it is, because we have been in _ heartbreaking? yes, it is, because we have been in survival— heartbreaking? yes, it is, because we have been in survival mode i heartbreaking? yes, it is, because we have been in survival mode for| we have been in survival mode for the last 18 months, trying to pull the last 18 months, trying to pull the restaurant back together, working with varying degrees of furlough, lack of customers, terraced dining, so many pivots we have had to make as an industry. to now be faced with such a decreased
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amount of customers in our restaurant, for what was meant to be the busiest month of the year, it�*s heartbreaking. the busiest month of the year, it's heartbreaking.— the busiest month of the year, it's heartbreaking. took us through the fi . ures in heartbreaking. took us through the figures in terms _ heartbreaking. took us through the figures in terms of _ heartbreaking. took us through the figures in terms of what _ heartbreaking. took us through the figures in terms of what was i figures in terms of what was happening in the run—up to the weekend when you felt you had no option to be closed, bookings and cancellations and also come as you have mentioned, the impact on staff of covid? taste have mentioned, the impact on staff of covid? ~ ., ., ., .,~ of covid? we ran into a weakened surface up — of covid? we ran into a weakened surface up upwards _ of covid? we ran into a weakened surface up upwards of— of covid? we ran into a weakened surface up upwards of 150 - of covid? we ran into a weakened surface up upwards of 150 booked j surface up upwards of 150 booked today, and we were seeing 80 or 90 cancellations every day. walkins were null and void. nobody is about, everybody is at home, protecting themselves ahead of christmas. that is fair. one thing that the government has to do right now is take action. we need help drastically. we need the government to step up and offer reduced vat again, to give us more grants, all of those things will make the world
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of those things will make the world of difference, to allow us to survive again and reopen injanuary, because it is just crippling the hospitality industry. and we are given no support at all. haifa hospitality industry. and we are given no support at all. how are you manauuin given no support at all. how are you managing in — given no support at all. how are you managing in terms _ given no support at all. how are you managing in terms of— given no support at all. how are you managing in terms of literally i managing in terms of literally paying the wages each month, and all of the other bills that you have to deal with? of the other bills that you have to dealwith? presumably, of the other bills that you have to deal with? presumably, also, of the other bills that you have to dealwith? presumably, also, if of the other bills that you have to deal with? presumably, also, if you had all of those covers booked for the weekend, and it was last minute cancellations, presumably you had stock into actually deliver the food, what happens to that? today i stood on an — food, what happens to that? today i stood on an empty _ food, what happens to that? today i stood on an empty restaurant, i food, what happens to that? today i stood on an empty restaurant, we i food, what happens to that? today i i stood on an empty restaurant, we are cleaning and going through the stock that we have. hopefully gifting it to good homes. again, it�*s another cost that we can�*t afford right now. it's cost that we can�*t afford right now. it�*s crippling. t cost that we can't afford right now. it's crippling-— it's crippling. i mentioned you set u n it's crippling. i mentioned you set u- in it's crippling. i mentioned you set up in 2020- _ it's crippling. i mentioned you set up in 2020. what _ it's crippling. i mentioned you set up in 2020. what happened i it's crippling. i mentioned you set up in 2020. what happened when things kicked off? tt up in 2020. what happened when things kicked off?— things kicked off? it was late in the ear things kicked off? it was late in the year when _ things kicked off? it was late in the year when we _ things kicked off? it was late in the year when we opened i things kicked off? it was late in the year when we opened the i things kicked off? it was late in i the year when we opened the door, things kicked off? it was late in - the year when we opened the door, we had three modes of training before
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covid hit. at that point we thought it was going to be a couple of weeks. two metal years —— two days later, we are not given any guidance, not given any support. we only hear things through the media. we were very fortunate to have the furlough scheme for our team, throughout that time. but that is finished now. there are many more measures that the government has to step up and take action for, otherwise our business won�*t survive. like many other hospitality businesses in the uk. taste survive. like many other hospitality businesses in the uk.— businesses in the uk. we wish you all the very — businesses in the uk. we wish you all the very best, _ businesses in the uk. we wish you all the very best, melanie - businesses in the uk. we wish you all the very best, melanie brown. . all the very best, melanie brown. thank you forjoining us. sorry you have had such a tough time of it all. i hope you get to have a nice christmas. us pharmaceutical company moderna have said that a booster dose of its covid—19 vaccine appeared to be protective against the omicron variant in laboratory testing. their research shows that a 50 microgram booster dose — which is standardly given in the uk
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— increased neutralizing antibodies against the variant 37 fold. a higher, 100 microgram booster dose of the same vaccine drove antibody levels even higher. the company also says it plans to develop a vaccine specifically to protect against omicron, which it hopes to advance into clinical trials early next year. a new covid drug designed to reduce the risk of vulnerable patients needing hospital treatment will be offered on the nhs in england from today. sotrovimab is an antibody given as a transfusion to treat people in high risk groups. it will be offered initially in england, before being rolled out across the uk. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here�*s sarah. good morning. covid heading sport as well, nowhere is immune? ~ , , covid heading sport as well, nowhere is immune?—
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covid heading sport as well, nowhere is immune? ~ , , ., , is immune? absolutely, we have seen an awful lot— is immune? absolutely, we have seen an awful lot of— is immune? absolutely, we have seen an awful lot of impact _ is immune? absolutely, we have seen an awful lot of impact on _ is immune? absolutely, we have seen an awful lot of impact on the - an awful lot of impact on the premier league which we will come to any moment. we start with the cricket. england have a mountain to climb if they are to regain the ashes after losing the second test in adelaide this morning and going 2—0 down in the five match series. jos buttler offered some resistance batting for over 200 balls, but england were finally all out for 192 in their second innings, losing by 275 runs. patrick gearey reports. so, to the last englishman standing in adelaide, a lonely place on the other side of the world. at the other side of the world. at the other end, from mitchell starc... ollie pope didn�*t last ten minutes. five wickets left. the biggest of them was ben stokes. so, australia�*s field is made on enclosure around him and then sent in a lion. nathan lyon thought he had him trapped, lbw. the umpire didn�*t. australia reviewed. then rejoiced. england reset. chris woakes made a defiant
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44. jos buttler, a natural cavalier, relied on his shield. no wicket fell for more than two and a half hours. say it quietly, maybe? but english optimism on this tour is no sooner formed than shattered. the end of so no chris woakes and, ultimately, hope. the aussies were closing in. olly robinson lasted an hour before lyon got him. still, perhaps improbably, the match went into the final session. improbably, the match went into the finalsession. still improbably, the match went into the final session. still there, jos buttler, the adelaide barricade. for 246 balls, he hardly put a foot wrong. watch the lights on the bails. hit wicket. what a way to go. richardson�*s fifth wicket finished the job for the aussies. today marks 4000 days since england last won a test in australia. to regain the ashes, they must somehow win the next three. patrick geary, bbc news. tottenham have been eliminated from the europa conference league with uefa confirming that their postponed match against rennes is to be deemed a forfeit.
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the match at the tottenham hotspur stadium was due to be played on december ninth, but was called off after a covid—19 outbreak among the spurs squad. the ruling means the rennes have been awarded a 3—0 victory in the game, and spurs finish third in their group, outside the top two quailfication places. the 20 premier league clubs are set to meet at 1 o�*clock this afternoon to discuss the escalating issues around the coronavirus pandemic. six of the premier league�*s 10 weekend matches were postponed because of covid. managers and captains are also due to hold their own meetings. england manager gareth southgate thinks players need to take responsibility and take the vaccine i think everybody has that responsibility. we are notjust looking after ourselves, we are looking after ourselves, we are looking after ourselves, we are looking after other people. actually, all of the restrictions and all of the devastation to health, and as i said earlier, the economy, are down to the fact that we won�*t get a clearer and less the
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numbers are high. so, the league is a little bit complicated, because we�*ve got players who are fully vaccinated, who have also still caught the virus. so we know that is a complex situation for them, which games to be played and which not. but, in the end, everybody has to pull together to get through something like this. meanwhile, rafa nadal has tested positive for covid—19 after making his comeback from injury in an exhibition event in abu dhabi last week. the 20—time grand slam champion returned the positive test on arrival back in spain. he said he was having "some unpleasant moments but hopes to improve little by little." nadal has not played a tour event since august, and the australian open begins in melbourne four weeks today. that�*s all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that�*s bbc.co.uk/sport.
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breaking news about vaccinations for 12-15 breaking news about vaccinations for 12—15 —year—olds. we are hearing that bookings have now open for children between those ages to get their second dose of the coronavirus vaccine. all of those in the age group who are eligible will be able to book their second jab to the nhs national booking service if their first dose was more than 12 weeks ago. also, breaking news to bring you from our correspondencejune kelly at the old bailey, where a 63—year—old man has been sentenced to an indefinite hospital order after being found responsible last month for the death of a fellow resident at a care home in south—east london. alexander rawson, 63, killed eileen dean, after being placed in the room next door to her after he was moved into the home where she was living in south—east london, from a mental health unit, a few days before christmas last year. he was suffering from twin mental health conditions linked to alcohol
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dependency. it was decided he was mentally unfit to stand trial. instead, a jury listened to the evidence and decided he was responsible for the killing. more breaking news to bring you about the cabinet. we are just hearing that there is definitely going to be a meeting of the cabinet later today at 2pm. it is a virtual meeting of the cabinet. so, there is a lot for them to discuss in terms of what happens next, in terms of any covid restrictions. the bbc has been told there are three scenarios that have been planned for. we don�*t know the detail of those scenarios, but presumably that is exactly what will be discussed, and what decisions will be taken. so, we will keep you updated. a 30—year—old man, romario henry, has been charged with robbery by police investigating the break—in at the home of olympic cyclist mark cavendish in november. it happened at the home of olympic silver medallist in the early hours of the morning on saturday 27 november.
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two 27—year—old men were also arrested last week. they have been released on bail until mid january. the tennis player emma raducanu has been voted bbc sports personality of the year. the 19—year—old, who — at her first attempt — won the us open in september, is the first female tennis player to win the trophy since virginia wade in 1968. though she couldn�*t attend in person as she�*s isolating in abu dhabi after testing postive for covid—19, raducanu said winning the public vote capped a remarkable year. here�*s the moment her victory was announced. this is always a very big moment. laura, can you please tell us who the winner is?— laura, can you please tell us who the winner is? the 2021 bbc sports personality 0f _ the winner is? the 2021 bbc sports personality of the _ the winner is? the 2021 bbc sports personality of the year _ the winner is? the 2021 bbc sports personality of the year is - the winner is? the 2021 bbc sports personality of the year is emma i personality of the year is emma raducanu — personality of the year is emma raducanu. . ~ personality of the year is emma raducanu-— personality of the year is emma raducanu. ., ,, i. ., �*, raducanu. thank you. i mean, it's such an honour— raducanu. thank you. i mean, it's such an honourjust _ raducanu. thank you. i mean, it's such an honourjust to _ raducanu. thank you. i mean, it's such an honourjust to be -
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raducanu. thank you. i mean, it's| such an honourjust to be amongst these _ such an honourjust to be amongst these nominees. _ such an honourjust to be amongst these nominees, and _ such an honourjust to be amongst these nominees, and congrats- such an honourjust to be amongst these nominees, and congrats to i such an honourjust to be amongst i these nominees, and congrats to you for such— these nominees, and congrats to you for such an _ these nominees, and congrats to you for such an amazing _ these nominees, and congrats to you for such an amazing year— these nominees, and congrats to you for such an amazing year and - these nominees, and congrats to you for such an amazing year and all- for such an amazing year and all your— for such an amazing year and all your achievements. _ for such an amazing year and all yourachievements. i— for such an amazing year and all your achievements. i am - for such an amazing year and all your achievements. i am really. for such an amazing year and all- your achievements. i am really happy with this, _ your achievements. ! am really happy with this, of— your achievements. i am really happy with this, of course, _ your achievements. i am really happy with this, of course, and _ your achievements. i am really happy with this, of course, and i— your achievements. i am really happy with this, of course, and i watch i with this, of course, and i watch sports _ with this, of course, and i watch sports personality _ with this, of course, and i watch sports personality of _ with this, of course, and i watch sports personality of the - with this, of course, and i watch sports personality of the year. sports personality of the year growing — sports personality of the year growing up _ sports personality of the year growing up so— sports personality of the year growing up. so i'm _ sports personality of the year growing up. so i'm really- sports personality of the year- growing up. so i'm really humbled to 'oin growing up. so i'm really humbled to join the _ growing up. so i'm really humbled to join the amazing _ growing up. so i'm really humbled to join the amazing past _ growing up. so i'm really humbled to join the amazing past winners. - growing up. so i'm really humbled to join the amazing past winners. yeah, i'm join the amazing past winners. yeah, im also— join the amazing past winners. yeah, im also very— join the amazing past winners. yeah, i'm also very happy— join the amazing past winners. yeah, i'm also very happy for _ join the amazing past winners. yeah, i'm also very happy for british - i'm also very happy for british tennis— i'm also very happy for british tennis that _ i'm also very happy for british tennis that we _ i'm also very happy for british tennis that we managed i i'm also very happy for british tennis that we managed to i i'm also very happy for britishl tennis that we managed to get i'm also very happy for british i tennis that we managed to get this award. _ tennis that we managed to get this award. again! _ tennis that we managed to get this award, again! and— tennis that we managed to get this award, again! and also, _ tennis that we managed to get this award, again! and also, thank- tennis that we managed to get this award, again! and also, thank youl tennis that we managed to get this . award, again! and also, thank you so much _ award, again! and also, thank you so much to— award, again! and also, thank you so much to all— award, again! and also, thank you so much to all the — award, again! and also, thank you so much to all the voters _ award, again! and also, thank you so much to all the voters and _ award, again! and also, thank you so much to all the voters and all- award, again! and also, thank you so much to all the voters and all the - much to all the voters and all the funds— much to all the voters and all the funds and — much to all the voters and all the funds and -- _ much to all the voters and all the funds and —— fans _ much to all the voters and all the funds and —— fans for— much to all the voters and all the funds and —— fans for the - much to all the voters and all the funds and —— fans for the support much to all the voters and all the. funds and —— fans for the support i received _ funds and —— fans for the support i received this — funds and —— fans for the support i received this year. _ funds and —— fans for the support i received this year. it's _ funds and —— fans for the support i received this year. it's been - received this year. it's been absolutely— received this year. it's been absolutely insane, - received this year. it's beenl absolutely insane, especially received this year. it's been - absolutely insane, especially the energy— absolutely insane, especially the energy that _ absolutely insane, especially the energy that i _ absolutely insane, especially the energy that i felt _ absolutely insane, especially the energy that i felt at _ absolutely insane, especially the energy that i felt at wimbledon, | energy that i felt at wimbledon, playing — energy that i felt at wimbledon, playing in— energy that i felt at wimbledon, playing in front _ energy that i felt at wimbledon, playing in front of _ energy that i felt at wimbledon, playing in front of my— energy that i felt at wimbledon, playing in front of my home - energy that i felt at wimbledon, i playing in front of my home crowd. that was _ playing in front of my home crowd. that was something _ playing in front of my home crowd. that was something i've _ playing in front of my home crowd. that was something i've never- playing in front of my home crowd. that was something i've never felt| that was something i've never felt before _ that was something i've never felt before so. — that was something i've never felt before. so, thank— that was something i've never felt before. so, thank you _ that was something i've never felt before. so, thank you very - that was something i've never felt before. so, thank you very much. i now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood/ for many of us, it is a cloudy day. having said that, there will be some breaks in the cloud as we go through the afternoon. a few more of us seeing some glimmers of sunshine. at
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the cloud will still be thick enough

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