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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 15, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines: a senior health official warns that cases of the omicron variant are doubling in less than every two days in most parts of the uk. it's probably the most significant threat we've had since the start of the pandemic, and i'm sure, for example, that the numbers we see on data over the next few days will be quite staggering. new rules come into force meaning adults in england must show a covid pass to get into nightclubs, big sports matches and other large events. is the party over for - you now, prime minister? more pressure on borisjohnson after 100 of his own mps vote against the covid passes. his own mps have had enough. they won't defend him.
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they won't turn up to support him, and if he proposes them they won't vote for basic public health measures. i understand the legitimate anxieties that colleagues have about restrictions on their liberty, and on the liberty of people, but i believe the approach we are taking is balanced and proportionate and right for this country. the cost of living hits its highest level for a decade — inflation surging to 5.1% in the year to november. sir lewis hamilton, for services to motorsport — and arise sir lewis — he may have lost the world title, but today lewis hamilton has been knighted at windsor castle. good afternoon and
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welcome to bbc news. the head of the uk health security agency says the growth of the omicron variant is going to be �*staggering'. drjenny harries described omicron as probably the �*most significant threat to public health since the start of the pandemic�*. from today, adults in england must now show a covid pass to get into nightclubs, big sports matches and other large events — it brings england broadly into line with scotland, wales and northern ireland. the new rules were approved last night, despite a commons rebellion by 100 conservative mps. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. the race to get boosters into arms continues this morning in sheffield. over—18s in england can now book a slot online to get theirjab. the number of suspected omicron infections is growing fast, but, speaking to mps this morning, the head of the uk health security agency
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stressed we're still only at the beginning of this latest outbreak. it's probably the most significant threat we've had since the start of the pandemic, and i'm sure, for example, that the numbers that we see on data over the next few days will be quite staggering compared to the rate of growth that we've seen in cases for previous variants. with that in mind, new regulations requiring a covid pass to enter larger venues, like football grounds, aim to at least slow the spread of the variant. the new rules bring england closer into line with the rest of the uk, and tonight, when crystal palace take on southampton, fans will need to show a pass to get in. it's something that we are well prepared for. it's something that, you know, we've had great support from other clubs. as you're aware, other clubs have actually implemented this and tried it for various games. for example, we've done exactly the same — we trialled it, done soft checks on supporters, supporters have been really receptive of that. the night—time economy will also feel the impact. pubs like this one in bristol
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have already taken a hit — 80% of christmas party bookings cancelled. constantly being stabbed in the back all the time, basically, by all these new rules and regulations. these few weeks, with all our corporate bookings, that's when we get some money in the pot and sees us through january and february. without that, we're going to really struggle in the next few months. but some do find there is reassurance in knowing everyone around you is vaccinated or tested. ijust think it makes everyone feel a little bit safer when they're going out, and it makes me more comfortable when i'm out in wales, knowing that people around me have had their vaccinations. i'm not, like, fully vaccinated, so it would probably affect me, but i think it will encourage, you know, people that haven't been fully vaccinated to get fully vaccinated. obviously, cases are going up at the moment, _ and ijust think anything we can do to try and stay safe - and keep everyone else safe is important _ today also sees the end of travellers arriving in the uk from so—called red—list countries having to isolate in hotels. with omicron now clearly spreading through the community,
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there's little point. it's another sign that stopping the spread of the omicron variant just isn't possible, and experts say vaccines and boosters remain the best defence against the virus. what we're very hopeful for is that the protection against severe disease which has held up really well against all the variants so far will also hold up against this variant. nevertheless, there are some data from south africa showing that the neutralisation of this virus is more difficult, and so that may mean that the vaccines... we really do need these boosters to bring down the rate of transmission. what happens in the next few weeks is uncertain. the scottish government is already asking people to limit socialising to three households at a time in the run—up to christmas. but new advice and regulations will only slow the spread of the virus. if huge numbers of people do start getting infected, ministers may find they have no choice but to introduce
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further restrictions. dominic hughes, bbc news. as we've been hearing, questions have been raised about borisjohnson�*s authority as prime minister, after the biggest revolt by conservative mps since he entered downing street. this lunchtime he faced his final prime minister's questions before christmas. our political correspondent, nick eardley, reports from westminster. there isn't much christmas cheer here. downing street has faced a long list of damaging accusations in the past fortnight. and with the prime minister's position already damaged, he is now dealing with the aftermath of the biggest rebellion of his premiership. is the party over for - you now, prime minister? the ayes to the right, 369. the noes to the left, 126. this was last night in the house of commons — almost 100 tory mps voting against the government on covid certification. fast forward to this afternoon. we now come to the leader - of the opposition, keir starmer.
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questions over borisjohnson�*s authority and the possibility of further restrictions. if further votes are needed to save lives and protect the nhs, labour mps will follow my leadership, and we will always put the national interest first. can i ask the prime minister to get his house in order so he can say the same? yes, mr speaker, if further measures are needed, as the house will understand, if further regulation is needed, of course this house will have a further say. as for following his leadership, mr speaker, they wobbled over plan b and over quarantine, and if we listened to him we wouldn't have had the vaccine roll—out, because we would have remained in the european medicines agency. we can't go on with a prime minister who is too weak to lead,
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so will he take time this christmas to look in the mirror and ask himself whether he has the trust and authority to lead this country? i respect the feelings... i respect the anxieties that colleagues have, of course i do. i respect and understand the legitimate anxieties that colleagues have about restrictions on their liberty, and on the liberty of people, but i believe that the approach we are taking is balanced and proportionate and right for this country. the last few weeks have undoubtedly been bruising for borisjohnson, and last night's vote calls into question his authority, his ability to persuade his party to back his plans. but while all the political drama plays out here, there is significant concern in government and in parliament about the spread of omicron, and what it might mean for further restrictions or guidance in the next few weeks. parliament breaks for christmas tomorrow —
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a relief for some in government, but there remain big questions about how the prime minister can rebuild his leadership and what further actions might be needed soon to tackle covid. joining us now is our political correspondent iain watson. how damaged do you think the prime minister is by these big and abroad rebellion he do anything to restore his authority at prime minister's questions? he his authority at prime minister's questions?— questions? he faced a broad rebellion. — questions? he faced a broad rebellion, people _ questions? he faced a broad rebellion, people on - questions? he faced a broad| rebellion, people on different questions? he faced a broad - rebellion, people on different sides of the brexit argument and people have been former cabinet ministers and people who had spent their whole life on the backbenches, some of the new intake, some of the newest conservative mps, like louie french, he said he was voting against his own government. that was the scale of it, 100 conservative mps, but prime minister's questions is not a
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good guide to the mood in the conservative benches because there is a tendency to rally round when faced with an attack from the opposition, so there was vocal support for the prime minister, lots of cheering when he attacked keir starmer for vacillating over the vaccination programme but the true guide to the mood on the conservative benches is partly the rebellion yesterday but also watch the reaction to the result in the shropshire by—election tomorrow. the liberal democrats are talking up their chances but one mp said even if it is a humiliating hold, if it is a conservative victory but with a low majority on a low turnout, their nerves will not be calm, so there's degree of authority which boris johnson has lost, but he's way of dealing with that is to move the conversation on as quickly as possible —— his way. he will be at a press conference in the next couple of hours and he will be talking by the threat posed by the omicron
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variant and the need to get the booster programme on steroids, basically, and attempt also to warn people of the dangers ahead, so moving the conversation on he will try to take the focus away from those questions which keir starmer raised about his lack of authority and lack of trust amongst his own mps. ~ . . and lack of trust amongst his own mps. ~ ., ., , and lack of trust amongst his own mps. ~ . ., , ., ., mps. we are hearing news about who will chair the — mps. we are hearing news about who will chair the covid _ mps. we are hearing news about who will chair the covid inquiry, _ mps. we are hearing news about who will chair the covid inquiry, have - will chair the covid inquiry, have you got any more details? we believe it will be baroness _ you got any more details? we believe it will be baroness hallet _ you got any more details? we believe it will be baroness hallet who - you got any more details? we believe it will be baroness hallet who is - you got any more details? we believe it will be baroness hallet who is a - it will be baroness hallet who is a retired appeal courtjudge and before that a criminal barrister but best known for leading the inquiry into the 77 attacks which took place 16 years ago in london. —— 7/7. at that inquiry at the time she was praised for how she handled the testimony of witnesses and indeed dealt with family members of the
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victims. in the end, when the inquiry concluded, she took the view that questions that have been raised about whether the secret services could have done more to have found out about the attackers or anticipated the attack, whether the emergency services could have done more to get to the victims, she said in the end that the deaths were all unavoidable but she had a wide—ranging number of recommendations including the funding of emergency medical care and so on, so she's experienced in dealing with a controversial area. she is also someone who won't hold back from pointing out where things have gone wrong but equally the government will be hoping that she might take a sympathetic view towards those who work in the middle of a crisis, in the way that she was understanding of the difficulties which the security services and emergency services faced during 7/7.
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borisjohnson made a pledge to the bereaved families that there would bereaved families that there would be a inquiry announced before christmas, and that has happened, but we have not heard from representatives from the brave families as to whether they think this is a good appointment. thanks for “oininu this is a good appointment. thanks forjoining us- _ so where does the rebellion leave the prime minister? mo hussein is a former special adviser to amber rudd as uk home secretary, and former no10 downing st chief press officer under david cameron. good afternoon. how much trouble do you think borisjohnson is in? he is you think boris johnson is in? he is in a precarious _ you think boris johnson is in? he is in a precarious position _ you think borisjohnson is in? he: 3 in a precarious position now, with the much larger rebellion than people expected yesterday, the prime minister made an attempt yesterday to talk to the rebels and give them a facetime and use his own political capital and the numbers were rumoured to be lower, but in reality thatis
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rumoured to be lower, but in reality that is not what has transpired. in terms of his authority being drained, and people trusting what number ten are doing and saying, especially the backbenches, this is a real issue. if you look at these people, there is always going to be a selection of backbench mps who just don't like the covid restrictions and they think the government is going too far, it is not like the conservatives, the government is intervening to much in peoples lives, in their view, but there were also people who were former ministers, select committee chairs, new intake mps who just got their seats a couple of years ago, mostly in labour held areas, on a borisjohnson ticket, and also an mp who has only been in the house for a couple of weeks, so a range of people and the prime minister is in a difficult position because many people who may not see eye to eye on much definitely see iti on the direction he is going on. ——
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definitely vc eye to eye on the direction he is going on. horse definitely vc eye to eye on the direction he is going on. how much was it a restriction _ direction he is going on. how much was it a restriction on _ direction he is going on. how much was it a restriction on how - direction he is going on. how much was it a restriction on how these i was it a restriction on how these covid restrictions are being planned but also how much the government is being run? i but also how much the government is bein: run? ~ ., , ., being run? i think a bit of both. the prime _ being run? i think a bit of both. the prime minister _ being run? i think a bit of both. the prime minister talked - being run? i think a bit of both. | the prime minister talked about having a conversation on mandatory vaccination, last week, but that was a step too far for many mps who thought that could be coming down the line. also other issues, six weeks with unforced errors from number ten whether it is marching mps up the hill to get them to vote a certain way on the owen paterson debacle only then for the government to u—turn, and it is the mps who have egg on their face and have to explain this to their constituents. and to other more recent issues, around the christmas party and the leaked videos, the government saying almost nothing to see here, there
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was no party, but at the same time investigating it and somebody resigning over it. that investigation is due to complete and a couple of days. all of this erodes trust and then there are other issues which some people feel strongly about, look at the small boats in the migration crisis, some mps feel that is not being gripped as effectively as it could, especially in a post covid contacts, and issues around the red announcement that the northern powerhouse rail, there were allegations of overpromising and under delivering and so for a variety of reasons there is disquiet and now it is all lies tomorrow on the north yorkshire by—election and seeing how that turns out. you the north yorkshire by-election and seeing how that turns out.— seeing how that turns out. you talk about the erosion _ seeing how that turns out. you talk about the erosion of _ seeing how that turns out. you talk about the erosion of trust, - seeing how that turns out. you talk about the erosion of trust, if - seeing how that turns out. you talk about the erosion of trust, if you i about the erosion of trust, if you were advising borisjohnson, what would you advise him to be doing? consultation and bringing people in and making them feel they are part of the decision—making process, just getting their views, that is
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essential. we hearfrom mps that they don't feel they are being consulted and they don't feel they are being told about things in advance before they are announced publicly, and if someone spent the time to say, how would this play out in your part of the country, what would be the reaction from your constituents, i think that would go a long way. it doesn't mean the govern has to agree with mps on everything and the government should not, it should have the right to make its own decisions, especially in a public health crisis, but trying to show people some of the data and being more transparent and making them feel they are involved, that creates goodwill and does go a long way and hopefully he would avoid a situation where just a couple of years ago you had a spectacular 80 seat majority and now you are relying on the opposition to get the business of your government through the house of commons. realize through the house of commons. really aood to talk through the house of commons. really good to talk to — through the house of commons. really good to talk to you. _ through the house of commons. really good to talk to you. thanks _ through the house of commons. really good to talk to you. thanks for- good to talk to you. thanks for joining us. we have some breaking
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news, a tweet from the health secretary, sajid javid. regarding the number of boosterjabs, a record 548,000 booster vaccines were administered yesterday, he says. thank you to everyone who made it possible, he says. this is a national mission so roll up your sleeves and get boosted now, he says. a record number of booster vaccines were administered yesterday, over half a million. the prime minister will lead a press conference at 5pm today, with the chief medical officer for england, professor chris whitty and the medical director of primary care for nhs england, dr nikki kanani. you can watch that here on bbc news. the cost of living has risen
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at its fastest rate for a decade, with inflation at 5.1% last month according to figures from the office for national statistics. rising transport and energy costs have driven the increase, which is substantially higher than analysts had been expecting and more than double the bank of england's inflation target of 2%. tomorrow, the bank has to decide whether or not to raise interest rates in response to the new inflation figures. here's our economics correspondent, andy verity. when chrissyjones from frome was younger, in the 1970s, they used to call it stagflation. as the economy slows almost to a stop, the cost of living is rising faster than it has in more than a decade. rose by 6.5%, the fastest in 30 years. electricity bills are up 19%, and on average bills for gas are up by 28%. when a previous supplier went bust
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and she switched to british gas, her bill almost doubled. we can't plan anything for the future. we probably won't have a holiday this coming year. and we were going to rescue another dog, which we had been planning to do, but i don't think that would be fair on the dog. it wouldn't be fair on our purse. the gradual reopening of the global economy this year has led to a surge in activity, meaning much higher demand for commodities like petrol. the supply has not kept up with demand, forcing up the average price of a litre of unleaded to a record £1.45.8p, compared to £1.13 a year ago. with manufacturers unable to make as many new cars owing to a shortage of microchips, the cost of second—hand cars has risen by 31% since april, as commuters sought to avoid public transport. on the financial markets, they're betting the bank of england will have to raise the official
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interest rate from a record low of 0.1%, but maybe not straightaway. normally, i think that would be a green light to go ahead and raise interest rates now, but we have all this uncertainty around the omicron variant. we don't know what is going to happen to the economy as a consquence in the next couple of months. and that is why, on balance, we think they will wait at least until february, assuming that hopefully the worst of the omicron situation is behind us by then. there's more upward inflationary pressure in the pipeline. the prices paid by manufacturers for raw materials like metals were up by an average of 14.3%, the fastest rise since 2008. after the worst decade in two centuries for improvements in living standards, they are now once again falling. the uk health security agency says arrangements are being made to release travellers currently staying in quarantine hotels, after the government announced that the red list of destinations was being scrapped in england.
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let's get more from our transport correspondent, katy austin. our people free to leave? the recise our people free to leave? the precise situation _ our people free to leave? tie: precise situation is still unclear, and because from four o'clock this morning they are no longer any countries on the red list, no one entering the uk from anywhere will have to enter a quarantine hotel but the question has been since we have the question has been since we have the announcement, what happens to the announcement, what happens to the people already in those hotels who had booked their ten day stay? a cabinet minister said they would be able to leave early but details on the process are still thin on the ground. people can according to the official red list rules face a fine official red list rules face a fine of up to £10,000 if they break the quarantine rules but since we heard that the government was going to allow people to leave early, some people this morning have taken it upon themselves to walk out and to leave, despite them being given a letter from the people at the
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department of health who manage the quarantine service, saying, don't leave, stay where you are, and there will be more details by lunchtime. it is about lunch time now and we still haven't heard any further details about the process but one person who is still at the hotel says she has been told they might be able to leave some time after four o'clock this afternoon but at the moment a lot of people just hang on and waiting to hear any more information.— and waiting to hear any more information. , , . , ., , information. this is costing people a considerable _ information. this is costing people a considerable amount _ information. this is costing people a considerable amount of- information. this is costing people a considerable amount of money, | information. this is costing people | a considerable amount of money, it is worth remembering. yes. a considerable amount of money, it is worth remembering.— is worth remembering. yes, people had to -a is worth remembering. yes, people had to pay more — is worth remembering. yes, people had to pay more than _ is worth remembering. yes, people had to pay more than £3000 - is worth remembering. yes, people had to pay more than £3000 per. had to pay more than £3000 per adult, the total cost is slightly less combined if you have two people in one room, but people have paid that money up front so there is also a question from some people in quarantine hotel is about whether they will get any money back from they will get any money back from the government. once again there have been sympathetic noises made by the health secretary but we don't have any confirmation about whether
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refunds will be made available and what the process will be. people have been in hotels for a varying length of time, some people have literally arrived yesterday or the day before and some might have already been nearing the end of their ten day stay, so at the moment there are questions to be answered but as i said, clearly some people have decided just to take it upon themselves to go home even though they have been told not to.— they have been told not to. thanks for “oininr they have been told not to. thanks forjoining us- _ a woman who killed 16—month—old star hobson after inflicting "utterly catastrophic" injuries on the toddler will be sentenced this afternoon. bouncer and amateur boxer, savannah brockhill, who was found guilty yesterday of murdering star, has been described by the little girl's family as "pure evil". star's mother, frankie smith, was cleared of murder, but convicted of causing or allowing the toddler's death. a man has been arrested on suspicion of murder and arson following a fatal fire in reading that has left one person dead
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and several others unaccounted for. thames valley police said the large fire at a property in grovelands road was not being treated as a terrorist incident. the 31—year—old man remains in custody. people have been told to avoid the area, with several road closures in place. parents forced to give up their babies for adoption in the 1950s, 60s and 70s will be among those giving evidence to an inquiry which gets underway today. thejoint parliamentary committee on human rights is looking into the forced adoption of babies of unmarried mothers during those years. duncan kennedy reports. it is nearly 50 years since pat king was forced to give up her newborn baby. pat became pregnant aged 15 in 1973. she wasn't married and, almost immediately, a social worker arrived to confront her.
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i was the wicked girl and i had sinned and i needed to put this right and the way i could put this right was to help some family who really needed this baby. did she call you wicked? she did call me wicked, yes. it is thought around 400,000 unmarried women in england and wales were pressured to give up their babies for adoption in the 30 years after the second world war. even as they gave birth, some nurses treated them cruelly. you weren't allowed to scream, you were told to shut up and stop making a noise and stop being silly, it was your own fault. "you have got yourself into this mess." in the delivery room, a nurse or midwife is telling you to shut up screaming? yes. there was even more anguish when pat came to hand over her baby son. the social workerjust walked towards us, held out her arms, took the baby, well... tried to fight her to get the baby off me but that didn't work
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and she took the baby and that was it, just a thank you and went, that was it. today's parliamentary inquiry follows a series of reports on bbc news with dozens of the birth mothers. the government says it was society to blame for forced adoptions, but the birth mothers say that's wrong. it wasn't society that took my baby away, it was the state and all the employees of the state, they were all in cahoots with this practice. which was just wrong. and, therefore, the state should apologise? yes, therefore the state should apologise. pat king has never been reunited with her son. she hopes the new inquiry will help bring comfort to thousands of women like her who had their babies taken. duncan kennedy, bbc news. he may have missed out on a record—breaking 8th world championship at the weekend, but formula one star, sir lewis hamilton, has been picking up a title of a different sort this
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morning. to receive the honour of knighthood, sir lewis— to receive the honour of knighthood, sir lewis hamilton _ to receive the honour of knighthood, sir lewis hamilton for— to receive the honour of knighthood, sir lewis hamilton for services - to receive the honour of knighthood, sir lewis hamilton for services to - sir lewis hamilton for services to moiorsporl _ the 36—year—old was knighted by the prince of wales at windsor castle. our sports correspondent, joe wilson, was there. these events are essentially private events, for the recipients of the honour and their families, events, for the recipients of the honour and theirfamilies, so lewis hamilton and his mother came out and posed for pictures for us, but he declined the opportunity to actually do any interviews. that is his right. i've been to many of these ceremonies with stars of sport and stage and screen who decide they don't really want them to become media events but of course we are all desperately interested about what might be going through lewis hamilton's my, does he feel contentment or any resentment about what happened in the final lap of the abu dhabi grand prix? there is at least the potential of an appeal from the mercedes team about the
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whole outcome of this year's world championship. we should remember that sir lewis hamilton is already the most successful driver in f1 history equal with seven titles but he has won more actual races than anybody else in f1 history. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. the weather pattern is settling down as high pressure establishes itself across the uk and today we have a mixture of weather, a lot of cloud and sunshine in the north and also a bit of rain, thanks to this weak weather front which bit of rain, thanks to this weak weatherfront which are bit of rain, thanks to this weak weather front which are starting to push its way north as we head through the evening and overnight but this area of high pressure will dominate the weather to end the week and into the weekend. we hold on to the cloudy skies, central southern areas with mist and murk and the weather front pushed into the north—west of scotland to bring like rain and drizzle and the best of any clear spells will be towards the
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north—east where it can be cold with mist and fog patches. thursday, largely cloudy, light winds for most, dry thanks to high pressure, any brightness over the north—east corner, and the weather front becomes confined to the far north of the uk to bring showery bursts of rain to the northern isles. it stays very mild for the time of year. similar picture on friday and also into the weekend. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... a senior health official warns that cases of the omicron variant are doubling in less than every two days in most parts of the uk. new rules come into force, meaning adults in england must show a covid pass to get into nightclubs, big sports matches and other large events. more pressure on borisjohnson, after 100 of his own mps vote against the covid passes. is the party over for you now,
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is the party overfor you now, prime minister? the cost of living hits its highest level for a decade, inflation surging to 5.1% in the year to november. and arise sir lewis — he may have lost the world title, but today lewis hamilton has been knighted at windsor castle. srna lewis hamilton, for services to moiorsporl — srna lewis hamilton, for services to motorsport. —— sir lewis hamilton. sport now, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre... here's gavin. very good afternoon to you. sergio a: uero very good afternoon to you. sergio aguero has — very good afternoon to you. sergio aguero has confirmed _ very good afternoon to you. sergio aguero has confirmed his - very good afternoon to you. if t? aguero has confirmed his retirement from football. he made the announcement in a tearful press conference earlier today. former manchester city and argentina striker joined manchester city and argentina strikerjoined barcelona in the summer but only made five appearances. he suffered chest pains and breathing difficulties in his last game and has now decided to call it a day after scoring 427 goals in 786 games. he told a news conference in barcelona it was a
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very hard moment for him, but that he was happy with his decision, adding" my health comes first". translation: i adding" my health comes first". translation:— adding" my health comes first". translation: ., ., , ., translation: i want to tell everyone that i did everything _ translation: i want to tell everyone that i did everything possible - translation: i want to tell everyone that i did everything possible to - that i did everything possible to have some hope, but there wasn't very much. i'm very proud of the career i have had, very happy, and i will leave now with my head held high, happy. idon't will leave now with my head held high, happy. i don't know what awaits me in the next life, but i know that there are a lot of people that love me, and want the best for me. ,, :, that love me, and want the best for me. ,, ., ~ ., that love me, and want the best for me. , ., : ., ., me. sergio aguero there. there are four premier _ me. sergio aguero there. there are four premier league _ me. sergio aguero there. there are four premier league matches - me. sergio aguero there. there are l four premier league matches tonight and they will be the first big sporting events where spectators will need to show a vaccination confirmation or an l f t negative
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test. it comes after a rise in the omicron variant. one of tonight's games will see western visit arsenal. ~ , ., arsenal. well, everything that ha--ened arsenal. well, everything that happened this _ arsenal. well, everything that happened this week _ arsenal. well, everything that happened this week obviously| arsenal. well, everything that i happened this week obviously is arsenal. well, everything that. happened this week obviously is a worrying — happened this week obviously is a worrying sign. they have been cancelled _ worrying sign. they have been cancelled and postponed for that reason, — cancelled and postponed for that reason, staff members with really hi-h reason, staff members with really high numbers of positive tests, so yeah, _ high numbers of positive tests, so yeah. it _ high numbers of positive tests, so yeah. it is — high numbers of positive tests, so yeah, it is really worrying. meanwhile, newcastle manager eddie howe says covid protocols could even impact on transfer business in january. the club is thought to have lots to spend, following their recently saudi backed takeover but whether a player is vaccinated or not may well influence a club's decision to sign them. certainly something _ decision to sign them. certainly something we _ decision to sign them. certainly something we are _ decision to sign them. certainly something we are considering. | decision to sign them. certainly . something we are considering. the vaccination — something we are considering. the vaccination status— something we are considering. the vaccination status is _ something we are considering. the vaccination status is something - something we are considering. the vaccination status is something we | vaccination status is something we take very— vaccination status is something we take very seriously. _ vaccination status is something we take very seriously. we've - vaccination status is something we take very seriously. we've been i vaccination status is something we take very seriously. we've been in| take very seriously. we've been in regular— take very seriously. we've been in regular dialogue _ take very seriously. we've been in regular dialogue with _ take very seriously. we've been in regular dialogue with all _ take very seriously. we've been in regular dialogue with all of - take very seriously. we've been in regular dialogue with all of our i regular dialogue with all of our players — regular dialogue with all of our players about _ regular dialogue with all of our players about educating - regular dialogue with all of our players about educating theml regular dialogue with all of our i players about educating them and making _ players about educating them and
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making sure — players about educating them and making sure that _ players about educating them and making sure that we _ players about educating them and making sure that we are - players about educating them and making sure that we are in - players about educating them and making sure that we are in tune . players about educating them and i making sure that we are in tune with everybody _ making sure that we are in tune with everybody else — making sure that we are in tune with everybody else and _ making sure that we are in tune with everybody else and following - making sure that we are in tune with everybody else and following the i everybody else and following the same _ everybody else and following the same guidelines _ everybody else and following the same guidelines was _ everybody else and following the same guidelines was not - everybody else and following the same guidelines was not onto i same guidelines was not onto cricket, same guidelines was not onto cricket. and — same guidelines was not onto cricket, and james _ same guidelines was no cricket, and james anderson same guidelines was no- cricket, and james anderson and stuart broad back in england's 12 man squad for the second ashes test against australia, a day night game that starts in the early hours of tomorrow morning in adelaide. the pair had been left out of the opening match, which england lost. anderson is england's leading wicket taker, broughtjust behind him. anderson believes the short time after a heavy defeat in brisbane has been good for england. it’s after a heavy defeat in brisbane has been good for england.— been good for england. it's been uuite a been good for england. it's been quite a good _ been good for england. it's been quite a good thing _ been good for england. it's been quite a good thing to _ been good for england. it's been quite a good thing to get - been good for england. it's been | quite a good thing to get straight back into the nets and have a game and quite quick succession. get straight back out there and try and put things right. play a much better game than we did at the gabba. it is a great opportunity for anyone, whoever gets the nod tomorrow, the 11 that play, great opportunity to get us back of the series was that meanwhile, australia have confirmed david warner will be fit enough to face england. the batter had been
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struggling with an injury, however bowlerjosh hazlewood has lost his fitness battle and will be replaced byj richardson. coverage across the bbc from 4am tomorrow. england will play the all blacks at twickenham as part of next yea r�*s play the all blacks at twickenham as part of next year's autumn international series. it will be the sides have met since the 2019 world cup semifinal in the first time at twickenham since 2018. england will also play world champions south africa, argentina and japan. that is all the support from us. -- all —— all the support from us. —— sport from us. police forces in england and wales have pledged to make more effort to target men who pose the highest risk of violence to women and girls. it's after officers were criticised following the murder of sarah everard. joining me now is the national police lead for violence against women and girls, deputy chief constable maggie blyth. it is good to have you with us. thanks forjoining us. do you
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accept, first of all, that there has been a huge blow to confidence in the service, especially among women. we think there's been tremendous blow to policing, and the trust and confidence of women and girls in policing over the last few weeks and months, and that's something that we have taken very, very seriously, and it's behind our launch of the first national framework for tackling violence against women and girls within policing. it violence against women and girls within policing.— within policing. it seems almost incredible that _ within policing. it seems almost incredible that it's _ within policing. it seems almost incredible that it's the _ within policing. it seems almost incredible that it's the first i incredible that it's the first national framework for this. why has it taken so long? each national framework for this. why has it taken so long?— it taken so long? each police force in encland it taken so long? each police force in england and _ it taken so long? each police force in england and wales _ it taken so long? each police force in england and wales is _ it taken so long? each police force in england and wales is different. | in england and wales is different. we have 43 different police forces, and there's already been much work around domestic abuse, rape and serious sexual offences, but this is the first time we have recognised that national consistency over what works in relation to tackling these awful crimes is really important, so
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this is about consistency across our 43 forces, and it's also recognising that that trust in confidence, the cultural changes needs a fundamental shift in how policing deals with it. one of the things you are going to tackle is, in what way are you going to target these people?— to target these people? there are three elements _ to target these people? there are three elements to _ to target these people? there are three elements to our— to target these people? there are j three elements to our framework, recognising that loss of trust and confidence that we think many people, women, girls feel, and have certainly told me since i came into role. we recognise that cultural shift around our workforce and around how we prioritise violence against women and girls offences is important. we will place that focus on perpetrators, usually male, not always, but perpetrators of these offences and victims say to
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policing, say two police officers and staff that sometimes when they are in the middle of an investigation, they feel under investigation, they feel under investigation, and we want to put that shift very much on offenders and on an offender focus, that shift very much on offenders and on an offenderfocus, and ensuring that every police force is reviewing always the risk that men present to women and girls in relation to these types of offences, so it is a real important shift focusing on the fact that this is predominantly a male issue, male violence against women and girls that we are reviewing. bud violence against women and girls that we are reviewing.— that we are reviewing. and what about police _ that we are reviewing. and what about police officers _ that we are reviewing. and what i about police officers themselves? i mean, something clearly went very wrong with wayne couzens, convicted of the murder of sarah everard. will you be changing your vetting procedures? what about recruitment? the focus on our own culture and the standards and behaviours we expect within policing is paramount to this framework. there is no place in policing for anyone who commits an
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offence of a violent or sexual nature against anyone else, whether thatis nature against anyone else, whether that is a member of the public or within policing itself. so those highest standards that policing needs to have to maintain trust in confidence is very much at the bedrock of our framework, and we are asking every force to review any allegations of perpetrators of domestic abuse or rape, serious sexual offences, or any offence against women and girls within our own workforce. brute against women and girls within our own workforce.— own workforce. we must leave it there, own workforce. we must leave it there. thank— own workforce. we must leave it there, thank you _ own workforce. we must leave it there, thank you very _ own workforce. we must leave it there, thank you very much. i because i want to bring you some news just in to us here at the bbc. reality tv star katie price given a 16—week suspended sentence for driving offences. districtjudge amanda kelly said she was lucky to not be going to prison, but said her hands were tied, and "you deserve to spend
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christmas behind bars". katie price has already been banned from driving on five separate occasions. she crashed her car in september of 2021 and was found to be over the legal limit for drink and had taken cocaine. in afghanistan, 1 million children under the age of five are at risk of starvation this winter, according to the world health organization. charities have warned that the humanitarian crisis facing the country after 20 years of war means a further 2.2 million people will suffer acute malnutrition. our afghanistan correspondent, secunder kermani, reports from the western province of ghor. a nation struggling to survive. a hospital struggling to cope. the war is over in afghanistan, but hunger is the new threat. these mothers desperately waiting for nutrition packs for their malnourished babies.
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"it's like this every day," he says. "it's been like this for four or five months." translation: we have | nothing, we have no food, my children are sick, we don't have money for medicine. a million children are at risk of starvation. with internationalfunding cut off following the taliban takeover, afghanistan's aid—dependent economy is collapsing. life for many here has always been hard, but with food prices and unemployment rising more families than ever recorded are going hungry. translation: right now, - there are two patients in a bed. sometimes, there are even three. when this child first arrived, the family did not have a single penny to buy medicine. the doctors and staff collected money for medicine to help them. we have come to the remote
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province of ghor. it's a ten—hour drive to the nearest big city. the snow here picturesque, but there's less than usual. drought is adding to the crisis. we're visiting the province's only hospital. staff are being paid for the first time in five months after the international committee of the red cross stepped in. but most patients have to buy their own medicines as supplies are so low. we don't have anything now. no medicines? no medicines. how difficult is it for you as the doctor? we are suffering, sometimes crying. if you want to get an idea of how dysfunctional things here can be, this is a child malnutrition ward. temperatures here can drop to minus ten degrees celsius at night, even lower at times. they've only got enough wood in this heater to last a couple of hours. translation: my message i
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to the international community is this is the worst situation we have ever faced. please deliver humanitarian aid to our people, negotiate with the islamic emirate and release their frozen funds. it's notjust hunger they're battling here. with the onset of winter, cases of severe pneumonia are on the rise. "we don't have fuel, we don't have shawls or warm clothes," she says. "we don't have a real life." born into an uncertain world. even when billions of dollars of international support were coming in, hospitals here were badly under resourced. now staff are doing what they can, but they say they need help. secunder kermani, bbc news, ghor province. the headlines on bbc news... a senior health official warns that cases of the omicron variant
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are doubling in less than every two days in most parts of the uk. new rules come into force, meaning adults in england must show a covid pass to get into nightclubs, big sports matches and other large events. the cost of living hits its highest level for a decade — inflation surging to 5.1% in the year to november. three premier league matches tonight will be the first big sporting events where fans will need to declare a covid pass or negative lateral flow for entry into the stadium. it's part of the government's "plan b" to combat the spread of the omicron variant of covid—19. alex howell has been to crystal palace to brighton is one of the team playing later today. brighton is one of the team playing latertoday. paul brighton is one of the team playing later today. paul balfour is chief executive and deputy chairman at brighton and hove albion football club and i'm delighted to sayjoins us now. to have you with us and i am sure is quite an porton down busy
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matchday actually. fans from today have to show proof of vaccination or proof of this negative lateral flow test. will it be possible for you? well, first of all they have to complete a declaration to show their covid status in advance of the match, that is in advance of them attending, that enables us to have a look at all 30,000 people due to attend, to make sure they understand what the requirements are, and then in agreement with our local authority, we will be checking around 20% of those actually attending the match, where we will actually have a physical check of their covid status, either through their covid status, either through their covid status, either through their covid passport or through their covid passport or through their negative lateral flow test. we will also be checking that against the physical ticket, the digital ticket they will be bringing, and also their photo id, so we can check they are the person they say they are, and therefore that the covid vaccination is valid. so are, and therefore that the covid vaccination is valid.— vaccination is valid. so it sounds like uuite vaccination is valid. so it sounds like quite a _ vaccination is valid. so it sounds like quite a lengthy _ vaccination is valid. so it sounds like quite a lengthy process. i vaccination is valid. so it sounds i like quite a lengthy process. have you had to bring in more staff and stewards to make this happen? we try
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to maximise — stewards to make this happen? we try to maximise our— stewards to make this happen? we try to maximise our numbers _ stewards to make this happen? we try to maximise our numbers to _ stewards to make this happen? we try to maximise our numbers to try i stewards to make this happen? we try to maximise our numbers to try and i to maximise our numbers to try and keep things as smooth as possible, but like a lot of other industries, at the moment, you know, getting staff numbers up to the levels we needifs staff numbers up to the levels we need it's been a challenge, and particularly when we only require them in our case for one match every two weeks at home. so it is a challenge, we are asking fans to be patient, i think it is really important that they help us and help our staff as much as possible so that we can keep the process as simple as possible and as smooth for their entry as we can. [30 simple as possible and as smooth for their entry as we can.— their entry as we can. do you su ort their entry as we can. do you support these _ their entry as we can. do you support these measures, i their entry as we can. do you support these measures, the their entry as we can. do you - support these measures, the reason i ask this question is, because actually i've been to your ground and i was at the other week, and it was pretty safe in the ground, but the minute you come out and then pile onto the train going back, you're all squashed against each other, and it seemed to me all restrictions then flew out the window, so ijust wonder how much you actually support what's being asked of you to do? first you actually support what's being asked of you to do?— asked of you to do? first of all, obviously. _ asked of you to do? first of all, obviously. we _ asked of you to do? first of all, obviously, we can _ asked of you to do? first of all, obviously, we can only - asked of you to do? first of all, obviously, we can only control. asked of you to do? first of all, i obviously, we can only control what happens on our footprint and in obviously, we can only control what happens on ourfootprint and in our stadium, we can't take response ability of public transport, but of course people have been asked to wear masks on public transport for
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quite some time now and i think the majority of people have got used to it, then got out of the habit, and i think we'll have to get back into the habit. we support the proposals because, at the end of the day, we have had nearly two years on and off of having restricted capacities come a long period playing behind closed doors, we managed to get fans back into the stadium, the vast majority of people are really happy to be back at the stadium, and honestly, from a business point of view, an economic point of view, we are delighted to have them, so this seems to me to be a relatively small price to pay in order to keep our business running. we have asked people to use their common sense, to be considerate of others, and be compliant, and if they can be those three things, then we've got every chance of keeping people safe, protecting the nhs and ultimately keeping our stadium is full. you mention about _ keeping our stadium is full. you mention about having to play behind closed doors in the past, if cases continue to rise, can you see that might come back on the table as an option? might come back on the table as an 0 tion? �* , : might come back on the table as an otion? �* , ., ,., might come back on the table as an otion? �* , ., ., option? i'm sure at some point down the track, option? i'm sure at some point down the track. if — option? i'm sure at some point down the track. if we _ option? i'm sure at some point down the track, if we don't _
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option? i'm sure at some point down the track, if we don't get _ option? i'm sure at some point down the track, if we don't get a _ option? i'm sure at some point down the track, if we don't get a grip i option? i'm sure at some point down the track, if we don't get a grip on i the track, if we don't get a grip on the track, if we don't get a grip on the infection rate rising as it has been, that's going to be something for the government to debate. what we have to do in the meantime as an industry is do everything possible to be as compliant as possible to help them ensure that doesn't happen. it is one of those cases where we all need to help each other. football fans need to help us keep them coming to matches by doing as we asked them to do, and we need to help government by making sure that we follow through with the rules and actually comply with them ourselves so that we can keep our business is running the way we would like to. so this is one of those occasions where we can all help each other and ultimately, hopefully, keep people out of hospital and take the pressure off the nhs during this obviously difficult period. paul barber from _ obviously difficult period. paul barber from brighton & hove albion barberfrom brighton & hove albion football club, really good to talk to you, thank you forjoining us. thank you. an increasing number of care companies supporting people who are older and disabled in their own homes say they're turning away new clients because of staff shortages. nearly 340 care providers in the uk responded to questions
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from the home care association. most worry the requirement for all home care staff to have covid vaccines will add to their recruitment problems. our social affairs editor, alison holt, has been speaking to one family—run care company. marion is three hours into what is going to be a very long day. morning, christine. she and her husband run their own home care company... how are you? ..but staff shortages mean both are also out providing support for people like christine. not good? no. 0k. the three visits christine gets a day provide the personal care she needs but also allow her to maintain her independence. she's previously been stuck in hospital waiting for home care and knows how miserable it can be. it's hard when you are in hospital and you are bed blocking. what they were doing for me, i can do at home, i can take my own pills, or get my pills, without them coming around me four times a dayjust
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to give me a pill and i was sitting there doing nothing. you have a good morning, and i'll see you later. 0k, thank you. but to provide support at home takes staff, and a survey of nearly 340 care providers by the home care association found nearly all those who responded were facing real difficulties recruiting. for marion and her husband, tim, that means constantjuggling to ensure their existing clients get the support they need. effectively, i'm doing a 16—hour day, and last week was like that — pretty much every day was seven till 11. it'sjust exhausting. how sustainable is that? it's not. like many other home care providers, they are turning away new clients, even though councils and the nhs are desperate for them to take on people who are ready to leave hospital. there is a high demand. we get an e—mail through every day from the council. i've got four on my e—mail at the moment that ijust noticed, but i can't take the clients
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on because i haven't got the staff and it's a never—ending circle. to try to ease some of the immediate staffing pressures, the government has announced an extra £300 million to provide bonuses, overtime and pay rises for care staff. that money runs until march. ok, thank you, bye. alison holt, bbc news. i want to bring you a quick update on the story we were reporting on a little early about those people who are currently quarantining in hotels after returning to the uk from red list countries. we arejust we are just hearing people will be able to lead room for pm this afternoon. people currently in hotel quarantine have been told they will be leaving today. they've been given a letter from the department of health and social care's managed quarantine team saying that departures should begin from 4pm.
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i should just add that the letter states that people who have tested positive for covid must continue to complete their quarantine. iam also i am also getting some other news into us here at the bbc, sojust bear with me if you wouldn't mind. another court case we have been reporting on. but my computer is now not working. so let's try now. yes, here we go. thank you for bearing with me. david fuller, the 67—year—old man, has been handed a whole life sentence. this is at maidstone crown court. this is after he admitted the murders of wendy nell, who was 25, and caroline piers, who was 20. those murders took place back in 1987. he has also been handed a whole life sentence because of sexually assaulting the
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bodies of women and girls in hospital mortuary is. you may remember this story, it is very distressing, but david fuller has been handed a whole life sentence today for his crimes and we will bring you more details on that from the court as soon as we get them. in the court as soon as we get them. in the meantime, another court case, and katie price has been handed a 16 week suspended jail sentence at crawley magistrates' court. that's for drink—driving while disqualified and without insurance. she was also given a two—year driving ban. our correspondent david sillitoe is outside crawley magistrates' court, and hejoins us now. david, bring us up—to—date with what happened in court. up-to-date with what happened in court. ~ , ., , court. well, this was the sentencing. _ court. well, this was the sentencing. katie - court. well, this was the sentencing. katie price i court. well, this was the i sentencing. katie price had court. well, this was the _ sentencing. katie price had admitted at the time when that crash happened that, yes, she was driving while disqualified, driving under the
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influence, and driving without insurance. thejudge influence, and driving without insurance. the judge said influence, and driving without insurance. thejudge said it influence, and driving without insurance. the judge said it was one of the worst driving records she had ever encountered. she described her as incredibly selfish, and said "you deserve to spend christmas behind bars", but said her hands had been tied by the previous decision in court and that she could only handed a suspended prison sentence katie price. suspended for 12 months. so providing there are no further offences, she will remain free. but there will also be 100 hours of community service and of course rehabilitation. she has orally spent time at the priory for problems with drink and drugs, and that is, we have heard nothing so far from drink and drugs, and that is, we have heard nothing so farfrom katie price. everyone is gathered outside the court here, expecting her to emerge at the next few minutes, but in the dock, she was impassive as the verdict, the sentence was read out today, and leftjust seconds
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afterwards. she was described by the judge to have been incredibly lucky not to be spending christmas behind bars. : ., ,., .,, not to be spending christmas behind bars. : ., .,, ., bars. and david, are you able to tell us why _ bars. and david, are you able to tell us why the _ bars. and david, are you able to tell us why the district - bars. and david, are you able to tell us why the district judge i bars. and david, are you able to| tell us why the district judge said tell us why the districtjudge said her hands were tied? that tell us why the district judge said her hands were tied?— tell us why the district judge said her hands were tied? at the previous heafina her hands were tied? at the previous hearin: at her hands were tied? at the previous hearing at crawley _ her hands were tied? at the previous hearing at crawley magistrates, i her hands were tied? at the previous hearing at crawley magistrates, she l hearing at crawley magistrates, she had pleaded guilty to the charges. you've got to remember she has orally been banned from driving on five separate occasions on two or three years, it is said there will be a deferment of the sentencing, and provided she went to the priory, there were no further offences, which those criteria were met, and so the judge which those criteria were met, and so thejudge said which those criteria were met, and so the judge said her hands were tied, and she said if it was up to her, she would be going to prison, but she said that katie price was
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incredibly lucky not to be going to prison. incredibly lucky not to be going to rison. ,, ., ., ,, ,., incredibly lucky not to be going to rison. ,, ., . ~ prison. david sillitoe, thank you so much for that _ prison. david sillitoe, thank you so much for that update. _ prison. david sillitoe, thank you so much for that update. as _ prison. david sillitoe, thank you so much for that update. as we i prison. david sillitoe, thank you so much for that update. as we were l much for that update. as we were just telling you... david fuller, 67, has been handed a whole life sentence at maidstone crown court after admitting the 1987 murders of wendy knell, 25, and caroline pierce, 20, and sexually assaulting the bodies of women and girls in hospital mortuaries. are correspondent tom siemons is outside maidstone crown court. bring us up—to—date. in outside maidstone crown court. bring us up-to-date-_ us up-to-date. in the last few minutes. _ us up-to-date. in the last few minutes. as — us up-to-date. in the last few minutes, as you _ us up-to-date. in the last few minutes, as you say, - us up-to-date. in the last few minutes, as you say, in i us up-to-date. in the last few minutes, as you say, in fact, l us up-to-date. in the last few- minutes, as you say, in fact, david fuller, who is 67, has been given two whole life sentences for the murder of wendy nell and caroline piers in 1987. a cold case investigation carried out by kent police only sold in recent years. we
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have had a long, harrowing hearing this morning with statements made by the parents of the victims of the two women, the young women he killed, but also the relatives of up to 100 victims who were lying at rest in mortuaries at two hospitals where david villa worked as a maintenance man, just to warn you, this is a distressing material, which has been the subject of this court case and it may be if you have young people perhaps listening to turn down the volume, but david fuller was accused and admitted sexually abusing a large number of dead bodies inside those two mortuaries. sentencing him, the judge said he was a vulture, picking his victims out from among the dead. she sentenced him for 12 years in relation to those offences in the mortuaries, and as i say, two whole
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life sentences for the murders of wendy knell and caroline pierce. this means that the age of 67 that he will spend the rest of his life in prison. he will spend the rest of his life in rison. : ~ he will spend the rest of his life in rison. ., ,, ,., he will spend the rest of his life in rison. : ~' ,. ., he will spend the rest of his life in rison. ., ,, ., ., in prison. thank you for that u date. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. the weather really settling down later this week, as high pressure establishes itself right across the uk. today we have a mixture of weather, a lot of cloud in the south come a bit of sunshine in the north and also a bit of rain, thanks to this weak weatherfront, and also a bit of rain, thanks to this weak weather front, which are starting to push its way northwards now as we have through this evening and overnight. this area of high pressure really will dominate the weather to end the week and indeed into the weekend. so we hold on to the cloudy skies, central and southern areas come a bit of mist and murk, that weatherfront southern areas come a bit of mist and murk, that weather front pushing into the north—west of scotland with some light rain and drizzle, the best of any clear spells will be towards the north—east and here it will turn quite chilly with some mist and fog patches developing here as well. for thursday then, a largely cloudy picture, light winds for most, mainly dry thanks to
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high—pressure, the best of any brightness will be because this north—east corner, the weather front combined to the far north of the uk to bring a few showery bursts of rain. you can see it stays very mild for the time of year. similar we head into friday and also into the weekend. —— similar picture.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: david fuller, who murdered two women in 1987, and sexually abused at least 102 dead women and girls in hospital mortuaries, has been told he will spend the rest of his life in prison. a senior health official warns that cases of the omicron variant are doubling in less than every two days in most parts of the uk. it's probably the most significant threat we've had since the start of the pandemic, and i'm sure, for example, that the numbers we see on data over the next few days will be quite staggering. new rules come into force meaning adults in england must show a covid pass to get into nightclubs, big sports matches and other large events. is the party over for - you now, prime minister? more pressure on borisjohnson
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after 100 of his own mps vote against the covid passes. his own mps have had enough. they won't defend him. they won't turn up to support him, and if he proposes them they won't vote for basic public health measures. i understand the legitimate anxieties that colleagues have about restrictions on their liberty, and on the liberty of people, but i believe the approach we are taking is balanced and proportionate and right for this country. reality tv star katie price has been given a 16—week suspended jail term, after admitting drink—driving while disqualified and without insurance. the cost of living hits its highest level for a decade — inflation surging to 5.1% in the year to november.
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we start with news that's broken in the last 15 minutes. david fuller, who murdered two women in tunbridge wells in 1987, and sexually abused at least 102 dead women and girls in hospital mortuaries, has been told he will spend the rest of his life injail. a warning that this story contains details of sexual offending which some viewers may find distressing. our correspondent tom symonds is outside maidstone crown court. bring us up—to—date with what has been happening. this bring us up-to-date with what has been happening-— bring us up-to-date with what has been happening. this is the end of a lona been happening. this is the end of a long journey — been happening. this is the end of a long journey for— been happening. this is the end of a long journey for the _ been happening. this is the end of a long journey for the police _ been happening. this is the end of a long journey for the police officers i long journey for the police officers who brought david fuller to trial and to justice in the last few weeks. he admitted a few weeks ago the murder of wendy now and caroline pierce, two women in their 20s who
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were living in small flats in time with wales in 1987. that case took a long time to solve because dna techniques in the 1980s were not up to thejob of techniques in the 1980s were not up to the job of identifying the samples that had been found at the seams of those two murders, samples we now note left by david fuller. but a cold case was only on the files and so can police kept going with it and improvements in dna technology which allows the police to identify family members of its aspects and narrow down the number of people they are looking at, eventually enabled them to identify david fuller. they knocked on his door in late 2020 in the middle of the pandemic and arrested him. what they found inside his crowded terraced house in heathfield in east sussex was truly shocking. that
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house was full of storage items, hard drives, computer devices, but also there were a vast amount of still pictures and videos stored on computers and on tapes. what police found was evidence that david fuller who had been a maintenance man at two hospitals in this part of kent, around tunbridge wells, that he had been sexually abusing dead bodies inside the mortuaries of the hospitals he worked at. he had been filming it himself and he had kept all of the footage he had filmed. he had carefully categorised it and catalogued it and he had stored it until the point where the police found it, taped to the back of a chest of drawers hidden inside a cupboard. that evidence was damning and also shocking and i've spoken to the police officer whose job and also shocking and i've spoken to the police officer whosejob it and also shocking and i've spoken to the police officer whose job it is to look at pictures of child abuse in pursuit of child abusers and his
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job was initially to assess who might be tasked to look at david fuller's videos and he said he felt he couldn't let any of his team do it. the stuff was so shocking. when he finally undertook that job it. the stuff was so shocking. when he finally undertook thatjob of looking at the footage he said he was extremely upset and it really deeply affected him. david fuller came to trial and he pleaded guilty to those offences, the mortuary offences as they became known, but he held out when it came to the murders but eventually faced with the evidence against him, he pleaded guilty. today was his sentencing hearing and it has been going on all morning and we heard some harrowing testimonies from some of the families, both of the two murdered young women but also of the victims, 102 victims who were laying invest in those mortuaries where david fuller was able to abuse them. —— in
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rest. wendy knell, the first victim was happy and successful and planning to get married when she was murdered in herflat in tunbridge wells. caroline pierce was a lively young woman who was finding her place in the world when david fuller who was a 32—year—old prowler at the time, he had a habit of hanging around outside houses, he selected those victims, and killed them. caroline pierce's body was found in romney marshes which is about 30 miles away from tunbridge wells, dumped in a ditch. turning to the mortuary offences, we heard the chiefjustice say that david fuller, who chose to offend against these women commit to sexually abuse them inside the mortuary, was like a vulture picking out his victims from amongst the dead. we had a great deal of discussion about the length of the sentence that he should serve and in the end it came down to the fact that the justice felt he had to
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spend the rest of his life in prison, he has two whole life sentences and that is the kind of sentences and that is the kind of sentence that was given to for example harold shipman who killed a number of older women some years ago, and other sentences, 50 years, for example, have also been given to one man who carried out a rain of terror, bombing campaign. we have heard a great deal of what the victims of these offences, the relatives of these victims, have felt and experience of what david fuller has done, best growth discussed in the terms of one of those women, —— best discussed in the terms of one of those women, the mother of caroline pierce said it had been a horrific part of her life which continues to this day. thanks for “oininr
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which continues to this day. thanks forjoining us- _ the head of the uk health security agency says the growth of the omicron variant is going to be "staggering". drjenny harries described omicron as probably the "most significant threat to public health since the start of the pandemic." from today, adults in england must now show a covid pass to get into nightclubs, big sports matches and other large events — it brings england broadly into line with scotland, wales and northern ireland. the new rules were approved last night, despite a commons rebellion by 100 conservative mps. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. the race to get boosters into arms continues this morning in sheffield. over—18s in england can now book a slot online to get theirjab. the number of suspected omicron infections is growing fast, but, speaking to mps this morning, the head of the uk health security agency stressed we're still only at the beginning of this latest outbreak. it's probably the most
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significant threat we've had since the start of the pandemic, and i'm sure, for example, that the numbers that we see on data over the next few days will be quite staggering compared to the rate of growth that we've seen in cases for previous variants. with that in mind, new regulations requiring a covid pass to enter larger venues, like football grounds, aim to at least slow the spread of the variant. the new rules bring england closer into line with the rest of the uk, and tonight, when crystal palace take on southampton, fans will need to show a pass to get in. it's something that we are well prepared for. it's something that, you know, we've had great support from other clubs. as you're aware, other clubs have actually implemented this and tried it for various games. for example, we've done exactly the same — we trialled it, done soft checks on supporters, supporters have been really receptive of that. the night—time economy will also feel the impact. pubs like this one in bristol have already taken a hit — 80% of christmas party bookings cancelled.
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constantly being stabbed in the back all the time, basically, by all these new rules and regulations. these few weeks, with all our corporate bookings, that's when we get some money in the pot and sees us through january and february. without that, we're going to really struggle in the next few months. but some do find there is reassurance in knowing everyone around you is vaccinated or tested. ijust think it makes everyone feel a little bit safer when they're going out, and it makes me more comfortable when i'm out in wales, knowing that people around me have had their vaccinations. i'm not, like, fully vaccinated, so it would probably affect me, but i think it will encourage, you know, people that haven't been fully vaccinated to get fully vaccinated. obviously, cases are going up at the moment, _ and ijust think anything we can do to try and stay safe - and keep everyone else safe is important _ today also sees the end of travellers arriving in the uk from so—called red—list countries having to isolate in hotels. with omicron now clearly spreading through the community,
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there's little point. it's another sign that stopping the spread of the omicron variant just isn't possible, and experts say vaccines and boosters remain the best defence against the virus. what we're very hopeful for is that the protection against severe disease which has held up really well against all the variants so far will also hold up against this variant. nevertheless, there are some data from south africa showing that the neutralisation of this virus is more difficult, and so that may mean that the vaccines... we really do need these boosters to bring down the rate of transmission. what happens in the next few weeks is uncertain. the scottish government is already asking people to limit socialising to three households at a time in the run—up to christmas. but new advice and regulations will only slow the spread of the virus. if huge numbers of people do start getting infected, ministers may find they have no choice but to introduce further restrictions. dominic hughes, bbc news.
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some breaking news. a woman who murdered her girlfriend's16—month—old child has been sentenced at bradford crown court. star hobson endured months of assaults and psychological harm at the hands of 28—year—old savannah brockhill, who was yesterday convicted of murder. star's mother, frankie smith, was found guilty of causing or allowing her death. our correspondent danny savage joins us from outside bradford crown court. the star hobson trial finished yesterday when the defendants were found guilty, savannah centre found guilty of murder and her mother frankie smith found guilty of allowing the death of her child —— savannah brockhill. and so today,
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the sentencing, tim on was given a minimum of 20 years and smith was given a sentence of eight years —— brockhill was given a minimum of 20 years. brockhill must serve the minimum of 25 years. the judge at bradford crown court ran through the aggravating factors, especially with brockhill, saying she injured star hobson bite slapping her and giving her internal injuries. —— buy. brockhill took star hobson to work in a car and was seen on cctv beating star hobson 23 times over a period of hours. thejudge said you have shown no remorse and you do not reflect on your terrible actions. the starting point the sentencing was 15 years but there were so many
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aggravating factors involved that that was increased to a minimum sentence of 25 years. those sentences have been passed in the last few moments and i'm sure we will have more reaction here at bradford crown court in the next half an hour.— bradford crown court in the next half an hour. , . . half an hour. danny savage, thanks for “oininr half an hour. danny savage, thanks forjoining us- _ half an hour. danny savage, thanks forjoining us. we _ half an hour. danny savage, thanks forjoining us. we will _ half an hour. danny savage, thanks forjoining us. we will talk - half an hour. danny savage, thanks forjoining us. we will talk to i half an hour. danny savage, thanks forjoining us. we will talk to you i forjoining us. we will talk to you further later. as we've been hearing earlier, questions have been raised about borisjohnson's authority as prime minister, after the biggest revolt by conservative mps since he entered downing street. this lunchtime he faced his final prime minister's questions before christmas. joining us now is our political correspondent iain watson. how damaged you think the prime minister is by this sizeable and very broad ranging rebellion and did do anything to re—establish his authority at prime minister's questions? it
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authority at prime minister's questions?— authority at prime minister's questions? ., , , ., questions? it was a broad rebellion, ranuain questions? it was a broad rebellion, ranging from — questions? it was a broad rebellion, ranging from former _ questions? it was a broad rebellion, ranging from former cabinet - ranging from former cabinet ministers to lifelong backbenchers, people on either side of the brexit debate, but many had different motivations for rebelling, and on the surface it was genuine opposition to the introduction of the covid pass but other people were also additionally upset about the prime minister's behaviour in the last few weeks and some worried he is turning into a liability and others simply worried that the government were not coming to them with sufficient evidence to justify some of the measures they are introducing. others wanted to put down a marker to say this far and no further in terms of restrictions and it is this question on which is authority rests, does he have the authority rests, does he have the authority to bring his party with him if he feels further restrictions are necessary? we have heard dire warnings from jenny harries, today, suggesting that omicron is going to the country at a staggering rate and we know chris whitty will be at a press conference with the prime minister in a couple of hours, and
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he has been briefing the cabinet on likely increases in hospitalisations so against that backdrop the authority of the prime minister matters. what keir starmer was keen to do was to create the impression that boris johnson to do was to create the impression that borisjohnson had effectively run out of road and he asked him to go and look in the mirror and answer whether he had the trust and authority to continue to lead the country. he stopped short of calling for his resignation but suggested that labour had real leadership, but with that onslaught from the labour leader, there was a lot of supportive noises from the conservative benches, people rallying around. the mood will be assessed when we look at the result of the north shropshire by—election in what should be a true blue seat. some conservatives say it is not just whether boris johnson manages to hold on just whether borisjohnson manages to hold on in shropshire but also the manner of any victory. if it is a humiliating hold, a low turnout and a low majority, then it may be nerves will still be jangling on the
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conservative benches and that authority will not necessarily be regained. authority will not necessarily be retained. , ., ,., authority will not necessarily be retained. , ., ., regained. the news also that baroness _ regained. the news also that baroness hallet _ regained. the news also that baroness hallet will - regained. the news also that baroness hallet will chair i regained. the news also that j baroness hallet will chair the public inquiry into the covid pandemic, what can you tell us about her? , : , pandemic, what can you tell us about her? , ., , , . ., pandemic, what can you tell us about her? , _ her? this has been confirmed by downin: her? this has been confirmed by downing street, _ her? this has been confirmed by downing street, the _ her? this has been confirmed by downing street, the prime i her? this has been confirmed by i downing street, the prime minister says he's delighted she is going to be chairing the inquiry and said she would do this in a forensic way. she is a very experienced lawyer and judge who was an appeal courtjudge and before that the criminal barrister. at the moment she is leading the inquest into the death of one of the deaths —— into one of the deaths in salisbury, of dawn sturgess, and that will take quite a long time, but she is best known for chairing the inquest into the terrorist killings in london in 2005, and she began sharing that
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inquest some years later and she was known for being further empathetic to witnesses, but when it came to answering questions as to whether more people could have been saved by a different response from the emergency services and whether the attacks could have been prevented by the security services doing more to look into the ring leader of that terrorist attack, she said in effect that these deaths could not have been prevented. the covid bereaved families forjustice aid is a positive step that she has been appointed and they are looking forward to working with her —— say it is a positive step. but they are more concerned about the length of time it is having the inquiry because they wanted it soon and they also want to be involved in the terms of reference for the inquiry and they want assurance from her and the prime minister that that would happen. the prime minister that that would ha en. : the prime minister that that would ha en, ., ., the prime minister that that would ha en. : ., ., the prime minister that that would hauen. : :, ., , ~ happen. thanks for “oining us. a
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senior health i happen. thanks forjoining us. a senior health official— happen. thanks forjoining us. a senior health official has - happen. thanks forjoining us. a senior health official has warned j senior health official has warned that cases of the omicron variant are doubling in less than every two daysin are doubling in less than every two days in most parts of the uk. joining me isjohn burn—murdoch, a data journalist at the financial times. does that figure sound right to you? that looks broadly in line for what i'm seeing in the numbers that the hilt to do security agency have been putting out. —— that the health security agency. putting out. -- that the health security agency-— putting out. -- that the health security agency. today, if you test ositive security agency. today, if you test positive for — security agency. today, if you test positive for covid, _ security agency. today, if you test positive for covid, you _ security agency. today, if you test positive for covid, you will - security agency. today, if you test positive for covid, you will have i security agency. today, if you test positive for covid, you will have to | positive for covid, you will have to isolate from now and beyond christmas, so how many people are likely to be isolating on december the 25th? the likely to be isolating on december the 25th? , ., , .,, ., the 25th? the number of people who have a positive _ the 25th? the number of people who have a positive test _ the 25th? the number of people who have a positive test today _ the 25th? the number of people who have a positive test today is - have a positive test today is probably going to be somewhere in the range of 70—100000 and so that is the number of people who could be starting their isolation period from today and we would also have people
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isolating if they test anytime between now and the of course. sizeable numbers. == between now and the of course. sizeable numbers.— between now and the of course. sizeable numbers. , ., . sizeable numbers. -- between now and the 25th, sizeable numbers. -- between now and the 25th. of _ sizeable numbers. -- between now and the 25th, of course. _ sizeable numbers. -- between now and the 25th, of course. government i the 25th, of course. government scientists say — the 25th, of course. government scientists say they _ the 25th, of course. government scientists say they are _ the 25th, of course. government scientists say they are expecting | scientists say they are expecting 400,000 new cases to date, and more tomorrow, and double that amount the next day —— new cases today. i’m next day -- new cases today. i'm sure they — next day -- new cases today. i'm sure they are _ next day —— new cases today. t“n sure they are looking very reliable numbers but one of the sources of confusion is the definition of a case, do we mean is in a positive test or someone of being infected. the number of infections will certainly be higher than the number of cases because we don't capture all of those, especially asymptomatic ones, but we will be talking about numbers greater than 100,000 per day very soon if not today. 100,000 per day very soon if not toda . : , 100,000 per day very soon if not toda. ., ,., 100,000 per day very soon if not toda. . ..,, today. that is about infections. what can you _ today. that is about infections. what can you tell— today. that is about infections. what can you tell us _ today. that is about infections. what can you tell us about i today. that is about infections. what can you tell us about the | what can you tell us about the severity and do we know whether it is definitively less severe than
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delta? : , , is definitively less severe than delta? . , , , ., , delta? the answer is it is too early to be sure. — delta? the answer is it is too early to be sure. and — delta? the answer is it is too early to be sure, and the _ delta? the answer is it is too early to be sure, and the data _ delta? the answer is it is too early to be sure, and the data from i delta? the answer is it is too early to be sure, and the data from the| delta? the answer is it is too early i to be sure, and the data from the uk is far too early to know but from south africa we are still seeing a substantially lower proportion of cases ending up in severe disease than previously, but based on the latest analysis the people doing that work are still of the opinion that work are still of the opinion that the bulk of that reduction in severity is because of the increase in immunity levels in south africa over the last several months. although we are doing the boosters in the uk it is not clear whether we will expect omicron in the uk to be less severe than the virus, then the variants we have had circulating about some people say they may be less severe but it is not clear. may be around 2% of covid cases end up in hospital in the uk and it may go down or go up, but either way, if a
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large number gets infected we could still be in trouble.— still be in trouble. really good to talk to you- _ still be in trouble. really good to talk to you- i _ still be in trouble. really good to talk to you. i have _ still be in trouble. really good to talk to you. i have no _ still be in trouble. really good to talk to you. i have no doubt i still be in trouble. really good to talk to you. i have no doubt we i still be in trouble. really good to i talk to you. i have no doubt we will be talking again in the next couple of days. thanks forjoining us. the prime minister will lead a press conference at 5pm today, with the chief medical officer for england, professor chris whitty and the medical director of primary care for nhs england, dr nikki kanani. you can watch that here on bbc news. katie price has been handed a 16—week suspended jail sentence at crawley magistrates' court for drink—driving while disqualified and without insurance. for drink—driving while disqualified she was also given a two—year driving ban. our correspondent david sillito is outside crawley magistrates court. bring us up—to—date. bring us up-to-date. katie price was involved in a — bring us up-to-date. katie price was involved in a car— bring us up-to-date. katie price was involved in a car accident, _ bring us up-to-date. katie price was involved in a car accident, a - bring us up-to-date. katie price was involved in a car accident, a crash, i involved in a car accident, a crash, she crashed her car in september last year, and she admitted at the time that she had been driving while
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disqualified, driving under the influence of drink and drugs and driving without insurance. today she was told by the districtjudge that she was incredibly lucky not to be going to prison. she said she was incredibly selfish and had no concern for the lives of others and that if it was up to her you deserve to spend christmas behind bars. but because there was a deferment of sentencing and she had been told if she went to the priory those with the condition, she said her hands were effectively tied, and so gave her a 16 week suspended sentence for 12 months. there will be 100 hours of community service and another driving ban, and remember, she already has had five driving bans in the last couple of years, and another at £7,000 of unpaid court fines as well, hanging over her head. katie price has definitely
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been going through difficulties, visits to rehab and also going through bankruptcy proceedings at the moment. she left court and has not actually left here, though, so we believe she is still inside the court building.— we believe she is still inside the court building. david, thanks for “oininr court building. david, thanks for joining us- _ baroness hallett, a former high courtjudge and crossbench peer is to chair the covid inquiry into the government's handling of the pandemic. baroness hallett presided over the inquests into the deaths from the 7/7 terror attacks, and was the first woman to chair the bar council. joining me now is lobby akinnola from covid—19 bereaved families forjustice — lobby�*s father died with coronavirus in april last year. good afternoon. thank you for having
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me. what good afternoon. thank you for having me- what is — good afternoon. thank you for having me. what is your _ good afternoon. thank you for having me. what is your reaction _ good afternoon. thank you for having me. what is your reaction to - good afternoon. thank you for having me. what is your reaction to the i me. what is your reaction to the news that _ me. what is your reaction to the news that we — me. what is your reaction to the news that we now _ me. what is your reaction to the news that we now have - me. what is your reaction to the news that we now have a - me. what is your reaction to the news that we now have a name | me. what is your reaction to the | news that we now have a name of me. what is your reaction to the i news that we now have a name of the person who is going to chair this inquiry? it person who is going to chair this inuui ? , , . ., , inquiry? it is very welcome news. i'm a of inquiry? it is very welcome news. i'm a of the _ inquiry? it is very welcome news. i'm a of the covid _ inquiry? it is very welcome news. i'm a of the covid bereaved i inquiry? it is very welcome news. i i'm a of the covid bereaved families forjustice —— i'm a member. we have been calling for an inquiry for a long time and to see any progress on this is very welcome, even if it has come a bit later than we would have liked. ~ , ., come a bit later than we would have liked. ~ y., _ come a bit later than we would have liked. ~ y., ., , ., liked. when you say a bit later, what progress _ liked. when you say a bit later, what progress has _ liked. when you say a bit later, what progress has been - liked. when you say a bit later, what progress has been made i liked. when you say a bit later, | what progress has been made if liked. when you say a bit later, i what progress has been made if any? it is great to see that the chair has been named and we met with the prime minister in september and he said the chair would be named before the end of the year. as a campaign we have been calling for the inquiry sincejune 2020 and part of the reason for that is so we were better prepared for any bigger waves of the
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pandemic. as a nation we now face ourfourth pandemic. as a nation we now face our fourth wave with the new variant landing on our shores and it is difficult to imagine that we are going to be better prepared. ilirui’heh going to be better prepared. when ou and going to be better prepared. when you and the _ going to be better prepared. when you and the other _ going to be better prepared. when you and the other families - going to be better prepared. when you and the other families met the prime minister, presumably you pressed him to bring forward the start of the inquiry, so what will you told? brute start of the inquiry, so what will ou told? ~ ., ., you told? we were told that the dela was you told? we were told that the delay was because _ you told? we were told that the delay was because the - you told? we were told that the | delay was because the members you told? we were told that the i delay was because the members who work needed to start the inquiry were too busy dealing with the current covid situation, and i'm not quite sure if that has changed, but we are pleased to see steps have been taken to start the inquiry. baroness hallett has been named as the chair of the inquiry, what is
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your understanding of when she will start hearing evidence and when it will begin? we start hearing evidence and when it will beuin? ~ ., ., start hearing evidence and when it will bein? ~ ., ., , ., ., will begin? we are not short of the details as of— will begin? we are not short of the details as of yet. _ will begin? we are not short of the details as of yet. the _ will begin? we are not short of the details as of yet. the prime - details as of yet. the prime minister said it will begin in the spring next year, but we are not sure what that means exactly. we are pleased to see that baroness hallett has spoken about having bereaved families at the core of the inquiry and helping to set the terms of reference for the guidelines, so it is encouraging and it sounds like we will be starting off on the right foot but the sooner the better is always the message.— foot but the sooner the better is always the message. what are the key auestions always the message. what are the key questions you — always the message. what are the key questions you want _ always the message. what are the key questions you want her _ always the message. what are the key questions you want her to _ questions you want her to investigate?— questions you want her to investigate? there are many questions — investigate? there are many questions and _ investigate? there are many questions and i'm _ investigate? there are many questions and i'm part - investigate? there are many questions and i'm part of. investigate? there are many| questions and i'm part of this campaign and we have over 5000 people who havejoined our group, each of whom have unique stories of how they have lost their loved ones.
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key questions that have arisen from speaking to people in the group are things like, the preparedness of the nation, the availability of ppe, the discharging of people from hospitals into care homes, and in general, with testing, there are concerns about the appropriateness of services on 111 and dealing with the pandemic, and there are also questions about how the pandemic has affected certain communities disproportionally and what conditions have led to that in the country, so there are many topics that need to be covered as part of the inquiry. that is why it is so important that the bereaved families are at the heart of this inquiry because we have a unique insight into what went wrong and unfortunately what the consequences were. ., ,
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unfortunately what the consequences were. . , unfortunately what the consequences were. ., unfortunately what the consequences were. . , ., ., ~ ., ., were. really good to talk to you and thanks forjoining _ were. really good to talk to you and thanks forjoining us. _ were. really good to talk to you and thanks forjoining us. thank - were. really good to talk to you and thanks forjoining us. thank you. - now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. the weather patterns settling down as high pressure establishes itself across the uk and today we have a mixture of weather, a lot of cloud in the south and sunshine in the north and also a bit of rain, thanks to this weak weather front which is starting to push its way north as we head through the evening and overnight but this area of high pressure will dominate the weather to end the week and into the weekend. we hold on to the cloudy skies, central southern areas with mist and murk and the weather front pushed into the north—west of scotland to bring light rain and drizzle and the best of any clear spells will be towards the north—east where it can be cold with mist and fog patches. thursday, largely cloudy, light winds for most, dry thanks to high pressure, any brightness over the north—east
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corner, and the weather front becomes confined to the far north of the uk to bring showery bursts of rain to the northern isles. it stays very mild for the time of year. similar picture on friday and also into the weekend. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... david fuller, who murdered two women in 1987, and sexually abused at least 102 dead women and girls in hospital mortuaries, has been told he will spend the rest of his life in prison. a senior health official warns that cases of the omicron variant are doubling in less than every two days in most parts of the uk. new rules come into force, meaning adults in england must show a covid pass to get into nightclubs, big sports matches and other large events. reality tv star katie price has been given a 16—week suspended jail term, after admitting drink—driving while disqualified and without insurance.
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and the cost of living hits its highest level for a decade — inflation surging to 5.1% in the year to november. the uk health security agency says anyone who is currently staying in a quarantine hotel can leave their accommodation at four o'clock this afternoon. travellers were still staying in quarantine hotels after the government announced that the red list of destinations was being scrapped in england. fey vercuiel is stranded in a quarantine hotel in luton. good to have you with us. well, the main question is, are you going at four o'clock?— four o'clock? yes, actually a few minutes ago. — four o'clock? yes, actually a few minutes ago. i _ four o'clock? yes, actually a few minutes ago, i phone _ four o'clock? yes, actually a few minutes ago, i phone security, | four o'clock? yes, actually a few. minutes ago, i phone security, they were like deer, at four o'clock, once you have a form of someone
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picking you up, you know, then you can leave. so i'm very, very happy about that, because i was really nervous about this uncertainty. so tell us what happened to you, how long have you been there? i’ue tell us what happened to you, how long have you been there? i've been here since the _ long have you been there? i've been here since the 8th _ long have you been there? i've been here since the 8th of _ long have you been there? i've been here since the 8th of december, - long have you been there? i've beeni here since the 8th of december, and yeah, the treatment has been abysmal. since landing, we werejust basically shoved from one cue to another queue, into a very cramped bus full of people, which is a big covid risk, and then when we arrived here, we were just told to go up to our rooms, i had nothing to eat that night, after travelling since 4am in the morning, so we arrived at ten p m, and yes, it has been horrendous. there is someone sitting outside my room 2a hours a day, there is no privacy, and i can't basically get any food to eat that is nutritious enough for my dietary needs. [30 any food to eat that is nutritious enough for my dietary needs. do they deliver food to _ enough for my dietary needs. do they deliver food to the _ enough for my dietary needs. do they deliver food to the door? _ enough for my dietary needs. do they deliver food to the door? how- enough for my dietary needs. do they deliver food to the door? how does i deliver food to the door? how does it work? ., , ., ._
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it work? yeah, three times a day they knock _ it work? yeah, three times a day they knock on — it work? yeah, three times a day they knock on the _ it work? yeah, three times a day they knock on the door _ it work? yeah, three times a day they knock on the door and - it work? yeah, three times a day they knock on the door and they| it work? yeah, three times a day - they knock on the door and theyjust leave the food there. find they knock on the door and they 'ust leave the food therei leave the food there. and how much is this all cost _ leave the food there. and how much is this all cost you? _ leave the food there. and how much is this all cost you? £2300. - leave the food there. and how much is this all cost you? £2300. say - is this all cost you? £2300. say auain? is this all cost you? £2300. say again? £2300- _ is this all cost you? £2300. say again? £2300. right, - is this all cost you? £2300. say again? £2300. right, and - is this all cost you? £2300. say l again? £2300. right, and there's nothin: again? £2300. right, and there's nothing you _ again? £2300. right, and there's nothing you could _ again? £2300. right, and there's nothing you could do _ again? £2300. right, and there's nothing you could do about - again? £2300. right, and there's nothing you could do about that, l again? £2300. right, and there's. nothing you could do about that, or could you claim it back on your insurance?— could you claim it back on your insurance? no, so basically the government— insurance? no, so basically the government uses _ insurance? no, so basically the government uses a _ insurance? no, so basically the government uses a private - insurance? no, so basically the - government uses a private contractor called ctm, and we have to just basically pay the bill and they decide what hotel you go to com you have no control over anything. qm. have no control over anything. ok, so ou've have no control over anything. ok, so you've heard — have no control over anything. ok, so you've heard that you can go in less than half an hour now, perhaps you are already packed you been so desperate to leave! i was going to say surprised you're not packing. in terms of today and the last 2a hours, what sort of information have you been given, how have you been able to find out what is going on? in the last 2a hours, we received two letters, and in those letters we were given some guidance, but it was very, very confusing, so i had to phone security to get more information.—
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phone security to get more information. . information. right, 0k, and then they said. _ information. right, 0k, and then they said. yes. — information. right, 0k, and then they said, yes, you _ information. right, 0k, and then they said, yes, you can _ information. right, 0k, and then they said, yes, you can go? - they said, yes, you can go? essentially, the letter wasn't very clear, so i had to phonejust to confirm, and then someone just phoned me right before this call, saying please provide your address, and if you have tested negative, you are allowed to leave. and and if you have tested negative, you are allowed to leave.— are allowed to leave. and you have tested negative, _ are allowed to leave. and you have tested negative, i _ are allowed to leave. and you have tested negative, i take _ are allowed to leave. and you have tested negative, i take it? - are allowed to leave. and you have tested negative, i take it? yes, - tested negative, i take it? yes, absolutely- _ tested negative, i take it? yes, absolutely. that _ tested negative, i take it? yes, absolutely. that must - tested negative, i take it? yes, absolutely. that must be - tested negative, i take it? yes, absolutely. that must be a - tested negative, i take it? yes, l absolutely. that must be a relief. tested negative, i take it? yes, i absolutely. that must be a relief. i su ose absolutely. that must be a relief. i suppose you _ absolutely. that must be a relief. i suppose you have _ absolutely. that must be a relief. i suppose you have any _ absolutely. that must be a relief. i suppose you have any sympathy i absolutely. that must be a relief. i l suppose you have any sympathy with the government, in the sense that this is a changing situation, nobody could have forecast the emergence of this new variant, and that you got caught up in something we just incredibly unfortunate? i caught up in something we 'ust incredibly unfortunate? i honestly feel like i have _ incredibly unfortunate? i honestly feel like i have just _ incredibly unfortunate? i honestly feel like i have just been - incredibly unfortunate? i honestly feel like i have just been tossed l feel like i have just been tossed around. i don't have much sympathy for the government in what has happened. ifeel that for the government in what has happened. i feel that they should have just trusted their people, the people who live here, to isolate in their homes, as we do when we test positive when you go to a party or something like that. there isjust such little trust, and i actually
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feel this has been quite psychologically traumatic, and it feels like i'm in a prison. honestly, i think prisoners are probably treated better than this. i'm sorry to hear that, let us try and end on a more positive note, if you don't mind? what are you most looking forward to about leaving? just to see my partner in brighton. honestly, it has been such a long time, i have not been able to see them, sojust time, i have not been able to see them, so just celebrating time, i have not been able to see them, sojust celebrating christmas in brighton with my family and my cat. . . in brighton with my family and my cat. ., , , ., cat. yeah, 0k, we wish you well, ha - cat. yeah, 0k, we wish you well, happy christmas _ cat. yeah, 0k, we wish you well, happy christmas and _ cat. yeah, 0k, we wish you well, happy christmas and thanks - cat. yeah, 0k, we wish you well, happy christmas and thanks for. happy christmas and thanks for talking to us.— happy christmas and thanks for talkin: to us. . ~' ,, . the cost of living has risen at its fastest rate for a decade, with inflation at 5.1% last month, according to figures from the office for national statistics. rising transport and energy costs have driven the increase, which is substantially higher than analysts had been expecting and more than double the bank of england's inflation target of 2%. 0ur economics correspondent, andy verity, said it was unlikely that interest rates
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will rise tomorrow. 0n the markets in the city, they are betting _ 0n the markets in the city, they are betting two— 0n the markets in the city, they are betting two to one against that possibility, because the bank of england — possibility, because the bank of england doesn't yet know what effect omicron _ england doesn't yet know what effect omicron has had on the labour market — omicron has had on the labour market. the markets are betting that rates will_ market. the markets are betting that rates will rise in the new year, getting — rates will rise in the new year, getting up— rates will rise in the new year, getting up to about one percentage point, _ getting up to about one percentage point, so _ getting up to about one percentage point, so ten times what they are at the moment, by the end of the year. there _ the moment, by the end of the year. there is_ the moment, by the end of the year. there is a _ the moment, by the end of the year. there is a limited amount that can do anyway— there is a limited amount that can do anyway to curb inflation, which is mostiy— do anyway to curb inflation, which is mostly driven by global commodity prices, _ is mostly driven by global commodity prices, as— is mostly driven by global commodity prices, as i_ is mostly driven by global commodity prices, as i was saying in the report, — prices, as i was saying in the report, if— prices, as i was saying in the report, if you have surging demand from _ report, if you have surging demand from a _ report, if you have surging demand from a reopening global economy and supply— from a reopening global economy and supply doesn't keep up, that's why prices _ supply doesn't keep up, that's why prices rise — supply doesn't keep up, that's why prices rise. the bank of england's hope _ prices rise. the bank of england's hope is _ prices rise. the bank of england's hope is that that is transitory and supply— hope is that that is transitory and supply will catch up and prices will come _ supply will catch up and prices will come down, but the key thing to watch _ come down, but the key thing to watch is — come down, but the key thing to watch is whether or not wages start to take _ watch is whether or not wages start to take off — watch is whether or not wages start to take off. if they do, then interest— to take off. if they do, then interest rates might have to rise fasten _ new figures reveal that violence against health and social care
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workers in northern ireland has increased during the pandemic, in some cases by around 20% over the six months to march this year. the abuse includes biting, spitting, throwing objects, sexual assault and abuse on social media. health bodies and the fire and rescue service are calling on politicians and the public to support staff. i'm joined now by peter mcnaney, chair of the health and social care chairs' forum in northern ireland. i hope you got your surname right there, did i? it i hope you got your surname right there. did i?— there, did i? it was a good effort. i onl there, did i? it was a good effort. i only want _ there, did i? it was a good effort. i only want to _ there, did i? it was a good effort. i only want to get _ there, did i? it was a good effort. i only want to get it _ there, did i? it was a good effort. i only want to get it wrong - there, did i? it was a good effort. i only want to get it wrong the - there, did i? it was a good effort. | i only want to get it wrong the one so i thought it was as well to try. thanks forjoining us. tell us something more about what health care staff in northern ireland are experiencing. we care staff in northern ireland are experiencing-_ care staff in northern ireland are ex-reriencin. ., ~ ., ., ., experiencing. we all know that over the last two — experiencing. we all know that over the last two years, _ experiencing. we all know that over the last two years, it _ experiencing. we all know that over the last two years, it has _ experiencing. we all know that over the last two years, it has been - experiencing. we all know that over the last two years, it has been a - the last two years, it has been a time of unprecedented pressure on the health service, and in particular on the staff, so staff have always suffered abuse, either
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verbal or physical, which has never been warranted. but we recognise that over the last two years, people are even more stressed, and are faced on occasion with longer waiting times, and as chair of health bodies in northern ireland we were shocked to see the recent statistics that straight across northern ireland in the last six months they have been 5500 attacks on staff, 80% of which have been physical attacks, and those attacks can vary from being pushed, from being spat on, from being verbally abused, to really quite serious assaults, where nurses and dd are grabbed around the throat and shaken, and people under the influence of drugs and alcohol are very difficult to manage, and physically abusive to staff, so when we became aware of the increase over
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the last period, we wanted to bring a more critical focus to the issue, and we wanted to ask all our colleagues and friends in society that we should all support our staff, we should recognise that health and social care staff need to be treated with respect, with kindness, and that we should all work together in whatever way we can contribute to make sure that this type of behaviour is just not tolerated. type of behaviour is 'ust not tolerated.�* type of behaviour is 'ust not tolerated. ~ ., , tolerated. what has been the reaction of — tolerated. what has been the reaction of staff, _ tolerated. what has been the reaction of staff, because - reaction of staff, because presumably these are again staff who are already pretty exhausted and have had a torrid time over the past couple of years. are you seeing people leaving the profession as a result? ~ . people leaving the profession as a result? ~ , ., ., ., result? well, it is hard for me to ut result? well, it is hard for me to put specific _ result? well, it is hard for me to put specific numbers _ result? well, it is hard for me to put specific numbers on - result? well, it is hard for me to put specific numbers on people i put specific numbers on people leaving the profession. i can say that staff who have been subject to attacks are often really traumatised. i also would want to
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say that we are dealing with a group of people who are incredibly dedicated. i've worked in many parts of the public sector, but i've never worked with people as dedicated as health and social care staff, and they're dedicated to their patients, dedicated to the people they care for, and they're extremely resilient. however, like everyone in society, staff are tired, staff do on occasion, and i think it is really important that we as a society reflect that they are valued, that we look back and look after us when we are unwell and sick we have an obligation which we will articulate, that we will look after and care for them. so i think there are many reasons why people might leave the service, but we don't see a specific correlation between increasing abuse and people leaving the service, albeit it is something we want to provide as much support to staff as we possibly can. find
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to staff as we possibly can. and what extra _ to staff as we possibly can. and what extra support do you think is needed to protect staff? imoll. what extra support do you think is needed to protect staff?— needed to protect staff? well, i think of course _ needed to protect staff? well, i think of course we _ needed to protect staff? well, i think of course we take - needed to protect staff? well, i. think of course we take measures within our health trust to protect staff and we work with our trade union colleagues to do that. i think just as important as additional measures within trusts themselves is a general awareness in society, and a general awareness in society, and a greater voice from society that we all have a duty to be kind and respect to our health and care staff, we all have a duty to recognise that emergency departments for example... recognise that emergency departments for example- - -— recognise that emergency departments for example- - -_ for example... peter, i'm very sor , for example... peter, i'm very sorry. i— for example... peter, i'm very sorry. i am — for example... peter, i'm very sorry. i am going _ for example... peter, i'm very sorry, i am going to _ for example... peter, i'm very sorry, i am going to interruptl for example... peter, i'm very i sorry, i am going to interrupt you only because we have to cross live to another story, but thank you so much for talking to us about this. my much for talking to us about this. my apologise for interrupting but i want to go straight to bradford crown court now for some reaction on the star hobson sentencing. thea;r the star hobson sentencing. they were together _
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the star hobson sentencing. ila: were together responsible for inflicting catastrophic injuries on a helpless young child. throughout her short life, a helpless young child. throughout hershort life, star a helpless young child. throughout her short life, star was subject to endless physical assaults and psychological harm. instead of the love and protection, she experienced a world of humiliation, cruelty and pain at the hands of those who should have protected her the most. it is impossible to imagine how any parent or carer could inflict this pain or suffering, sorry, inflict this pain and suffering on entirely defenceless little girl. our thoughts remain with star's family of course, as they have been throughout. thank you. so of course, as they have been throughout. thank you.- throughout. thank you. so a statement — throughout. thank you. so a statement outside _ throughout. thank you. so a statement outside bradford crown court, where a little earlier we heard that savannah brockhill has been jailed they are at the court for life, with a minimum term of 25 years, and that is for the murder of 16—month—old star hobson. star's
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mother frankie smith was jailed for eight years for causing or allowing the child's death. an increasing number of care companies supporting people who are older and disabled in their own homes say they're turning away new clients because of staff shortages. nearly 340 care providers in the uk responded to questions from the home care association. most worry the requirement for all home care staff to have covid vaccines will add to their recruitment problems. our social affairs editor, alison holt, has been speaking to one family—run care company. marion is three hours into what is going to be a very long day. morning, christine. she and her husband run their own home care company. how are you today? ..but staff shortages mean both are also out providing support for people like christine. not good? no. 0k. the three visits christine gets a day provide the personal care she needs but also allow her to maintain her independence.
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she's previously been stuck in hospital waiting for home care and knows how miserable it can be. it's hard when you are in hospital and you are bed blocking. what they were doing for me, i can do at home, i could take my own pills, or get my pills, without them coming around me four times a dayjust to give me a pill and i was sitting there doing nothing. you have a good morning, and i'll see you later. 0k, thank you. but to provide support at home takes staff, and a survey of nearly 340 care providers by the home care association found nearly all those who responded were facing real difficulties recruiting. for marion and her husband, tim, that means constantjuggling to ensure their existing clients get the support they need. effectively, i'm doing a 16—hour. day, and last week was like that — pretty much every day was seven till 11. - it'sjust exhausting. how sustainable is that? it's not.
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like many other home care providers, they are turning away new clients, even though councils and the nhs are desperate for them to take on people who are ready to leave hospital. there is a high demand. we get an e—mail through every day from the council. i've got four on my e—mail at the moment that ijust noticed, but i can't take the clients on because i haven't got the staff and it's a never—ending circle. to try to ease some of the immediate staffing pressures, the government has announced an extra £300 million to provide bonuses, overtime and pay rises for care staff. that money runs until march. ok, thank you, bye. alison holt, bbc news. a student has won a case against his landlord in court over the poor conditions of his university accommodation. jack simm used his law degree textbooks to challenge his landlord over his accommodation looking like a "building site". the i9—year—old won back what he had paid them, plus court fees, totalling £999.
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i'm pleased to say i've gotjack with me now — you must be relieved? many congratulations. you say the accommodation look like a building site. how had was it when you arrived? site. how bad was it when you arrived? , . . ., �* site. how bad was it when you arrived? , . �* ., site. how bad was it when you arrived? , �* ., ., arrived? 0h, rebecca, i'm not going to lie, we arrived? 0h, rebecca, i'm not going to lie. we came _ arrived? oh, rebecca, i'm not going to lie, we came all— arrived? 0h, rebecca, i'm not going to lie, we came all the _ arrived? 0h, rebecca, i'm not going to lie, we came all the way - arrived? 0h, rebecca, i'm not going to lie, we came all the way down - to lie, we came all the way down from newcastle down to norwich, which was quite a long journey, then as soon as we turned up, there were skips everywhere with metal railings everywhere, there was dust all over the place. the place as i say was literally a construction site. it was loud and busy, we had workmen running everywhere, drilling and sanding, and hammering into stuff, the walls. it really did look like something you would see from some inner city construction site. and norwich are _ inner city construction site. and norwich are supposed to be a fine city, that's its slogan, isn't it?
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after a week, you moved out, what happened then? 50 after a week, you moved out, what happened then?— after a week, you moved out, what happened then? so what we did... we moved into another _ happened then? so what we did... we moved into another accommodation, | moved into another accommodation, and that was ok for a moment, and then later on i got threatened with a recovery action from my landlord ljy a recovery action from my landlord by some kind of debt collector because apparently i have stopped paying rent. so obviously that was a bit daunting, the e—mail was really harsh and blunt as you'd expect from debt collector, and we thought the only way forward now as we have to take them to court. there is going to be no remit between the parties and that is the only thing to be done really. 50 and that is the only thing to be done really-— and that is the only thing to be done reall . ., ~ ., ., done really. so talk through what ou did. done really. so talk through what you did- so _ done really. so talk through what you did. so because _ done really. so talk through what you did. so because i've - done really. so talk through what you did. so because i've been - you did. so because i've been stud in: you did. so because i've been studying contract _ you did. so because i've been studying contract law - you did. so because i've been studying contract law at - you did. so because i've been studying contract law at the l you did. so because i've been - studying contract law at the time, i kind of already sort of knew what was going on, so we had a look at legislation, case law and the contract, just applied that to what actually happens. basically, it wasn't too hard as it were, but you needed to go through everything with a fine tooth comb. we saw that there
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were pretty bad breaches of the contract, in terms of quite simple things, like the place needs to be of sound condition, i had no hot water, no heating, there was no wi—fi, there were wires sticking out of the walls, the shower was in a pretty bad condition. because there was no extractor fan, pretty bad condition. because there was no extractorfan, there pretty bad condition. because there was no extractor fan, there was just a hole in the wall instead, so none of the moisture could be extracted, so all my toilet bowl went moulded and turn to a brown colour, and i couldn't use it. these are really clear breaches of the contract that anyone can point out, so we took all of this and i wrote my submission, got witness statements together from people in similar circumstances with me, my friends aidan, ira and andy who all live next to me, and they wrote down their situation and stuff like that, and they signed it off, saying this happened to me, we took
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that to court, and we went to the small claims track, and what that is, it's kind of the part of the civil court you go to if you are not so familiar to what big companies do. and that's what we did. you can't claim for anything more than what you put in, so you can't do it just because you are angry. we had our first months rent, just because you are angry. we had ourfirst months rent, our deposit, and legalfees took ourfirst months rent, our deposit, and legal fees took us up to a gram. so we took them in there and we won in the end which was delighting. i wanted to ask about how we felt about that but unfortunately we are so of time, but congratulations, and really good to talk to you, thank you so much. really good to talk to you, thank you so much-— really good to talk to you, thank ou so much. . ~' ,, , . estate education sent us a response — it says: "we are appealing the decision and will be raising a separate claim against mr simm for not telling the truth. the error we made was not having legal representation in place so we did not submit the appropriate
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documentation such as the 3rd party check in report showing the condition. we will also be submitting various witness statements from the subcontractors so mr simm will have some more revision to do." plans to reduce the number of cyber security incidents in the uk have been unveiled by the government. the strategy includes millions of pounds in funding to help protect industries and technologies from malware and hacking. the uk national cyber security centre says it has fought a record number of online attacks in the past year. our security correspondent gordon corera has this report. technology has moved to the heart of our daily lives, and the same is happening to government. this is sitcen, the uk's situation centre, housed in a secret location to provide the latest data in a crisis. opened in the last few months, the bbc was given exclusive access to film inside for the first time.
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it is close to the cobra briefing room, where politicians and officials take decisions in the event of terrorist attacks, disasters or other major incidents. what's new about the centre is, for the first time, data from across government and outside is brought together in one place to help officials and politicians make decisions in the middle of a crisis. that means, for instance, if a storm is hitting the country, they are able to put together weather data with details about transport and medical facilities in order to better coordinate a response. the recent fuel supply crisis was one of the first times the centre was put into action. when there was pressure on petrol supplies, the ability then to see which parts of the united kingdom were suffering from shortages, to ensure that the additional responses, such as the military drivers of those tankers that were then put in place, and working with industry, we could then target activity in a way that was driven by the data.
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today sees the government launched its new five—year cyber strategy. today sees the government launch its new five—year cyber strategy. it aims to ensure the uk is at the cutting edge of technology. cyber attacks have hit councils and businesses in the uk and around the world, while online scams have been growing. the strategy aims to ensure that our defences are stronger and also that the benefits of technology and innovation are better spread across the country. all of that, like the arrival of sitcen, a sign that technology increasingly underpins our security. gordon corera, bbc news. as nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, and her husband and daughter prepare to spend a sixth christmas apart, a new song has been released today to keep the family in the public eye. it's by the '805 pop band, the christians. they've reworked a single first released in 1991 to draw attention
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to the plight of the british journalist, john mccarthy, then being held hostage by militants in beirut. our correspondent, caroline hawley, reports. # times like these, i sit and wonder. # lord, it really can't be right...# it is three decades since the christians last recorded this for a british hostage, then as man don't cry. now it is for another british citizen being held in the middle east. gabriella has only had one christmas, herfirst, with both her parents. this was the moment nazanin was arrested in 2016 at tehran airport as she prepared to fly home after visiting her parents. she was accused of working against the iranian state and thrown into solitary confinement. herfirst sentence ended earlier this year, and almost immediately came a second. her husband richard has campaigned tirelessly for her release. he wants britain to pay a long—standing debt it owes iran, which he believes is key to getting her home. last christmas, we were close to the end of the sentence, it felt like we really were counting
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down the days. now that is less clear the case, now we are in some kind of limbo of open water. we are awaiting that call to prison, there has been a second case raised on other families, so it feels a lot more uncertain. there's clearly games being played still. he went on hunger strike this autumn to put pressure on the government, which says it is doing all it can. but it was seeing richard starve himself in whitehall for three weeks that inspired the christians to rerelease their song. we're just trying to do something, anything, to help. it is uppermost in my mind most days, really, that this injustice is happening. # so, naz, don't cry #. nazanin was able to join the recording session over facetime. richard says she is deeply moved. but behind the smiles, also sad and anxious, as another celebration approaches, another family milestone to be missed. caroline hawley, bbc news.
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the singer billie eilish has described how she suffered nightmares, after being exposed to "abusive" pornography from the age of ii. in a radio interview, the i9—year—old said she is now "devastated" to reflect on her exposure to the content. eilish said the experience led her to "not say no to things that were not good" when she began having sex. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. mixed fortunes of weather today, some areas rather grey and gloomy, and a little bit of rain in the forecast as well, particularly across the north of the uk, but all areas are pretty mild for the time of year with temperatures through this afternoon and sticking in double figures for many. this building area of high pressure slowly pushing north—westwards, this weak weather front trapped still in the system across the north of the
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uk, that's bringing some thick cloud, some patchy outbreaks of rain to northern ireland, into the far north of england and southern scotland, pretty much stalling here. to the north of it, brightness and sunshine, slices of bright weather, and then rather play —— grey and gloomy across the south. the wind is light for most but like i mentioned, it is mild through this afternoon, those temperatures in double figures for most. as we head into this evening and overnight, that weak weather front begins to migrate northwards again, becoming confined to the north—west of scotland by the end of the night. elsewhere, largely dry, quite a lot of cloud, particularly across southern areas but where we get clear spells in northern eastern england, perhaps north scotland can it could turn quite chilly with some mist and fog patches developing, otherwise the most generally a mild night. thursday is looking pretty grey and gloomy across urban areas, some low cloud, is a mild night. thursday is looking pretty grey and gloomy across urban areas, some low cloud, so missed around as well, probably the best of and we will still have
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this weather front affecting the far north of scotland, mainly affecting the northern isles, but again another mild day for the time of year, temperatures ranging from ten to 12 degrees. this area of high pressure sits across the uk in a block pattern called an omega block, you can see from the greek letter shape, thejet you can see from the greek letter shape, the jet stream you can see from the greek letter shape, thejet stream moving you can see from the greek letter shape, the jet stream moving to the north of it. generally we are in a zone of milder air with this area of high pressure, but the area that was a rather cloudy through the days will feel a bit chilly and so will wear skies clear towards the weekend, some mist and fog as well. towards the weekend. friday, the high pressure pretty much sitting on top of us, try as well across the north of scotland, a lot of cloud through central and southern parts of the country, quite grey and gloomy, perhaps the best of the sunshine after a chilly start across parts of northern england and into scotland. similarstory parts of northern england and into scotland. similar story as we head through the weekend. it states largely gladly —— it stays largely cloudy for most but if you areas may have some sunshine. —— a few areas.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the two women responsible for the death of star hobson, who was 16 months old when she was killed, have been sentenced. savannah brockhill, found guilty of murdering the girl, was given a minimum of 25 years in prison. her partner frankie smith, who's also star's mother, was given an eight year sentence for causing or allowing her death. david fuller, who murdered two women in 1987, and sexually abused over 100 dead women and girls in hospital mortuaries, has been told he will spend the rest of his life in prison. the prime minister is due to hold a press conference in the next hour as a senior health official warns that cases of the omicron variant are doubling in less than every two
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days in most of the uk. it's probably the most significant threat we've had since the start of the pandemic, and i'm sure, for example, that the numbers we see on data over the next few days will be quite staggering. baroness hallett, who led the inquest into the 7/7 terror bombings, will be chair of a public inquiry into the government's handling of the covid—i9 pandemic. some bereaved families have welcomed the appointment. people currently staying in quarantine hotels can now leave, following the end of the covid travel red list. the cost of living hits its highest level for a decade — inflation surging to 5.1% in the year to november. and reality tv star katie price has been given a i6—week suspended jail term, after admitting drink—driving while disqualified and without insurance.
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a woman who murdered her partner's i6—month—old daughter has beenjailed for a minimum of 25 years. savannah brockhill caused "catastrophic" injuries to star hobson, whose mother frankie smith was sentenced to eight years for causing or allowing the toddler's death. during sentencing at bradford crown court, star's paternal grandfather bernard hobson gave an emotional statement about the "devastating" loss of his granddaughter. our correspondent danny savage joins us from outside bradford crown court. such an awful case. bring us up—to—date. such an awful case. bring us up-to-date-_ such an awful case. bring us up-to-date. such an awful case. bring us u-to-date. , , , up-to-date. many people will become familiar with — up-to-date. many people will become familiar with this _ up-to-date. many people will become familiar with this case _ up-to-date. many people will become familiar with this case over _ up-to-date. many people will become familiar with this case over the -
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familiar with this case over the last 2a hours and it was yesterday that star hobson's trial ended with savannah brockhill and frankie smith found guilty of the charges against them, savannah brockhill found guilty of murder, frankie smith for causing or allowing the death of a child. this afternoon was the sentencing hearing, at bradford crown court and it lasted about an hour, and savannah brockhill was given a minimum sentence of 25 years with thejudge telling given a minimum sentence of 25 years with the judge telling her that she may never be eligible for release and will always be on licence for the rest of her life, even if she is released. she will be 53 in 25 years time when she becomes may be eligible to be released again. frankie smith given eight years and told that she has to serve two thirds of at least that sentence, she is star hobson's mother. pretty terrible things said today with the judges summing up and giving her
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reasoning for passing those sentences, and she said in relation to the fatal punch given to star hobson on the 22nd of september last year by savannah brockhill, the level of force needed was a massive, similar to a car crash, no wonder that her injuries were then un—survivable. she told savannah brockhill she had shown no remorse and she did not reflect on her terrible actions. after sentencing, the lawyer for the crown prosecution service came out and made this statement. service came out and made this statement-— statement. yesterday savannah brockhill was _ statement. yesterday savannah brockhill was found _ statement. yesterday savannah brockhill was found guilty - statement. yesterday savannah brockhill was found guilty of. statement. yesterday savannah | brockhill was found guilty of the murder— brockhill was found guilty of the murder of star hobson. and frankie smilh— murder of star hobson. and frankie smith was— murder of star hobson. and frankie smith was found guilty of causing or allowing _ smith was found guilty of causing or allowing the death of the child. they— allowing the death of the child. they were together responsible for inflicting _ they were together responsible for inflicting catastrophic injuries on a helpless young child. throughout her short— a helpless young child. throughout her short life star hobson was subjected to endless physical assaults and psychological harm and instead _ assaults and psychological harm and instead of— assaults and psychological harm and instead of the love and protection
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she experienced a world of humiliation, cruelty and pain, at the hands — humiliation, cruelty and pain, at the hands of those who should have protected _ the hands of those who should have protected her the most. it is impossible to imagine how any parent or carer— impossible to imagine how any parent or carer could inflict this pain or suffering. — or carer could inflict this pain or suffering, this pain and suffering, sorry. _ suffering, this pain and suffering, sorry. on— suffering, this pain and suffering, sorry, on entirely defenceless little — sorry, on entirely defenceless little girl, and our thoughts remain with star— little girl, and our thoughts remain with star hobson's family as they have _ with star hobson's family as they have been— with star hobson's family as they have been throughout. aggravating factors that were taken into account with savannah brockhill being convicted of murder, at the starting point thejudge being convicted of murder, at the starting point the judge said was 15 years but that went up to 25 years because of various factors, that she injured star hobson injuly last year by slapping her, giving her internal injuries, and at the recycling plant, the car drew up, and star hobson was in the car and savannah brockhill had brought her to work to effectively look after her but she did anything but. she viciously punched and slapped her,
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giving her injuries, and she was described in court as cruel and callous. that was sentencing which took place today and this has also been raised in parliament with the prime minister saying that there is now an inquiry under way into what is happening. it feels the government have got bradford council in their sites after what has happened because star hobson was known to social services throughout the last months of her life and she was seen on a number of occasions and taken to hospital by police at one point. a lot of questions remain to be answered about why star hobson died, when people knew what was going on and that people were flagging it up to the authorities. danny savage, thanks forjoining us. we have the latest government figures for the number of covid cases. they are pretty sobering. the
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uk has reported 78,000 and 610 new covid—19 cases, compared with 59,610 a day earlier. a more pertinent comparison is with other covid cases in the last year. the highest daily total, number of cases so far had beenin total, number of cases so far had been injanuary this year, 68,053, but today sent 8610 have been reported —— 78,610. 165 new covid deaths have also been reported but thatis deaths have also been reported but that is compared with 150 a day earlier but in terms of new covid cases, a record number have been reported. 78,610.
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david fuller, the man who murdered two women in tunbridge wells in 1987, and sexually abused at least 101 dead women and girls in hospital mortuaries, has been told he will spend the rest of his life injail. the 67—year—old killed wendy knell and caroline pierce in two sepearate attacks. a warning that this story contains details of sexual offending which some viewers may find distressing. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds is outside maidstone crown court. he can bring us the details. this was a harrowing _ he can bring us the details. “in 3 was a harrowing sentencing hearing at maidstone crown court which has been going on for most of the day before david fuller was sentenced. we heard about the two murder victims, caroline pierce described as a lively young woman, finding her way in the world, just 20, and wendy knell, successful, happy and
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independent, planning to get married, she was 25, and both murdered in 1987 by david fuller. in the last hour, wendy's mother pamela has given this statement to us about her feelings. it's been coming, we have been hoping — it's been coming, we have been hoping and hoping for years. now it hasiust_ hoping and hoping for years. now it hasjust come and it's not going to sink in_ hasjust come and it's not going to sink in for— hasjust come and it's not going to sink in for a — hasjust come and it's not going to sink in for a little while. we now know that he has been caught. never cominr know that he has been caught. never coming out- — know that he has been caught. never coming out. yes, _ know that he has been caught. never coming out. yes, life. _ know that he has been caught. never coming out. yes, life. we _ know that he has been caught. never coming out. yes, life. we also - know that he has been caught. never coming out. yes, life. we also heard| coming out. yes, life. we also heard from the mother— coming out. yes, life. we also heard from the mother of _ coming out. yes, life. we also heard from the mother of caroline - coming out. yes, life. we also heard from the mother of caroline pierce, l from the mother of caroline pierce, katrina ross, who said this had been a truly horrific part of her life, since her daughter's murder 3a years ago which has become a nightmare and has continued to this day —— katrina frost. thejudge has continued to this day —— katrina frost. the judge said today that
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david fuller was somebody who was obsessed with having sex with dead people she gave him two whole life sentences meaning he will never be released from prison. police realised the scale of his offending when they went to his house last year, searched it and found evidence that he had been filming the sexual abuse of bodies inside the mortuaries at the hospitals where he worked, which he had access to via a swipe card. we heard that individual families who were here today to hear the sentencing, 12 years in total, for a vast number of offences of sexually abusing dead bodies, but in some cases quite small sentences, in some cases quite small sentences, in some cases quite small sentences, in some cases just three months, and one person said their daughter was amongst david fuller's victims, she died last year and was in the military and she gave this response to that three—month sentence. maybe you have families, have
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children. — maybe you have families, have children, this is not fair and just. it children, this is not fair and just. it is _ children, this is not fair and just. it is not — children, this is not fair and just. it is not acceptable. she was worth more _ it is not acceptable. she was worth more than — it is not acceptable. she was worth more than that. people that sell drugs _ more than that. people that sell drugs or— more than that. people that sell drugs or have class a drugs on them have a _ drugs or have class a drugs on them have a larger— drugs or have class a drugs on them have a larger sentence. it's a disgrace _ have a larger sentence. it's a disgrace and i more than disappointed, but ladyjustice is a superstar~ — disappointed, but ladyjustice is a superstar. i heard her and i watched her, superstar. i heard her and i watched her. she _ superstar. i heard her and i watched her. she was— superstar. i heard her and i watched her, she was incredible, and she delivered — her, she was incredible, and she delivered what she could, but the law has _ delivered what she could, but the law has got to change. this is from my heart — what she means is that the sentencing has to be increased and currently it is a maximum two—year sentence for an offence relating to sexual abuse, or having sexual activity with a dead body, but there has been a public inquiry announced as a result of this case. the nhs has questions to answer about the security measures put in place to
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protect bodies and the mortuary itself. should david fuller have been subjected to a greater level of vetting? there will be a public inquiry take place next year and one of the things it may want to look at is whether the sentences are correct for this truly horrendous crime. thanks forjoining us. more now on the coronavirus figures for the uk — with 78,610 new cases in the last 2a hours — the highest daily figure reported since the pandemic began. with me is our health correspondent, anna collinson. a staggering figure. the head of the uk have a security _ a staggering figure. the head of the uk have a security agency _ a staggering figure. the head of the uk have a security agency this - uk have a security agency this morning, jenny harries, warned that in the coming days we would start to see staggering numbers, she said, because of this record growth.
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latest figures show the uk recorded 78,610 new covid cases, the highest number ever recorded, the previous record was on the 8th of january and that was 68,000 cases. england and scotland had just entered a national opt out at that time, wales and northern ireland were already in one —— national lockdown at that time. a further 165 deaths have been recorded and a further 174 hospital admissions and we also have data from the have security agency which is confirming the number of omicron cases, a further 4671 omicron cases have been confirmed, taking the total to just over 10,000. fin total to just over 10,000. on hospitalisations, total tojust over 10,000. on hospitalisations, that is the key, a lot of people might now have this, but may not seriously ill or is it shown that these cases are translating into more people going into hospital? that
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translating into more people going into hospital?— into hospital? that is the issue at the moment. _ into hospital? that is the issue at the moment, we _ into hospital? that is the issue at the moment, we are _ into hospital? that is the issue at the moment, we are expecting i into hospital? that is the issue at the moment, we are expecting to into hospital? that is the issue at - the moment, we are expecting to see these rocketing cases today and it is likely it is only going to increase further. these are confirmed cases and it is likely there are even more infections within the uk, but what is the million dollar question is, how many of these cases will turn into hospitalisations? that is the fear, that these cases, the majority amongst young people, and the concern is it will spread amongst older people who are more at risk of covid, and if it passes onto them, and then leads into pressure on the nhs, how will the nhs cope? the problem is to get that data and to fully understand, if we wait for that date it will be too late, so that date it will be too late, so thatis that date it will be too late, so that is the issue and the challenge facing the government and health officials and i expect we will hear more about this at the press conference at five o'clock. which we will of course _ conference at five o'clock. which we will of course bring _ conference at five o'clock. which we will of course bring you _ conference at five o'clock. which we will of course bring you here - conference at five o'clock. which we will of course bring you here on - conference at five o'clock. which we will of course bring you here on bbc news. the government set itself some
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ambitious targets for the booster programme, how is that looking? thea;t programme, how is that looking? they have set programme, how is that looking? tieg have set themselves extremely difficult target and they want to get everyone in england vaccinated ljy get everyone in england vaccinated by the end of december, a similar target for wales and scotland. we got some figures this afternoon showing that the latest figures, more than 656,000 boosterjabs administered on tuesday, another record daily numberfor administered on tuesday, another record daily number for the administered on tuesday, another record daily numberfor the uk, taking the total number of boosters to 24.7 million, but there is a lot of pressure that comes with rolling out these boosters at a fast pace and we are seeing queues outside vaccination centres and digital cues online and also that is the focus, to get these boosters to as many people as possible, but what comes at a cost is that sam kerr has got to be cancelled including things like —— is that some other aspects of care have got to be cancelled including things like knee and hip operations. for including things like knee and hip oerations. ., ., ., including things like knee and hip operations-— operations. for now, thanks for 'oininr operations. for now, thanks for
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joining us- _ i'm joined by professor clare bryant, an immunologist from the university of cambridge. drjenny harries says omicron is probably the most significant threat since the pandemic began. is that your view? since the pandemic began. is that yourview? it since the pandemic began. is that our view? . ., since the pandemic began. is that your view?— your view? it is a reasonable view riven your view? it is a reasonable view given how — your view? it is a reasonable view given how little _ your view? it is a reasonable view given how little we _ your view? it is a reasonable view given how little we know- your view? it is a reasonable view given how little we know because | your view? it is a reasonable view- given how little we know because the case numbers are shooting up so fast. it is a cause for concern as to the impact that is likely to have on the nhs. the mitigating factor is that we have vaccines and antiviral drugs and we have the tools to fight the infection. we are in a better state than we were this time last year but the case numbers are undoubtedly alarming. taste year but the case numbers are undoubtedly alarming. we were 'ust talkinr undoubtedly alarming. we were 'ust talking about — undoubtedly alarming. we were 'ust talking about the i undoubtedly alarming. we were 'ust talking about the case i undoubtedly alarming. we were just talking about the case numbers, - undoubtedly alarming. we were just talking about the case numbers, did they surprise you? yes talking about the case numbers, did they surprise you?— they surprise you? yes and no. it has been pretty _ they surprise you? yes and no. it has been pretty clear _ they surprise you? yes and no. it has been pretty clear from - they surprise you? yes and no. it has been pretty clear from the i has been pretty clear from the numbers coming out of south africa that this variant is very infectious so the numbers are shooting up is not that much of a surprise. it is
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playing out the way it would have been predicted from south africa over the last couple of weeks, i'm afraid. d0 over the last couple of weeks, i'm afraid. ,, over the last couple of weeks, i'm afraid. , ., ~ over the last couple of weeks, i'm afraid. i. ~ , ., , afraid. do you think it is doubling in less than _ afraid. do you think it is doubling in less than every _ afraid. do you think it is doubling in less than every two _ afraid. do you think it is doubling in less than every two days, - afraid. do you think it is doubling in less than every two days, is i afraid. do you think it is doubling i in less than every two days, is that about right? the in less than every two days, is that about right?— in less than every two days, is that about right? the data that suggests eve 2-3 about right? the data that suggests every 2-3 days _ about right? the data that suggests every 2-3 days at — about right? the data that suggests every 2-3 days at the _ about right? the data that suggests every 2-3 days at the moment - about right? the data that suggests every 2-3 days at the moment but l every 2—3 days at the moment but that could come down and it might be shorter. that will become clearer as time goes on. we shorter. that will become clearer as time goes on— time goes on. we can see it is infectious _ time goes on. we can see it is infectious and _ time goes on. we can see it is infectious and i _ time goes on. we can see it is infectious and i suppose - time goes on. we can see it is infectious and i suppose what| time goes on. we can see it is i infectious and i suppose what we still don't know is how severe it is and whether it is more or less severe than delta come up be fair? yes, that is the million dollar question, as the previous woman said, the data from south africa suggests it may be less of a problem but it is difficult to translate that to the uk because we have a higher population density and we have more people indoors and different demographics and different age distribution of people. and we have people who are vaccinated and people who are not vaccinated. in
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south africa a lot of people had the infection, as well, so it is difficult to translate across, but we hope it causes less severe disease, but i think we will know across the next week or so is the case numbers increase, we will see whether hospital cases increase and whether hospital cases increase and whether the deaths increase but we hope not, obviously. it is whether the deaths increase but we hope not, obviously.— hope not, obviously. it is in some wa s a hope not, obviously. it is in some ways a case _ hope not, obviously. it is in some ways a case of— hope not, obviously. it is in some ways a case of having _ hope not, obviously. it is in some ways a case of having to - hope not, obviously. it is in some ways a case of having to wait, i hope not, obviously. it is in some ways a case of having to wait, as | ways a case of having to wait, as you say, but in the meantime action has got to be taken. do you think the current measures are about proportionate to what we do know? we proportionate to what we do know? e have to do as much as we can to stop the spread, basically. the less contact people have with other people, the more people who are vaccinated, everybody wearing masks, decreasing social interactions, these other things we can do to protect us and others from catching and the virus, it is a very difficult situation because of the infectivity of the strain. [30 difficult situation because of the infectivity of the strain.-
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infectivity of the strain. do you think further _ infectivity of the strain. do you think further measures - infectivity of the strain. do you think further measures are i infectivity of the strain. do you - think further measures are required? very difficult to say. in an ideal world may be but the problem is with theissues world may be but the problem is with the issues on mental health and with finance it is difficult, it is a very complex situation. those are issues for the government, i'm afraid. i issues for the government, i'm afraid. . ., issues for the government, i'm afraid. , ., ., , afraid. i understand. professor, thanks for _ afraid. i understand. professor, thanks forjoining _ afraid. i understand. professor, thanks forjoining us. _ questions have been raised about boris johnson's authority as prime minister, after the biggest revolt by conservative mps since he entered downing street. this lunchtime he faced his final prime minister's questions before christmas. our political correspondent, nick eardley, reports from westminster. there isn't much christmas cheer here. downing street has faced a long list of damaging accusations in the past fortnight. and with the prime minister's position already damaged, he is now dealing with the aftermath of the biggest rebellion of his premiership.
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is the party over for - you now, prime minister? the ayes to the right, 369. the noes to the left, 126. this was last night in the house of commons — almost 100 tory mps voting against the government on covid certification. fast forward to this afternoon. we now come to the leader - of the opposition, keir starmer. questions over borisjohnson's authority and the possibility of further restrictions. if further votes are needed to save lives and protect the nhs, labour mps will follow my leadership, and we will always put the national interest first. can i ask the prime minister to get his house in order so he can say the same? yes, mr speaker, if further measures are needed, as the house will understand, if further regulation is needed, of course this house will have a further say.
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as for following his leadership, mr speaker, they wibble—wobbled over plan b and over quarantine, and if we listened to him we wouldn't have had the vaccine roll—out, because we would have remained in the european medicines agency. we can't go on with a prime minister who is too weak to lead, so will he take time this christmas to look in the mirror and ask himself whether he has the trust and authority to lead this country? i respect the feelings... i respect the anxieties that colleagues have, of course i do. i respect and understand the legitimate anxieties that colleagues have about restrictions on their liberty, and on the liberty of people, but i believe that the approach we are taking is balanced and proportionate and right for this country. the last few weeks have undoubtedly been bruising for borisjohnson, and last night's vote calls into question his authority,
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his ability to persuade his party to back his plans. but while all the political drama plays out here, there is significant concern in government and in parliament about the spread of omicron, and what it might mean for further restrictions or guidance in the next few weeks. parliament breaks for christmas tomorrow — a relief for some in government, but there remain big questions about how the prime minister can rebuild his leadership and what further actions might be needed soon to tackle covid. the prime minister will lead a press conference at 5pm today, with the chief medical officer for england, professor chris whitty and the medical director of primary care for nhs england, dr nikki kanani. you can watch that here on bbc news. baroness hallett,
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a former high courtjudge and crossbench peer is to chair the covid inquiry into the government's handling of the pandemic. baroness hallett presided over the inquests into the deaths from the 7/7 terror attacks, and was the first woman to chair the bar council. earlier we heard from lobby akinnola, whose father died from coronavirus last year. it is great to see that the chair has been named. we met with the prime minister in september and he said the chair would be named before the end of the year. as a campaign we have been calling for the inquiry sincejune 2020 and part of the reason for that is so we were better prepared for any future waves of the pandemic. as a nation we now face our fourth wave with the new variant landing on our shores and it's difficult
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to imagine that we are going to be better prepared if we had started the inquiry. people currently in hotel quarantine have been told they can now leave. a letter from the department of health and social care also states that people who have tested positive for covid must continue to complete their quarantine. anyone who test negative for the virus will receive a refund for the unused portion of their stay. the reality tv star katie price has been handed a 16—week suspended jail sentence at crawley magistrates' court for drink—driving while disqualified and without insurance. she was also given a two—year driving ban. our media correspondent, david sillito, gave me this update from outside the court. katie price was involved in a car accident, a crash, she crashed her car in september last year, and she admitted at the time that she had been driving while disqualified, driving under the influence of drink
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and drugs and driving without insurance. today was sentencing and she was told by the district judge that she was incredibly lucky not to be going to prison. she said she was incredibly selfish and had no concern for the lives of others and that if it was up to her, "you deserve to spend christmas behind bars." but because there was a deferment of sentencing and she had been told if she went to the priory, those were the condition, she said her hands were effectively tied, and so gave her a 16 week suspended sentence for 12 months. there will be another 100 hours of community service and another driving ban. remember, she already has had five driving bans in the last couple of years, and another £7,000 of unpaid court fines as well, hanging over her head. katie price has definitely been going through difficulties,
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visits to rehab and also going through bankruptcy proceedings at the moment. she left court. hasn't actually left here, though, so we believe she is still inside the court building. dame diana johnson has been elected the new chairwoman of the home affairs select committee. the labour mp for kingston upon hull north replaces yvette cooper following her return to the opposition frontbench as shadow home secretary. he may have missed out on a record—breaking 8th world championship at the weekend, but formula one star, sir lewis hamilton, has been picking up a title of a different sort this morning. to receive the honour— of knighthood, sir lewis hamilton for services to motorsport. the 36—year—old was knighted by the prince of wales at windsor castle. our sports correspondent,
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joe wilson, was there. these events are essentially private events, for the recipients of the honour and their families, so sir lewis and his mother came out and posed for pictures for us, but he declined the opportunity to actually do any interviews. that's his right. i've been to many of these ceremonies with stars of sport and stage and screen who decide they don't really want them to become media events but of course we are all desperately interested about what might be going through lewis's mind, does he feel contentment or any resentment about what happened on the final lap of the abu dhabi grand prix? there's at least the potential of an appeal from the mercedes team about the whole outcome of this year's world championship. we should remember that sir lewis is already the most successful driver in f1 history, equal with seven titles, but he has won more actual races
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than anybody else in f1 history. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. no coat at windsor there, what does that tell us? we no coat at windsor there, what does that tell us?— that tell us? we have had some sunshine further _ that tell us? we have had some sunshine further north, - that tell us? we have had some sunshine further north, lovely i sunshine further north, lovely sunsets around and a bit of rain, as well, the weather front spreading north. tomorrow, much of the uk will be dry and pretty mild. this area of high pressure is influencing the weather, pushing the weather front north, gradually, through the evening and overnight, splashes of rain clearing away from northern ireland and that will become confined to the north—west, especially the hebrides. most places will be dry, areas that remain cloudy will be mild, where we have clear skies, a touch of frost or chili with a bit of mist and fog. and a dry mainly cloudy day, some
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areas with sunshine, in the east and north—east, and showers confined to the northern isles. look at the temperatures, double figures, nearly 13 in any sunny areas. the same on friday, similar story, with a lot of cloud around, quite mild, and into the weekend, turning a bit cooler, especially where skies are clear in the overnight periods.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... the uk records over 78,000 new coronavirus cases — the highest daily figure of the entire pandemic. prime minister borisjohnson says he'll hold a press conference at 5pm. the two women responsible for the death of star hobson, who was 16 months old when she was killed, have been sentenced. savannah brockhill, found guilty
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of murdering the girl, was given a minimum of 25 years in prison. her partner frankie smith, who's also star's mother, was given an eight—year sentence for causing or allowing her death. david fuller, who murdered two women in 1987, and sexually abused over 100 dead women and girls in hospital mortuaries, has been told he will spend the rest of his life in prison. baroness hallett, who led the inquest into the 7/7 terror bombings, will be chair of a public inquiry into the government's handling of the covid—19 pandemic. some bereaved families have welcomed the appointment. the cost of living hits its highest level for a decade, inflation surging to 5.1% in the year to november. sport, and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. sergio aguero has confirmed his retirement from football. he made the announcement
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in a tearful press conference earlier today. the former manchester city and argentina strikerjoined barcelona in the summer but only made five appearances. he suffered chest pains and breathing difficulties in his last game and has now decided to call it a day, after scoring 427 goals in 786 games. he told a news conference in barcelona that it was a very hard moment for him, but that he was happy with his decision, adding "my health comes first". translation: i want to tell everyone that i did everything _ possible to have some hope, but there wasn't very much. i'm very proud of the career i have had, very happy, and i will leave now with my head held high, happy. i don't know what awaits me in the next life, but i know that there are a lot of people that love me, and want the best for me.
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there are four premier league matches tonight, and they'll be the first big sporting events, where spectators will need to show a covid pass or negative lateral flow test for entry into the stadium. fans are also being asked to complete a covid status declaration before attending, and should not go to the games if they are feeling unwell. it comes after a rise in cases of the omicron variant across the uk, a rise that has been mirrored among players and staff. meanwhile tottenham manager antonio conte has revealed that his side wanted to play their outstanding europa conference league group match tomorrow, instead of the premier league game against leicester. leicester also wanted the match postponed. the premier league refused the request. spurs previously postponed league matches against burnley and brighton after a covid outbreak at the club. the virus also forced them to call off that europa conference league tie against french side rennes last week. uefa have declared that match has to be rescheduled by december 31. it isa
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it is a really strange situation, because — it is a really strange situation, because we didn't play, not through our fault. _ because we didn't play, not through ourfault, but because we didn't play, not through our fault, but for a because we didn't play, not through ourfault, but fora big problem, because — ourfault, but fora big problem, because the government decided to close our— because the government decided to close our training ground, to stop for three — close our training ground, to stop for three days our training session. for this _ for three days our training session. for this reason, we didn't play, not for other— for this reason, we didn't play, not for other reasons, and i think it's not our fault _ for other reasons, and i think it's not our fault for what happened, and i tell not our fault for what happened, and i tell you _ not our fault for what happened, and i tell you to— not our fault for what happened, and i tell you to have a chance to play the last _ i tell you to have a chance to play the last game and to try to get to the last game and to try to get to the next — the last game and to try to get to the next round. cricket now, and james anderson and stuart broad are back in england's 12 man squad for the second ashes test against australia. it's a day—night game, which starts in the early hours of tomorrow morning in adelaide. the pair had been left out of the opener in brisbane, which england lost by nine wickets. pace bowler mark wood is rested, with spinnerjack leach retained despite some harsh treatment from the australian batsmen. anderson believes that the short time between tests after the heavy defeat in brisbane coukld benefit england.
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it's been quite a good thing to get straight _ it's been quite a good thing to get straight back— it's been quite a good thing to get straight back in— it's been quite a good thing to get straight back in the _ it's been quite a good thing to get straight back in the nets - it's been quite a good thing to get straight back in the nets and - it's been quite a good thing to get straight back in the nets and have| it's been quite a good thing to get. straight back in the nets and have a game _ straight back in the nets and have a game in _ straight back in the nets and have a game in quite — straight back in the nets and have a game in quite quick— straight back in the nets and have a game in quite quick succession. - straight back in the nets and have a| game in quite quick succession. get straight _ game in quite quick succession. get straight back— game in quite quick succession. get straight back out _ game in quite quick succession. get straight back out there _ game in quite quick succession. get straight back out there and - game in quite quick succession. get straight back out there and try- game in quite quick succession. get straight back out there and try and. straight back out there and try and put things— straight back out there and try and put things right _ straight back out there and try and put things right. play _ straight back out there and try and put things right. play a _ straight back out there and try and put things right. play a much - straight back out there and try andl put things right. play a much better game _ put things right. play a much better game than — put things right. play a much better game than we — put things right. play a much better game than we did _ put things right. play a much better game than we did at— put things right. play a much better game than we did at the _ put things right. play a much better game than we did at the gabba. - put things right. play a much better game than we did at the gabba. sol game than we did at the gabba. so it's a _ game than we did at the gabba. so it's a great— game than we did at the gabba. so it's a great opportunity— game than we did at the gabba. so it's a great opportunity for- it's a great opportunity for everyone. _ it's a great opportunity for everyone, whoever- it's a great opportunity for everyone, whoever gets i it's a great opportunity for. everyone, whoever gets the it's a great opportunity for- everyone, whoever gets the nod tomorrow. — everyone, whoever gets the nod tomorrow. the _ everyone, whoever gets the nod tomorrow, the 11— everyone, whoever gets the nod tomorrow, the 11 that _ everyone, whoever gets the nod tomorrow, the 11 that play, - everyone, whoever gets the nodl tomorrow, the 11 that play, great opportunity— tomorrow, the 11 that play, great opportunity to— tomorrow, the 11 that play, great opportunity to get _ tomorrow, the 11 that play, great opportunity to get us _ tomorrow, the 11 that play, great opportunity to get us back - opportunity to get us back in the series _ fresh from his dramatic formula one championship—winning drive in abu dhabi max verstappen has been back behind the wheel. the red bull driver was testing tyres in abu dhabi, the scene of his controversial victory over lewis hamilton on sunday. mercedes have until tomorrow to decide whether to appeal the result of the race. races should be won on the track, and i think, for the whole season, we have been doing that. and, like i said before, when you have the whole season, if you take away the bad luck, we should have already won the championship before that, so you can also speak about that, because of the bad luck you're in that position. and at the end of the day, we will celebrate regardless, but we
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at least won it on the track. that's all the sport for now. the cost of living has risen at its fastest rate for a decade, with inflation at 5.1% last month, according to figures from the office for national statistics. rising transport and energy costs have driven the increase, which is substantially higher than analysts had been expecting and more than double the bank of england's inflation target of 2%. tomorrow, the bank has to decide whether or not to raise interest rates in response to the new inflation figures. here's our economics correspondent, andy verity. when chrissyjones, from frome, was younger, in the 19705, they used to call it "stagflation". as the economy slows almost to a stop, the cost of living is rising faster than it has in more than a decade. goods prices, everything from saucepans to cookers, rose by 6.5%, the fastest in 30 years.
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electricity bills are up 19%, and on average bills for gas are up by 28%. when her previous supplier went bust and she switched to british gas, her bill almost doubled. we can't plan anything for the future. we probably won't have a holiday this coming year. and we were going to rescue another dog, which we had been planning to do, but i don't think that would be fair on the dog. it wouldn't be fair on our purse. the gradual reopening of the global economy this year has led to a surge in activity, meaning much higher demand for commodities like petrol. the supply has not kept up with demand, forcing up the average price of a litre of unleaded to a record £1.45.8p, compared to £1.13 a year ago. with manufacturers unable to make as many new cars owing to a shortage of microchips, the cost of second—hand cars has risen by 31% since april, as commuters sought
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to avoid public transport. on the financial markets, they're betting the bank of england will have to raise the official interest rate from a record low of 0.1%, but maybe not straightaway. normally, i think that would be a green light to go ahead and raise interest rates now, but we have all this uncertainty around the omicron variant. we don't know what is going to happen to the economy as a consquence in the next couple of months. and that is why, on balance, we think they will wait at least until february, assuming that hopefully the worst of the omicron situation is behind us by then. there's more upward inflationary pressure in the pipeline. the prices paid by manufacturers for raw materials like metals were up by an average of 14.3%, the fastest rise since 2008. after the worst decade in two centuries for improvements in living standards, they are now once again falling.
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thames valley police said the fire was not being treated as a terrorist incident. people have been told to avoid the area, with several road closures in place. parents forced to give up their babies for adoption in the 19505, 60s and 70s will be among those giving evidence to an inquiry which gets under way today. thejoint parliamentary committee on human rights is looking into the forced adoption of babies of unmarried mothers during those years. duncan kennedy reports. it is nearly 50 years since pat king was forced to give up her newborn baby. pat became pregnant aged 15 in 1973. she wasn't married and, almost immediately, a social worker arrived to confront her.
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i was the wicked girl and i had sinned and i needed to put this right and the way i could put this right was to help some family who really needed this baby. did she call you wicked? she did call me wicked, yes. it is thought around 400,000 unmarried women in england and wales were pressured to give up their babies for adoption in the 30 years after the second world war. even as they gave birth, some nurses treated them cruelly. you weren't allowed to scream, you were told to shut up and stop making a noise and stop being silly, it was your own fault. you have got yourself into this mess. in the delivery room, a nurse or midwife is telling you to shut up screaming? yes. there was even more anguish when pat came to hand over her baby son. the social workerjust walked towards us, held out her arms, took the baby, well...
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i tried to fight her to get the baby off me but that didn't work and she took the baby and that was it, just a thank you and went, that was it. today's parliamentary inquiry follows a series of reports on bbc news with dozens of the birth mothers. the government says it was society to blame for forced adoptions, but the birth mothers say that's wrong. it wasn't society that took my baby away, it was the state and all the employees of the state, they were all in cahoots with this practice. which was just wrong. and, therefore, the state should apologise? yes, therefore the state should apologise. pat king has never been reunited with her son. she hopes the new inquiry will help bring comfort to thousands of women like her who had their babies taken. duncan kennedy, bbc news.
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an increasing number of care companies supporting people who are older and disabled in their own homes say they're turning away new clients because of staff shortages. nearly 340 care providers in the uk responded to questions from the home care association. most worry the requirement for all home care staff to have covid vaccines will add to their recruitment problems. our social affairs editor, alison holt, has been speaking to one family—run care company. marion is three hours into what is going to be a very long day. morning, christine. she and her husband run their own home care company. how are you today? ..but staff shortages mean both are also out providing support for people like christine. not good? no. 0k. the three visits christine gets a day provide the personal care she needs but also allow her to maintain her independence. she's previously been stuck in hospital waiting for home care and knows how miserable it can be. it's hard when you are in hospital and you are bed blocking.
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what they were doing for me, i can do at home, i could take my own pills, or get my pills, without them coming around me four times a dayjust to give me a pill and i was sitting there doing nothing. you have a good morning, and i'll see you later. 0k, thank you. but to provide support at home takes staff, and a survey of nearly 340 care providers by the home care association found nearly all those who responded were facing real difficulties recruiting. for marion and her husband, tim, that means constantjuggling to ensure their existing clients get the support they need. effectively, i'm doing a 16—hour. day, and last week was like that — pretty much every day was seven till 11. - it'sjust exhausting. how sustainable is that? it's not. like many other home care providers, they are turning away new clients, even though councils and the nhs are desperate for them to take on people who are ready to leave hospital.
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there is a high demand. we get an e—mail through every day from the council. i've got four on my e—mail at the moment that ijust noticed, but i can't take the clients on because i haven't got the staff and it's a never—ending circle. to try to ease some of the immediate staffing pressures, the government has announced an extra £300 million to provide bonuses, overtime and pay rises for care staff. that money runs until march. ok, thank you, bye. alison holt, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the uk records over 78,000 new coronavirus cases — the highest daily figure of the entire pandemic. prime minister borisjohnson will hold at a press conference at 5pm. david fuller, who murdered two women in 1987, and sexually abused over 100 dead women and girls in hospital mortuaries, has been told he will spend the rest of his life in prison.
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baroness hallett, who led the inquest into the 7/7 terror bombings, will be chair of a public inquiry into the government's handling of the covid—19 pandemic. some bereaved families have welcomed the appointment. morneau on the coronavirus figures for the uk, with 78,610 new cases in the last 24 hours —— more now. the highest daily figure reported since the pandemic began. in the last few minutes, health secretary sajid javid has been speaking outside a hospital in westminster. he was askedif hospital in westminster. he was asked if the government would introduce any further coronavirus guidance before christmas. we keep the whole situation _ guidance before christmas. we keep the whole situation under _ guidance before christmas. we keep the whole situation under review. it| the whole situation under review. it is fast moving, i think people understand that, the case numbers are still sadly rising rapidly. we've been very open about how quickly this new variant spreads. we
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are seeing it double in terms of infections every two to three days across the country. in london now for example it is our understanding it is around 16% —— around 60% of all cases in london already. so we are in this race between the virus in the vaccine, we of course want to stay ahead in that race and the best way to do that, for anyone listening, is to make sure they are coming forward as soon as they can for their boosterjab. pare coming forward as soon as they can for their boosterjab.— for their booster 'ab. are you rollin: for their booster 'ab. are you rolling out _ for their booster 'ab. are you rolling out more i for their boosterjab. are you rolling out more restrictionsl for their boosterjab. are you i rolling out more restrictions before new year? — rolling out more restrictions before new year? brie _ rolling out more restrictions before new year? ~ ., ., ., ,, new year? we have to observe the situation and _ new year? we have to observe the situation and learn _ new year? we have to observe the situation and learn more _ new year? we have to observe the situation and learn more about i new year? we have to observe the situation and learn more about this all the time, we are buying time, we are buying time to assess this virus and build our defences and that is our strategy. and build our defences and that is ourstrategy. i and build our defences and that is our strategy. i think it's been clear from the moment we learned about this variant, and right here and now, the biggest thing that anyone can do if they want to play their part, which i think everyone does, is to get boosted.- their part, which i think everyone does, is to get boosted. should we be preparing _ does, is to get boosted. should we be preparing ourselves _ does, is to get boosted. should we be preparing ourselves for- does, is to get boosted. should we be preparing ourselves for new i does, is to get boosted. should we. be preparing ourselves for new year and new— be preparing ourselves for new year and new restrictions, _ be preparing ourselves for new year and new restrictions, is _ be preparing ourselves for new year and new restrictions, is that - be preparing ourselves for new year and new restrictions, is that in- be preparing ourselves for new year and new restrictions, is that in the l and new restrictions, is that in the government's— and new restrictions, is that in the government's plan? _ and new restrictions, is that in the government's plan? you— and new restrictions, is that in the government's plan?— and new restrictions, is that in the government's plan? you should be --rearinr government's plan? you should be preparing yourselves _ government's plan? you should be preparing yourselves to _ government's plan? you should be preparing yourselves to get - government's plan? you should be l preparing yourselves to get boosted. the government has consistently and
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what it _ the government has consistently and what it can _ the government has consistently and what it can deliver. _ the government has consistently and what it can deliver. the _ the government has consistently and what it can deliver. the transport i what it can deliver. the transport secretary — what it can deliver. the transport secretary said _ what it can deliver. the transport secretary said this _ what it can deliver. the transport secretary said this morning - what it can deliver. the transport secretary said this morning that i secretary said this morning that there _ secretary said this morning that there would _ secretary said this morning that there would be _ secretary said this morning that there would be no— secretary said this morning that there would be no more - secretary said this morning that i there would be no more restrictions, before _ there would be no more restrictions, before new— there would be no more restrictions, before new year, _ there would be no more restrictions, before new year, are _ there would be no more restrictions, before new year, are you _ there would be no more restrictions, before new year, are you going i there would be no more restrictions, before new year, are you going to. before new year, are you going to agree _ before new year, are you going to agree with — before new year, are you going to agree with that. _ before new year, are you going to agree with that, do _ before new year, are you going to agree with that, do you _ before new year, are you going to agree with that, do you think- before new year, are you going to| agree with that, do you think there will be _ agree with that, do you think there will be no — agree with that, do you think there will be no more _ agree with that, do you think there will be no more restrictions- agree with that, do you think there will be no more restrictions until. will be no more restrictions until new year? — will be no more restrictions until new year? no _ will be no more restrictions until new year?— will be no more restrictions until new year? ., ., ., , ., , ., , new year? no one wants to see any more restrictions, _ new year? no one wants to see any more restrictions, and _ new year? no one wants to see any more restrictions, and these - more restrictions, and these restrictions, whenever they are made, they are really difficult things to do, because they have a real impact on people's lives, you can really disrupt their daily activities, what they were perhaps planning to do no one wants to see that. at the same time, people want to be safe for themselves, for their families, for theirfriends, and we all know now what we can do. we are learning more about this variant all the time, and really getting your vaccination, especially your booster shot. but what i was hearing today at the hospital, they are seeing record number is a people coming forward for their first vaccination, as well, compared to just where they were a few weeks ago. so if you haven't been vaccinated before, please come forward for your first jab or your second jab, but most of all, for those of us who have, get boosted. sajid javid talking just a little
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earlier. as nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, and her husband and daughter prepare to spend a sixth christmas apart, a new song has been released today to keep the family in the public eye. it's by the '805 pop band, the christians. they've reworked a single first released in 1991 to draw attention to the plight of the british journalist, john mccarthy, then being held hostage by militants in beirut. our correspondent, caroline hawley, reports. # times like these, i sit and wonder. # lord, it really can't be right...# it is three decades since the christians last recorded this for a british hostage, then as man don't cry. now it is for another british citizen being held in the middle east. gabriella has only had one christmas, herfirst, with both her parents. this was the moment nazanin was arrested in 2016 at tehran airport, as she prepared to fly home after visiting her parents. she was accused of working
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against the iranian state and thrown into solitary confinement. herfirst sentence ended earlier this year, and almost immediately came a second. her husband richard has campaigned tirelessly for her release. he wants britain to pay a long—standing debt it owes iran, which he believes is key to getting her home. last christmas, we were close to the end of the sentence, it felt like we really were counting down the days. now that is less clear the case, now we are in some kind of limbo of open water. we are awaiting that call to prison, there has been a second case raised on other families, so it feels a lot more uncertain. there's clearly games being played still. he went on hunger strike this autumn to put pressure on the government, which says it is doing all it can. but it was seeing richard starve himself in whitehall for three weeks that inspired the christians to rerelease their song. we're just trying to do something, anything, to help. it is uppermost in my mind most days, really, that this injustice is happening.
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# so, naz, don't cry #. nazanin was able to join the recording session over facetime. richard says she is deeply moved. but behind the smiles, also sad and anxious, as another celebration approaches, another family milestone to be missed. caroline hawley, bbc news. strictly come dancing's aj odudu is on crutches, after injuring her foot ahead of the competition's final. the tv presenter said she is "frustrated and upset" by the injury, and and vowed to do "everything" possible to make sure she can dance this saturday. in a moment, ben brown will bring you live coverage of today's downing street coronavirus briefing, led by the prime minister. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav. hello, there. we've got mixed fortunes of weather today. some areas are rather grey
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and gloomy, other areas seeing some lovely winter sunshine, and there's a little bit of rain in the forecast as well, particularly across the north of the uk. all areas, though, are pretty mild for the time of year, with temperatures through this afternoon sticking in double figures for many. we've got this building area of high pressure slowly pushing its way north westwards. we still have this weak weather front trapped in the system across the north of the uk, that's bringing some thicker clouds, some patchy outbreaks of rain to northern ireland into the far north of england and in towards southern scotland, and it's pretty much stalling here through the day. to the north of it, bright with some sunshine, slice of bright weather through north wales, north midlands, northern england, then it's rather grey and gloomy across the south. the winds light for most, but quite breezy, even windy across the north and west of scotland. and like i mentioned, it is mild through this afternoon, those temperatures will be in double figures for most. now as we head on into this evening and overnight, that weak weather front begins to migrate northwards again, becoming confined to the north west of scotland by the end of the night. elsewhere, largely dry,
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quite a lot of cloud, particularly across southern areas. but where we get clear spells, northern, eastern england, perhaps north—east scotland, it could turn quite chilly with some fog patches developing. otherwise, for most generally, a mild night. thursday, then, is looking pretty grey and gloomy across southern areas. there'll be some low clouds, some mist around too. probably the best of any sunshine will be across the north east of the uk. and we'll still have this weather front affecting the far north of scotland, mainly affecting the northern isles. but again, it is another mild day for the time of year with temperatures ranging from 10 to 12 degrees. this area of high pressure sits across the uk in a block pattern called an omega block, you can see from the greek letter shape there, and the jet stream moving to the north of it. generally, we're in a zone of milder air with this area of high pressure, but, of course, areas that will stay rather cloudy throughout the days, will feel a bit chilly and see where skies clear at night towards the weekend, it will turn quite chilly as well, some mist and fog. friday, then a quiet day with that area of high pressure pretty much sitting on top of us, drier as well across
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the north of scotland. a lot of cloud, though, through central and southern parts of the country, quite gray and gloomy here. perhaps the best of the sunshine after a chilly start will be across parts of northern england and into scotland. similar stories as we head through the weekend. it stays largely cloudy for most, chilly where skies clear at night, but at least a few areas may have some sunshine.
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hello, very good afternoon. you are watching bbc news with me, ben brown. we are building up to the prime minister, borisjohnson, who is about to hold a news conference in downing street injust is about to hold a news conference in downing street in just a few minutes' time.
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that is after a senior government scientist warned that the omicron variant was "probably the most significant threat" since the pandemic began. drjenny harries, the head of the uk health security agency, told mps earlier today that the growth of the variant over the coming days would be "staggering", and her words are being born out by the latest data, which shows that the highest daily number of covid—19 cases have been recorded in the last 24 hours — that's 78,610 lab—confirmed covid—19 cases recorded in the uk, as of 9am this morning. as we wait for the prime minister in downing street, let's talk to our health correspondent, anna collinson. a very dramatic rise, 78,000 cases, and it really does sort of confirm whatjenny harries has been saying about we should prepare ourselves for staggering daily rises ins case numbers. that's rirht, this daily rises ins case numbers. that's right, this morning, _ daily rises ins case numbers. that's right, this morning, she _ daily rises ins case numbers. that's right, this morning, she said i right, this morning, she said prepare for staggering this afternoon, we see it. they have ——
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those confirmed cases have jumped from 20,000 injust one day, more than 78,000 cases confirmed, the highest number since january eight, which wasjust over highest number since january eight, which was just over 68,000 cases were recorded and that was of course during the peak of the pandemic. when we talking about confirmed cases here, we are not talking about infections. it is thought infections will be even higher, possibly hundreds of thousands. the head of the uk health security agency dr jenny harries told mps the doubling time of the variant is now under two days for most of the uk. the government has said in the past hour that in london, it is thought omicron makes up to about 60% of all cases and there are also particularly high numbers we are seeing in manchester. so those cases are pretty staggering. fiend seeing in manchester. so those cases are pretty staggering-— are pretty staggering. and it is a race between, _ are pretty staggering. and it is a race between, is— are pretty staggering. and it is a race between, is the _ are pretty staggering. and it is a | race between, is the government are pretty staggering. and it is a i race between, is the government keep telling us, between the virus in the vaccine. in terms of vaccinations, the prime minister set that target of a million a day of boosters. how are we on boosters, what is the
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latest data on that?— are we on boosters, what is the latest data on that? yeah, i think it is important — latest data on that? yeah, i think it is important to _ latest data on that? yeah, i think it is important to stress - latest data on that? yeah, i think it is important to stress that i latest data on that? yeah, i think| it is important to stress that while these numbers are concerning, and they are big, they are huge, we are in a different place compared to last year, and one of the main thing is, the big key thing is the vaccine, it is the booster, and this afternoon it was confirmed a record number of boosters were administered in the uk, more than 650,000. now, that's not reaching that sort of daily target of 1 that's not reaching that sort of daily target of1 million, but a lot of effort has been going into that. i actually got my booster on monday. well done. ., . ., i actually got my booster on monday. well done. ., .., ., , well done. yeah, recovered now, but eah, ou well done. yeah, recovered now, but yeah. you are — well done. yeah, recovered now, but yeah, you are really— well done. yeah, recovered now, but yeah, you are really seeing _ well done. yeah, recovered now, but yeah, you are really seeing the i well done. yeah, recovered now, but yeah, you are really seeing the long i yeah, you are really seeing the long queues, extra people being brought in, volunteers, the military, but this comes at a cost. other types of care have to be compromised on that. i suppose it will take a while to mmp i suppose it will take a while to ramp that booster service up, isn't it, and you're not going to get to a million realistically a day overnight?— million realistically a day overnirht? ~ , . overnight? absolutely. when we were reachin: overnight? absolutely. when we were reaching those — overnight? absolutely. when we were reaching those high _ overnight? absolutely. when we were reaching those high numbers - overnight? absolutely. when we were reaching those high numbers of i reaching those high numbers of 800,000 i think around march time, we were seeing people getting vaccinated in stadiums, that kind of
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thing. it does take time and effort to ramp up those numbers. but, you know, 650,000, a decent numberfor quite a quick turnaround, and honestly everyone working on that is working extremely long hours, after nearly two years of really tiring work. ., ., ., ~ , ., , work. for the moment, thank you very much indeed- — work. for the moment, thank you very much indeed. let's _ work. for the moment, thank you very much indeed. let's get _ work. for the moment, thank you very much indeed. let's get the _ work. for the moment, thank you very much indeed. let's get the view i work. for the moment, thank you very much indeed. let's get the view from i much indeed. let's get the view from westminster. just before we hear from borisjohnson in downing street we canjoin our from borisjohnson in downing street we can join our political correspondent, ian watson. i suppose the question on many people's minds right now as those case numbers shoot up, is whether there are going to be more restrictions announced, maybe not tonight by borisjohnson, but in the coming days and weeks? that is the question, whether he can resist _ that is the question, whether he can resist further restrictions was that we know— resist further restrictions was that we know in— resist further restrictions was that we know in scotland for example guidance — we know in scotland for example guidance rather than legal obligation, advice from nicola sturgeon the first minister for people — sturgeon the first minister for people to restrict their social mixing — people to restrict their social mixing ahead of christmas. it could be perfectly possible borisjohnson may want— be perfectly possible borisjohnson may want to issue similar guidance at some _
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may want to issue similar guidance at some point. he has had his hand bitten _ at some point. he has had his hand bitten somewhat by going down the regulatory roots, because he had that massive rebellion, 100 of his own mps— that massive rebellion, 100 of his own mps not backing covid passes in england. _ own mps not backing covid passes in england, but there are other ways, other— england, but there are other ways, other means he can use to try to encourage — other means he can use to try to encourage people to slow the spread of this— encourage people to slow the spread of this virus. that said, sajid javid. — of this virus. that said, sajid javid. the _ of this virus. that said, sajid javid, the health secretary, was asked _ javid, the health secretary, was asked today three times whether he could rule _ asked today three times whether he could rule out further restrictions, and he _ could rule out further restrictions, and he gave interesting answers, such— and he gave interesting answers, such as. — and he gave interesting answers, such as, you know, people don't like restrictions. — such as, you know, people don't like restrictions, and get yourself boosted. _ restrictions, and get yourself boosted, but he did not rule out further — boosted, but he did not rule out further restrictions will stop the transport — further restrictions will stop the transport secretary grant shapps earlier— transport secretary grant shapps earlier suggested they would probably be no further measures this year. _ probably be no further measures this year. but _ probably be no further measures this year, but don't forget, we only have 16 days _ year, but don't forget, we only have 16 days of— year, but don't forget, we only have 16 days of this year left, and certainly— 16 days of this year left, and certainly circulating in whitehall, i've certainly circulating in whitehall, l've seen— certainly circulating in whitehall, i've seen some pretty scary projections about future hospitalisations. now, these don't take into _ hospitalisations. now, these don't take into account the plan b measures, the impact that working from home — measures, the impact that working from home may have. nonetheless, it does look— from home may have. nonetheless, it does look as— from home may have. nonetheless, it does look as though the nhs will
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come _ does look as though the nhs will come under severe pressure in january. — come under severe pressure in january. so _ come under severe pressure in january. so i think, for that reason. _ january. so i think, for that reason, we are not actually hearing government ministers absolutely ruling _ government ministers absolutely ruling out further restrictions. i'm sure _ ruling out further restrictions. i'm sure the _ ruling out further restrictions. i'm sure the prime minster will be asked but at _ sure the prime minster will be asked but at the _ sure the prime minster will be asked but at the press conference today and l'm _ but at the press conference today and i'm sure he will have to find a form _ and i'm sure he will have to find a form of— and i'm sure he will have to find a form of words to convince people that christmas won't be entirely ruined _ that christmas won't be entirely ruined but— that christmas won't be entirely ruined but equally he will keep the option— ruined but equally he will keep the option open of taking further measures if the spread of the virus suddenly— measures if the spread of the virus suddenly reaches a stage where the nhs is _ suddenly reaches a stage where the nhs is potentially being overwhelmed. we nhs is potentially being overwhelmed.— nhs is potentially being overwhelmed. ~ ., ., ., nhs is potentially being overwhelmed. ., ., ., ., overwhelmed. we are going to hear from the prime _ overwhelmed. we are going to hear from the prime minister _ overwhelmed. we are going to hear from the prime minister any - overwhelmed. we are going to hear from the prime minister any secondj from the prime minister any second now. i may have to rudely interrupt you but i'm going to ask you another question, which is, you alluded to that revolt in the commons by tory backbenchers. do you think that will deter borisjohnson backbenchers. do you think that will deter boris johnson from backbenchers. do you think that will deter borisjohnson from more legal restrictions? because in the end he will get them through, probably, isn't he, with labour party support, but it doesn't look good? it doesn't look good and the mood on the conservative benches is volatile. _ the conservative benches is volatile. you may see some of the
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rest of— volatile. you may see some of the rest of the — volatile. you may see some of the rest of the restlessness of

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