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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 14, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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you're watching bbc news. the headlines... you're watching bbc news. the headlines. . ._ you're watching bbc news. the headlines... , ., headlines... the ayes to the right, 369. the noes _ headlines... the ayes to the right, 369. the noes to _ headlines... the ayes to the right, 369. the noes to the _ headlines... the ayes to the right, 369. the noes to the left, - headlines... the ayes to the right, 369. the noes to the left, 126. - headlines... the ayes to the right, l 369. the noes to the left, 126. mps vote through _ 369. the noes to the left, 126. mps vote through the _ 369. the noes to the left, 126. mp5 vote through the government plans with measures to tackle the omicron variant in england but there is a sting in the tail for the prime minister, 98 conservative mps rebelled, the largest act of defiance since he became prime minister two years ago. long queues forjabs as the top adviser warns advisers to race for a significant increase in the number of hospitalisations. nicola sturgeon tightens restrictions and so she does not want people to cancel christmas but calls for no more than three households to mix. this is to
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try to curb the spread. in three households to mix. this is to try to curb the spread.— try to curb the spread. in the run-u try to curb the spread. in the run-up to — try to curb the spread. in the run-up to and _ try to curb the spread. in the run-up to and in _ try to curb the spread. in the run-up to and in the - try to curb the spread. in the i run-up to and in the immediate run—up to and in the immediate aftermath of christmas, i am asking everyone to reduce as far as possible and to a minimum context we have with in other households. fine have with in other households. one ofthe have with in other households. one of the story — have with in other households. one of the story this _ have with in other households. one of the story this hour and a woman is found guilty of murdering 16—month—old star hobson, a's daughter, after months of physical abuse. —— her girlfriend's daughter. good evening. we begin with that commons vote, new coronavirus rules in england have been approved despite borisjohnson experiencing despite boris johnson experiencing the despite borisjohnson experiencing the biggest rebellion of his premiership, almost 100 conservative
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mps including the newest of them all voted against the government introducing covid passes for large venues. they had to rely on labour votes to pass. let's look at the latest restrictions confirmed by those votes. covid pass which will be introduced in some venues like nightclubs, facemasks are pretty much compulsory in all indoor public spaces, including public transport and shops. new rules on self—isolating, if you are double vaccinated and come into contact with someone with covid, you should take daily lateral flow tests for seven days rather than isolate. and that did not provoke a vote, there was no opposition. mandatory covered vaccination for front line nhs staff, which also required a vote, will come into effect from the beginning of april. we can speak to ben wright, at westminster. a lot quieter than it was a not so long ago. this was a really dramatic vote
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tonight? it ago. this was a really dramatic vote toni . ht? ., , ago. this was a really dramatic vote toniaht? . , .,, ., ago. this was a really dramatic vote tonirht? . , ., . ,., tonight? it really was and you couldn't really _ tonight? it really was and you couldn't really get _ tonight? it really was and you couldn't really get a _ tonight? it really was and you couldn't really get a sense - tonight? it really was and you couldn't really get a sense of| tonight? it really was and you - couldn't really get a sense of where this was going the debate. there was a murmur of opposition from the conservative benches, you had backbenchers complaining about certain parts of the package but he did not get a sense from lessening that it was going to be a rebellion on this scale. when the series of votes began, it was quite apparent quickly that something was going on because the first vote was on extending the mask mandate to more indoor settings. a0 tory mps rebelled. then twice the number rebelled. then twice the number rebelled on the question of introducing covid passes or some indoor settings. a far more sizeable revolt than we were expecting, we were talking about perhaps 70 or 80 and it turned out to be a 98 tory mps. during the day conservative ministers have been trying their best to persuade backbenchers to
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think again and stick with the government and this is what the health secretary said as he opened the debate at lunchtime... in the debate at lunchtime... in england, ten people are confirmed to have been_ england, ten people are confirmed to have been hospitalised with the omicron — have been hospitalised with the omicron variant and i know that some honourable _ omicron variant and i know that some honourable members have said that because _ honourable members have said that because confirmed hospitalisations are low, _ because confirmed hospitalisations are low, then we don't need to act. but it_ are low, then we don't need to act. but it is the — are low, then we don't need to act. but it is the fact that omicron hospitalisations are low that means it is the _ hospitalisations are low that means it is the best time to act and we have _ it is the best time to act and we have seen— it is the best time to act and we have seen during previous waves, we have seen during previous waves, we have seen_ have seen during previous waves, we have seen this, the lag between infections — have seen this, the lag between infections and hospitalisations is atrout— infections and hospitalisations is about two weeks. when infections are rising _ about two weeks. when infections are rising so— about two weeks. when infections are rising so quickly, we are likely to see a _ rising so quickly, we are likely to see a substantial rise in hospitalisations before any measure is starting _ hospitalisations before any measure is starting to have an impact. there really— is starting to have an impact. there really is no — is starting to have an impact. there really is no time to lose. sajid really is no time to lose. sa'id javid really is no time to lose. sa'id javid teuing d really is no time to lose. sa'id javid telling mps d really is no time to lose. sa'id javid telling mps that i really is no time to lose. sa'id javid telling mps that the i really is no time to lose. s: c javid telling mps that the situation was grave and they should expect a big surge in hospitalisations within
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the next couple of weeks. that was something professor chris whitty told the cabinet this morning that he told mps when he did a call with them just before this debate started. sajid javid was trying to explain to his backbenchers that in his view, this was a relatively limited package of measures that were proportionate, the description were proportionate, the description we have heard, and it would be time limited. these expire injanuary. it was particularly the issue when the covid pass that he tried to take on some of the concerns of tory mps and he was emphatic that this was not a covid passport, that people going to nightclubs or big indoor venues good at present held negative lateral flow test or proof of vaccination but it then became clear there were deep conservative reservations and he was a flavour of what the tory backbenchers said... this he was a flavour of what the tory backbenchers said. . ._ backbenchers said... this was effectively _ backbenchers said... this was effectively the _ backbenchers said... this was effectively the first _ backbenchers said... this was effectively the first big - backbenchers said... this was effectively the first big test i backbenchers said... this was | effectively the first big test for the government, about how you deal with a _
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the government, about how you deal with a variant of concern with very well vaccinated operation. i am very disappointed that we very quickly have gone into panic and emergency mode _ have gone into panic and emergency mode i_ have gone into panic and emergency mode. i would say to my colleagues, if you _ mode. i would say to my colleagues, if you wish— mode. i would say to my colleagues, if you wish to — mode. i would say to my colleagues, if you wish to send the government a clear signal— if you wish to send the government a clear signal that it needs to rethink— clear signal that it needs to rethink its approach, then on vaccine — rethink its approach, then on vaccine passports, vote against them, _ vaccine passports, vote against them, send the government a clear message _ them, send the government a clear message that we can do better. there is a better— message that we can do better. there is a better way to do this, send that— is a better way to do this, send that message today.— is a better way to do this, send that message today. deputy speaker, i have that message today. deputy speaker, i have supported _ that message today. deputy speaker, i have supported the _ that message today. deputy speaker, i have supported the government - i have supported the government throughout the pandemic when i could see the present danger we faced, at this time around the measures proposed are precautionary, just in case. and i cannot see where this will end. covid will be with us for many years to come and it is unthinkable that every autumn from now on, we will be limiting the quality of life for all citizens just to be on the safe side. and justifying our new illiberal rules
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on the basis that they are less authoritarian than other countries, is truly appalling. that is not our culture and not our history. fin is truly appalling. that is not our culture and not our history. on the covid passroort. — culture and not our history. on the covid passport, if— culture and not our history. on the covid passport, if you _ culture and not our history. on the covid passport, if you are - culture and not our history. on the| covid passport, if you are prepared to put— covid passport, if you are prepared to put aside — covid passport, if you are prepared to put aside the _ covid passport, if you are prepared to put aside the moral— covid passport, if you are prepared to put aside the moral arguments, | to put aside the moral arguments, which _ to put aside the moral arguments, which i _ to put aside the moral arguments, which i do — to put aside the moral arguments, which i do not. _ to put aside the moral arguments, which i do not, and _ to put aside the moral arguments, which i do not, and many- which i do not, and many constituents _ which i do not, and many constituents do - which i do not, and many constituents do not, - which i do not, and manyj constituents do not, then which i do not, and many. constituents do not, then a which i do not, and many- constituents do not, then a vaccine does _ constituents do not, then a vaccine does not _ constituents do not, then a vaccine does not stop— constituents do not, then a vaccine does not stop you _ constituents do not, then a vaccine does not stop you getting - constituents do not, then a vaccine does not stop you getting this, - constituents do not, then a vaccine does not stop you getting this, it. does not stop you getting this, it is not _ does not stop you getting this, it is not stop— does not stop you getting this, it is not stop you _ does not stop you getting this, it is not stop you passing _ does not stop you getting this, it is not stop you passing it- does not stop you getting this, it is not stop you passing it on, - is not stop you passing it on, professor— is not stop you passing it on, professor whitty— is not stop you passing it on, professor whitty said - is not stop you passing it on, professor whitty said this - is not stop you passing it on, - professor whitty said this afternoon that there _ professor whitty said this afternoon that there is — professor whitty said this afternoon that there is a — professor whitty said this afternoon that there is a minimal— professor whitty said this afternoon that there is a minimal impact - professor whitty said this afternoon that there is a minimal impact on. that there is a minimal impact on transmission _ that there is a minimal impact on transmission of— that there is a minimal impact on transmission of all— that there is a minimal impact on transmission of all of _ that there is a minimal impact on transmission of all of our - that there is a minimal impact on. transmission of all of our vaccines. the issue _ transmission of all of our vaccines. the issue i— transmission of all of our vaccines. the issue i have _ transmission of all of our vaccines. the issue i have with— transmission of all of our vaccines. the issue i have with these - the issue i have with these regulations is in terms of language and how— regulations is in terms of language and how we bring people together to -et and how we bring people together to get the most compliance. i think that omicron certainly is not the last variant we will have to deal with and — last variant we will have to deal with and in— last variant we will have to deal with and in my constituency there are a _ with and in my constituency there are a significant number of people with grave — are a significant number of people with grave concerns about civil liberties. _ with grave concerns about civil liberties, data harvesting and all of these — liberties, data harvesting and all of these things. while i think their fears— of these things. while i think their fears are _ of these things. while i think their fears are unfounded, i have to listen — fears are unfounded, i have to listen to— fears are unfounded, i have to listen to them and i think we in this place — listen to them and i think we in this place have to take their
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concerns— this place have to take their concerns seriously. as the honourable lady for brighton paviiion— honourable lady for brighton pavilion said, we do not allay those fears— pavilion said, we do not allay those fears of— pavilion said, we do not allay those fears of overregulation by passing more regulation. a fears of overregulation by passing more regulation.— more regulation. a flavour of the rebels and _ more regulation. a flavour of the rebels and their— more regulation. a flavour of the rebels and their reasoning, - rebels and their reasoning, particularly on the issue of the covid passes, which caused 98 to defy their whips and the prime minister. borisjohnson was speaking at a meeting of the 1922 committee one hour before the vote, explaining that this was really serious on these measures were required. it did not make a lot of difference when it came to his own side.— not make a lot of difference when it came to his own side. when you talk to those mps — came to his own side. when you talk to those mps who _ came to his own side. when you talk to those mps who made _ came to his own side. when you talk to those mps who made the - came to his own side. when you talk to those mps who made the decision tonight, is thisjust to those mps who made the decision tonight, is this just about the regulations or is there a sense that there is a desire to send a bigger message to the prime minister? perhaps his top team, notjust officials but ministers, about their relationship with the parliamentary party and therefore with the wider conservative family?—
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conservative family? there was definitely deep _ conservative family? there was definitely deep disquiet - conservative family? there was definitely deep disquiet within i conservative family? there was i definitely deep disquiet within the parliamentary party at the moment about the number 10 operation, they do not think it a sharp or there is much grip and there is clearly a degree of despair about recent events, right back to the attempt to rip up the standards rules and the owen paterson case through to the continuing rocker and drama around parties that happened in downing street. there is disquiet and many tory mps are miserable but i was just talking to one of the well—known tory rebels a few minutes ago and i said, is this about broader discontent with boris johnson or is it about the four measures you were asked to vote on today? he said this really was about the restrictions being imposed, that have been passed, because voting against them today is a line in the sand. they will not tolerate anything else, almost irrespective of how much more serious the omicron variant becomes the prime minister coming to them with new ideas,
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potentially in that year, tackle it. for the vast majority of tory mps who rebelled, it was a point of principle, they did not believe the evidence is there to justify the covid pass and they wanted to make it clear to downing street that they are unhappy and that they will not accept any further measures along these lines. the question is, and labour made this clear today, if the government comes forward with further restrictions, if it feels they are needed, labour will act in they are needed, labour will act in the national interest. you have this new alliance, which is very uncomfortable for boris johnson, between the conservatives, some tory backbenchers, the front bench and the labour party, who at the moment did vote today for restrictions to tackle the current crisis. ben wriuht, tackle the current crisis. ben wright. thank _ tackle the current crisis. ben wright, thank you. _ tackle the current crisis. ben wright, thank you. we - tackle the current crisis. ben wright, thank you. we can talk to the conservative mp for the forest of dean in gloucestershire, mark harper, former government chief whip. thank you for being with us.
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from your point of view, this has been a successful operation. you have maximised your influence as backbenchers, we have shown the premise to your dissatisfaction. are you worried about where you have left him and the government, that you have made it very hard for the government even in public health grounds to come back with anything stronger if the circumstances change? i stronger if the circumstances chance? ., �* stronger if the circumstances chance? . ., change? i don't agree with that. the thin i change? i don't agree with that. the thing i said. — change? i don't agree with that. the thing i said, and _ change? i don't agree with that. the thing i said, and you _ change? i don't agree with that. the thing i said, and you had _ change? i don't agree with that. the thing i said, and you had it - change? i don't agree with that. the thing i said, and you had it in - change? i don't agree with that. the thing i said, and you had it in your . thing i said, and you had it in your clip, i thing i said, and you had it in your clip, lam thing i said, and you had it in your clip, i am very disappointed by how the government has handled this. we have a very well vaccinated population, this is the first variant of concern with that well vaccinated population and we immediately have gone into panic mode, with late—night addresses on sunday, scaring people and causing panic. i don't think that is how this should be conducted. i urge my colleagues to send the government a clear message on this subject but we
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need to do things differently and better. it is about treating part of it seriously. i tried very hard to get a commitment from the government that if they had to do further measures that it felt were necessary, there was a commitment that if it happens after parliament rises for the christmas recess, that we are brought back, evidence would be put before mps and we would be asked to vote on them before they were brought into force and we could ask questions on behalf of constituents. i asked that for two days running and have not had the commitment and i hope the message today from conservative mps on this issueis today from conservative mps on this issue is that they want parliament to be treated parliament —— property and for the government to change its ways and for the prime minister to behave differently on the subject and take parliament more seriously and take parliament more seriously and mps more seriously. and i hope, it is a clear message that came through in your report, and i hope the prime minister listens and acts on it. ., , ., , the prime minister listens and acts onit. . ,. ,~ ., on it. that is a very clear statement _ on it. that is a very clear statement of _ on it. that is a very clear statement of why - on it. that is a very clear statement of why on -
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on it. that is a very clear. statement of why on these on it. that is a very clear- statement of why on these issues on it. that is a very clear— statement of why on these issues you feel so strongly and i know you are speaking for yourself, you cannot speaking for yourself, you cannot speak for individual speaking for yourself, you cannot speakfor individual mps speaking for yourself, you cannot speak for individual mps who are different combinations. that is a common factor but used a couple of phrases. behaving differently and better. asking the prime minister to behave differently. is there something about the approach of government that this exemplifies that has made you uncomfortable? yes, i referred before in parliament and you touched on it in that report and you touched on it in that report and your conversation, this started with the standards issue with owen paterson, where the government effectively tried to blow up the standards of system. that was a prime minister'sdecision, it went very badly wrong and i voted against the government on that occasion very quickly the government position unravelled and i think i was shown to be right, as were a few of my colleagues that were in the lobby with me. we have had other misjudgments on the way the
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christmas party issue was handled and a number of other things. it is and a number of other things. it is a way parliament is being treated, the way colleagues are being treated. and i have said before and i know this is a former chief whip, the team captain should be able to command the loyalty of the team but it is two—way, it means making good decisions with evidence, it means putting those in front of colleagues and treating them properly and treating parliament properly and if you make a mistake it means taking responsibility and apologising. none of that has been happening and i hope the vote tonight and the large number of conservative colleagues that expressed dissatisfaction with the government sends a message that the government sends a message that the prime minister needs to change his ways. we cannot do things differently and better and that is really important when we are dealing with these very important public health measures, as you correctly said, earlier in the interview. to be fair to you and your colleagues, i do not suggest you are underplaying the importance of the
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public health debate. i appreciate you were talking about the way these things have been prevented in the way the conversation has happened. he mentioned the captain of the team and unusually, for the sport, the team elect the captain and decide how long he remains in charge. i am not suggesting that this is some kind of attempt to force the prime ministerfrom office, those will say you have done him no favours if you want to continue in office? i disagree. sending the prime minister a clear message that we need to change, he needs to change how he is doing things and we need to do things better, i think it is very helpful. what is important is whether he listens and if he listens and the government starts conducting itself differently and better, that is good for everyone, that is good for conservatives and for the conservative government and good for the public because we will be governing better and that is really important. whether the prime
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minister listens, we have done our job and sent a clear message and it is up to the prime minister whether he does so. good to speak to you. thank you- — he does so. good to speak to you. thank you- you — he does so. good to speak to you. thank you. you will _ he does so. good to speak to you. thank you. you will find _ he does so. good to speak to you. thank you. you will find out - he does so. good to speak to you. thank you. you will find out how. he does so. good to speak to you. l thank you. you will find out how the story of the rebellion and others are covered in the front pages at 10:30pm with broadcasterjohn stapleton, who has presented a political programme on itv, and sian griffiths, the family editor with the sunday times. stay with us for that. ifirst chance the sunday times. stay with us for that. i first chance to see how the papers are covering it. privately, what mps are saying about the vote as well. professor sir chris whitty has warned that hospitals face a significant increase in the number of people being admitted with covid as infections of the omicron variant double every two to three days. the uk has recorded the highest daily number of new cases since january
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the 9th with close to 60,000. long queues have continued at vaccination centres across the country as people seek to be boosted. the number of people in england are trying to get a pcr test today was so high this morning no appointments were available. hugh pym has been following developments... high level concern about the new variant is increasing and the rapid roll—out of booster jabs is seen as a vital part of the official response. there was no shortage of people queueing for boosters in bristol today, though finding staff to do them hasn't been easy. it is difficult to recruit enough staff, both vaccinators and admin people. and they have all been working in this programme since the beginning of the year. and in swindon, a long queue as well and a wait of several hours. i have been here since nine o'clock and i am supposed to have work at two o'clock, but they told me the queue is going to be until half three. | not happy, i've got better thingsj to do than stand here in a queue. just underfive hours and when we got in there,
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there were only two people jabbing. long lines had built up after the acceleration of the booster offer to more adults. since the system in england was opened up to people aged 30 and over early on monday morning, around 1 million people have booked their boosters and that doesn't include walkins. the question now, can that momentum be maintained? at some vaccine centres, delivery fell behind and there were temporary closures. extremely high demand, according to officials, meant there were no slots to book pcr tests this morning in england, though this changed as the day wore on, with availability in all regions. rebecca has been struggling to book pcr test since being in contact with a positive case on friday. the frustration i have is i try to find guidelines and that has proven difficult. and ijust want surety for myself that i can go out and also to know that i am not putting other people
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at risk, especially in the build—up to christmas. it wasn't possible to book lateral flow tests online in england, they are now required daily for anyone who has been in contact with someone who is infected. at some pharmacies, they were not available either, although officials say stocks haven't run out. we need an increase of deliveries of lateral flow tests _ so we can then give them out, and at the minute we - are receiving 50 a day, we need to be closer. to 200, 300. all this as the chief medical officer chris whitty wants the cabinet of a likely increase in covid hospital numbers, a view echoed by other senior officials. we are concerned with the large volume of individuals who are being infected every day in the population that we are going to have a very difficult four weeks ahead with cases in the community, which will of course cause individuals to stay away from work and work
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and school and then for those cases to transfer into admissions to hospital. their key message is get yourjab come up, with military personnel helping in taunton and other centres. they will hope they can keep up with the spread of the virus. hugh pym, bbc news. the uk has to date recorded its highest number of new infections since the 9th of january, highest number of new infections since the 9th ofjanuary, 59,610 highest number of new infections since the 9th of january, 59,610 new cases in 2a hours to tuesday, meaning an average nearly 5a,000 new cases reported each day in the past week. the number in hospital with covid stands at 7672. in the 2a hours to tuesday, 150 deaths recorded, people who have died within 28 days of receiving a positive covid—19 test. lower than this time last week. 11a covid—related deaths on average every day in the past week. on the vaccination site, an average ofjust over a50,000 people have had their boosterjab everyday over a50,000 people have had their booster jab everyday over the over a50,000 people have had their boosterjab everyday over the seven days. the government is aiming to get1 million a day if possible. the
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number overall total is 2a million. scotland's first minister said the number of cases of omicron is increasing faster than any variant which has gone before. she wants people across scotland to limit social contacts before and after christmas and stressed it was only advice and not a legal requirement. it certainly felt like christmas was coming at this market in glasgow, butjust how much will the new variant affect celebrations in scotland? ahead of nicola sturgeon's statement, shoppers were anxious about omicron and the impact it might have on their lives. the plan is to go to my son's and daughter—in—law�*s for christmas, spend it with the wee one since it is herfirst one and my worry is we won't be able to. at holyrood, the first minister said this was not the update she had wanted. my key request is this, before and immediately after christmas, please minimise your social mixing with other households
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as much as you can. if you do plan on socialising either at home or in indoor public places, we are asking that you limit the number of households represented in your group to a maximum of three and make sure you test before you go. the scottish conservatives said ms sturgeon should have moved faster on booster vaccinations. week after week my party has come to the chamber and asked _ the first minister to- prepare to bring in mass |vaccination centres, but only now, | only today has that been accepted. the first minister's statement also included legally enforceable measures to stop crowding and maintain physical distancing in shops and hospitality venues. and there will be £200 million to support businesses affected by the changes, and to help people to self—isolate. nicola sturgeon was adamant she did not want to cancel christmas. nevertheless, these changes will make big differences to people's festive season.
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there is definitely an atmosphere in the air, people are just getting a bit more worried and people are not going to have the christmas they hoped for. i feel like by now, - people have stopped caring a little bit, especially now with the festive spirit. - people are kind of desperate to go out and socialise and go back- to their normal lives. with the things going on at downing street with parties and things like that, it makes you think, what is the point if they are not sticking to it? the first minister set out a plan which is designed to see scotland through the winter, but no—one can predict with certaintyjust how severe this new wave will be. james shaw, bbc news, glasgow. louise maclean, director of the signature group which owns 2a bars and restaurants across scotland joins me. thank you forjoining us. this is disappointing news tonight
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but had you already seen signs of this in terms of the public�*s behaviour? this in terms of the public's behaviour?— this in terms of the public's behaviour? , , , . behaviour? yes, went public in scotland issued _ behaviour? yes, went public in scotland issued a _ behaviour? yes, went public in scotland issued a statement i behaviour? yes, went public in i scotland issued a statement last thursday and then when the first minister announced that she did not want people to go to christmas parties, we thought genuinely of an avalanche of cancellations, thousands of tables and covers being parted. the struggle being cancelled. today was another disappointment in 18 months of disappointments so it did not come with much surprise but you are right, it came with disappointment. presumably there are all kinds of costs with this, it is not as if somebody cancels and you think that's all right, somebody is either fighting for the table or it does not matter because you have not ordered the food because a lot of things are ordered in advance? yes. things are ordered in advance? yes, and it is important _ things are ordered in advance? yes, and it is important to _
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things are ordered in advance? is: and it is important to think about the supply chain that goes further down. it is the baby—sitter is not being booked or the taxis and the new outfits not being bought and the hare and the nails and the beauty industry that goes hand in hand with how we celebrate the festive season. there is the wholesale channel, we are at the coal face and a chill wind of people affected as well. aha, wind of people affected as well. a good point about the economic knock—on effects of this. from your point of view, and that of lots of other people who are perhaps only tangentially affected by the hospitality industry but will feel the effects. back to the question which we have to talk about a lot, financially how do you cope with this given that a lot of the uk wide measures have gone shallow it is so difficult. on one hand i almost would like the chancellor to reinstate furlough but that is a bit like turkeys voting for christmas. because the first minister intimated
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today that if the treasury were more forthcoming with funding she would bring in further restrictions for hospitality and potentially shut us down. it is very difficult and it is making the best of a very difficult situation. , ., , ., situation. there is a bit of funding but if i situation. there is a bit of funding but if i can — situation. there is a bit of funding but if i can put — situation. there is a bit of funding but if i can put that _ situation. there is a bit of funding but if i can put that into _ but if i can put that into context, it is potentially thousand £500 per venue and on thursday and friday of this week, one of our venues alone has lost £a5,000 in two days. that has lost £45,000 in two days. that is more than _ has lost £45,000 in two days. that is more than i _ has lost £45,000 in two days. that is more than i watch _ has lost £45,000 in two days. that is more than i watch willingly painful from a business is more than i watch willingly painfulfrom a business point of view. your margins have been squeezed over a very long period. when you look at your business and the spread of where you are geographically and the businesses you have, is the starting to make you have, is the starting to make you think about having to perhaps restructure and change your focus as an organisation? h0. restructure and change your focus as an organisation?—
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an organisation? no, we are very committed _ an organisation? no, we are very committed to _ an organisation? no, we are very committed to safe _ an organisation? no, we are very committed to safe hospitality - an organisation? no, we are very| committed to safe hospitality and socialising responsibility, as we have been since the start and we will not look to do that but we will look to really reduce costs. while we can and while we are in this period of uncertainty. the other big thing we need to consider is consumer confidence. some of our customers and some of our demographic are back to being really scared, scared of omicron, sol demographic are back to being really scared, scared of omicron, so i am asking the government to make sure there is consistent messaging and to make sure that they are getting the words sight of how they want customers to behave and why. and as the first minister said last week, about levelling up.— the first minister said last week, about levelling up. otherwise the fear is ou about levelling up. otherwise the fear is you will _ about levelling up. otherwise the fear is you will get _ about levelling up. otherwise the fear is you will get levelled - about levelling up. otherwise the| fear is you will get levelled down. every business suffers as a result. louise maclean, we will all keep our fingers crossed for hogmanay, at least. thank you. sir keir starmer hasjust been given least. thank you. sir keir starmer has just been given his least. thank you. sir keir starmer hasjust been given his reaction least. thank you. sir keir starmer has just been given his reaction to the rebellion bite 98 conservative
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mps against the introduction of covid passes. mps against the introduction of covid passes-— covid passes. this is a very significant _ covid passes. this is a very significant blow _ covid passes. this is a very significant blow to - covid passes. this is a very significant blow to the - significant blow to the already damaged authority of the prime minister. it confirms that he is too weak to discharge the basic functions of government and these public health measures would not have gone through if labour had not shown the leadership that the prime ministerfailed to show shown the leadership that the prime minister failed to show by voting in the public interest. that is what we did, and it was because of our votes that these measures went through. are you calling on the pi minister to resign? are you calling on the pi minister to resin? ~ , , to resign? the prime minister needs to resign? the prime minister needs to take a long. _ to resign? the prime minister needs to take a long, hard _ to resign? the prime minister needs to take a long, hard look— to resign? the prime minister needs to take a long, hard look at - to resign? the prime minister needs to take a long, hard look at himselfl to take a long, hard look at himself and asked himself whether he has the authority to take this country through the pandemic. this is a very significant blow for him. do through the pandemic. this is a very significant blow for him.— significant blow for him. do you have anything _ significant blow for him. do you have anything to _ significant blow for him. do you have anything to say _ significant blow for him. do you have anything to say to - significant blow for him. do you - have anything to say to conservative rebels? l have anything to say to conservative rebels? ., ~ have anything to say to conservative rebels? ., . _ ., , rebels? i do. when i say that they should act — rebels? i do. when i say that they should act in _ rebels? i do. when i say that they should act in the _ rebels? i do. when i say that they should act in the public— rebels? i do. when i say that they should act in the public interest. | should act in the public interest. in the pandemic, the labour party that i lead will act in the public interest and these public health
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measures were necessary and that is why we voted in the public interest to ensure they become law. it would not have happened if we had not voted for them this evening. you say conservative — voted for them this evening. you say conservative mps _ voted for them this evening. you say conservative mps should _ voted for them this evening. you say conservative mps should act - voted for them this evening. you say conservative mps should act in - voted for them this evening. you say conservative mps should act in the i conservative mps should act in the public interest. are you therefore encouraging conservative rebels to hand in letters to the 1922 committee? it hand in letters to the 1922 committee?— hand in letters to the 1922 committee? , ., ., committee? it is important to understand — committee? it is important to understand just _ committee? it is important to understand just how- committee? it is important to understand just how deep - committee? it is important to understand just how deep the | committee? it is important to - understand just how deep the breach of trust is between the prime minister and his own party. he hasn't 80 seat majority and has just had 90 or 100 of his mps voting against him on a three line whip, thatis against him on a three line whip, that is a significant blow to the authority of the prime minister. just when we need decisive decisions in this pandemic. it is a worst possible leader at the worst possible leader at the worst possible time. sir possible leader at the worst possible time.— possible leader at the worst ossible time. ,, ,, ., . possible time. sir keir starmer. we will ut possible time. sir keir starmer. we will put this — possible time. sir keir starmer. we will put this in _ possible time. sir keir starmer. we will put this in context... _ 98 is not the biggest ever rebellion. there were 118 who voted
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against theresa may over the brexit withdrawal agreement, and there was an even bigger with rebellion over the labour government. diane nadler is a biographer and joins us live. even for allowing that, that is not a good look for the prime minister. l good look for the prime minister. i think this will have done considerable damage in the store term. he does need to respond to this because i think what is it so telling about some of the interviews with mark harper is leading into what he was saying, that there is a lack of trust amongst mps that voted against the government this evening about how the government have handled this,
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what they feel the government might be doing next — in other words, are they putting down a marker against any further moves towards vaccine meditations? —— mandates. during his press conference last week. i think that was very worrying to a lot of conservative mps. it is this sense of mandating things. i've heard people say this evening conservative mps were voting against masks. it's that idea that government is mandating people to wear masks and not trusting people to use their bestjudgment. i think on a number of fronts, this is a big steam to the prime minister, but also, if you look at the range that people who voted against him, they come from sort of various different areas of the conservative party. even the fact that the newest conservative mps who's only been there for days
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voted against the prime minister, this does add up to quite a considerable reprimand. stand this does add up to quite a considerable reprimand. and a very public one- — considerable reprimand. and a very public one- is— considerable reprimand. and a very public one. is there _ considerable reprimand. and a very public one. is there a _ considerable reprimand. and a very public one. is there a risk _ considerable reprimand. and a very public one. is there a risk with - public one. is there a risk with these kind of things that you've seenin these kind of things that you've seen in your time as a political journalist and a commentator, watching various leaders who limped on? it's easy to see theresa may's authority disappeared. you had in a majority and didn't have to call... and afterwards, things were never the same again. butjohn major's authority felt like it dissipated and dissipated, but he still had to kind of stagger on for a long time. where do you think borisjohnson lies in this? is he somebody who can stagger on with this loss of authority, or will he have to find a way to confront it? he still got on paper the biggest conservative
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majority. paper the biggest conservative ma'ori . ., , , ., majority. you can completely ignore that. i majority. you can completely ignore that- lthink— majority. you can completely ignore that. i think if— majority. you can completely ignore that. i think if anybody _ majority. you can completely ignore that. i think if anybody has - majority. you can completely ignore that. i think if anybody has the - that. i think if anybody has the capacity to bounce back, it is boris johnson. he does have an extraordinarily political persona which we've seen when he decides to work hard and focus, and he has the right team behind him. in many ways, he can be quite unbeatable. i think one reason why so many people voted against him tonight, actually, they want him to get back on game and they want him to focus. they're giving him a warning shot which is that you've got the party and the government depending on you now, pulling this together. i don't think they could have get him —— him clear message, and now he has to go away and regroup in serious style. he
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might be able to bring into the number ten operation. that is absolutely essential. there's been a lot of chatter in recent weeks about the failure of the whipping system. his inability to read the mood of the house of commons. there is no doubting his mps' mood now and he has to act on it. it’s doubting his mps' mood now and he has to act on it.— has to act on it. it's striking that he appeared _ has to act on it. it's striking that he appeared before _ has to act on it. it's striking that he appeared before the - has to act on it. it's striking that he appeared before the 1922 - he appeared before the 1922 committee, but he did appear... he was in the commons teams rooms this afternoon. not necessarily seen very often. the prime minister �*s often don't have the time. is there something about the relationship tween the prime minister and the backbenchers that he needs to think about as well? this
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backbenchers that he needs to think about as well?— backbenchers that he needs to think about as well? this is something we have seen- — about as well? this is something we have seen. you _ about as well? this is something we have seen. you pulled _ about as well? this is something we have seen. you pulled out _ about as well? this is something we have seen. you pulled out some - about as well? this is something we have seen. you pulled out some of. have seen. you pulled out some of the historical allusions earlier, and it's something that has a bit of and it's something that has a bit of a running problem because we heard the same about theresa may, we heard that david cameron had surrounded himself with what we called the quartet during the coalition years. there's a sense that the prime minister is going to his bunker, and they don't really pay attention to feedback from their mps. the danger is in that, not necessarily they're not stroking their egos, but they aren't hearing what mps are hearing from their constituents, and that goes to the heart of quite a lot of what's happened here today, and again, it's significant for the prime minister and he has to act to. joann nadler, thanks very much. all 11 african countries which have
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been put on the travel read lists are to be taken off the list from for a:m.. are to be taken off the list from fora:m.. —— fora:m.. people are to be taken off the list from for a:m.. —— for a:m.. people who arrive will be allowed to leave early unless they have tested positive for covid. it's been a busy half hour. let's pause and handed over to the weather. we've seen some rain seen some rain across seen some rain across the north of scotland. that band of rain becoming light and patchy and will sink southwards. ahead of that, a few more breaks in the cloud developing across other parts. that will lead to temperatures down to 5 degrees or so. it's milder in southern parts of england and wales. some sunshine
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after that early mist and fog. a there could be more cloud, a little rain and drizzle. and it's a mild day in, temperatures why the 11 or 12. it stays mild towards the rest of this week. high pressure will turnit of this week. high pressure will turn it dry, but there will be a lot welcome back. this is bbc news with shaun ley and the headlines. mps have voted for the government's plan to tackle the omicron variant. by far the biggest act of defined acts as borisjohnson became prime minister. nicola sturgeon says she
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doesn't want people to cancel christmas, but she urges them to mix less to curb the spread of omicron. the government reports new cases of covid in the uk in the 2a hours to today. that's the highest daily total since early injanuary. after moving all the countries on the uk red list introduced after omicron. 11 african nations were on the list. a woman has been found guilty of murdering her girlfriend's 16 month daughter. star ajury a jury cleared the girl's mother from murder, but she was convicted of allowing or causing her
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daughter's death. danny savage report contains distressing details. star hobson — a happy little girl, seen here with her great—grandfather. but over a period of months, she changed from this — you are about to see a distressing image of star asleep, covered in bruises. she was seen by police and social workers, but was always allowed to stay with her abusers. in the months before her death, david fawcett and his partner, anita, compared star's plight to baby p, who died despite being well known to children's services. they went on to have a chilling conversation with a social worker. anita says, "well, you don't want another baby p on your hands, do you?" and she said, "how do you mean?" so anita said, "well, just think about it, you know, that little baby p a couple of years ago, he got let down by the social services,
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so we just want you to go see what the problem is here." but, er, that was it, we never heard a thing. theyjust said the case were closed, and that were that. star's own mother and her partner lied repeatedly about how she had been hurt, while subjecting her to a horrifically cruel campaign of abuse. frankie smith and savannah brockhill deprived their little girl of sleep, played cruel psychological tricks, and kept concerned social workers away from her. pretty girl. you're a spoilt pretty girl. star hobson was anything but spoilt. smith and brockhill posted these caring images publicly but, privately, they were horrible to her. on one occasion, brockhill took star to her work at a recycling centre. cameras here later caught the amateur boxer hitting star 21 times, over three hours.
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and if you want to keep your kneecaps... brockhill was routinely violent towards star and even called herself a psychopath. she's with the number—one psycho. to me, she were just pure evil. ijust can't believe she could do something like that to a baby girl. she, like, ascended from the bowels of hell and just completely devastated, wrecked our family. ambulance service, - is the patient breathing? on september 22nd last year, star hobson was murdered. is she conscious? on the day she died, her killer searched the internet for how to bring a baby out of shock. that was 15 minutes before savannah brockhill calmly made this call. she was crying, and then she stopped crying, and then she was sick. and now, she'sjust a little bit floppy, to be honest with you. ijust find it beyond belief that anybody could treat a child in the way that star was treated over that period of time, and then to inflict those horrific injuries that caused her death.
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today, savannah brockhill was found guilty of murder. frankie smith was convicted of causing, or allowing, the death of a child. was star hobson's death avoidable? many questions are raised by the short life of this sweet little girl. danny savage reporting there. joining us is professor harry ferguson from the department of social care... i'm not sure, where are you? thanks very much. i'm sorry about that. this is a horrible case. it comes a couple weeks after we heard about the case of arthur hughes. there will be those thinking, how we got an epidemic for child abuse, or are we reallyjust
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seeing because of lockdown, keeping cases through the particular time. this is a dreadful case of child cruelty. no question about it. clearly, social brokers and police were involved, and medics. —— social workers. there are a series of questions to be asked. i think there is no doubt really, that the capacity of professionals to achieve the depth that's necessary to understand what was happening for children like star was diminished because of social distancing. so, and the re church, we found social workers were instructed by government guidelines —— the research, to try and avoid going into homes because of risk of
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infection. they would go to the doorstep, they would see children in the gardens, but where there was enough information to suggest that children were at serious risk, they would go into the home. and what they would then do is try and maintain a social distance from the children and get as close as they could. i think what's really significant in this incident is the age of the child. older children such as three, for, five needed physical contact. the social workers would reciprocate and hug back. obviously, children like star can't do that. she would have been so young she couldn't have walked. and she couldn't reach out to be held —— four. workers being able to initiate that close contact to find out what
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is happening. covid was a major barrier. is happening. covid was a ma'or barrier. �* , ., , , is happening. covid was a ma'or barrier. �* , . , , ., barrier. it's really interesting to hear ou barrier. it's really interesting to hear you talk— barrier. it's really interesting to hear you talk about _ barrier. it's really interesting to hear you talk about the - barrier. it's really interesting toj hear you talk about the physical closeness and how much you can tell when you're in a place when you're watching and interaction, presumably things like body language. how a child reacts to their parents�* voice. those things could be clues presumably. voice. those things could be clues presumably-— presumably. social workers are trained to _ presumably. social workers are trained to be _ presumably. social workers are trained to be really _ presumably. social workers are trained to be really sensitive i presumably. social workers are trained to be really sensitive to all those things. our research showed that in many, many incidences, children were well protected, families were helped. what i think would be a key variable in this case, as it has been in other high—profile cases of child care, is the parents in the kind of level of deception and manipulation that went on. from the depiction of the mother and the stepmother and the mother and the stepmother and the family, it seems that they were
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very tactical in the way that they would've hidden whatever bruises or harm would've been done to this little girl. harm would've been done to this little uirl. , ., , , little girl. sorry to interrupt, but ou can little girl. sorry to interrupt, but you can see _ little girl. sorry to interrupt, but you can see that _ little girl. sorry to interrupt, but you can see that it's _ little girl. sorry to interrupt, but you can see that it's us - little girl. sorry to interrupt, but you can see that it's us on - little girl. sorry to interrupt, but you can see that it's us on some l you can see that it's us on some social media posts. not only mentally affiliating, even doctoring the images and using filters so she looks like her eyes are bigger, she looks like her eyes are bigger, she looks more conventionally appealing to people watching.— to people watching. absolutely. thankfully. _ to people watching. absolutely. thankfully, these _ to people watching. absolutely. thankfully, these kinds - to people watching. absolutely. thankfully, these kinds of- to people watching. absolutely. i thankfully, these kinds of serious cases that involve sadistic abuse, they're quite rare, but when they do occur, what we find is there is a huge amount of tactical deception going on. when social workers and police and so on do start to get beyond those sorts of offences that the parents put up, the parents often become angry, intimidating, aggressive. that makes professional
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anxious, so there's a huge issue as well about what kind of organisational support are workers getting to help them to understand their feelings and the impact of anxiety and what it's possible for them to see and make sense of in a child's life. again, covid was complex in this regard because a lot of professionals were working from home and they didn't have the same organisational support and supervision as they would've had in pre—covid times. supervision as they would've had in pre-covid times.— pre-covid times. professor harry ferguson. _ pre-covid times. professor harry ferguson, fascinating _ pre-covid times. professor harry ferguson, fascinating to - pre-covid times. professor harry ferguson, fascinating to talk - pre-covid times. professor harry ferguson, fascinating to talk to l ferguson, fascinating to talk to you. big tech companies should against online crime and of according to a committee. it's called for greater safeguards for children women and more action. it wants all of them to be made subject to the law. for years, every country
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and particularly western democracies have grappled with how to minimise the harms of life online while reaping the benefits. many of those harms affect children, especially grooming, usually by anonymous abusers. louise, as we've agreed to call her, was targeted when just 11 years old. so, i really, really was after that attention and validation from someone in my life and abusers have recognised these kind of things and recognise venerable people and this abuse stole my teenage years away from me. she is now working with the nspcc to improve child safety online. i really think there needs to be a massive push for online safety for children because it's just not acceptable and there are so many different ways that kids can fall into the traps or these places where there are predators. it shouldn't be up to
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kids to keep themselves safe on the internet. an important report today by a joint committee on the draft online safety bill which is due, finally, to go through parliament next year, contains recommendations likely to be followed. it suggests minimum safety standards in british law, policed by the regulator, ofcom. new offences to make cyber flashing, the sending of explicit pictures or any promotion of suicide or self—harm illegal. and there will be exemptions for quality publishers to protect freedom of speech. my youngest daughter died... having heard from ian russell, whose teenage daughter molly took her own life after seeing self—harm images on instagram, the committee also recommends bereaved parents should be able to access their dead children's account. the key focus of the recommendation is to transfer power from silicon valley to elected officials closer to home, and to make what is illegal legal off—line also illegal online. this baroness has campaigned for a safe internet for years. i think we have seen over a period
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of time that the desire for growth has not been mitigated by an equal and opposite desire to keep either individuals or society safe, and we have just seen so many bad outcomes and, you know, the tech sector has failed to deal with them by itself. regulating technology is very hard which is why it taking so long to implement new rules, but the era of self—regulation is over. amol rajan, bbc news. more people are off school with expected coronavirus. had teachers say they're struggling to take... as they get off the bus, a squirt of sanitiser. school is ramping up precautions again across england and scotland, more pupils and teachers absent. mrs regan runs 30 schools around darlington as determined to
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mrs regan runs 30 schools around darlington. she's determined to keep them open. we've already lost in some ways a generation. a cheese tells me covering. it is hard. in recent weeks, we've had to close a year group in primary school because we simply could not cover it in terms of staffing and there were no supplies to be had. the supply agency also said that they were 50% down on the amount of supply teachers that they could provide to schools. hands up if you think air is a mixture. in the classroom, a c02 manager means open windows and energy bills or schools have scored. schools are trying to get through fully open until the end of term. already across this group of schools, more than half of the teachers have had covid since the beginning of the pandemic, making precautions such as opening windows and ventilating classrooms all the more important. especially with christmas coming, there's a lot of push to do all of the testing and wearing masks. we've been told to keep the windows
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open and doors open, so i've decided to bring a jump in. decided to bring a jumper in. they want to be back in school after christmas. it's very important because children can see their friends and i think- keeping the windows open is a very| small price to pay because it's much better than being poorly and getting covid. - almost time for the last bell of term, so are these primary parents worried about the new variant? i don't think i'm worried as such but concerned, definitely. when your kids are in an environment where there are lots of people in a small room you have to be concerned. i feel our school has fantastic procedures in place as well, so i feel comfortable that when they come that when they come back, they're in a safe environment as well. picking up tests for christmas, everyone hoping that schools will be able to open injanuary.
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branwen jeffreys, bra nwen jeffreys, bbc branwen jeffreys, bbc news, branwenjeffreys, bbc news, darlington. on thursday, voters will go to the polls collect their next mp. it was driven by the resignation of owen patterson. mark harper referred to this case. alex forsyth has been talking to people in the constituency. in north shropshire, they are not necessarily used to all of this attention, but this constituency has been thrown into sharp focus. it is the centre of a political contest that is particularly crucial for the conservatives. their candidate is trying to hold a seat that has their candidate's trying to hold a seat that's been tory for decades, but for which he's having to fight. there's lots of distractions nationally, but what is important is i am talking to the voters see on the constituents and putting forward a positive message,
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and what i would say is that unlike some of my opponents, i'm the only candidate putting forward a positive message with solutions. this is a vast constituency. swathes of farmland scattered through market towns, and most people here back to brexit. a loss here would be a blow for the conservatives. this time, the lib dems are pitching themselves as the alternative. i think there's a strong sense that people have been taken for granted by the conservatives, and what we're saying is if they can send a message to the government that that's not acceptable any more and elect an mp that will listen to the people here and fight their corner for them nationally. everyone ready? labour, too, is standing firm in the fight, hoping they can cause a political upset. it's great and you meet an awful lot of people who usually vote tory, as they do round here, who are frankly fed up and feel like they've been taken for granted. it's notjust the christmas party and barnard castle, it's about having no one around here who has been standing up for this. standing up for us. there is anger here at recent events.
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they're not abiding by their own rules and that is unacceptable. trying to keep conservatives i like, from a little boy village, _ a mining town that i like. but of course, perspectives differ. it's a distraction from what is going on. there are more serious things like a pandemic. i shall vote conservative. i write down the things that are good and bad and i think boris has done very, very well in adversity. this by—election is an important measure of the public mood and an important moment for boris johnson. there is unrest in this party, but for many conservatives there is unrest in his party, but for many conservatives, he is the man who has won them elections, so they'll be watching to see if it happens here on traditional tory turf after a few turbulent weeks in westminster. the challenges are circling. the green party saying local services have been neglected. reform uk is out campaigning even though their candidate has covid, hoping to capture
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dissolution photos. ukip and the reclaim party pushing at that, too. for some, it is frustrating. i'm sick to death of it and i'm sick of them putting leaflets in mono of them putting leaflets in my door because they go straight into the recycling bin. i'm a bit more tolerant than my wife, but what i do think is that parties need to think long and hard about how they treat their constituents. there are multiple factors at play here stop local issues, here — local issues, the national picture, whatever colour people pick, whatever colour people pick could determine how merry this christmas is for the parties in this race. alex forsyth, bbc news, north structure. there are 1a in total. you can find more details on the bbc website. all the details are there. time for a look at the weather. it's been a
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mild day today thanks to south—westerly winds and some places were lucky enough to see a bit of sunshine. through the rest of the week, there'll be a lot of cloud around. there will be some areas of mist and fog, and the rain that we're seeing will push away. it is mainly coming from this band of figure cloud. that's that wiggling weather front that will weaken as it runs southwards. down across western scotland to bring some patchy rain. down into northern ireland and into cumbria as well. perhaps north wales, the north midlands and across east anglia, so it'll turn a bit cooler. there may be some mist and fog patches. it's pretty mild across more southern parts of england and wales. we've got this blanket of cloud and it's grey and gloomy. that mist and fog... we've got some shine
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and for lancaster, bit of patchy rain for cumbria and for lancaster, bit of patchy rainfor cumbria and and for lancaster, bit of patchy rain for cumbria and northern ireland. all areas will be mild again. temperatures typically 11 or 12 degrees. not much rain in the forecast. what there is will be swept northwards. high pressure starts to build in from continental europe. we still got a little rain, otherwise, a lot of dry weather. some areas of mist and fog in the best of any sunshine probably for eastern scotland, perhaps into lincolnshire. still got those temperatures above average. the wind is turning lighter as that area of high pressure starts to build in as we head towards the end of the week. that will stick around for quite some time. this is the story for friday. we will have more sunshine across northern parts of scotland. we've got a lot of cloud around
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elsewhere. is that low cloud continues. temperatures not quite as high on friday. over the weekend, we will find those temperatures dropping away a little bit more. it will turn a little bit cooler over the weekend, but high pressure will keep it find a dry. possible time. sir keir starmer. we will put this in context... _
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you're watching bbc news. the headlines... you're watching bbc news. the headlines. . ._ you're watching bbc news. the headlines... . . , ., headlines... there are an estimated 200,000 infections _ headlines... there are an estimated 200,000 infections of _ headlines... there are an estimated 200,000 infections of omicron - headlines... there are an estimated 200,000 infections of omicron in l 200,000 infections of omicron in britain. tonight the government forced through stricter regulations to deal with it. the forced through stricter regulations to deal with it.— to deal with it. the ayes to the riaht, to deal with it. the ayes to the right. 369. _ to deal with it. the ayes to the right, 369. the _ to deal with it. the ayes to the right, 369. the noes _ to deal with it. the ayes to the right, 369. the noes to - to deal with it. the ayes to the right, 369. the noes to the - to deal with it. the ayes to the l right, 369. the noes to the left, 126. �* ., ., ., , ., , right, 369. the noes to the left, 126.�* ., ., .,, 126. but not without a sizeable tory rebellion. 126. but not without a sizeable tory rebellion- of— 126. but not without a sizeable tory rebellion. of those _ 126. but not without a sizeable tory rebellion. of those 126 _ 126. but not without a sizeable tory rebellion. of those 126 knows, - rebellion. of those 126 knows, nearly 100 were conservative, a warning to borisjohnson from his party. text showed donald trump's son and a host of fox news host for writing to the white house chief of staff in real time urging the president to intervene in the january six right. in kentucky the
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search effort continues, the governor says the death toll from

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