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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 13, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hutch this is bbc news. the headlines: the first death in the uk with the omicron variant of coronavirus is announced — as the booster programme is expanded to combat its spread. the idea that this is somehow a milder version of the virus, i think that's something we need to set on one side, and just recognise the sheer pace at which it accelerates through the population. home lateral flow test kits are currently unavailable on the uk government website — a day after the government changed its testing strategy. and we'll be putting all your questions on the omicron variant and the booster campaign to experts in your questions answered at 2:30. you can get in touch on twitter using the hashtag bbcyourquestions,
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or email at yourquestions@bbc.co.uk from today people in england are being asked to work from home if they can — but businesses are worried it will hit the crucial christmas market. rescue teams search for survivors after the string of tornadoes in the united states that have killed almost 100 people. i'm martine croxall in north shropshire, where people will head to the polls this thursday to elect an mp. traditionally traditionally a safe seat for the conservatives but this has become a tight race in recent weeks. a bbc investigation finds networks of breeders are offering to mutilate puppies, to follow a social media trend.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news. borisjohnson says at least one person has died in the uk with the omicron variant of coronavirus — with the government warning the new variant is spreading at a rate �*not seen before�*. last night, the prime minister announced an expansion of the vaccination booster programme. england's deputy chief medical officer professorjonathan van tam is writing to every vaccination volunteer encouraging them to come back and help with the booster programme. well, so far, 40% of people eligible for the vaccine in the uk have received their booster. like england, scotland is aiming to offer all adults a third vaccine by the end of december. while wales has set a target of the end of january. in northern ireland, people over 30 are currently
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being offered third doses. meanwhile the nhs website for booking a shot in england has been overwhelmed. and the government's online service for ordering rapid tests has been suspended because of high demand. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports on how the government now hopes to jab a million people a day. the race between the virus and the vaccine has intensified once again. and, at a vaccination clinic in central london this morning, some sobering news from the prime minister. sadly, at least one patient has now been confirmed to have died with omicron. so, i think the idea that this is somehow a milder version of the virus, i think that's something we need to set on one side. in stockport, greater manchester, this walk—in centre has seen steady business, particularly as concerns grow around the omicron variant. all the time, we feel like we are getting more people coming through. it does feel we have had queues around the building.
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so, there is a definite energy and demand. and that's people coming for their firstjabs, second jabs and their boosters. there is still lots we don't know about this new variant. but one thing is clear, and that's vaccines remain our best defence against developing serious illness. and that's why it is as important as ever to get jabs into as many arms as quickly as possible. now the booster programme has been expanded, offering jabs to all eligible over—18s by the end of the month, a significant challenge for an already hard—pressed health service. if that offer of a booster was translated into actually delivering the jab, it would mean giving i million doses a day, every day, until the end of the year. at the moment, about 500,000 are being given a day. so ramping up the programme will come at a cost, with other non—covid related health care being put off. reports are emerging of a shortage of lateral flow tests, with those trying to order them online being told no home testing kits are available.
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problems, too, with the website for booking boosters in england. high demand means the site is crashing, and people are advised to try again later or tomorrow. and in hospitals, where staff are already under pressure, there is real anxiety over what the next few weeks may bring, particularly for those patients that need high levels of care. it's awful, you feel like you're giving them a third world service. we have people who need an intensive care bed after their operation, which we can't do, because the beds are either full of covid patients or full of people we can't get a ward bed for, because there's no capacity in the hospital. long queues outside vaccination centres, booking websites crashing because of massive demand. these are all signs the message on the importance of boosters is getting through. now it's a question of getting those jabs into arms. dominic hughes, bbc news. earlier we spoke to our medical editor fergus walsh, who gave us this update on the spread of the omicron variant.
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in london, it now makes up about 40% of all cases. the prime minister said it would probably make up the majority by tomorrow. by the end of the week, omicron should be the dominant source of all cases in the uk, completely taking overfrom delta. that's because it's spreading so fast. it's doubling every two or three days. that is faster than any previous variant. so, that means we could be heading for 100,000, maybe 200,000 cases a day by the end of the month, may be sooner. and if that keeps on doubling, at some point that curve will start to bend. we've had one death confirmed. obviously, that is a tragedy for the family involved, but it tells us very little useful about the level of threat we face from omicron. but even if it is generally a milder illness than we get from delta, because so many people have got some level of immunity, if we get a massive spike in cases, it still will result,
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potentially, in a lot of people in hospital. but we won't have the full detail on that threat for a few weeks, which is why the booster programme is so important, because it will give protection against infection and should give very strong protection against severe illness. fergus walsh, our medical editor. i'm joined now by our political correspondent iain watson. we heard last night, the prime minister talking about the increase in what he hopes is the booster campaign, and where are we in terms of the nhs and its ability to keep up of the nhs and its ability to keep up with that hope? it is of the nhs and its ability to keep up with that hope?— up with that hope? it is still not clear whether _ up with that hope? it is still not clear whether ambitious - up with that hope? it is still not clear whether ambitious targets up with that hope? it is still not - clear whether ambitious targets will be met, the prime minister said he was going to go at warp speed but it is one thing to announce something and another thing to deliver it. he is bringing forward the offer of a jab to everyone in england at the end ofjanuary, to the end of this
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month, so that would mean doubling the number of boosters being done each day and so far the record is around 844,000 on any one day, so it is ambitious. it is an ambitious programme and some gps are worried whether they can deliver this but the prime minister said there will be logistical help including from the military. he has set the target, not quite clear yet whether it can be delivered, but slightly inauspicious start this morning because at various times the nhs website where you could book a vaccine has crashed or people have gone into long queues, and lateral flow tests, booking them on line has become difficult, and it is still possible to get them from chemists, for example, some council libraries, as well, the prime minister said there is a ready supply of these tests. go to the nhs england website and it was difficult to book. we will be talking to somebody who will
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be able to explain a bit more about the supply chain when it comes to those lateral flow tests because when you go on the website it says those home tests are not available at the moment. looking ahead at tomorrow, we are expecting a vote on further restrictions, the number of conservatives who potentially will rebel is increasing, where are we with this? ., , ., , , rebel is increasing, where are we withthis? ., , ., , , ., with this? the latest tally is that 70 conservatives _ with this? the latest tally is that 70 conservatives are _ with this? the latest tally is that 70 conservatives are going - with this? the latest tally is that 70 conservatives are going to . with this? the latest tally is that i 70 conservatives are going to vote against the covert pass plans. — covid pass plans. there will be a vote on the plans, and the conservative focus will be on the idea you have to produce either prove a negative lateral flow test or prove you have been vaccinated, to get into a nightclub, or other large venues, and many conservative mps have been critical of this with “p mps have been critical of this with up one said he will be voting
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against it because this isn't nazi germany. another likened the restrictions to the communist era in eastern europe. certainly the rhetoric has been pretty robust so far and people will vote against. one of the reasons that they feel able to vote against is because labour are saying they are committed to helping the government out and they say they are voting for the nhs and voting to help slow the pace of the omicron spread rather than helping the government as such but it means these restrictions will go through no matter what which gives some people the opportunity to lodged a protest but it is also why the prime minister is talking down any prospect of cancelling christmas. he said he couldn't save more restrictions would be necessary and he had to follow the pandemic as he said, but the tone was very much suggesting that we have the right
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approach following the existing steps, plan b and the booster campaign, to try and reassure some mps who think this is going to end “p mps who think this is going to end up ratcheting up until we have more and more restrictions, possibly even another lockdown, as case numbers rise, so there is a lot of restlessness on his own side of the house. �* ,., restlessness on his own side of the house. ~ , ,, ,, ., house. also restlessness about the arties, house. also restlessness about the parties. the — house. also restlessness about the parties, the alleged _ house. also restlessness about the parties, the alleged parties - house. also restlessness about the parties, the alleged parties that. parties, the alleged parties that took place roughly this time last year, what has he said today when it came to the quiz that he apparently part hosted? fix, came to the quiz that he apparently part hosted?— part hosted? a lot of talk about the events and gatherings _ part hosted? a lot of talk about the events and gatherings which - part hosted? a lot of talk about the events and gatherings which took i events and gatherings which took place supposedly at downing street and in government buildings and he was asked about the event on the 15th of december, the picture in the sunday mirror, where the prime minister was apparently involved in a zoom christmas quiz, sitting next to somebody draped in tinsel. his choice of words were interesting, he
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said, certainly he had not broken any rules. nationally when he is asked about this he says, he has been assured that no rules have been broken — nationally when he is asked. this time it was a personal declaration, but he did confirm that the most senior civil servant is already looking into the allegations of a party on the 18th of december in downing street and he will now also be looking into what happened on the 15th of december because the bbc has been told by multiple sources that although it looks like a virtual quiz, the prime minister looking at a laptop, all around buildings and government including the cabinet office room, teams of six were gathering around their screens and mixing, at a time when london was in tier two restrictions which meant people should not be mixing with other
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let's talk to jan godsell, professor of supply chain strategy at loughborough university. the message is clear, the lateral flow tests were no longer available on the website, what does that mean in real terms? the prime minister also said that you can go to a pharmacy to pick them up. my pharmacy to pick them up. ij�*i understanding pharmacy to pick them up. m: understanding is pharmacy to pick them up. m; understanding is there were a couple of issues with the website today and firstly it crashed just because of the sheer volume of people that were visiting the site, and what i assume has also happened at the same time, there is probably a relatively
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stable rate at which people would normally order lateral flow tests through the website but as a result of the recent announcements, the number of tests that people wanted for that route increased rapidly, a bit like when we went to the supermarket and people were panic buying toilet roll and suddenly that china was out of stock. — suddenly that channel. the uk presumably you have not said we are going to increase the lateral flow testing unless we have enough home test kits and they have suggested pharmacies have those kits, so we need to get those tests and collect them at the rate we want to use them, akin to some of the scenes we saw in supermarkets before, where we have panic brought, people maybe don't want to try to use them in the rate
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we are going to use them. we have had an update _ we are going to use them. we have had an update from _ we are going to use them. we have had an update from the _ we are going to use them. we have | had an update from the government we are going to use them. we have i had an update from the government in the past couple of moments, i will take a moment to bring viewers up—to—date, spokesperson for the government denies there is a shortage of rapid lateral flow tests after the website was suspended because of demand. the statement says there is no shortage and we have more than sufficient supply so this reflects what you were saying, that because of heightened supply, those slots have run out today and we are working to further increase booking slots, it says. on the booster website, as well, that wasn't working properly, and the government says there have been some challenges after many people found they were not able to make bookings but the government is working to improve the nhs vaccine booking website, so anybody, given that we are being encouraged to take tests and to do more of them, what is your advice to somebody who wants to get hold of them and potentially can't
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do that or the website? what should we be looking at? the do that or the website? what should we be looking at?— do that or the website? what should we be looking at? the government is advisin: we be looking at? the government is advising and — we be looking at? the government is advising and if— we be looking at? the government is advising and if you _ we be looking at? the government is advising and if you think _ we be looking at? the government is advising and if you think about - advising and if you think about where we get the tests, some people get their tests through school or university and they will continue to do that, and many other people have got their tests through their pharmacies and i got a test more recently at new street station and some libraries and other council services are handing them out. i would implore people to get tests at the rate that you use them, and don't try to go out and hoard them or get extra, otherwise what we will see, it is like turning the tap on full and emptying the tank, suddenly we will see that the tests are in the wrong place, and the government earlier this year, we were getting our test originally from china but they have secured supply of some tests in the uk, the manufacturer will be able to ramp up to make up
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to 14 million tests in the uk by the end of december. so this is a supply chain issue and we need to balance demand and supply and it is very important that we try to use those tests at the rate that we need them and to make sure that there is enough to go round for those that require them. the enough to go round for those that require them-— enough to go round for those that require them. the toilet paper was one of those _ require them. the toilet paper was one of those examples _ require them. the toilet paper was one of those examples of- require them. the toilet paper was one of those examples of where i one of those examples of where people absolutely went into panic mode, so the advice here is to not panic because there is enough to go round. , ., . round. yes. if we do panic, we will rive the round. yes. if we do panic, we will give the impression _ round. yes. if we do panic, we will give the impression there - round. yes. if we do panic, we will give the impression there is - round. yes. if we do panic, we will give the impression there is not i give the impression there is not enough to go round, and then the people that really need those tests, possibly to actually go and do their job, may not be able to get them, so it is important. we have seen these things before, we did not run out of toilet paper, even with the fuel issue, they settled down, so we should learn from these experiences and just try to use things at the rate at which we actually consume
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them. , ., rate at which we actually consume them. ,., , , , them. the government stressing there is no shortage — them. the government stressing there is no shortage and _ them. the government stressing there is no shortage and they _ them. the government stressing there is no shortage and they have _ them. the government stressing there is no shortage and they have more - is no shortage and they have more than a sufficient supply when it comes to lateral flow tests, they say. for now, thanks forjoining us. thank you for that advice. breaking news regarding emma raducanu, the us open champion, she has tested positive for covid and she will miss this week's world tennis championship exhibition event in abu dhabi. she said she was looking forward to playing in front of the fans in abu dhabi but unfortunately after testing positive she now says that she has got to postpone until the next opportunity and she says that she is isolating and hopefully will be able to get back soon. the
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us open champion emma raducanu, the tennis star, has tested positive for covid—19 and will be missing that championship exhibition event in abu dhabi. lots more coming up on covid. and we'll be putting all your questions on the omicron variant and the booster campaign to experts in your questions answered. you can get in touch on twitter using the hashtag bbcyourquestions, or email at yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. rescue teams are still searching for survivors of the wave of tornadoes, that hit parts of the united states on friday, killing at least 94 people. there are fears the death toll could rise. presidentjoe biden has called it "one of the largest" storms in american history, and has declared a majorfederal disaster in kentucky, the state that's been worst affected. leboo diseko has this report.
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picking up the pieces of their lives. homes, businesses and whole towns reduced to rubble. it's horrible, it's the definition of hell on earth. i can't... people have lost everything and it's just, it's terrible, it's horrible. this is what was left of one home. its owner says it tookjust four minutes to do this. everything stopped. i stuck my head out and looked up with my flashlight to the edge of the house and i noticed there was no wall there and that's when i told my wife, i said, i'm going to tell you right now, i'm warning you, when we go up there, i don't think the house is there, it's gone. kentucky's governor says this is the most devastating tornado event in his state's history, with no one found alive since saturday. to the people of america, there is no lens big enough to show you the extent of the damage
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here in graves county or in kentucky. one of the worst affected towns is mayfield. eight people were confirmed to have died at a candle factory, destroyed with more than 100 employees inside. and, at an amazon factory in neighbouring illinois, at least six employees are reported to have lost their lives. president biden has declared a major federal disaster in this state. he says he will ask the environmental protection agency to look into whether climate change played a role in the storms. it's going to be a long process to repair this damage, caused in such a short space of time. lebo diseko, bbc news. voters in north shropshire go to the polls in a by—election on thursday. that's the constituency which was previously held by owen paterson. martine croxall is there for us in oswestry.
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the umbrella has gone down. yes, it has, but hopefully _ the umbrella has gone down. yes, it has, but hopefully it _ the umbrella has gone down. yes, it has, but hopefully it won't _ the umbrella has gone down. yes, it has, but hopefully it won't be - the umbrella has gone down. yes, it has, but hopefully it won't be too - has, but hopefully it won't be too wet. welcome to one of the five rural towns in this constituency, held by the conservatives over many years, with a 20,000 majority, but the race got very interesting, a lot of focus now on what has been happening in down street, especially last christmas and the investigations into what has happened — downing street. we are here to talk to candidates. i'm joined now by the green party candidate, duncan kerr. how much are the downing street issues a focus? for how much are the downing street issues a focus?— how much are the downing street issues a focus? for many people it issues a focus? for many people it is like the straw _ issues a focus? for many people it is like the straw that _ issues a focus? for many people it is like the straw that breaks - issues a focus? for many people it is like the straw that breaks the i is like the straw that breaks the camels — is like the straw that breaks the camels back, a drip drip drip of a lackof— camels back, a drip drip drip of a lack of confidence and in itself it would _ lack of confidence and in itself it would not — lack of confidence and in itself it would not have been an issue but coming _ would not have been an issue but coming on — would not have been an issue but coming on the back of those other issues, _ coming on the back of those other issues, back to owen paterson's own problems. _ issues, back to owen paterson's own problems, people have got to the
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stage _ problems, people have got to the stage where they think we are not being _ stage where they think we are not being represented well by the people who are _ being represented well by the people who are our mps. they are not one of us, they— who are our mps. they are not one of us, they are _ who are our mps. they are not one of us, they are displaying arrogance and entitlement, that is what has been _ and entitlement, that is what has been said — and entitlement, that is what has been said to me. you and entitlement, that is what has been said to me.— been said to me. you are a local councillor— been said to me. you are a local councillor and _ been said to me. you are a local councillor and famously - been said to me. you are a local councillor and famously as i been said to me. you are a local councillor and famously as the i been said to me. you are a local i councillor and famously as the green party would say, you overturned a majority to win 12 of the 18 seats on the town council, how can your party translate that international success? br; party translate that international success? �* , ,., party translate that international success? j , ,, success? by the same process. i was elected as the — success? by the same process. i was elected as the only _ success? by the same process. i was elected as the only grain _ success? by the same process. i was elected as the only grain of- success? by the same process. i was elected as the only grain of the i elected as the only grain of the town— elected as the only grain of the town council and they said you would never _ town council and they said you would never have _ town council and they said you would never have anything to do on the town— never have anything to do on the town council but we have won the town _ town council but we have won the town council but we have won the town council because people see we work hard _ town council because people see we work hard and we work hard for them on the _ work hard and we work hard for them on the ground — the only green. we do everything we can to get jobs into the — do everything we can to get jobs into the community and to help those who are _ into the community and to help those who are left _ into the community and to help those who are left out, i was talking this morning _ who are left out, i was talking this morning about the problems with youth _ morning about the problems with youth services and the town council
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is stepping — youth services and the town council is stepping in to run youth services because _ is stepping in to run youth services because the tory —controlled shropshire council has given up on that service — shropshire council has given up on that service and left young people. this is— that service and left young people. this is a _ that service and left young people. this is a safe seat for the conservatives. it this is a safe seat for the conservatives.— this is a safe seat for the conservatives. surely conservatives. it has been. surely it will be the _ conservatives. it has been. surely it will be the liberal— conservatives. it has been. surely it will be the liberal democrats i conservatives. it has been. surely i it will be the liberal democrats who are going to be the most successful here, how are you going to challenge them? i here, how are you going to challenge them? ., ., ._ here, how are you going to challenge them? ., ., ., ., them? i have to say labour and the lib dems have _ them? i have to say labour and the lib dems have no _ them? i have to say labour and the lib dems have no county _ them? i have to say labour and the | lib dems have no county councillors in north— lib dems have no county councillors in north shropshire and no town councillors — in north shropshire and no town councillors so that they talk a good talk but _ councillors so that they talk a good talk but they have not won elections and at _ talk but they have not won elections and at the _ talk but they have not won elections and at the last local elections the lib dems — and at the last local elections the lib dems managed to lose the only county— lib dems managed to lose the only county councillor they had in north shropshire, so although their vote share _ shropshire, so although their vote share might look, their actual on the ground — share might look, their actual on the ground do not produce the same outcomes _ the ground do not produce the same outcomes. that is because we show that we _ outcomes. that is because we show that we actually do work for people and people have said to me countless timesi _ and people have said to me countless times, we _ and people have said to me countless times, i've always been a tory, but i times, i've always been a tory, but i admire _ times, i've always been a tory, but i admire your— times, i've always been a tory, but i admire your hard work and your motivation. _ i admire your hard work and your motivation, they say. they say they
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are prepared to back me because we have the _ are prepared to back me because we have the heart of the town in our thoughts — have the heart of the town in our thou . hts. have the heart of the town in our thou~hts. ., ,., have the heart of the town in our thou~hts. ., , , , ., thoughts. owen paterson stepped down because it was — thoughts. owen paterson stepped down because it was found _ thoughts. owen paterson stepped down because it was found to _ thoughts. owen paterson stepped down because it was found to have _ because it was found to have breached lobbying rules, where do you stand on taking a second job? i would not take a second job but i have _ would not take a second job but i have gone — would not take a second job but i have gone further than that because those _ have gone further than that because those of— have gone further than that because those of us — have gone further than that because those of us want to stand to be an mp had _ those of us want to stand to be an mp had a — those of us want to stand to be an mp had a responsibility to regain trust _ mp had a responsibility to regain trust so — mp had a responsibility to regain trust so i — mp had a responsibility to regain trust so i said i would never take more _ trust so i said i would never take more than — trust so i said i would never take more than the uk average wage, i have _ more than the uk average wage, i have been— more than the uk average wage, i have been one of those mps who have said you _ have been one of those mps who have said you can _ have been one of those mps who have said you can cap my wage at the uk average _ said you can cap my wage at the uk average and — said you can cap my wage at the uk average and the rest can go to charitv — average and the rest can go to charitv if_ average and the rest can go to charity. if that could happen, i don't — charity. if that could happen, i don't know, but this area does not even _ don't know, but this area does not even pay— don't know, but this area does not even pay average wages and the average — even pay average wages and the average wage here is considerably below— average wage here is considerably below the — average wage here is considerably below the uk average. how average wage here is considerably below the uk average.— average wage here is considerably below the uk average. how would you make sustainable _ below the uk average. how would you make sustainable measures _ below the uk average. how would you make sustainable measures in - make sustainable measures in peoplemccombes affordable because a lot of people cannot run to an electric car — people's homes. it is electric car - people's homes. it is ludicrous what _ electric car - people's homes. it is ludicrous what the _ electric car — people's homes. it is ludicrous what the government has done, _ ludicrous what the government has done, we _ ludicrous what the government has done, we need to invest in improving ehergv_ done, we need to invest in improving energy efficiency of their housing stock _
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energy efficiency of their housing stock it — energy efficiency of their housing stock. it reduces fuel bills. i work doing _ stock. it reduces fuel bills. i work doing schemes of renovating our fashion — doing schemes of renovating our fashion houses and we can put together— fashion houses and we can put together schemes which will employ local people and pay itself back because — local people and pay itself back because fuel bills are going through the roof— because fuel bills are going through the roof at— because fuel bills are going through the roof at the moment, so when you insulate _ the roof at the moment, so when you insulate properties you reduce the fuel costs — insulate properties you reduce the fuel costs and that reduces incomes. duncan _ fuel costs and that reduces incomes. duncan kerr, — fuel costs and that reduces incomes. duncan kerr, from the green party, thanks forjoining us. we'll be speaking to a number of the candidates throughout the day here on bbc news. we will also be speaking to voters about where they are going to put their cross on the ballot paper on thursday. we'll be speaking to a number of the candidates throughout the day here on bbc news. there are a total of 14 candidates standing in the north shropshire by—election. here's a full list of them now. and you can find more details about
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the by—election on our website. we will be back with martin later on. from today, people in england are being asked to work from home if they can, as part of the restrictions announced last week to tackle the rising number of coronavirus infections. the change brings england into line with scotland, wales and northern ireland. but many businesses fear it will mean quieter town and city centres in the crucial run up to christmas. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. well, already there's evidence that people working from home is having an impact on the numbers of commuters taking public transport. let's talk to our transport corresnpondent, katy austin. what are the numbers you have found?
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on the railways we are already seeing some data coming through which indicate that it looks like fewer commuters are coming into city centres now that in england people are being asked to work from home where they can. bringing england into line with the rest of the uk in that respect. network rail managers some of the bigger terminus stations like the ones in london, manchester, birmingham and bristol. it says across those stations broadly it has seen footfall down about 20%, so 20% fewer people around those stations today compared with the week before. some of those stations, i have some more details come through, some of them have seen a stark change. cannon street in london is down 48% from last week and leeds central down 35%, so you could say a bit of
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that might be people starting to wind down for christmas, but actually that is a big drop compared tojust one week actually that is a big drop compared to just one week ago. elsewhere in london, transport for london says there were a million taps in and out on the underground before 10am but thatis on the underground before 10am but that is about 18% down on the week before, so a drop of about one fifth on one week ago on the tube. also if people on buses but passenger use on buses on london was only down 6%, and that might be because people tend to use the bus in different ways, more localjourneys and school journeys, and of course it is not just in london. the numbers on greater manchester's metro service was down 30% impaired to last monday. coming onto the roads — compared to last monday. it is early
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days, of course, but tomtom, a technology provider, it says in the major cities of england this morning there was notably less congestion and there was two weeks ago. thank ou ve and there was two weeks ago. thank you very much _ and there was two weeks ago. thank you very much for — and there was two weeks ago. thank you very much for talking _ and there was two weeks ago. thank you very much for talking us - and there was two weeks ago. thank you very much for talking us through those figures. we appreciate you getting the most up—to—date ones for us. lots more as you would expect on the website. i will be back shortly. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello there. we're going to start the evening with some cooler conditions across scotland and northern ireland. still in the very mild air across england and wales where we've got a lot of cloud. most of the rain is affecting northern england and north wales. that rain band will start to nudge its way southwards overnight and at the same time, the rain becomes light and patchy. the showers in the north fade away. as we start to see some clearer skies following the rain, we could well find some fog forming, particularly across northern england. some more cloud, wind and rain comes
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into the north—west of scotland later, lifting temperatures a bit here. for many, though, it will be a bit cooler than it was last night. we've still got the mild air with that damp weather across more southern parts of england and wales. the mist and fog, though, especially northern england, perhaps the north midlands and north wales, will be slow to clear. there will be a lot of cloud for much of the uk on tuesday. we've got rain, mainly for the highlands and islands, western parts of mainland scotland, perhaps some sunshine around aberdeenshire. stronger, milder wind for scotland and northern ireland. mild for southern parts of the uk, but where we have that mist and fog, it will be quite a chilly day. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the first death in the uk with the omicron variant of coronavirus is announced — as the booster programme is expanded to combat its spread. the idea that this is somehow a milder version of the virus, i think that's something we need to set on one side, and just recognise the sheer pace at which it accelerates through the population.
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home lateral flow test kits are currently unavailable on the uk government website — a day after the government changed its testing strategy. and we'll be putting all your questions on the omicron variant and the booster campaign to experts in your questions answered at 2.30. you can get in touch on twitter using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions, or e—mail at yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. from today, people in england are being asked to work from home if they can — but businesses are worried it will hit the crucial christmas market. rescue teams search for survivors after the string of tornadoes in the united states that have killed almost 100 people. a bbc investigation finds networks of breeders are offering to mutilate puppies, to follow a social media trend.
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lots of news coming out very shortly but now let's bring you up to date with all the sports news. we will cross over to the bbc sport centre. over to you. good afternoon. the champions league last 16 draw hasjust taken place, for a second time today. the first one was declared void because of mistakes made that uefa blamed on a software problem. so here is the new version. there's one tie that is the same as the first attempt. that's holders chelsea against lille. while the other english teams will face different opponents. liverpool will play inter milan. manchester city agaisnt sporting. and manchester united are taking on atletico madrid. which leads us nicely to the errors made earlier, and we can speak now to our football reporter, simon stone. simon, it was manchester united who were at the centre of the snafu or at least one of the two snafus? that's right, some second draw that
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kimmich was villarreal against a non—seeded team. uefa announced they had seven potential opponents but actually they only had six because manchester united couldn't play against them because they had been in the same group. lo and behold, six balls went into the pot, out came manchester united. uefa tried to navigate their way around this by saying it couldn't happen, then manchester city was drawn against villarreal but then in the next pot, it was established after looking back that when atletico madrid were drawn out, the ball for liverpool, who couldn't be drawn against atletico madrid because they had beenin atletico madrid because they had been in the same group, were being put in as a potential opponent, manchester united, who could be a potential opponent, hadn't been put in. then all this came about on social media, uefa had to have an investigation and promptly declared that the software was to blame, that
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is why we have ended up with another draw. latte is why we have ended up with another draw. ~ . , , . , ., draw. we are seeing pictures of the wron: draw. we are seeing pictures of the wrong draw- _ draw. we are seeing pictures of the wrong draw. the _ draw. we are seeing pictures of the wrong draw. the right _ draw. we are seeing pictures of the wrong draw. the right drawer- draw. we are seeing pictures of the wrong draw. the right drawer has i draw. we are seeing pictures of the i wrong draw. the right drawer has now taken place. how will the english teams feel about the new opponents they face? manchester united against psg was original tie, you had messi against ronaldo, that's not happening?— against ronaldo, that's not happening? against ronaldo, that's not haueninu? ., , , ., , against ronaldo, that's not haueninu? ., , , . , ., happening? no, but instead they have antoine griezmann _ happening? no, but instead they have antoine griezmann and _ happening? no, but instead they have antoine griezmann and luis _ happening? no, but instead they have antoine griezmann and luis suarez, . antoine griezmann and luis suarez, diego simeone and atletico madrid so there is still plenty of stardust and a very difficult game. chelsea will not care they have this have the same opponent. man city probably about the same, liverpool a little harder, from salzburg to inter milan, bayern munich probably the big winners because they have got salzburg instead who many people think are the weakest team in the competition. think are the weakest team in the competition-— think are the weakest team in the cometition. ,, ., ,, ., ., ,, , ., competition. simon stone, thank you very much- — competition. simon stone, thank you very much. that's _ competition. simon stone, thank you very much. that's exactly _ competition. simon stone, thank you very much. that's exactly why - competition. simon stone, thank you very much. that's exactly why we i very much. that's exactly why we needed somebody to explain that! that's only one of three draws at uefa hq today. the others didn't have any
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of the same problems. this is the one for the europa league knockout round playoffs, involving teams that finished third in their champions league groups and those that were runners up in their europa league groups. you'll see rangers have drawn borussia dortmund, while barcelona against napoli is the pick of those eight ties. the winners willjoin west ham in the last 16. then there's the europa conference league. again, the group winners are straight through to the last 16. so these are the runners—up from that competition's groups, along with those that finished third in their europa league groups. leicester will play danish side randers. celtic are taking on norweigan champions bodo/glimt. and either tottenham or vitesse will play rapid vienna. emma raducanu has tested positive for covid—19 so she will miss the world tennis championship in abu dhabi. she is expensive mild symptoms, she will isolate for ten days. she was due to face belinda
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bencic. that's all the sport for now. now it's time for your questions answered. welcome to bbc news. it is now our opportunity to answer your questions about the government because my decision to expand the booster programme in the uk. everyone over the age of 18 will be offered a boosterjab by the end of the year. with me is to answer your questions is our health correspondent, anna collinson, and professor danny altmann, an immunologist from imperial college london. thank you both for coming to speak to us today. we have an awful lot of questions from our viewers so a big thank you to everybody who has sent the man. danny, starting with you, tom says that he ins in the high—risk group because of being on
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immunosuppressant drugs, and he says, i've received my third dose at the beginning of october, when will i get my boosterjab? ok. the beginning of october, when will i get my boosterjab?— i get my booster “ab? ok, so, i'll start with _ i get my booster “ab? ok, so, i'll start with a — i get my boosterjab? ok, so, i'll start with a disclaimer, _ i get my boosterjab? ok, so, i'll start with a disclaimer, i - i get my boosterjab? ok, so, i'll start with a disclaimer, i am i i get my boosterjab? ok, so, pm start with a disclaimer, i am more on the hard—nosed immunology rather than on the policy so if i say anything not in line with current policy, maybe anna will correct me. the first thing to say about the immunology is that we and many other labs around the world have done a tonne of work on the vaccines and boosters in immunosuppressed people. the simple answer is that even in the immunosuppressed, they work really well. i've been surprised by how high the levels of immunity have been boosted. my understanding from the jcvi website been boosted. my understanding from thejcvi website is that the three month rule still applies, and it'll be, you know, as soon as possible three months from the previous dose. but anna can correct me if i'm wrong. and i was nodding there, do
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you want to come in on that? it is a three-month _ you want to come in on that? it is a three-month wait, _ you want to come in on that? it is a three-month wait, you _ you want to come in on that? it is a three-month wait, you know, i you want to come in on that? it is a| three-month wait, you know, that's three—month wait, you know, that's right _ three—month wait, you know, that's right we _ three-month wait, you know, that's ritht. ~ . . three-month wait, you know, that's ritht.~ . ., ., three-month wait, you know, that's ritht. . ., ., ., right. we are all in accord on that. anna, right. we are all in accord on that. anna. chris _ right. we are all in accord on that. anna. chris is _ right. we are all in accord on that. anna, chris is saying _ right. we are all in accord on that. anna, chris is saying that - right. we are all in accord on that. anna, chris is saying that having i anna, chris is saying that having been vaccinated with the modern macro jab, he's been told he is not eligible for a booster. apparently the moderna vaccine does not fade as the moderna vaccine does not fade as the other vaccines do, is that true? that is incorrect so i'm glad chris said that — that is incorrect so i'm glad chris said that in _ that is incorrect so i'm glad chris said that in. i see that they live in london — said that in. i see that they live in london and the government messages to anyone in england that they want— messages to anyone in england that they want all over 18 is in england to be _ they want all over 18 is in england to be offered a third dose by the end of— to be offered a third dose by the end of the — to be offered a third dose by the end of the year and it's a similar target _ end of the year and it's a similar target for— end of the year and it's a similar target for scotland and wales, while the northern ireland to the programme now is trying to expand to anyone _ programme now is trying to expand to anyone over— programme now is trying to expand to anyone over 30. the booster is more important _ anyone over 30. the booster is more important than ever now. i attended a briefing _ important than ever now. i attended a briefing with the uk health security— a briefing with the uk health security agency on friday afternoon and they _ security agency on friday afternoon and they shared with us some data
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which _ and they shared with us some data which showed that two doses of a vaccine _ which showed that two doses of a vaccine will not be enough to stop you from — vaccine will not be enough to stop you from catching the omicron variant — you from catching the omicron variant. early data shows a third dose, _ variant. early data shows a third dose. a — variant. early data shows a third dose, a booster dose, prevent 75% of people _ dose, a booster dose, prevent 75% of people getting infection. they only looked _ people getting infection. they only looked at _ people getting infection. they only looked at astrazeneca and pfizer but they did _ looked at astrazeneca and pfizer but they did say that there wasn't enough — they did say that there wasn't enough data for moderna but they didn't— enough data for moderna but they didn't think there would be any difference between moderna and for example _ difference between moderna and for example pfizer because they are the same _ example pfizer because they are the same sort _ example pfizer because they are the same sort of vaccine, so the message would _ same sort of vaccine, so the message would be _ same sort of vaccine, so the message would be to— same sort of vaccine, so the message would be to make sure that they get their boosterjab.— their booster 'ab. danny, can i ask, what is it their boosterjab. danny, can i ask, what is it about _ their boosterjab. danny, can i ask, what is it about the _ their boosterjab. danny, can i ask, what is it about the booster - their boosterjab. danny, can i ask, what is it about the booster dose i what is it about the booster dose thatis what is it about the booster dose that is so important when it comes to omicron? it’s that is so important when it comes to omicron?— to omicron? it's really critical, so b now to omicron? it's really critical, so by now we _ to omicron? it's really critical, so by now we have _ to omicron? it's really critical, so by now we have got _ to omicron? it's really critical, so by now we have got i _ to omicron? it's really critical, so by now we have got i think- to omicron? it's really critical, so by now we have got i think about| by now we have got i think about seven different datasets where there is great convergence, they'll say same thing, that even if you had your two doses of vaccine, maybe three or four or five months ago, your two doses of vaccine, maybe three orfour orfive months ago, if you do that lab test where you makes the serum with the virus and see if
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cells can still get infected, the vast majority of us would essentially be on the baseline, in other words zero protection. no neutralisation of omicron at all. when you are given a booster, those responses go straight up into the protective safe zone. if you look at the graphs, they could not be a more compelling argument for getting boosted. . ., , , ., ., boosted. ok, that leads us on two, dann , a boosted. ok, that leads us on two, danny, a question _ boosted. ok, that leads us on two, danny, a question from _ boosted. ok, that leads us on two, danny, a question from sue, i boosted. ok, that leads us on two, danny, a question from sue, in i boosted. ok, that leads us on two, i danny, a question from sue, in terms of what kind of combination of vaccines? suit says she is double jabbed with pfizer and she wonders what the best booster is to complement that. should she have different booster?— complement that. should she have different booster? again, the simple answer is that _ different booster? again, the simple answer is that the _ different booster? again, the simple answer is that the general _ different booster? again, the simple answer is that the general advice i different booster? again, the simple answer is that the general advice is i answer is that the general advice is to just get the booster as far doesn't as soon as possible. pfizer and moderna are being used equally across different centres according to what's available. they are both simply amazing and stupendous. they
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will boost you absolutely into the safe zone. . ~ will boost you absolutely into the safe zone. ., ,, , ., , will boost you absolutely into the safe zone. . ~' ,. , . safe zone. thank you very much. unequivocal— safe zone. thank you very much. unequivocalthere, _ safe zone. thank you very much. unequivocal there, get _ safe zone. thank you very much. unequivocal there, get boosted. | unequivocal there, get boosted. anna, simon is asking, and our hearts go out to you, simon, my teenage child is self—isolating at her house. my wife and i are negative and tests so far. so the question from simon is, should i go to my scheduled boosterjab as things are? to my scheduled booster 'ab as things a_ things are? well, it's really complicated _ things are? well, it's really complicated and _ things are? well, it's really complicated and simon, i i things are? well, it's really i complicated and simon, i think, things are? well, it's really - complicated and simon, i think, i'm assuming _ complicated and simon, i think, i'm assuming he's in england, but slightly— assuming he's in england, but slightly different rules for wales and northern ireland and scotland, we have _ and northern ireland and scotland, we have a — and northern ireland and scotland, we have a really good article on the front page — we have a really good article on the front page of the bbc website which breaks— front page of the bbc website which breaks down that information. if you're _ breaks down that information. if you're in— breaks down that information. if you're in a — breaks down that information. if you're in a similar situation to simon — you're in a similar situation to simon and _ you're in a similar situation to simon and you want some guidance, looking _ simon and you want some guidance, looking there. but as i say, this is really— looking there. but as i say, this is really a _ looking there. but as i say, this is really a question about self—isolation rather than booster self— isolation rather than booster jabs _ self—isolation rather than booster jabs it's — self—isolation rather than booster jabs. it's about whether you can leave _ jabs. it's about whether you can leave the — jabs. it's about whether you can leave the house if someone you lived with has— leave the house if someone you lived with has tested positive. in england at the _ with has tested positive. in england at the moment, if you are double vaccinated. — at the moment, if you are double vaccinated, you don't have to
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self—isolate unless you are contacted by test and trace and told that a _ contacted by test and trace and told that a person has omicron, then you would _ that a person has omicron, then you would have _ that a person has omicron, then you would have to isolate for ten days. but from _ would have to isolate for ten days. but from tomorrow, that is changing. in but from tomorrow, that is changing. in england. _ but from tomorrow, that is changing. in england, you need to do a lateral flow every— in england, you need to do a lateral flow every morning for seven days regardless — flow every morning for seven days regardless of what variant you might have been— regardless of what variant you might have been infected with and anyone who tests _ have been infected with and anyone who tests positive needs to get a pcr~ _ who tests positive needs to get a pcr~ so — who tests positive needs to get a pcr~ so if— who tests positive needs to get a pcr. so if you don't get a positive, you don't— pcr. so if you don't get a positive, you don't have to self—isolate so that should mean that simon, for ekample. — that should mean that simon, for example, he should be able to get his boosterjab. even so, even if he is able _ his boosterjab. even so, even if he is able to— his boosterjab. even so, even if he is able to get — his boosterjab. even so, even if he is able to get that, he should be taking _ is able to get that, he should be taking all— is able to get that, he should be taking all the other precautions needed — taking all the other precautions needed at this time. danny was talking — needed at this time. danny was talking about how fantastic the boosters are and how effective they are, but _ boosters are and how effective they are, but they only do so much of the 'ob are, but they only do so much of the job particularly against omicron, so things— job particularly against omicron, so things like — job particularly against omicron, so things like washing her hands, being in ventilated spaces, wearing face coverings — in ventilated spaces, wearing face coverings. it�*s in ventilated spaces, wearing face coverints. �* , ., in ventilated spaces, wearing face coverints. �*, . ., in ventilated spaces, wearing face coverints. �*, ., ., ., in ventilated spaces, wearing face coverints. �*, . ., ., . coverings. it's all about that basic messate coverings. it's all about that basic message that _ coverings. it's all about that basic message that we _ coverings. it's all about that basic message that we are _ coverings. it's all about that basic message that we are reverting i coverings. it's all about that basic. message that we are reverting back to. thank you very much. simon, our thoughts go out to you, i hope your
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child will get better soon. danny, i appreciate your not so much policy, but let me just throw this to you, is from catherine and it regards her 91—year—old very frail housebound mother who still has not had her booster. catherine has tried helplines and the gp but to no avail. asking, can you help? i'm asking you this because lots and lots of people are asking this of us. i wonder, lots of people are asking this of us. iwonder, talk lots of people are asking this of us. i wonder, talk us through what these people in this position can do for their elderly relatives. if these people in this position can do for their elderly relatives.— for their elderly relatives. if i've understood _ for their elderly relatives. if i've understood her _ for their elderly relatives. if i've understood her question - for their elderly relatives. if i've i understood her question correctly, she knows that her mother is eligible for a booster, she wants a booster, and this is about the kind of teething problems that people are facing in terms of not being able to access it, is the right? i facing in terms of not being able to access it, is the right?— access it, is the right? i think that's right — access it, is the right? i think that's right and _ access it, is the right? i think that's right and especially i access it, is the right? i think| that's right and especially now access it, is the right? i think- that's right and especially now that we are hearing about the websites going down, but i think this is more in terms of summary whose housebound, who can't get out of the housebound, who can't get out of the house and it's about when they will
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get those boosters to their bedside, it's a difficult one.— it's a difficult one. well, my answer probably _ it's a difficult one. well, my answer probably isn't i it's a difficult one. well, my answer probably isn't very i it's a difficult one. well, my i answer probably isn't very helpful, but it is to catherine to carry on doing what she's doing. her mother is very lucky to have her. just doing her damnedest to get through these teething problems, this is a very unprecedented and innocence a sense unplanned situation, this enormous rush to get boosted. she will have to be very determined to hang in there on the websites and make sure she gets a slot for her mother, not sure what any of us would do. i mother, not sure what any of us would do-_ mother, not sure what any of us would do. ~' ,. , ., ., would do. i think you 'ust have to kee- would do. i think you 'ust have to keep trying. h would do. i think you 'ust have to keep trying. the h would do. i think you just have to keep trying, the government i would do. i think you just have to keep trying, the government say | would do. i think you just have to i keep trying, the government say they are working to improve the nhs vaccine booking website because they had those issues early today i was going to say, i spoke to a contact of the weekend whose job it is to go out into the local area. of the weekend whose 'ob it is to go out into the local area.— out into the local area. when i say local and talking _ out into the local area. when i say local and talking about _ out into the local area. when i say local and talking about a _ out into the local area. when i say local and talking about a radius i out into the local area. when i say local and talking about a radius of| local and talking about a radius of ”p local and talking about a radius of up to— local and talking about a radius of up to 100 — local and talking about a radius of up to 100 miles, and it's a real challenge, _ up to 100 miles, and it's a real challenge, because you are going
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from _ challenge, because you are going from address to address, trying to reach _ from address to address, trying to reach people who are housebound, so even just _ reach people who are housebound, so evenjust things like reach people who are housebound, so even just things like getting to the door, _ even just things like getting to the door, it _ even just things like getting to the door, it all— even just things like getting to the door, it all takes a lot of time. you _ door, it all takes a lot of time. you can— door, it all takes a lot of time. you can only do around two or three boosters _ you can only do around two or three boosters on — you can only do around two or three boosters on monday, according to this contact so there are real challenges when it comes to reaching these _ challenges when it comes to reaching these people. but that's no consolation, i'm sure, for catherine and her— consolation, i'm sure, for catherine and her mum — consolation, i'm sure, for catherine and her mum. it consolation, i'm sure, for catherine and her mum-— and her mum. it is a worrying time. norman says. _ and her mum. it is a worrying time. norman says. he — and her mum. it is a worrying time. norman says, he is _ and her mum. it is a worrying time. norman says, he is 80, _ and her mum. it is a worrying time. norman says, he is 80, he - and her mum. it is a worrying time. norman says, he is 80, he had i and her mum. it is a worrying time. norman says, he is 80, he had hisl norman says, he is 80, he had his booster several months ago, how long will it protect him for?— will it protect him for? really good tuestion, will it protect him for? really good question, norman. _ will it protect him for? really good question, norman. i— will it protect him for? really good question, norman. ithink- will it protect him for? really good i question, norman. ithink something question, norman. i think something that a _ question, norman. i think something that a lot _ question, norman. i think something that a lot of— question, norman. i think something that a lot of people will be asking, particularly his age. so we know he is in a _ particularly his age. so we know he is in a high—risk group when it comes— is in a high—risk group when it comes to _ is in a high—risk group when it comes to covid. it depends. one key thing _ comes to covid. it depends. one key thing is, _ comes to covid. it depends. one key thing is, how— comes to covid. it depends. one key thing is, how long ago did norman get his— thing is, how long ago did norman get his boosterjab? they started being _ get his boosterjab? they started being rolled out in september. even then, _ being rolled out in september. even then, is— being rolled out in september. even then, is difficult to know for sure 'ust then, is difficult to know for sure just how— then, is difficult to know for sure just how long protection will last, particularly with the omicron variant, _ particularly with the omicron variant, which is now soaring. last
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week— variant, which is now soaring. last week the _ variant, which is now soaring. last week the chief medical officer of england, chris whitty, was asked whether— england, chris whitty, was asked whether there would be a need for a fourth _ whether there would be a need for a fourthjab _ whether there would be a need for a fourthjab and he said at the time he didn't— fourthjab and he said at the time he didn't want to speculate, that more _ he didn't want to speculate, that more data — he didn't want to speculate, that more data was needed. the one group he did _ more data was needed. the one group he did talk— more data was needed. the one group he did talk about who would definitely be getting a fourth jab are those who have suppressed immune systems— are those who have suppressed immune systems and _ are those who have suppressed immune systems and they will get three doses— systems and they will get three doses and then a booster. having said that, — doses and then a booster. having said that, companies like pfizer have _ said that, companies like pfizer have said — said that, companies like pfizer have said they are preparing for a yearly— have said they are preparing for a yearly boosterjabs so i think it will be — yearly boosterjabs so i think it will be one of those wait—and—see situations. — will be one of those wait—and—see situations, particularly because of omicron — situations, particularly because of omicron. �* ., situations, particularly because of omicron. . . ., ,, , ., , omicron. and are, thank you very much. omicron. and are, thank you very much- danny. _ omicron. and are, thank you very much. danny, to _ omicron. and are, thank you very much. danny, to you, _ omicron. and are, thank you very much. danny, to you, we - omicron. and are, thank you very much. danny, to you, we have i omicron. and are, thank you very i much. danny, to you, we have priti saying, i am a recent migrant from india, she is shield fascinated. —— michael brescia vaccinated. she askedif michael brescia vaccinated. she asked if there are any side—effects or precautions they need to be of? a few people asking this type of question who have been getting those initial vaccine shots in different countries, also china as well. what do they need to be looking out for? it's really important question,
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because sitting in this country, we have tended to get really obsessed with astrazeneca and pfizer and to a lesser extent, moderna and b forget that there are people who are lucky enough to access the vaccine and may have accessed any one of 24 different vaccines out there. so these are two common examples. cover shield is the name that was come to the licence for astrazeneca, manufactured in india, then we have lots of people in this country who may have been in countries that have the chinese vaccines, and the answer in all cases is that they are eligible for a booster, and the general booster programme to give pfizer or moderna would be absolutely superb for them. they are doing a mix—and—match combination of vaccines, they work really, really well. i would have no concerns at
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all. , ., well. i would have no concerns at all. ., 4' ., well. i would have no concerns at all. ., ,, ., ., all. good to know that. that's really clear — all. good to know that. that's really clear and _ all. good to know that. that's really clear and i _ all. good to know that. that's really clear and i hope - all. good to know that. that's really clear and i hope that i all. good to know that. that's really clear and i hope that is | all. good to know that. that's i really clear and i hope that is good for priti to know as well. a lot has been spoken about with this increase in the booster uptake and this push to get more people boosted. anna, what happens to other treatments, what happens to other treatments, what happens to other treatments, what happens to other parts of the nhs? there has been a lot of concern when it comes to cancer care and treatment but we have had an update from the prime minister's spokesperson? we have. the spokesperson? we have. the spokesperson says, there will be no disruption. spokesperson says, there will be no disru-tion. , , disruption. sorry, there will be disruption _ disruption. sorry, there will be disruption to _ disruption. sorry, there will be disruption to nhs _ disruption. sorry, there will be disruption to nhs care - disruption. sorry, there will be disruption to nhs care but i disruption. sorry, there will be disruption to nhs care but not| disruption to nhs care but not cancer— disruption to nhs care but not cancer treatment. the prime minister's _ cancer treatment. the prime minister's official spokesman has said while there will be disruption because _ said while there will be disruption because of the need to focus on the new vaccine — because of the need to focus on the new vaccine campaign, cancer treatments will not be affected by the requirement that the energy group _ the requirement that the energy group group redeploy staff to help it is reiterating what we heard from the health — it is reiterating what we heard from the health secretary this morning, he was _ the health secretary this morning, he was keen to stress that. what's likely— he was keen to stress that. what's likely to _ he was keen to stress that. what's likely to be — he was keen to stress that. what's
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likely to be postponed, be cancelled, is the non—elective surgery. — cancelled, is the non—elective surgery, things like knee and hip surgery — surgery, things like knee and hip surgery. i've interviewed people over— surgery. i've interviewed people over the — surgery. i've interviewed people over the last year who have had their— over the last year who have had their cancer care delay. one woman i spoke _ their cancer care delay. one woman i spoke to— their cancer care delay. one woman i spoke to who — their cancer care delay. one woman i spoke to who had to go through several— spoke to who had to go through several delays and cancellations, she said — several delays and cancellations, she said actually, the mental health impact _ she said actually, the mental health impact of— she said actually, the mental health impact of having those treatments cancelled — impact of having those treatments cancelled was actually more difficult _ cancelled was actually more difficult to deal with than the cancer~ — difficult to deal with than the cancer. so this will be a positive announcement for those people. having _ announcement for those people. having said that, there will be people — having said that, there will be people on this waiting lists, this record _ people on this waiting lists, this record waiting lists, who have been waiting _ record waiting lists, who have been waiting months, maybe years to have their knees— waiting months, maybe years to have their knees or their hip surgery and to hear— their knees or their hip surgery and to hear that — their knees or their hip surgery and to hear that news, that once again their— to hear that news, that once again their operations may be pushed back further, _ their operations may be pushed back further, well, it may not be as life—threatening as cancer, that type _ life—threatening as cancer, that type of— life—threatening as cancer, that type of work, it stops you being able _ type of work, it stops you being able to — type of work, it stops you being able to move, it stops you being able _ able to move, it stops you being able to _ able to move, it stops you being able to live your life, maybe you can't _ able to live your life, maybe you can't work. _ able to live your life, maybe you can't work, so it is positive in that— can't work, so it is positive in that sense, _ can't work, so it is positive in that sense, that those cancer patients _ that sense, that those cancer patients will be protected, but by
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focusing — patients will be protected, but by focusing all the work of vaccines, that does— focusing all the work of vaccines, that does have ramifications elsewhere. 50 that does have ramifications elsewhere-— that does have ramifications elsewhere. ., elsewhere. so those nonurgent services that _ elsewhere. so those nonurgent services that are _ elsewhere. so those nonurgent services that are still _ elsewhere. so those nonurgent services that are still painful, i services that are still painful, you're not comfortable and it is difficult. anna, staying with you, pam says, she had to put in at about three days later despite no symptoms she tested positive for coronavirus. the question is, is that likely to have reduced the effectiveness of the booster? the have reduced the effectiveness of the booster?— the booster? the answer is, we believe it _ the booster? the answer is, we believe it shouldn't _ the booster? the answer is, we believe it shouldn't have - the booster? the answer is, wel believe it shouldn't have actually reduced — believe it shouldn't have actually reduced the effectiveness. if anything it could actually lead to stronger— anything it could actually lead to stronger antibodies, t cells and other— stronger antibodies, t cells and other forms of immunity. but the advice _ other forms of immunity. but the advice is, — other forms of immunity. but the advice is, it's important to stress, if you _ advice is, it's important to stress, if you do— advice is, it's important to stress, if you do have covid before your jab. _ if you do have covid before your jab. you — if you do have covid before your jab, you need to wait 28 days from the date _ jab, you need to wait 28 days from the date of — jab, you need to wait 28 days from the date of test of symptoms. there are many— the date of test of symptoms. there are many reasons for this, one is to -ive are many reasons for this, one is to give your— are many reasons for this, one is to give your body time to recover following — give your body time to recover following infection, but also if you are waiting for 28 days it means you eliminate _ are waiting for 28 days it means you eliminate the risk of going into a high-risk— eliminate the risk of going into a high—risk setting lack a vaccination centre _ high—risk setting lack a vaccination
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centre and — high—risk setting lack a vaccination centre and potentially spreading the virus around. 50 centre and potentially spreading the virus around-— virus around. so 28 days, which leads us to _ virus around. so 28 days, which leads us to a — virus around. so 28 days, which leads us to a question, - virus around. so 28 days, which | leads us to a question, dannica, from gary, who asks, should i get the boosterjab if i've recently had and recovered from covert and just adding onto that, gary also asking, does it answer change if you suffer from long covid? we have heard so much about the of that. part from long covid? we have heard so much about the of that.— much about the of that. part of the answer is just _ much about the of that. part of the answer is just a _ much about the of that. part of the answer isjust a continuation i much about the of that. part of the answer isjust a continuation of- much about the of that. part of the answer isjust a continuation of thej answer is just a continuation of the last one. the 28 days rule. the other bit of that is, again, just to endorse the view that prior infection is an amazing additional boost in terms of giving you a really good quality and quantity of immunity. and the long covid question, so many people have thought about this and published on it, and thejury is thought about this and published on it, and the jury is still to some extent out. so when people look at the impact of vaccination on long covid, perhaps about 40% of people say that for some period, they feel
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quite a lot better after vaccination, perhaps about a third say they feel about the same and about a third say they feel worse. some of that might be to do with perhaps some of the long covid people who have it because of a reservoir of the virus. but the simple answer is even if you have had long covid, just get the booster. had long covid, 'ust get the booster. , , ., booster. the message straight there, dann , booster. the message straight there, danny. thank — booster. the message straight there, danny. thank you- — booster. the message straight there, danny, thank you. anna, _ booster. the message straight there, danny, thank you. anna, wayne i booster. the message straight there, | danny, thank you. anna, wayne asks, how soon after receiving the booster will a person be protected? that’s how soon after receiving the booster will a person be protected?— will a person be protected? that's a really good — will a person be protected? that's a really good question. _ will a person be protected? that's a really good question. with - will a person be protected? that's a really good question. with the - really good question. with the previous— really good question. with the previousjabs, the first really good question. with the previous jabs, the first window was around _ previous jabs, the first window was around two — previous jabs, the first window was around two weeks. but the way one scientist _ around two weeks. but the way one scientist put it to the bbc this morning — scientist put it to the bbc this morning is, the response to boosters is faster— morning is, the response to boosters is faster and — morning is, the response to boosters is faster and stronger. we don't know— is faster and stronger. we don't know the — is faster and stronger. we don't know the exact time yet studies have shown— know the exact time yet studies have shown very— know the exact time yet studies have shown very high protection after one or two— shown very high protection after one or two weeks after the boosterjab. so there _ or two weeks after the boosterjab. so there was a recent trial by ptizer— so there was a recent trial by pfizer which suggested after seven days a _ pfizer which suggested after seven days a pfizer booster is extremely
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effective — days a pfizer booster is extremely effective at preventing illness white — effective at preventing illness while the first uk real—world study found _ while the first uk real—world study found production levels were very hi-h found production levels were very high after— found production levels were very high after 14 days. so it's that sort _ high after 14 days. so it's that sort of— high after 14 days. so it's that sort of one to two week window. thank— sort of one to two week window. thank you — sort of one to two week window. thank you. danny, the last question to you, it's from dawn, who says allergies in diabetes and advice from immunologists means that she was only allowed the astrazeneca vaccine initially. now her booster is due but there are no places in her area that she can access the astrazeneca booster as they are only offering pfizer and moderna. so what does she do? i offering pfizer and moderna. so what does she do?— does she do? i think it's a really hard one for— does she do? i think it's a really hard one for her— does she do? i think it's a really hard one for her because - does she do? i think it's a really hard one for her because if - does she do? i think it's a really hard one for her because if you | hard one for her because if you remember, right back at the beginning of the programme, there were quite rare examples around the world of anaphylactic response to the pfizer vaccine, and that led to advice that any people, even with quite marginal allergy histories, should be switched on to
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astrazeneca. although in a sense, we don't see it as a bigger deal any more, that advice prevails, which puts people like dawn in a very hard situation. so i think she has to go back to her gp and try and work out what the correct policy is locally. but in terms of, she cannot have the astrazeneca, sorry, she cannot have the pfizer or the moderna, she has to stick with astrazeneca? ilustiellll. to stick with astrazeneca? well, from an immunology _ to stick with astrazeneca? well, from an immunology point - to stick with astrazeneca? well, from an immunology point of. to stick with astrazeneca? if from an immunology point of view, not necessarily, but obviously it's not necessarily, but obviously it's not for me to make policy on who is —— on that. not for me to make policy on who is -- on that-— -- on that. thank you for clarifying- _ -- on that. thank you for clarifying- i _ -- on that. thank you for clarifying. i have - -- on that. thank you for clarifying. i have to - -- on that. thank you for clarifying. i have to say, l -- on that. thank you for- clarifying. i have to say, we've had so much brilliant questions, some real difficult and very specific ones, so i really do appreciate both of you, professor danny altmann of imperial college london, thank you so much. and anna collinson, my colleague thank you to you too. a lot of very great questions. as
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always, if you have any more, do get in touch with that. we would love to hear from you because we've got throughout the rest of the week, i'm sure, lots more opportunities to put all these great questions to our brilliant panel. thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. the windy weather we had in the north—west of scotland has moved away, but for many northern parts of the uk, we are seeing cooler air coming in. by contrast, we still have this mild air from the tropics covering much of england and wales. in between those two different air masses we have this zone of thicker cloud, that has been producing some outbreaks of rain. that rain still nudging into the far south of scotland, mainly affecting northern england and north wales. south of that, a lot of cloud, damping places where its mile, north of that belt
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of rainwear into that cooler air with some clearer spells and showers. the showers will this band of rain moves southwards of an item of the rain becomes light and patchy, we see some clearer skies following for a while and that could lead to some fog especially in northern england. more rain coming back into the north—west of scotland, for many parts of the uk it will be cooler than last night. still some mild air with the cloudy and damp weather across more southern parts of england and wales. a change coming into northern areas on tuesday, this weather system will be draped across northern parts of scotland, it will bring milder atlantic air and stronger winds to scotland and northern ireland. a lot of cloud, the rain mini for the highlands and islands, some western parts of mainland scotland, some sunshine around aberdeenshire. not much sunshine for northern ireland, england and wales, the mist and fog especially in northern england will be slow to clear. in places it will have a dry day, still mild in the south, but milder across scotland and northern ireland. where we see the fog, especially northern england and perhaps the north midlands and north wales, it will be quite a bit
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cooler. moving into wednesday, we have had weather front still sitting across northern parts of the uk for the more of a breeze into wednesday. probably not quite as much mist and fog around but still a lot of cloud for many parts of the country. there is the weather front, not producing much rain, there should probably move away, heading up to the central belt of scotland, but we are all essentially in milder air on wednesday. temperatures widely in double figures. that band of rain is getting nudged away by an area of high pressure. that will build in towards the latter part of the week and really settle things down. so there is not really any rain to speak of longer term, but there will be a a lot of cloud underneath the high pressure. and some mist and fog particularly over the higher ground. there is a trend as we head into the weekend for temperatures to drop away by a few degrees.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the first death in the uk with the omicron variant of coronavirus is announced — as queues of people wait to get booster jabs in england. the best thing we can do is get our boosters, we are opening up centres across the country and we are getting the army to help with logistics and we are expanding in every possible way. home lateral flow test kits are currently unavailable on the uk government website — a day after the government changed its testing strategy. from today people in england are being asked to work from home if they can — but businesses are worried it will hit the crucial christmas market. rescue teams search for survivors after tornadoes in the united states that have
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killed almost 100 people. we're expecting an update from the governor of kentucky shortly. a bbc investigation finds networks of breeders are offering to mutilate puppies, to follow a social media trend. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news. borisjohnson says at least one person has died in the uk with the omicron variant of coronavirus — with the government declaring that the new variant is spreading at a rate 'not seen before'. last night, the prime minister announced an expansion of the vaccination booster programme. england's deputy chief medical officer professorjonathan van tam is writing to every vaccination
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volunteer encouraging them to come back and help with the booster programme. well, so far, 40% of people eligible for the vaccine in the uk have received their booster. like england, scotland is aiming to offer all adults a third vaccine by the end of december. while wales has set a target of the end of january. in northern ireland, people over 30 are currently being offered third doses. meanwhile the nhs website for booking a shot in england has been overwhelmed. and the government's online service for ordering rapid tests has been suspended because of high demand. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports on how the government now hopes to jab a million people a day. the race between the virus and the vaccine has intensified once again. and, at a vaccination clinic in central london this morning, some sobering news from the prime minister. sadly, at least one patient has now been confirmed to have died with omicron. so, i think the idea
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that this is somehow a milder version of the virus, i think that's something we need to set on one side. in stockport, greater manchester, this walk—in centre has seen steady business, particularly as concerns grow around the omicron variant. all the time, we feel like we are getting more people coming through. it does feel we have had queues around the building. so, there is a definite energy and demand. and that's people coming for their firstjabs, second jabs and their boosters. there is still lots we don't know about this new variant. but one thing is clear, and that's vaccines remain our best defence against developing serious illness. and that's why it is as important as ever to get jabs into as many arms as quickly as possible. now the booster programme has been expanded, offering jabs to all eligible over—18s by the end of the month, a significant challenge for an already hard—pressed health service. if that offer of a booster was translated into actually delivering the jab, it would mean
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giving 1 million doses a day, every day, until the end of the year. at the moment, about 500,000 are being given a day. so ramping up the programme will come at a cost, with other non—covid related health care being put off. reports are emerging of a shortage of lateral flow tests, with those trying to order them online being told no home testing kits are available. problems, too, with the website for booking boosters in england. high demand means the site is crashing, and people are advised to try again later or tomorrow. and in hospitals, where staff are already under pressure, there is real anxiety over what the next few weeks may bring, particularly for those patients that need high levels of care. it's awful, you feel like you're
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giving them a third world service. we have people who need an intensive care bed after their operation, which we can't do, because the beds are either full of covid patients or full of people we can't get a ward bed for, because there's no capacity in the hospital. long queues outside vaccination centres, booking websites crashing because of massive demand. these are all signs the message on the importance of boosters is getting through. now it's a question of getting those jabs into arms. dominic hughes, bbc news. earlier we spoke to our medical editor fergus walsh, who gave us this update on the spread of the omicron variant. in london, it now makes up about 40% of all cases. the prime minister said it would probably make up the majority by tomorrow. by the end of the week, omicron should be the dominant source of all cases in the uk, completely taking overfrom delta. that's because it's spreading so fast. it's doubling every two or three days. that is faster than any previous variant. so, that means we could be heading for 100,000, maybe 200,000 cases a day by the end of the month, may be sooner.
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and if that keeps on doubling, at some point that curve will start to bend. we've had one death confirmed. obviously, that is a tragedy for the family involved, but it tells us very little useful about the level of threat we face from omicron. but even if it is generally a milder illness than we get from delta, because so many people have got some level of immunity, if we get a massive spike in cases, it still will result, potentially, in a lot of people in hospital. but we won't have the full detail on that threat for a few weeks, which is why the booster programme is so important, because it will give protection against infection and should give very strong protection against severe illness. fergus walsh, our medical editor. let's talk to our reporter andrew plant who's been with people queueing for up to three hours to get a vaccine in hungerford. bring us up—to—date, how long do they have bring us up—to—date, how long do
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they have to bring us up—to—date, how long do they have to wait? bring us up—to—date, how long do they have to wait? the bring us up-to-date, how long do they bring us up-to-date, how long do the have to wait? ,., bring us up-to-date, how long do they bring us up-to-date, how long do the have to wait? , ., , bring us up-to-date, how long do they bring us up-to-date, how long do the have to wait? , ., , , they have to wait? the same story is true in every — they have to wait? the same story is true in every walk _ they have to wait? the same story is true in every walk in _ they have to wait? the same story is true in every walk in centre - they have to wait? the same story is true in every walk in centre across i true in every walk in centre across the country and certainly true here in hungerford, the q is snaking behind me and it goes way around the corner. this is a walk—in centre and an appointment centre but they said they stopped taking walkins at two o'clock this afternoon because there was too many. they have a long way to go. someone in the queue has been waiting about three hours and they probably still have around about one hour to go but many people determined to get the booster here today after that announcement yesterday about the ambitious target to try to get everybody, every adult given their booster or at least offered it, by the end of the year and that equates to something like a million people, just more than a million people, just more than a million every single day, in fact, so hungerford is doing its bit to try and achieve that. some people have had problems booking on the
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website and many people said they were facing virtual cues, one person saying over 15,000 people in the virtual queue this morning, and the advice is, if you can't get on and book your appointment, try later and come back again tomorrow. it is the amount of people all of a sudden trying to use the service at the same time, but there has also been problems reported with the lateral flow devices and people will know you can go on the government website and order those easily and they turn up and order those easily and they turn up fairly quickly at your door, but this morning people getting the message there was no more of those tests available. we are told that is not the case, we are told there is plenty of supply, and the problem is in fact distribution and trying to get enough people to meet the demand for people going on they are looking for people going on they are looking for those lateral flow devices, and the advice is to try again later, but they are still available at shops and pharmacies as well. so it is not a supply issue but it is trying to distribute them to all the people that suddenly want the same thing at the same time. you can see here a lot of people trying to get
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their boosterjab at the earliest opportunity, trying to meet the ambitious target, and facing exceptionally long queues but i have not seen anybody here in hungerford put off by those long waits here so far. , ., ., ., put off by those long waits here so far. ,., ., ., , ., put off by those long waits here so far. ., , ., , ., ., far. good to see that people are not bein: ut far. good to see that people are not being put off- _ far. good to see that people are not being put off. andrew, _ far. good to see that people are not being put off. andrew, thanks - far. good to see that people are not l being put off. andrew, thanks mcrae. people are very much wanting to get their booster there — thanks for joining us. the latest figures from the health agency, 1576 new cases were announced of the omicron variant of this brings the overall number now the 4713. so these are the latest figures for the last 24—hour is. this is according to the
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health security agency of the uk. i'm nowjoined by helen donovan, professional lead for public health nursing at the royal college of nurses. we are seeing this uptake and this large push when it comes to getting the booster into people's arms, how will that, how is that impacting the people that you represent? the ressure people that you represent? the pressure on _ people that you represent? fie: pressure on the people that you represent? “me: pressure on the nhs people that you represent? 11s pressure on the nhs and people that you represent? 11s: pressure on the nhs and the people that you represent? 1“1e: pressure on the nhs and the wider health and social care system is immense, and has been now for several weeks if not months, so this is adding further pressure and nursing staff are really now stepping up to try and meet this demand, but i think one of the things that is impacting is the feeling of, well, how do we manage
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all of the other care that we need to deliver? there is a concern in the system that some of the routine care but also even the essential services managing that, while the booster campaign and the surge in making sure that the booster campaign is available to everybody, so i think that is one of the key things from my profession. and my colleagues. it's how they deliver that. so it is about resources and getting as many people as possible that we can, but also those messages to the public, that came through in your report before, being a bit patient, coming back to the website to book, because a lot of this is about getting the demand for this booster programme happening, and it is great to see people queueing up, great to see people asking for the services, but that has got to be
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tapered and managed as best we can. so further guidance we need in terms how we manage those queues and how we manage the expectation, and i think the other thing to say is that everybody needs to play their part with other measures so wearing face coverings, that remain hugely important to stop the spread of this virus transmitting even further, and using sensible approaches, so that you minimise the risk as much as possible. 1 you minimise the risk as much as ossible. ., ., ., ,, ., possible. i want to talk about face masks in a — possible. i want to talk about face masks in a moment _ possible. i want to talk about face masks in a moment but _ possible. i want to talk about face masks in a moment but going - possible. i want to talk about face | masks in a moment but going back possible. i want to talk about face - masks in a moment but going back to what you are talking about in terms of being patient and it is good to see people wanting the boosters, we know the government is trying to work to improve the booking website when it comes to boosters and also the lateral flow test issue, but in terms of getting a million people per day boosted, is this a realistic
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target? should we talk about targets or should we just encourage people to do it? b, or should we 'ust encourage people to do it? �* , ., or should we 'ust encourage people todo it? �* , ., or should we 'ust encourage people todoit?, ., ._ to do it? a bit of both, really. the taruet to do it? a bit of both, really. the target helps _ to do it? a bit of both, really. the target helps in — to do it? a bit of both, really. the target helps in making _ to do it? a bit of both, really. the target helps in making sure - to do it? a bit of both, really. the target helps in making sure that l to do it? a bit of both, really. the l target helps in making sure that the system has got the resources and thatis system has got the resources and that is what we still need to see from a nursing perspective, but i think you are right, the message actually needs to be, it is getting the third booster because we know what that will do is help stop severe infection. it won't stop all infection but it certainly has been shown by the latest evidence from the uk health agency that it will help prevent infection, so alongside the other messages, as well, but thatis the other messages, as well, but that is the key thing, know one thing is going to work on this, we need to have a multi—pronged attack, really. need to have a multi-pronged attack, reall . ., . ~' need to have a multi-pronged attack, reall . ., ., ,, ., need to have a multi-pronged attack, reall. ., ., ,, ., really. you talked about facemasks and we have _
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really. you talked about facemasks and we have the _ really. you talked about facemasks and we have the vote _ really. you talked about facemasks and we have the vote taking - really. you talked about facemasks and we have the vote taking place | and we have the vote taking place tomorrow on extra restrictions, how beneficial is it to wear face masks when we are facing omicron? the evidence when we are facing omicron? 11s: evidence around facemasks and coronavirus is increasing all the time, so this is predominantly a virus that is spread through respiratory, aerosol generating, so if you are in an enclosed space, you should wear a face covering that covers your nose and your mouth and is well fitted, so that when you are out and about you are not able to spread the virus as easily. the other key thing, wherever possible, to be in a ventilated space, and i know that is difficult in winter, but even having the window open a little bit will help dispel any aerosol that is generated, and those things have been shown to be really important. we probably should have been wearing face coverings for longer than we have done, so it is
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getting that message alongside the increase of the vaccine, so it is one of the key pillars that we need to follow. ., ., ., to follow. helen, thanks for 'oining us. helen donovan * to follow. helen, thanks for 'oining us. helen donovan from _ to follow. helen, thanks forjoining us. helen donovan from the - to follow. helen, thanks forjoining us. helen donovan from the royall us. helen donovan from the royal couege us. helen donovan from the royal college of nurses, thank you macro. dipak patel owns a pharmacy in sevenoaks in kent from where hejoins me now. you are taking a short break in between giving boosterjabs. how much extra uptake have you had it since the booster programme has been really encouraged? istate since the booster programme has been really encouraged?— really encouraged? we are three times as busy — really encouraged? we are three times as busy than _ really encouraged? we are three times as busy than normal - really encouraged? we are three| times as busy than normal times, really encouraged? we are three . times as busy than normal times, in terms of normal waiting times, it has been phenomenal, the queues have been along all day long, since the prime minister made his announcement yesterday. we were a bit annoyed
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about the prime minister not recognising the pharmacies and how we are working hard. we worked here at seven o'clock this morning and we have promised everyone as they are in the queue, there was a queue for about three hours waiting today, but we have enough vaccine and we will get there and finish at about seven o'clock, ten o'clock tonight, although we are supposed to close at four o'clock. you although we are supposed to close at four o'clock-— four o'clock. you are going to keep the doors open- — four o'clock. you are going to keep the doors open. is _ four o'clock. you are going to keep the doors open. is this _ four o'clock. you are going to keep the doors open. is this the - four o'clock. you are going to keep the doors open. is this the normal| the doors open. is this the normal number of people who are booking or are you experiencing a huge upsurge in bookings for your pharmacy? istate in bookings for your pharmacy? we are the in bookings for your pharmacy? , are the closest in sevenoaks to do the walking, there are no other pharmacies or surgeries open for walking, so we do have our own booking appointments, 20 per day, thatis booking appointments, 20 per day, that is booked until the end of january, so this isjust that is booked until the end of january, so this is just the walkins we are taking and so that is why we
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are talking about that, it has gone three times more than normal. because of the news yesterday. iloathed because of the news yesterday. what about when it — because of the news yesterday. what about when it comes _ because of the news yesterday. what about when it comes to _ because of the news yesterday. what about when it comes to the lateral flow test because we have seen the government website say that home tests are not available from that booking system where you book and then they deliver it to your home but the prime minister said you can go into pharmacies and request a lateral flow test, and go into pharmacies and request a lateralflow test, and i know boots the chemist has issued a statement saying that regular testing is important and they are providing test kits to over 2000 pharmacies in the uk on behalf of the nhs. that's something that if someone went into your pharmacy, can they get a lateral flow test?— your pharmacy, can they get a lateral flow test? yes. we had the stock until this _ lateral flow test? yes. we had the stock until this afternoon, - lateral flow test? yes. we had the stock until this afternoon, so - lateral flow test? yes. we had the stock until this afternoon, so we l stock until this afternoon, so we are running low, so we might be running out but we will try to order
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from the normal wholesale is a line so we hope to get something from them, but there is a shortage, because it says it is not available from the normal nhs website and everyone is trying at their pharmacy, so there is a shortage, definitely. pharmacy, so there is a shortage, definitel . ~ . , ., , definitely. what is the lead up time from the supplier _ definitely. what is the lead up time from the supplier is _ definitely. what is the lead up time from the supplier is given - definitely. what is the lead up time from the supplier is given the - definitely. what is the lead up time from the supplier is given the huge| from the supplier is given the huge increase in demand? thea;r from the supplier is given the huge increase in demand?— increase in demand? they do not rovide a increase in demand? they do not provide a timescale, _ increase in demand? they do not provide a timescale, so - increase in demand? they do not provide a timescale, so we're - increase in demand? they do not| provide a timescale, so we're just trying every day, you keep trying to order, and if you get there, and they have the stocks, they don't provide a special timescale, so there is no system for it. that is interesting- _ there is no system for it. that is interesting. when _ there is no system for it. that is interesting. when it _ there is no system for it. that is interesting. when it comes - there is no system for it. that is interesting. when it comes to i there is no system for it. that is. interesting. when it comes to the way this encouragement of the booster programme was done, do you think the government have liaised with people like you and pharmacies enough, have they given you enough
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support? what about the infrastructure to support this? ilttui’elll infrastructure to support this? well ointed infrastructure to support this? well pointed out- _ infrastructure to support this? well pointed out. that _ infrastructure to support this? -11 pointed out. that is the key important point, i was the same as you, watching the news last night, we had no information at all, prior to this. and everyone over 18 would have their vaccine by the end of december but we had no information and no plans or any kind of information given to us before, and we were here at seven o'clock because we knew it would happen and it did happen. the queue started at seven o'clock in the morning. 50 it did happen. the queue started at seven o'clock in the morning. so you had no information _ seven o'clock in the morning. so you had no information beforehand - seven o'clock in the morning. so you had no information beforehand that| had no information beforehand that the age would be dropped to 18 and that this drive to get a million people jabbed and boosted per day would happen? ihla
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people jabbed and boosted per day would happen?— people jabbed and boosted per day would happen? no information about that before haka _ would happen? no information about that before haka regarding _ would happen? no information about that before haka regarding about - i that before haka regarding about — about that beforehand regarding having all this by the end of december, and so we could have planned better if we had known a week before, so the prime minister, if he had announced it three days before, this is going to be happening, we could work as a team and get as much information as we can and get it done as quickly as possible, then it would have been ideal for us to have that information well in advance, and so we had no plans this morning when we walked in. we had about 300 people waiting in the queue.— waiting in the queue. fascinating to seak waiting in the queue. fascinating to s - eak to waiting in the queue. fascinating to speak to you _ waiting in the queue. fascinating to speak to you and — waiting in the queue. fascinating to speak to you and so _ waiting in the queue. fascinating to speak to you and so much - waiting in the queue. fascinating to speak to you and so much for- waiting in the queue. fascinating to speak to you and so much for your. speak to you and so much for your insight and explaining how this works from your practical point of view. we will let you get back to your pharmacy and i hope, i know you
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are working until ten o'clock in the evening, but it is very much appreciated. mr patel, thanks for joining us. from today people in england are being asked to work from home if they can, as part of the restrictions announced last week to tackle the rising number of coronavirus infections. the change brings england into line with scotland, wales and northern ireland. but many businesses fear it will mean quieter town and city centres in the crucial run up to christmas. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. a commuter service into london this morning. half—empty platforms and plenty of empty seats. evidence that, here at least, people are heeding the call to work from home once again. but while some might be happy to avoid a journey into the office, others will miss the opportunity to meet up with colleagues. in newmarket, mixed feelings...
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if we have to, we will do and i can do myjob from home. i've been going into the office one day a week. it'sjust nice to go somewhere different, have a bit of a change, get out of the house. like, put on proper clothes. for businesses like social chain, a marketing agency with offices in manchester, being able to meet with their staff is vital. definitely creativity and collaboration, the office looks like it does because we work in a creative space and we need to constantly be creative, but also problem—solving. it happens so quickly when you are in the office and all together and you canjust have a very quick conversation, whereas when you are working from home, it can quite often escalate and snowball into a much bigger problem. and, if people aren't coming into the office, other businesses are going to suffer as well. all of the restaurants, the cafes and sandwich shops which exist to serve office workers, they are going to see customer numbers fall and some may struggle to survive. in sheffield, this restaurant is already feeling the impact of plan b.
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pretty much overnight, we lost about 100 covers with the announcement of plan b. we foresee losing more covers, not to mention the walk—in trade we will miss over christmas and the new year period, so, really, ithink for the hospitality industry, this is a really devastating blow. with the prime minister now saying the country faces a tidal wave of infection due to the omicron variant, businesses that rely on people travelling to work are bracing themselves for a very harsh winter. and workers, now resigned to spending even more time at home with their laptops, will be asking just how long that will last. theo leggett, bbc news. much more on all of the coronavirus news on our website but now to the us. rescue teams are still searching for survivors of the wave of tornadoes, that hit parts of the united states on friday, killing at least 94 people. there are fears the death toll could rise. presidentjoe biden has called it "one of the largest" storms in american history,
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and has declared a majorfederal disaster in kentucky, the state that's been worst affected. leboo diseko has this report. picking up the pieces of their lives. homes, businesses and whole towns reduced to rubble. it's horrible, it's the definition of hell on earth. i can't... people have lost everything and it's just, it's terrible, it's horrible. this is what was left of one home. its owner says it tookjust four minutes to do this. everything stopped. i stuck my head out and looked up with my flashlight to the edge of the house and i noticed there was no wall there and that's when i told my wife, i said, i'm going to tell you right now, i'm warning you, when we go up there, i don't think the house is there, it's gone. kentucky's governor says this is the most devastating tornado event in his state's history, with no one found alive since saturday. to the people of america, there is no lens big enough to show
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you the extent of the damage here in graves county or in kentucky. one of the worst affected towns is mayfield. eight people were confirmed to have died at a candle factory, destroyed with more than 100 employees inside. and, at an amazon factory in neighbouring illinois, at least six employees are reported to have lost their lives. president biden has declared a major federal disaster in this state. he says he will ask the environmental protection agency to look into whether climate change played a role in the storms. it's going to be a long process to repair this damage, caused in such a short space of time. lebo diseko, bbc news. andy beshear, the governor of kentucky, has just delivered a press conference —
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where he spoke about the number of lives lost and the rescue operation that is still underway it might be weeks before we have final counts on deaths and levels of destruction. we lost lives in at least eight counties and at least 18 counties suffered damage. as of this morning, our best count for confirmed deaths, the most accurate count we have as of this morning, 64 people from kentucky. remember, this is fluid and the numbers will change and sometimes they have, thank god, gone down, but other times they have gone down, but other times they have gone up. it breaks down as follows, 20 in graves, 13 in hopkins, 11... 12 in warren, four in caldwell, one in marshall, one in taylor, one in
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fulton, and one more... undoubtably, there will be more. we believe it will certainly be above 70. the governor _ will certainly be above 70. the governor of — will certainly be above 70. the governor of kentucky with the fears that the death toll will increase after those tornadoes. elon musk, the chief executive officer of tesla, has been named time magazine's 2021 person of the year. musk is also the founder and ceo of rocket company spacex. the company launched a citizen—astronaut service in september with the first all—civilian crew to reach space. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello there. we're going to start the evening with some cooler conditions across scotland and northern ireland. still in the very mild air across england and wales where we've got a lot of cloud. most of the rain is affecting northern england and north wales.
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that rain band will start to nudge its way southwards overnight and at the same time, the rain becomes light and patchy. the showers in the north fade away. as we start to see some clearer skies following the rain, we could well find some fog forming, particularly across northern england. some more cloud, wind and rain comes into the north—west of scotland later, lifting temperatures a bit here. for many, though, it will be a bit cooler than it was last night. we've still got the mild air with that damp weather across more southern parts of england and wales. the mist and fog, though, especially northern england, perhaps the north midlands and north wales, will be slow to clear. there will be a lot of cloud for much of the uk on tuesday. we've got rain, mainly for the highlands and islands, western parts of mainland scotland, perhaps some sunshine around aberdeenshire. stronger, milder wind for scotland and northern ireland. mild for southern parts of the uk, but where we have that mist and fog, it will be quite a chilly day.
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sport now, and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre, here's hugh. good afternoon. the champions league last 16 draw hasjust taken place, for a second time today. the first one was declared void because of mistakes made that uefa blamed on a software problem. so here is the new version. there's one tie that is the same as the first attempt. that's holders chelsea against lille. while the other english teams will face different opponents. liverpool will play inter milan. manchester city against sporting. manchester united are taking on atletico madrid. and it was united who were at
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the centre of the problems with the first draw. the second draw that came out with the second draw that came out with villarreal as they non—seeded team. uefa announced they had seven potential opponents. but actually they only had six. manchester united can play against them because they had been in the same group. six balls went into the pot and in the next but it was established after looking back that when atletico madrid were drawn out, the ball for liverpool, who couldn't be drawn against atletico madrid because they had been in the same group, had been put in as a potential opponents, and manchester united, who could be a potential opponent, hadn't been put in. then all this came about on social media, uefa had to have an investigation, and promptly declared that the software was to blame, that is why we have ended up with another draw.
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that's only one of three draws at uefa hq today. the others didn't have any of the same problems. this is the one for the europa league knockout round play offs. rangers have drawn borussia dortmund. while barcelona against napoli is the pick of those eight ties. the winners willjoin west ham who are already in the last 16 after winning their group. in the europa conference league leicester will play danish side randers. celtic are taking on norweigan champions bodo/glimt. and either tottenham or vitesse will play rapid vienna. we'll know spurs' fate after uefa decide what to do after their final group game was cancelled for covid reasons. meanwhile, manchester united say they're unsure if it's safe for their premier league game with brentford tomorrow to go ahead after they shut down their training ground. they've done so for 24 hours to minimise risk of further let's go to the house of commons now where the labour mp margaret hodge is asking an urgent question following the conclusion of the inquests into the victims
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of serial killer, stephen port. the inquests into the deaths of the victims. ~ , ~ .,~ the inquests into the deaths of the victims. ~ , ~ �* victims. minister. mr speaker, i'm sure the thoughts _ victims. minister. mr speaker, i'm sure the thoughts of— victims. minister. mr speaker, i'm sure the thoughts of the _ victims. minister. mr speaker, i'm sure the thoughts of the whole - victims. minister. mr speaker, i'm i sure the thoughts of the whole house are with the families and friends of the three victims. the stories we have all read of their lives and terrible deaths have moved and horrified the country. the government expect the highest standards from the place to carry out their vital work in particular dutchman protecting the public in investigating serious crimes. the conclusions have shown these standards were not met and the investigative has probably contributed to the deaths of three of the young man. the met police have accepted as much and there are serious questions for them to answer. it is of course profoundly important that the first take responsibility for past failings and make sure they are not repeated.
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while the primary accountability body for the met is the mayor of london and the london assembly the metropolitan police have assured us they are putting in place significant movements including more and better trained investigators, new structures so that intelligence teams, specialist officers on the gun can work closely to identify and link crimes much earlier, but to develop a greater understanding of the drug ghb and its use as a weapon in sexual assault. it is also essential that the police build trust with all these communities and that includes the lgbt plus community. another commissioner and her team are committed to doing so at a time when the trust public have in them has been seriously shaken by recent events. it is of course right that the police handling of cases such as these are subject to independent scrutiny. her majesty's inspectorate of constabulary and fire and rescue services have been asked by the deputy mayor of london and the commission can —— to conduct and the commission can —— to conduct an investigation into the standards of the met police's investigations
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and the independent office for police conduct is assessing whether to reopen either in full or in part the investigation into the way the metropolitan police service and inquiries into the deaths of these young men. the police perform an enormous important function in our society, it is a job that on the whole day do with skill, courage and professionalism. only last thursday i attended a police bravery awards and heard stories of selfless heroism. but when things go wrong it is profoundly important lessons are and applied and we will continue to hold the national police service and the mayors office into account in making sure the failures highlighted by this truly awful, these truly awful cases, ouraddress. by this truly awful, these truly awful cases, our address. thank you, mr speaker- — awful cases, our address. thank you, mr speaker- i — awful cases, our address. thank you, mr speaker. i have _ awful cases, our address. thank you, mr speaker. i have to _ awful cases, our address. thank you, mr speaker. i have to say _ awful cases, our address. thank you, mr speaker. i have to say to - awful cases, our address. thank you, mr speaker. i have to say to the - mr speaker. i have to say to the minister that this happened in london but it might and could have happened anywhere in the country. and therefore it is a matter for him. the premature deaths of four young gay men who were robbed of their lives is an unspeakable
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tragedy, especially because six years after it happened, it is now finally being publicly conceded that the deaths of three of them, gabriel, danieland jack, could have been avoided if the police had properly investigated the killing of the first victim. the litany of police errors is simply horrific. from refusal to check the murderer�*s laptop because it was too expensive, failure to engage in appropriate behaviour for the partners and families, failure to check the authenticity of a fake suicide note, failure to check cctv, and the incomprehensible failure to link the deaths when three of the bodies were found in or close to st margaret's church art in my constituency. does the minister agree with the friends, partners and families that the
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metropolitan police are prejudiced, and institutionally homophobic? does he at the very least degree that given the facts of the cases, homophobia must have been a factor that influenced the actions and inactions of the police? in these circumstances, he please order a full public enquiry to examine whether there is institutional homophobia in the police service, and does he agree that such an enquiry is vital if the police are to gain the trust of the lgbtq+ community? does he further agree that the enquiry is also vital to ensure that such a tragedy never happens again? 17 police officers were investigated by the higher pc
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in 2015, none were sacked and five have since been promoted. is he —— which is the independent office of police conduct fit for purpose and what action has he taken to ensure that all police officers treat gay partners in the same way as they would any other partner, with appropriate respect and a proper duty of care? action by the home office, the metropolitan police and the mayor is essential if homophobia and our police service is to be properly and thoroughly investigated and addressed.— and addressed. well, mr speaker, i do aaree and addressed. well, mr speaker, i do agree with _ and addressed. well, mr speaker, i do agree with the _ and addressed. well, mr speaker, i do agree with the right _ and addressed. well, mr speaker, i do agree with the right honourable | do agree with the right honourable lady, this was an unspeakable tragedy, and one that has moved all of us by its dreadful miss. i can't imagine what those families have gone through, not least living through the deaths of their loved ones but also then the investigation and this dreadful but necessary
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process of an inquest of investigation thereafter. in my experience, while there are obviously shortcomings in this investigation, which they met off —— which the met police have admitted and have expressed as profound desire to improve, it's not my experience, i have to say, that the met police is institutionally homophobic. however, obviously, the commissionerand homophobic. however, obviously, the commissioner and the mayor obviously have commissioned baroness casey to look at the culture of the metropolitan police in order —— in all these aspects following the awful killing of sarah everard and i understand her work will include examining whether there are prejudices such as she outlines within the force. it is definitely the case and i think it's recognised both by city hall and by the metropolitan police leadership, that there is a job of work to be done to rebuild trust between that
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organisation and the people it serves in order to create —— in all its great tapestry in the capital which i had the honour to serve for eight years. as far as the independent office for police complaints is concerned, they are considering reopening info and a party and investigations they undertook earlier in the light of any new evidence that may be presented as part of the inquest. there have recently been reforms to the ilo pc, then a change in regulations just last year, to try and improve their performance. i do have confidence that they will try to get to the bottom of the often very difficult and complicated issues, but as i say until we see if they are going to reopen the investigation, i can't really comment on that any further. finally i would say that my reading of the apologies by the senior officers at the met are very heartfelt, and that they recognise there was a serious failure in this case. from helen
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ball, who i know well, an officer of great commitment, through to stewart cundy, who leads on homicide for the national police cuts across the country for the by now they are all committed to facing these failure and improving in the future. bill and improving in the future. fill right—thinking members of this house support our police and understand that they do a tremendous job often in very difficult circumstances, but cases like this leave us in the off opposition, because as there are some incredibly difficult questions to be answered. does he agree with me that the police up and down this country need to be held to the highest standards, whether it is on homophobia or any other issue we need to tackle, root out any prejudice and make sure that this sort of case can never be allowed to happen again? 1 sort of case can never be allowed to happen again?— happen again? i completely agree with the honourable _ happen again? i completely agree with the honourable gentleman, l happen again? i completely agree - with the honourable gentleman, while is possible for us to hold enquiries and make structural changes and
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urged organisations to examine their own internal cultures, in the end, this is a matter of leadership, and the signal that is sent by senior police officers about how the junior officers should comport themselves. the confidence that officers should have internally to core out behaviour, whether it is homophobia, racism, sexism, misogyny, whatever it might be full to the inquiries that are under way and the work the national police councils is doing as well well i think put us in a better place to face those unpleasant phenomena within the organisation but he is right to point out that every day up and down the land, thousands and thousands of police officers do remarkable things and we should neverforget officers do remarkable things and we should never forget that. officers do remarkable things and we should neverforget that. can officers do remarkable things and we should never forget that. 12.3111 should never forget that. can i welcome her _ should never forget that. can i welcome her back— should never forget that. can i welcome her back to _ should never forget that. can i welcome her back to the - should never forget that. can i welcome her back to the front| should never forget that. can 1 welcome her back to the front bench, the shadow home secretary. thank ou, it's the shadow home secretary. thank you. it's good _ the shadow home secretary. thank you. it's good to — the shadow home secretary. thank you, it's good to be _ the shadow home secretary. thank you, it's good to be back, - the shadow home secretary. thank you, it's good to be back, even - the shadow home secretary. thank you, it's good to be back, even on | you, it's good to be back, even on such a difficult issue. all our hearts will be with the family and
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friends of antony froggat, gebra, and jack. these are mages by a man who targeted young gay men, often close to his house and it is incomprehensible that the dots were not joined. incomprehensible that the dots were notjoined. the verdict that fundamental failings notjoined. the verdict that fundamentalfailings in notjoined. the verdict that fundamental failings in the notjoined. the verdict that fundamentalfailings in the police investigation probably contributed to three deaths is extremely serious. three young men who might otherwise have been alive today. the jurors heard damning evidence about lack of basic checks, lack of professional curiosity, serious workforce pressures, long delays on digitalforensics, serious failures and leadership and crucially, the victims�* families have raised very serious concerns about homophobia blighting both the investigation and the way they as partners and relatives treated, though the juries were directed not to consider this. rightly, the met have recognised failings and are making changes and we await the prevention of future
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death report but given the seriousness of this, does the minister not agree a further independent enquiry will be required to get to the truth of how and why it was possible for things to go so badly wrong, does he accept that the family need answers which they have not got right now on how homophobia, prejudice and unconscious bias affected this investigation? the home office response is too weak, given the seriousness of this. the policing minister and the home secretary have a responsibility to be relentless in pursuit of truth, ensuring the families get the answers that they need and deserve. the ilo pc will look at individual, the hmic thomas procedures, but none of them are addressing the full scale of what went wrong in this case, whether homophobia was involved, and what changes are needed, notjust in the met but the police forces right across the country. to make sure this can never
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happen again. can i please urge him to look at this again?— to look at this again? well, mr seaker, to look at this again? well, mr speaker. i _ to look at this again? well, mr speaker, i obviously _ to look at this again? well, mr speaker, i obviously do - to look at this again? well, mr i speaker, i obviously do recognise the deep concern about these investigations, not least as the right honourable lady pointed out, and i must welcome her to her place, she pointed out the seeming incompressible nature of the dots not being drawn together i have to say, this is often a problem, not just for the met but for other police forces, where seemingly obvious patterns of behaviour have failed to be linked together. we did see it earlier in the case ofjohn worboys, a serial rapist who is pattern of offending was never pieced together. i am reassured that they met have made significant changes structurally, aligning their homicide teams with their basic command units so that there can be better coordination and making sure
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there is better analysis of patterns of offending to see early on if there are links in the series of crimes. as far as independent enquiry is concerned, the deputy mayor has commissioned hmi to look at the investigative practices, the met have themselves commissioned ernest casey to look at the culture internally. the iopc are considering whether to investigate —— reopen this investigation. we will keep the situation under review but for the moment we would like to see how they conclude. can moment we would like to see how they conclude. . ~ , conclude. can i think my right honourable _ conclude. can i think my right honourable friend _ conclude. can i think my right honourable friend for - conclude. can i think my right honourable friend for his i conclude. can i think my right i honourable friend for his statement. everyone is rightly horrified at the deaths of these young men. reports of alleged institutional homophobia in the metropolitan police must be taken seriously. can my right honourable friend reassure the gay community of london that he will support every effort to root out
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homophobia?— support every effort to root out homophobia? support every effort to root out homohobia? ~ ~ ,,, ., ,, homophobia? well, mr speaker, i certainly can _ homophobia? well, mr speaker, i certainly can give _ homophobia? well, mr speaker, i certainly can give reassurance. i homophobia? well, mr speaker, i| certainly can give reassurance. we will stand foursquare with the commissioner herself, as she seeks to do exactly that. obviously, the met have still to do with this issue, i understand they have a new lgbtq+ group, they have volunteer advisors across the whole of the met, officers have been posted to a particular bar or particular area and are now being briefed much more trained and more coherently about the nature of the community they are dealing with, including obviously lgbtq+ members of that community. they are making big strides but nevertheless mother will be lessons to be learned particularly from these cases review and we look forward to seeing those conclusions. thank you, mr speaker. my constituent, anthony�*s mother, was
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on holiday in turkey when the met police contacted her to say that her son had been found dead. from that very second, mr speaker, sarah accused the met police prejudice. and throughout the entire proceedings, she has constantly made the point that there was discrimination. sadly, the coroner chose not to look at that. i make no criticism of the coroner. but when i spoke with sarah last night, she said to me, what can the home secretary do to persuade her that this can never, ever happen again? well, mr speaker, obviouslyl this can never, ever happen again? well, mr speaker, obviously i offer my profound condolences to sarah. as a father myself, i cannot ever imagine having to go through that
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kind of experience, it must have been terrible. i know in particular that there were failings in the positing of family liaison officers with some of the brief which i know is also being addressed by the met. those people who know baroness casey will now that she will be unrelenting and forensic in her examination of the culture of the metropolitan police. i have confidence in her to do a good job on examining the overall culture of the met, of which an examination of this issue would be part. once she has concluded, we can draw some lessons about the future.- has concluded, we can draw some lessons about the future. thank you, mr speaker- — lessons about the future. thank you, mr speaker. there _ lessons about the future. thank you, mr speaker. there is _ lessons about the future. thank you, mr speaker. there is always - lessons about the future. thank you, mr speaker. there is always a i lessons about the future. thank you, | mr speaker. there is always a danger that an entire institution will be damaged by the failures of a few. however, what action is going to be taken against those officers found guilty of such an abysmal failure of
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investigation? and if action isn�*t then doesn�*t that create the narrative that there is something wrong with the institution as a whole? ~ ~ ,,, ., ,, whole? well, mr speaker, the riuht... whole? well, mr speaker, the right- -- the — whole? well, mr speaker, the right... the honourable i whole? well, mr speaker, the i right... the honourable gentleman is so that the right, people need to have confidence notjust in the force as a whole but in the individual officers that make it up. he may know that originally 70 officers were investigated by the iopc. they concluded some time ago, however, it is my understanding they are considering whether to reopen the investigation in full or in part in the light of the evidence from the inquests. in the light of the evidence from the inquests-— in the light of the evidence from the inauests. . ~ ~ ., ,, the inquests. thank you, mr speaker. my consistency _ the inquests. thank you, mr speaker. my consistency in _ the inquests. thank you, mr speaker. my consistency in vauxhall_ the inquests. thank you, mr speaker. my consistency in vauxhall is - the inquests. thank you, mr speaker. my consistency in vauxhall is home i my consistency in vauxhall is home to one of the largest lgbt communities in the country and i share... studio: that was an urgent question in the house of commons from the labour mp margaret hodge following the conclusion of the inquest into the conclusion of the inquest into the victims of the serial killer stephen port. we heard their
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margaret hodge speak about the unspeakable tragedy now that fun the police have publicly conceded the deaths of three of those four men could have been avoided if the police had properly investigated the killing of the first man. during the inquests, we heard for the first time the metropolitan police�*s responses to the deaths, they were revealed and we have heard today in the house of commons a request for a full public enquiry to find out whether there is institutional homophobia within the police force. so we thought we would bring you that urgent question from the house of commons following the inquest into the deaths of those four men. also while we were listening to that we have had a tweet from england because �*5 chief medical officer, professor chris whitty, who has said that the nhs is once again facing a rising challenge, and he thanked
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health staff for all of their efforts. this is of course in response to the increased effort to get people boosted. professor whitty saying that nhs staff have worked with skill, integrity and determination through very difficult circumstances for a long time. adding that as millions come for boosters and pressures increase in the nhs, we are once again facing a rising challenge. a profound thank you for all you are doing. we also heard earlier on professorjonathan heard earlier on professor jonathan van heard earlier on professorjonathan van tam writing to every vaccination volunteer, encouraging them to go back to help with this large booster programme. the aim is to get everyone over the age of 18 and above to get their booster. so a lot going on in that space of time as we were listening to what was happening in the house of commons. now let�*s turn to the golden globes.
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the 2022 awards ceremony will not be broadcast on television after us network nbc dropped the show following backlash over the organisation�*s lack of diversity. let�*s talk to our entertainment correspondent colin paterson. we are hearing how people like tom cruise are giving back the trophies, bring us up to date with where we are? , , ., are? the big thing is that the nominations _ are? the big thing is that the nominations have _ are? the big thing is that the nominations have just - are? the big thing is that the nominations have just been l are? the big thing is that the - nominations have just been announced today. kenneth branagh�*s film belfast leading the way but what everyone is talking about is what you were mentioning there, this boycott of the awards. if we can go back to february this year, it emerged that of the 87 people who vote for the golden globes, the hollywood foreign press association, not one of them was black and not one black person had voted in the golden globes for almost two decades. the response was immediate, a boycott was called for the golden globes, 100 publicists said they
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would not let their clients to any interviews with members of the hollywood foreign press. then the big one, nbc, who have the rights to the event, you can remember wreckage of ice and tina fey hosting this awards show, they said they would not televise the awards in 2022. tom cruise added back the three awards he had one for the likes of magnolia, so today there was no interest to see what would happen with the nominations, with any stars —— and it would any stars want to be associated with an? will be start to hear stars saying, i don�*t want this nomination, but i have been given for this film? it is too early for that to happen yet. interestingly, there was one celebrity who turned up there was one celebrity who turned up at the nominations and read out first half of them, snoop dogg a dog, the hip—hop star and actor was there when his support. so many people might be surprised to see that. 50 people might be surprised to see that, ., ., ., people might be surprised to see that. ., ., ., ., that. so how have we got to the sta . e? that. so how have we got to the stage? when — that. so how have we got to the stage? when you _ that. so how have we got to the
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stage? when you read - that. so how have we got to the stage? when you read about i that. so how have we got to thej stage? when you read about we that. so how have we got to the i stage? when you read about we have comparisons, the golden globes were once the oscars�* favourite cousin and now they have gone on to be the industry�*s embarrassingly drunk uncle is one of the reviews i have read. people are really interested in how the golden globes have got to this stage because like you say, they were such a big deal. yes, especially _ they were such a big deal. yes, especially those _ they were such a big deal. yes, especially those five _ they were such a big deal. yes, especially those five times i they were such a big deal. 1a: especially those five times ricky gervais is hosted then, it really took the golden globes to this level. they were the most famous awards outside of the oscars and they were the first ones, there was managed to get the first week in —— my first weekend in january so they kick—started awards season. but it was these revelations during the year and although they came out and said they were going to bring in new members, people felt changes were not happening quick enough and in particular, would not happen in time to reflect changes in the 2022 awards and that�*s why people said they didn�*t want anything to do with them for one year. it�*s going to be
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fascinating to see what happens, what fallout there is. one significant change, because nbc are not showing the golden globes, the critics choice awards have decided to move to that weekend and become the awards show that kick—starts it all, that is now going to be shown on cbs, bigger network than it has previously been shown on in the united states. so there will be happening the same weekend as the golden globes. and stars who are nominated for both will have to decide which show they go to. and it�*s pretty obvious, they will follow the ones where the cameras which show their victory live on tv. so briefly, the nominations leading the way, kenneth branagh�*s belfast, it�*s a black—and—white film, predominantly, about the troubles in the 19605 but it�*s a real feel—good movie and merry way. it is equal with jane campion�*s western starring benedict cumberbatch, the power of
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the dog. the golden globes also does tv, the show leading the way is succession, which many people believe to be a fictionalised version of the murdoch family. succession leading the way in the tv categories. but it is the 9th of january when we�*ll see just how much this hollywood boycott of the golden globes comes into effect. istate this hollywood boycott of the golden globes comes into effect.— globes comes into effect. we will have to wait _ globes comes into effect. we will have to wait and _ globes comes into effect. we will have to wait and see. _ globes comes into effect. we will have to wait and see. thanks i globes comes into effect. we will have to wait and see. thanks so l globes comes into effect. we will i have to wait and see. thanks so much for bringing us all of that and as and when we get any more reaction we will go straight back to colin. now the weather with darren. hello there. the very windy weather that we had earlier this morning in the north—west of scotland has moved away. for many northern parts of the uk, we are seeing cooler aircoming in today. by contrast, we have still got this mild air from the tropics covering much of england and wales. in between those two different air masses, we have this zone of this thicker cloud. that has been producing outbreaks of rain. that rain still nudging into the far south of scotland.
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mainly affecting northern england and south wales. a bit damp in places but it is mild. north of that belt of rain, we are into that cooler air and showers this evening. the showers will fade away. this band of rain moves southwards over night. the rain becomes a light and patchy. we see clearer skies following for a while, that could lead to some fog in northern england. some more rain coming back into the north—west of scotland. for many parts of the uk, cooler than it was last night. we still have some mild air, with a cloudy damp weather across parts of southern england and wales. this weather system draped across northern parts of scotland. it will bring milder atlantic air and stronger winds to scotland and northern ireland. a lot of cloud, that rain. that rain mainly for the highlands and islands and western parts of mainland scotland. some sunshine around aberdeenshire. not much sunshine around for england, northern ireland and wales. mist and fog, especially in northern england, will be quite slow to clear. many places will have a dry day and still mild in the south. milder across scotland and northern ireland.
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where we see that fog, especially northern england, north midlands, north wales, it will be quite a bit cooler. as we move away into wednesday, that weather front still sitting across northern parts of the uk. more of a breeze though into wednesday. not as much mist and fog around. a lot of cloud for many parts of the country. this weather front not producing much rain. that should probably move away from northern ireland and move up to the central belt of scotland. we are all essentially in milder air on wednesday. those temperatures widely in double figures. that band is getting nudged away. it is getting nudged awake by an area of high pressure. that is going to build in by the latter part of the week and really settle things down. not really any rain to speak of longer term, but a lot of cloud under the hight pressure, but some mist and fog, particularly over the higher ground. there is a trend as we head into the weekend for temperatures to drop away by a few degrees.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the first death in the uk with the omicron variant of coronavirus is announced — as queues of people wait to get booster jabs in england. the best thing we can do is get our boosters, we are opening up centres across the country and we are getting the army to help with logistics and we are expanding in every possible way. home lateral flow test kits are currently unavailable on the uk government website — a day after the government changed its testing strategy. we�*ll be hearing from the health secretary sajid javid shortly — after the government set a new target to give boosters to all adults by the end of the month. rescue teams search for survivors after tornadoes in the united states that have killed almost 100 people. the governor of kentucky
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gave this update. we lost lives in at least eight counties and at least 18 counties suffered damage. a bbc investigation finds networks of breeders are offering to mutilate puppies, to follow a social media trend. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. borisjohnson says at least one person has died in the uk with the omicron variant of coronavirus — with the government warning the new variant is spreading at a rate �*not seen before�*. last night, the prime minister announced an expansion of the vaccination booster programme.
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england�*s deputy chief medical officer professorjonathan van tam is writing to every vaccination volunteer, encouraging them to come back and help with the booster programme. well, so far, 40% of people eligible for the vaccine in the uk have received their booster. like england, scotland is aiming to offer all adults a third vaccine by the end of december. while wales has set a target of the end of january. in northern ireland, people over 30 are currently being offered third doses. the spread of the omicron continues with nearly 1,600 people testing positive for the variant across the uk in the past 24 hours. meanwhile, the nhs website for booking a shot in england has been overwhelmed. and the government�*s online service for ordering rapid tests has been suspended because of high demand. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports on how the government now hopes to jab a million people a day. the race between the virus and the vaccine has intensified once again.
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and, at a vaccination clinic in central london this morning, some sobering news from the prime minister. sadly, at least one patient has now been confirmed to have died with omicron. so, i think the idea that this is somehow a milder version of the virus, i think that�*s something we need to set on one side. in stockport, greater manchester, this walk—in centre has seen steady business, particularly as concerns grow around the omicron variant. all the time, we feel like we are getting more people coming through. it does feel we have had queues around the building. so, there is a definite energy and demand. and that�*s people coming for their firstjabs, second jabs and their boosters. there is still lots we don�*t know about this new variant. but one thing is clear, and that�*s vaccines remain our best defence against developing serious illness. and that�*s why it is as important as ever to get jabs into as many arms as quickly as possible.
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now the booster programme has been expanded, offering jabs to all eligible over—18s by the end of the month, a significant challenge for an already hard—pressed health service. if that offer of a booster was translated into actually delivering the jab, it would mean giving 1 million doses a day, every day, until the end of the year. at the moment, about 500,000 are being given a day. so ramping up the programme will come at a cost, with other non—covid related health care being put off. reports are emerging of a shortage of lateral flow tests, with those trying to order them online being told no home testing kits are available. problems, too, with the website for booking boosters in england. high demand means the site is crashing, and people are advised to try again later or tomorrow. and in hospitals, where staff are already under pressure, there is real anxiety over what the next few weeks may bring, particularly for those patients that need high levels of care. it�*s awful, you feel like you�*re
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giving them a third world service. we have people who need an intensive care bed after their operation, which we can�*t do, because the beds are either full of covid patients or full of people we can�*t get a ward bed for, because there�*s no capacity in the hospital. long queues outside vaccination centres, booking websites crashing because of massive demand. these are all signs the message on the importance of boosters is getting through. now it�*s a question of getting those jabs into arms. dominic hughes, bbc news. we have the lead —we — we have the latest numbers. over 23.5 million doses of the boosters have been administered. these are the latest numberjust coming into
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us. over54,000 the latest numberjust coming into us. over 54,000 new cases. the uk health security agency has released the latest numbers of the omicron covid variant across the uk. nearly 1,600 new cases have been recorded in the past 24 hours — that�*s nearly double the 131 cases that were reported yesterday. the total number of confirmed covid—19 omicron cases in the uk is now 4,713. earlier we spoke to our medical editor fergus walsh, who gave us this update on the spread of the omicron variant. in london, it now makes up about 40% of all cases. the prime minister said it would probably make up the majority by tomorrow. by the end of the week, omicron should be the dominant source of all cases in the uk, completely taking overfrom delta. that�*s because it�*s spreading so fast. it�*s doubling every two or three days. that is faster than
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any previous variant. so, that means we could be heading for 100,000, maybe 200,000 cases a day by the end of the month, may be sooner. and if that keeps on doubling, at some point that curve will start to bend. we�*ve had one death confirmed. obviously, that is a tragedy for the family involved, but it tells us very little useful about the level of threat we face from omicron. but even if it is generally a milder illness than we get from delta, because so many people have got some level of immunity, if we get a massive spike in cases, it still will result, potentially, in a lot of people in hospital. but we won�*t have the full detail on that threat for a few weeks, which is why the booster programme is so important, because it will give protection against infection and should give very strong protection against severe illness. fergus walsh, there, our medical editor.
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let�*s talk to our correspondent andrew plant who�*s been with people queueing for up to three hours to get a vaccine in hungerford in berkshire. what have you been finding out from people who are getting involved in the booster programme? the people who are getting involved in the booster programme? the scenes we have seen at _ the booster programme? the scenes we have seen at this _ the booster programme? the scenes we have seen at this walk-in _ the booster programme? the scenes we have seen at this walk-in centre - the booster programme? the scenes we have seen at this walk-in centre in i have seen at this walk—in centre in hungerford are repeated pretty much everywhere across england, sparked by the demand from the speech yesterday to get as many boosters done as possible, up to i yesterday to get as many boosters done as possible, up toi million per day, if they want to get every aduu per day, if they want to get every adult offered their booster by the end of this year, and tonnes of people turning up today. it is a walk—in centre and an appointment centre but they cut off the walk in part by two o�*clock because there were too many people turning up and they are only open until seven o�*clock and they had to close that off so they could get everybody jabbed who was in the queue. people he had been waiting three hours and they are probably about another hour
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away, but i have to say everybody is determined to stay and get it done today as soon as possible. lots of other evidence of high demand and this morning as people tried to go on to the nhs website, to book their boosters, some of them are found there were huge virtual cues and one person said there were 15,000 people in the queue before them, and another person said 100,000 people, dumped themselves onto the website at one time and it could not cope. there are appointments available so the advice is to try again tonight or tomorrow morning. more appointments will become available. and everybody will be familiar with the lateral flow test, you can order these for free from the government website but some people this morning were told none were available, but in fact it was just the volume of people just trying to get the same thing at the same time and we are
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told there is plenty of supply, it was just a distribution told there is plenty of supply, it wasjust a distribution issue, the website was not able to distribute that many at any one time a switch out off the supply temporarily but the advice is to go back at a later date. in the meantime you can still get them in shops and pharmacies. in hungerford, still a couple of hundred people waiting for their jabs, it has snaked around the corner, and they are hoping to get them done before they finish at seven o�*clock but there will even be these drop—in centres open on christmas centre to meet the demand, although i�*m not sure what the demand will be on christmas day, and thatis demand will be on christmas day, and that is how far they are going to try and get everyone offered the booster by the start of the new year. not the single person here put off by the way, they were determined to wait and get their booster done as soon as possible. figs to wait and get their booster done as soon as possible.— as soon as possible. as always, thanks for— as soon as possible. as always, thanks forjoining _ as soon as possible. as always, thanks forjoining us. _ i�*ve been speaking to dipak patel, a pharmacist in sevenoaks. he will be working until ten o�*clock
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tonight. he says people have been queueing outside since first thing this morning for their boosterjab. we were here at seven o�*clock this morning and we have promised everyone as they are in the queue, there was a queue for about three hours waiting today, but we have enough vaccine and we will get there and finish at about seven o�*clock, ten o�*clock tonight, although we are supposed to close at four o�*clock. you�*re going to keep the doors open, then. is this the normal number of people who are booking or are you experiencing a huge upsurge in bookings for your particular pharmacy? we are the closest in sevenoaks to do the walk—ins, there are no other pharmacies or surgeries open for the walk—in, so we do have our own booking appointments, 120 per day, that is booked
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until the end ofjanuary, so this is just the walk—ins we are taking and so that is why we are talking about that, it has gone three times more than normal because of the news yesterday. what about when it comes to the lateral flow tests because we have seen the government website say that home tests are not let�*s go the house of commons where the health secretary sajid javid is making a statementon the rollout of the covid booster programme. we have been locked in a race between the virus and the vaccine and the success of our national vaccination programme has moved us ahead in that race but now with the new omicron variant we have to work even harder to stay ahead. since last week we learnt a couple of things about this variant, the first is that no variant of covid—19 has spread this fast, there are now 4713 confirmed cases of omicron in the uk. uk security agency estimates
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that the current number of daily infections is around 200,000. while omicron represents over 20% of cases in england, we have already seen it rise to over 44% in london. we expect it to become the dominant covid—19 variant in the capital in the next 48 and was. there are currently ten can permit people in england who have been hospitalised with it. — confirmed people. it is vital that hospitalisations and deaths like infections by around two weeks so we can expect those numbers to increase in the days and weeks that lie ahead. in preparation uk�*s four chief medical officers raise the covid alert level 24, the second—highest level, this was over the weekend — to four. nhs england have returned their highest level of
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emergency preparedness, level four, national incident, which means the nhs response to omicron will be coordinated as a national effort rather than led by individual trusts. the second thing we have learned in the past week is that two jabs are not enough to prevent symptomatic infection from omicron, but a third dose, a booster dose, provides strong protection. with analysis by the uk health security agency showing a third dose is 70% effective at preventing symptomatic infection and we expect the booster to take effect more quickly than the second dose. we are already running the most successful booster campaign in europe, and overfour in ten uk adults have now received a third dose or booster, and saturday was a record, with over half a million a booster across the uk. but with the
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race between the virus in the vaccine so close, we must move faster. two weeks ago we announced that we would offer every eligible aduu that we would offer every eligible adult a booster by the end of january. but in response to the omicron emergency and as the prime minister announced yesterday evening, we are bringing that target forward by a month and launching the omicron emergency booster. we have opened the booster programme to every adult who has had a second dose of the vaccine at least three months ago, to offer them the chance of getting their booster before the new year. from this morning, anyone over 18 can walk into a vaccination centre and from one they can book online via the nhs website — from wednesday. uk government will provide whatever support is needed to accelerate vaccinations in scotland, wales and northern ireland. we have the jabs, the challenge now is to get them into
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arms, and to meet our ambitious target the nhs will need to deliver a record number ofjabs and until now the highest number ofjabs we have delivered in a single day in the uk was over 840,000. we will not only need to match that but beat that every day. but we can and we have got a plan to try and do it. we are opening more vaccination sites including pop—up and mobile sites that will be working seven days a week and we are training thousands more volunteer vaccinators and asking gps and pharmacies to do more, and we are drafting in 42 military planning teams across every region of the country. this collective national mission will only succeed if we all play our part. those who haven�*t had their booster should find their local walking and vaccination centre or they can book an appointment on the
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nhs website on wednesday. those who have had their boosterjab should encourage their friends and family to do the same. those who have or recently had covid should weigh 28 days from their positive result to get their booster. — weight. and to those who have not had their vaccine at all, yet, i would like to say this, whatever has held you back in the past, please think again and book yourjab as quickly as possible. but acting together to get boosted now, we can protect ourselves against omicron this winter. i acknowledge there are some difficult trade—offs with the national mission and we are redeploying nhs staff away from nonurgent services, and this means that for the next two weeks all primary care services will focus on urging clinical needs and vaccines
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and some urgent appointments and elective surgeries may be postponed until the new year. while we prioritise getting people the booster. these are steps that no health secretary would wish to take unless they were absolutely necessary. but i�*m convinced that if we don�*t prioritise the booster now, the health consequences will be far more grave in a — the months that lie ahead. the omicron emergency boost is a major step but i�*m not going to pretend that this alone will be enough to see us through the difficult weeks ahead. because of the threat of omicron, we are moving to plan b in england are subject to the will of this house. meaning that we must use face coverings in indoor public places, people should work from home if they can, and from wednesday again, subject to this house, you will need to show a negative lateral flow test to get
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into nightclubs and large events with an exemption for the double vaccinated. whilst all adults have had a reasonable chance to get their boosterjab, we intend to change this exemption to require a booster dose, and even with plan b we still have far fewer restrictions in place than europe. i can also confirm that from tomorrow fully vaccinated contacts of a covid—19 case will now be able to take a daily lateral flow test instead of self isolating. this is a vital way to minimise the disruption to people�*s daily lives and to avoid the so—called pingdemic and to avoid the so—called pingdemic and i can assure the house we have sufficient lateral flow test to see us through the coming weeks and if anybody finds they are unable to get anybody finds they are unable to get a kit online that they should check the website the following day or pop down to their local pharmacy and pick up a kit. and from today i can
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confirm that the nhs covid pass is being rolled out to 12 and 15—year—olds for international travel. allowing even more people to be able to prove their vaccine status for travel where it is needed. from today. mr speaker, taken together, these are proportionate steps to keep the country moving, whilst slowing the spread of omicron and buying more time to get more boosters into arms. we are also taking steps to keep people safe in adult social care, and we know that sadly people in care homes are those who received — and those who receive domiciliary care are more likely to receive health consequences if they get covid—19, so we are expanding our specialist vaccination teams to get more boosters to the vulnerable and those providing care, but even as we
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do so, we must go further to protect colleagues and residents from omicron. so we are increasing the frequency of staff testing, and with a heavy heart, we must restrict every resident to just three nominated visitors not including the essential caregiver. this is a difficult step and i understand it comes with an impact, physical and mental well—being, comes with an impact, physical and mentalwell—being, but comes with an impact, physical and mental well—being, but we know that from previous waves, it is one of the most effective things we can do to protect vulnerable residents. we are also increasing our workforce recruitment and retention fund with £300 million of new money, in addition to the £162.5 million we announced in october. the money will help pay bonuses and bring forward pay rises for care staff and fund over time and increased workforce
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numbers over the winter. i know that members had hoped that the days of this kind of covid—19 update were behind us, after our successful reopening in the summer it is not an update i wanted to deliver but the renewed threat of omicron means that we have got more work to do to stay ahead of this virus. we can if we all play our part, and boosters are the key. we have achieved so many phenomenal things over the last two years and i know we are wary but it is on everyone to pick up and step up is on everyone to pick up and step up and do some phenomenal work once again to play our part and to get boosted now, and i commend this statement to the house. flan boosted now, and i commend this statement to the house. 12.3111 statement to the house. can i sun est statement to the house. can i suggest we — statement to the house. can i suggest we could _ statement to the house. can i suggest we could be - statement to the house. can i suggest we could be a - statement to the house. can i suggest we could be a pop-up statement to the house. can i suggest we could be a pop—up site for all— suggest we could be a pop—up site for all the — suggest we could be a pop—up site for all the staff— suggest we could be a pop—up site for all the staff that _ suggest we could be a pop—up site for all the staff that work - suggest we could be a pop—up site for all the staff that work here i suggest we could be a pop—up site for all the staff that work here to i for all the staff that work here to -et for all the staff that work here to get them — for all the staff that work here to get them boosted? _ for all the staff that work here to get them boosted? we - for all the staff that work here to get them boosted? we now- for all the staff that work here toi get them boosted? we now come for all the staff that work here to i get them boosted? we now come to for all the staff that work here to - get them boosted? we now come to the shadow— get them boosted? we now come to the shadow health— get them boosted? we now come to the shadow health secretary. _ get them boosted? we now come to the shadow health secretary. can _ get them boosted? we now come to the shadow health secretary. can i- get them boosted? we now come to the shadow health secretary.— shadow health secretary. can i thank him for advance _ shadow health secretary. can i thank him for advance sight _ shadow health secretary. can i thank him for advance sight of _ shadow health secretary. can i thank him for advance sight of his - him for advance sight of his statement. today we learned of the
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first death _ statement. today we learned of the first death in the uk as a result of the omicron virus and so on behalf of the _ the omicron virus and so on behalf of the house cannot send our condolences to the friends and family— condolences to the friends and family of— condolences to the friends and family of that person who has lost her life _ family of that person who has lost her life - — family of that person who has lost her life — can i send our condolences. it is a stark reminder that the _ condolences. it is a stark reminder that the pandemic is not over and that the pandemic is not over and that the _ that the pandemic is not over and that the new variant is a clear and serious _ that the new variant is a clear and serious risk— that the new variant is a clear and serious risk to our public health and of— serious risk to our public health and of the — serious risk to our public health and of the urgency of getting britain — and of the urgency of getting britain boosted and protecting us against _ britain boosted and protecting us against this threat. the labour party— against this threat. the labour party will— against this threat. the labour party will always act in the best interests — party will always act in the best interests of the nhs and of our public— interests of the nhs and of our public health and of our nation, and having _ public health and of our nation, and having repeatedly called for the booster— having repeatedly called for the booster programme to be ramped up we will give _ booster programme to be ramped up we will give our— booster programme to be ramped up we will give our full support this effort — will give our full support this effort. and we on these benches will make _ effort. and we on these benches will make every— effort. and we on these benches will make every effort to get the message out that— make every effort to get the message out that vaccines are the best tool we have _ out that vaccines are the best tool we have at— out that vaccines are the best tool we have at our disposal to protect ourselves — we have at our disposal to protect ourselves and protect those closest to us _ ourselves and protect those closest to us and _ ourselves and protect those closest to us and to protect our nhs. the target _
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to us and to protect our nhs. the target of— to us and to protect our nhs. the target of getting 1 million people per day— target of getting 1 million people per day their booster vaccine is unprecedented and it may even prove impossible, _ unprecedented and it may even prove impossible, but we applaud the ambition — impossible, but we applaud the ambition. if anyone can do it, the nhs can, — ambition. if anyone can do it, the nhs can, at— ambition. if anyone can do it, the nhs can, at the whole country will be willing — nhs can, at the whole country will be willing them on and we won't knock— be willing them on and we won't knock them for trying. what people will not _ knock them for trying. what people will not accept is the government moving _ will not accept is the government moving the goalposts, the prime minister— moving the goalposts, the prime minister is now famous for overpromising and under delivering. in overpromising and under delivering. in his _ overpromising and under delivering. in his televised address last night he said _ in his televised address last night he said and i quote, people will have _ he said and i quote, people will have the — he said and i quote, people will have the chance to get the booster before _ have the chance to get the booster before the — have the chance to get the booster before the new year. but that aim these _ before the new year. but that aim these instead is to offer the booster— these instead is to offer the booster by every — to every adult by the end _ booster by every — to every adult by the end of— booster by every — to every adult by the end of the month which means the delivery— the end of the month which means the delivery will _ the end of the month which means the delivery will wait untiljanuary the end of the month which means the delivery will wait until january and february. — delivery will wait until january and february, so are they rowing back on the target, _ february, so are they rowing back on the target, why has it changed overnight, and what hope do we have of achieving _ overnight, and what hope do we have of achieving the level of booster 'abs of achieving the level of booster jabs we — of achieving the level of booster jabs we need if the public and those delivering _ jabs we need if the public and those delivering the vaccines are told one thing _ delivering the vaccines are told one thing one _ delivering the vaccines are told one thing one day and another at the next? _
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thing one day and another at the next? the — thing one day and another at the next? the prime minister has got to learn _ next? the prime minister has got to learn to— next? the prime minister has got to learn to be — next? the prime minister has got to learn to be straight with people because — learn to be straight with people because he has undermined public trust and — because he has undermined public trust and confidence in the government and public health measures at a critical time. can i also _ measures at a critical time. can i also ask— measures at a critical time. can i also ask what discussions the secretary— also ask what discussions the secretary of state has had with locat— secretary of state has had with local authorities, secretary of state has had with localauthorities, gps, pharmacies, local authorities, gps, pharmacies, and localauthorities, gps, pharmacies, and other— localauthorities, gps, pharmacies, and other delivery partners who will be crucial _ and other delivery partners who will be crucial to the effort. then there is the _ be crucial to the effort. then there is the shambles of testing and i must _ is the shambles of testing and i must say— is the shambles of testing and i must say i _ is the shambles of testing and i must say i thought the secretary of state _ must say i thought the secretary of state might be living in a different planet _ state might be living in a different planet when he described the availability of testing because the government website today states that home testing kits are currently unavailable and pharmacies across the are _ unavailable and pharmacies across the are out— unavailable and pharmacies across the are out of stock and even in partiament— the are out of stock and even in parliament there are no home testing kits available from portcullis house, _ kits available from portcullis house, and no doubt this is because of a surge _ house, and no doubt this is because of a surge in — house, and no doubt this is because of a surge in demand ahead of the new testing requirements this week but surely— new testing requirements this week but surely that should have been foreseen — but surely that should have been foreseen. this is a serious problem, those _ foreseen. this is a serious problem, those coming into contact with positive — those coming into contact with positive omicron cases will not be able to— positive omicron cases will not be able to follow the rules and get themselves tested on a daily basis
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and those — themselves tested on a daily basis and those who require tests to undertake home visits risk being left short— undertake home visits risk being left short and many others need them for work. _ left short and many others need them for work. so _ left short and many others need them for work, so how does the secretary of state _ for work, so how does the secretary of state plan to make sure there are enough _ of state plan to make sure there are enough tests in stock and available to everyone who needs them when they need them _ to everyone who needs them when they need them and when will this be resolved? — need them and when will this be resolved? it doesn't appear that he was even _ resolved? it doesn't appear that he was even aware of the problem. absent— was even aware of the problem. absent from the address yesterday from the _ absent from the address yesterday from the prime minister was a plan to speed _ from the prime minister was a plan to speed up the vaccine rolled out for 1245— to speed up the vaccine rolled out for 12—15 —year—olds and on current trends _ for 12—15 —year—olds and on current trends and — for 12—15 —year—olds and on current trends and some teenagers won't receive _ trends and some teenagers won't receive a — trends and some teenagers won't receive a vaccine until fabric five months — receive a vaccine until fabric five months after the initial target of the october half term — until february _ the october half term — until february. we'll be secretary of state _ february. we'll be secretary of state update the house on the vaccine — state update the house on the vaccine roll—out for 12—15 —year—olds and will they receive their— —year—olds and will they receive their vaccines by the end of the christmas — their vaccines by the end of the christmas holidays as we have called for? patients will be concerned by the news — for? patients will be concerned by the news that appointments will be delayed _ the news that appointments will be delayed to accommodate the booster roll-out _ delayed to accommodate the booster roll—out. there is no doubt that the booster— roll—out. there is no doubt that the booster programme is the right
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priority— booster programme is the right priority and if we don't get ahead of omicron — priority and if we don't get ahead of omicron the pressure on the nhs will be _ of omicron the pressure on the nhs will be unbearable and the disruption to people's appointments in the _ disruption to people's appointments in the new year will be severe but let's be _ in the new year will be severe but let's be honest, the challenge is made _ let's be honest, the challenge is made so — let's be honest, the challenge is made so much greater as a direct result— made so much greater as a direct result of— made so much greater as a direct result of the government's mismanagement of the nhs for 11 years _ mismanagement of the nhs for 11 years we — mismanagement of the nhs for 11 years. we went into the pandemic with record — years. we went into the pandemic with record waiting lists, 6—figure staff shortages, so where is the nhs workforce _ staff shortages, so where is the nhs workforce plan, where is the plan for recovery of elective care and why can — for recovery of elective care and why can this government not understand that their continued failure — understand that their continued failure to— understand that their continued failure to fix social care is piling even _ failure to fix social care is piling even more _ failure to fix social care is piling even more pressure on the nhs at the worst— even more pressure on the nhs at the worst possible time? on social care visits, _ worst possible time? on social care visits, can _ worst possible time? on social care visits, can t — worst possible time? on social care visits, can i ask the secretary of state _ visits, can i ask the secretary of state to— visits, can i ask the secretary of state to think again about limits on care home — state to think again about limits on care home visits because this feels like the _ care home visits because this feels like the wrong decision at the wrong time _ like the wrong decision at the wrong time i_ like the wrong decision at the wrong time. i would like to conclude with some _ time. i would like to conclude with some words directed to the public, we realise — some words directed to the public, we realise on these benches that the
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prime _ we realise on these benches that the prime minister has tested patients by asking — prime minister has tested patients by asking people to follow the rules when _ by asking people to follow the rules when numberten didn't by asking people to follow the rules when number ten didn't and the actions _ when number ten didn't and the actions of— when number ten didn't and the actions of the prime minister have undermined trust at a critical moment— undermined trust at a critical moment so i say to people feeling let down— moment so i say to people feeling let down or lied to that i do trust the letdown or lied to that i do trust the chief— let down or lied to that i do trust the chief medical officer and i do trust _ the chief medical officer and i do trust the — the chief medical officer and i do trust the chief scientific adviser and i_ trust the chief scientific adviser and i do — trust the chief scientific adviser and i do trust the nhs. the prime minister— and i do trust the nhs. the prime minister might not lead by example but the _ minister might not lead by example but the rest of us can and we the labour— but the rest of us can and we the labour party trust you with the british— labour party trust you with the british people to do the right thing. — british people to do the right thing. to— british people to do the right thing, to protect yourselves and protect— thing, to protect yourselves and protect the ones you love and to protect — protect the ones you love and to protect the ones you love and to protect the nhs. can protect the ones you love and to protect the nhs.— protect the ones you love and to protect the nhs. can i say i heard our protect the nhs. can i say i heard your request _ protect the nhs. can i say i heard your request at — protect the nhs. can i say i heard your request at the _ protect the nhs. can i say i heard your request at the start - protect the nhs. can i say i heard your request at the start and i protect the nhs. can i say i heard your request at the start and if. protect the nhs. can i say i heard your request at the start and if it | your request at the start and if it is ok with you, mr speaker, i can take that up with you directly, and can i thank the honourable gentleman for his support of the need to accelerate the booster programme. can i alsojoin him as the house does to express condolences for the
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individual who has been the first in this country to die with this new variant, omicron. turning to his questions, he has asked about the testing capacity, and i would like to share more information would be house, there is no shortage of actual tests that are held, there are tens of millions of tests in stock and billions arriving each week, but the issue, the limiting factor because of the increase in demand — millions arriving each week. it is the ability to deliver the tests, having enough capability to deliver the tests because the current arrangements with royal mail are not enough and they are new arrangements which have been arranged with amazon and other delivery methods, and what that means, there will still be many
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hundreds of thousands of deliveries every day but the access points are increased including many more from pharmacies and we are looking at other access points and i think he�*s right to raise this but i hope he other members understand there has been a huge surge and it is notjust about the number tests available but about the number tests available but about getting them through and delivered both equally important. the other issue he raised was about the booster programme itself and the timing of that programme, and he is right that a couple of weeks ago the plan was to get everybody a booster, this was after the changing advice from the jcvi, this was after the changing advice from thejcvi, that it should now include everyone over the age of 18, and the plan was to do that by the end ofjanuary, for the reasons that i have explained and the prime minister shared yesterday, we want to bring that forward, and what this
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is, it is working hard with the nhs, the nhs has done a phenomenal work, by the way, to reach four in ten adults with boosters and vaccination programme in general, it is asking a huge amount of our colleagues in the nhs. but again, i hope the honourable gentleman can respect that the nhs is doing everything it can, with the full support of every government department, to throw everything at this, to offer as many opportunities and maximum possible capacity that there is for delivering on that
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commitment. the honourable gentleman was asked about the nhs in terms of the challenges it is facing. i would like to remind him and the house that this year, the government has put in an extra £34 billion into the nhs and social care, £5.4 billion of that in the second half of this year, and over the next three years, there is a commitment to at least £8 billion extra into the largest catch—up fund the nhs has ever seen. in the last year we have seen almost 10,000 nursesjoin in the nhs, almost 3000 doctors, it is increasing workforce and capacity, looking at new ways to do electives and putting a huge amount of effort into its electives programme and its long covid work. lastly an adult social care and the limit to visitors, i understand what the honourable gentleman has set and it is important to get the balance right. we all know the problems and
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the sad deaths we saw in care homes with this pandemic not that long ago and it is right to take a balanced measures to protect people in care homes, we are working and listening with those people that run our care homes to try to take a balanced approach that allows visits to take place but it also protects those individuals that are there. thank ou, mr individuals that are there. thank you, mr speaker. _ individuals that are there. thank you, mr speaker. one _ individuals that are there. thank you, mr speaker. one year i individuals that are there. thank you, mr speaker. one year and l individuals that are there. thank. you, mr speaker. one year and five days ago, the uk administered the first properly approved covid vaccine in the world. the government is absolutely right to focus on immunisation. but israel approved booster jabs immunisation. but israel approved boosterjabs for all immunisation. but israel approved booster jabs for all adults immunisation. but israel approved boosterjabs for all adults in booster jabs for all adults in september, boosterjabs for all adults in september, france approved jabs for teenagers injune, both long before us. the united states has already approved jabs for five—year—olds, again long before us. is he worried that our regulators, having been the noblest in the world, are now taking too long, they are brilliant
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scientists, they are rightly totally independent, but what can he do to speed up this crucial decision making in a pandemic? mr speed up this crucial decision making in a pandemic? speed up this crucial decision makin: ina andemic? ~ .,~ , making in a pandemic? mr speaker, my riaht making in a pandemic? mr speaker, my right honourable _ making in a pandemic? mr speaker, my right honourable friend _ making in a pandemic? mr speaker, my right honourable friend makes - making in a pandemic? mr speaker, my right honourable friend makes a - making in a pandemic? mr speaker, my right honourable friend makes a very i right honourable friend makes a very important point. and i think it is fair to say we can be proud of so much about our regulators have achieved and what they�*ve done, and as he has said himself, we were the first in the world to approve a covid—19 vaccine, but he�*s also right to challenge on this and ask what more can be done, especially in light of the circumstances we face. i hope he can also commend how the jcvi since the emergence of omicron, and i know this is an important part of the approvals process, about how quickly they reacted in changing the rules around boosters as soon as we learned about omicron.— rules around boosters as soon as we learned about omicron. thank you, mr seaker.
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learned about omicron. thank you, mr speaker. scotland _ learned about omicron. thank you, mr speaker. scotland has— learned about omicron. thank you, mr speaker. scotland has the _ learned about omicron. thank you, mr speaker. scotland has the most i speaker. scotland has the most vaccinated people in the uk and i would encourage everyone to continue to take up the booster. does the secretary show my rage that his backbenchers were literally during the conversation that he needs to make more for moore�*s people as we come from —— pobble —— it�*s wrong message. tragically we know people are now being hospitalised, we have already recorded sadly one death from omicron. based on evidence elsewhere, what kind of upward trajectory does the secretary of state think will be in terms of hospitalisations? and why have plan b measures brought forward, where there a public exemption? what risk amplifications has it assessed in terms of using lf teas to keep
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people from self—isolating? surely he needs to consider the minimum being a pcr test and follow the more cautious approach being adopted by the scottish government. and why is the scottish government. and why is the guidance about putting themselves in this ridiculous position of the sign —— website saying they have run out of kits? if we are talking about supporting people to self—isolate, we need to revisit and extend the levels of statutory sick pay. what discussions has he had about this, and critically, does he support calls from the devolved nations that they need extra support to put in place what restrictions they believe are required to control the spread and impact of omicron to support livelihood is at the same time? the scottish comment has already put in place rates relief for hospitality industry, but with trade dropping, suppliers and the trade itself need further support, especially if further support, especially if further restrictions are required. i will take this up with the
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chancellor and as the cabinet consider report for the travel industry because my agree that targeted sector restrictions with full financial support is a better long—term strategy rather than the all or nothing type approach we seem to be using and bring the booster programme alone will be sufficient? it's programme alone will be sufficient? it�*s going to need a lot more work than just that alone. the it's going to need a lot more work than just that alone. the honourable aentleman than just that alone. the honourable gentleman is — than just that alone. the honourable gentleman is right _ than just that alone. the honourable gentleman is right to _ than just that alone. the honourable gentleman is right to point - than just that alone. the honourable gentleman is right to point to i than just that alone. the honourable gentleman is right to point to the i gentleman is right to point to the lag between the point of infection and hospitalisations, and that emphasises the need to act interact strongly and that�*s why the booster programme is so important, in scotland and england and throughout the uk, it is good that all nations are working closely together on that. in the lateral flow tests, as a way, an alternative to self—isolation, think lateral flow tests are the right approach, they can be taken daily so the individual is tested each day for seven days for a pcr is a single test at a
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single moment and i think it�*s much more flexible and it�*s something that�*s based on advice to ministers have received, and his questions around economic support, that is something we keep under review. thank you, mr speaker. i do congratulate the government on the roll—out of the vaccination programme, it is impressive start but what does my right honourable friend saying to my constituent who says she is now less afraid of covid that she is of intrusive and incoherent government regulations? 1 would say to my right honourable friend that i hope her constituent would appreciate that the government has to act on the information that it receives before in terms of the spread of this new version, the rate of spread, the information we now know about this degree of vaccine escape, notjust to protect her constituent but also to protect her
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constituent�*s loved ones and community. constituent's loved ones and community-— constituent's loved ones and communi . ., ~ community. thank you, mr speaker. i was deel community. thank you, mr speaker. i was deeply shocked _ community. thank you, mr speaker. i was deeply shocked when _ community. thank you, mr speaker. i was deeply shocked when he - community. thank you, mr speaker. i was deeply shocked when he was i community. thank you, mr speaker. i was deeply shocked when he was in i was deeply shocked when he was in this house recently and when i said all sensible members of parliament will be supporting any measures to save lives, and i heard booing and catcalls from the government benches. can i repeat my view, does he realise what a great potential we as members of parliament, in our communities, working for this, rolling our sleeves up, working cross—party with local councillors and local volunteers, this is a real resource, this house of commons, please, please, will he use this effectively? mr please, please, will he use this effectively?— please, please, will he use this effectively? please, please, will he use this effectivel? ~ , , , effectively? mr deputy speaker, can i think the honourable _ effectively? mr deputy speaker, can i think the honourable gentleman i effectively? mr deputy speaker, can| i think the honourable gentleman for his call for all members to do their bit to help the nation at this time of crisis. it�*s notjust what we can all do in this house but i�*m sure he
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will agree it is what we can do in our local communities.— will agree it is what we can do in our local communities. thank you, mr deu our local communities. thank you, mr deputy speaker- _ our local communities. thank you, mr deputy speaker- my _ our local communities. thank you, mr deputy speaker. my right _ our local communities. thank you, mr deputy speaker. my right honourable | deputy speaker. my right honourable friend rightly talks about protecting the nhs, but can i ask him if he can ensure we protect our children as well? and make sure that the schools are kept open injanuary and that the government sets out a plan keeping the schools open in january. given that the sunday times suggested that primary school children were going to be vaccinated, will he come in and make a statement, or the secretary of state for education make a statement about this vaccination programme for younger children and ensure that there is 100% parental consent? first of all, can i agree with my right honourable friend on the importance of protecting our children. we all know in this house
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how children have suffered throughout this pandemic, the impact there has been on their education, their mental health, their socialisation, and many others and he�*s right to talk about that, and one of the reasons to take the measures that we take, especially around the expanding of the booster programme is to make sure we can prioritise our children. on the issue of vaccination for younger children, forfive to 11, that is something that the jcvi is something that thejcvi is considering. when something that the jcvi is considering. when the something that thejcvi is considering. when the government does hear back from them on that, thatis does hear back from them on that, that is something of course the government will bring to the house. thank you, mr speaker. can i welcome the secretary of state�*s statement, and having listened to it and studied it in some detail over the weekend, i will be supporting the
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government�*s measures stop but what would the secretary of state have to say to those out there in the community who are saying if the government, the rule makers cannot be trusted to obey their own rules, why should we?— why should we? first of all, can i think the honourable _ why should we? first of all, can i think the honourable gentleman | why should we? first of all, can i i think the honourable gentleman for his support. and i think it�*s always important to emphasise that these rules, whether the ones we are discussing now rules of any type, obviously he is talking about rules around the pandemic, they are there for all of us and the equally apply to all of us. for all of us and the equally apply to all of us— to all of us. thank you. gps particularly _ to all of us. thank you. gps particularly those _ to all of us. thank you. gps particularly those in - to all of us. thank you. gps particularly those in rural. to all of us. thank you. gps i particularly those in rural areas are finding it difficult and challenging to be able to deliver the booster programme or have to deliver in great numbers. with the secretary of state look at measures which will speed through the flow for those gps and will he also sent a message out to all patients that
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they will need to be understanding over the next couple of weeks and ensure that the morale of our gps, who worked so hard, is not undermined?— who worked so hard, is not undermined? first of all, my honourable _ undermined? first of all, my honourable friend _ undermined? first of all, my honourable friend is - undermined? first of all, my honourable friend is right i undermined? first of all, my honourable friend is right to | undermined? first of all, my i honourable friend is right to talk about how hard gps have been working throughout this pandemic. but also about the need to provide greater support, we expect and would need them to help with this big vaccination effort. and i do think there are already signs of many people showing how they understand the need for gps to re—prioritise over the next couple of weeks, is —— weeks, and that�*s important too. it's weeks, and that�*s important too. it�*s clear from the secretary of state�*s statement there is a considerable improvement on his previous —— by his predecessor. i�*m sure he except that covid is now endemic in variance will probably return in four years if not decades. in that case, surely by now instead of the erratic response we�*ve seen, we should have a well—prepared plan
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of action and chain of command ready to be activated as soon as a new variant is detected. as well as enough supplies and train personnel to operate. so why does his department seem to be continually surprised by the arrival of variance and instead of a smooth running plan, we have chaos and panic? well. plan, we have chaos and panic? well, mr speaker. — plan, we have chaos and panic? well, mr speaker, there _ plan, we have chaos and panic? well, mr speaker, there are _ plan, we have chaos and panic? 711 mr speaker, there are going to be variants of covid—19, as he says, for many years and indeed there have been many hundreds of variance. there is no country in the world thatis there is no country in the world that is better at surveillance of those variance. may i remind him that it was the uk that alerted the world to the threat of omicron. there is no country that is better prepared. if you look at how quickly and swiftly the uk reacted, for example, with the international restrictions, the information we shared with the world on vaccines. so i think the honourable gentleman
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understands those points. i regret the way he has framed his question. thank you very much. i thank my honourable friend for his dinner. many of my constituents will be surprised to hear that anyone can walk into a vaccination centre, i wonder if he can give me an update about. could ask about the nhs covid pass being rolled out to 12 to 15—year—olds, such a welcome announcement is something of a product —— my promised would be brought back. how exactly will that work? many of my constituents will be travelling within the next few days, certainly over christmas, how will they be able to access this pass, given they cannot access the nhs app the same way as adults can? i thank my honourable friend for what he said. he is, the covered
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passis what he said. he is, the covered pass is a very important issue, we will be publishing exactly how they would work. but it�*s been rolled out as a digital pass in the same way it is working for adults starting today. is working for adults starting toda . . ~ is working for adults starting toda . ., ,, i. is working for adults starting toda . . ~' ,, , is working for adults starting toda. ., , . today. thank you very much indeed, mr deu today. thank you very much indeed, mr deputy speaker. _ today. thank you very much indeed, mr deputy speaker. the _ today. thank you very much indeed, mr deputy speaker. the prime i mr deputy speaker. the prime minister addressed this but what he has done is addressed to the nhs in the same way ford when i spoke at four o�*clock to derbyshire, they were unaware, they had no system letter from the department of health and prioritisation of vaccines, there were unaware about whether the quality outcomes framework payments were suspended, they were unaware about the winter access fund obligations that they had have now been suspended. so can the secretary of state make sure all of our health providers are informed about these crucial matters that actually give reality in terms of their delivery of these really important messages that he�*s got in terms of the
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funding and the priorities there are for the national health service? yes, mr deputy speaker, the honourable gentleman will appreciate its very fast—moving situation. the nhs made the final decision to go on the expansion of the booster programme that are referred to earlier yesterday. and the system letter has gone out today. mr deputy seaker, letter has gone out today. mr deputy speaker. can — letter has gone out today. mr deputy speaker. can i— letter has gone out today. mr deputy speaker. can i say — letter has gone out today. mr deputy speaker, can i say to _ letter has gone out today. mr deputy speaker, can i say to my _ letter has gone out today. mr deputy speaker, can i say to my right - letter has gone out today. mr deputy speaker, can i say to my right on i speaker, can i say to my right on the front that it�*s welcome he comes here today, but i�*m concerned about the mixed and heavy messaging coming from the government. the unintended consequences of that can be dire. i notice as the chairman of the education select committee said, there has been a report about the huge damage to young children particularly in the poorer communities and schools start locking down and shutting them out, can he ensure that the message is clear to them that they are not locked down? when i spoke this morning to gps in my constituency, i asked them, what is the one thing
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you would like the secretary of state to now to get all these people through? they said, do we really need to have the 15 minute wait? if we can end that we could triple our way through this and you would get it straightaway.— it straightaway. first of all, can i but a much _ it straightaway. first of all, can i but a much agree _ it straightaway. first of all, can i but a much agree with _ it straightaway. first of all, can i but a much agree with my i it straightaway. first of all, can i but a much agree with my right. but a much agree with my right honourable friend on the importance of never losing sight of unintended consequences. he points to an excellent report by the centre for socialjustice that looked at that in the past actions taken and that is not lost on me or my colleagues in government. but he�*s right to highlight that to the house once again. i hope he disagree with the measures we set out so far, they are measured and they are proportionate and the focus should be on the booster campaign because that is our way out of this. on the 15 minute wait that he refers to, it is being very actively looked at, and i will have something more to say on that,
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i�*m sure, very shortly. have something more to say on that, i'm sure, very shortly.— i'm sure, very shortly. thank you, mr deputy — i'm sure, very shortly. thank you, mr deputy speaker. _ i'm sure, very shortly. thank you, mr deputy speaker. the _ i'm sure, very shortly. thank you, mr deputy speaker. the secretary i'm sure, very shortly. thank you, i mr deputy speaker. the secretary of state says there are millions of tests available but only nine local authorities after —— out of 153 across england have access to a flood stock of 500 pcr test kits to use at their discretion using local knowledge to tackle covid clusters. this is very important to disrupt outbreaks and slow down transmission. but it�*s not available outside those nine local authorities. given the importance of slowing down transmission of the omicron variant, will he agree to authorise the same flute stock of 500 pcr test kits to every director of public health in every area to give them the tools they need to fight this variant? flan give them the tools they need to fight this variant?— fight this variant? can i say to her, fight this variant? can i say to her. when _ fight this variant? can i say to her. when i — fight this variant? can i say to her, when i was _ fight this variant? can i say to her, when i was referring i fight this variant? can i say to her, when i was referring to i fight this variant? can i say to i her, when i was referring to tests, the lateral flow test i think she�*s asking about pcr test and i will look into what she has said. thank
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ou, mr look into what she has said. thank you. mr deputy — look into what she has said. thank you, mr deputy speaker— look into what she has said. thank you, mr deputy speaker for- look into what she has said. thank you, mr deputy speaker for the i look into what she has said. thank you, mr deputy speaker for the last week�*s ofsted report was damning about the impact lockdown has had on our nation because my children and the immense harm students have suffered. however it seems that the government has left the door open to school closures after the christmas recess, so can i ask what specific conditions would need to be met for schools not to open in the new year? mr speaker, i welcome the question for my right honourable friend and what i would say to her is that with the risk that we see from omicron at this point in time, the rise in infections, the increased risk of hospitalisation, the information we have on the vaccines, we think we have on the vaccines, we think we have taken the appropriate responses, it is designed to protect so much that we live in our country, especially the interest of our children but the most important
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thing now to focus on is the booster programme. thing now to focus on is the booster programme-— programme. thank you, mr deputy seaker. programme. thank you, mr deputy speaker- first _ programme. thank you, mr deputy speaker. first of— programme. thank you, mr deputy speaker. first of all— programme. thank you, mr deputy speaker. first of all i _ programme. thank you, mr deputy speaker. first of all i would - programme. thank you, mr deputy speaker. first of all i would like i speaker. first of all i would like to say that i encourage everyone to be vaccinated and to have the boosterjab be vaccinated and to have the booster jab and be vaccinated and to have the boosterjab and i�*m delighted the secretary of state has moved away from passport having an lf t—test if they cannot show their covid pass. and i would like to thank our front bench for the work they�*ve done as well. my question is this, you have talked about the incredible work the nhs is doing and what it will do over the next few weeks, so will the secretary of state bores the plans that he has for mandatory vaccination of all nhs workers, and have the conversations with the trade unions and come up with a plan for this to be by consent rather than mandatory?— for this to be by consent rather than mandatory? first of all, mr deu than mandatory? first of all, mr deputy speaker. _ than mandatory? first of all, mr deputy speaker. i _ than mandatory? first of all, mr deputy speaker, i agree - than mandatory? first of all, mr deputy speaker, i agree with i than mandatory? first of all, mr| deputy speaker, i agree with her objection that she had to vaccine
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passports, that would be a requirement for people to be vaccinated to enter a venue, i think it�*s important that we focus on test requirements with an exemption, if you happen to have the right level of vaccination. in terms of her question on nhs mandatory vaccination, however, i�*m afraid i have to say we will not pause what we have already announced, not least because, and this is the view of the nhs leadership as well, not least because omicron has made it even more urgent that we continue with it. ., ., ., more urgent that we continue with it. four weeks ago i raised the matter of _ it. four weeks ago i raised the matter of a — it. four weeks ago i raised the matter of a family _ it. four weeks ago i raised the matter of a family member- it. four weeks ago i raised the l matter of a family member who it. four weeks ago i raised the i matter of a family member who is aged 90, completely bedbound, vulnerable at home, still no booster jab. i was promised action, nothing has happened, he�*s still waiting and i now there are potentially hundreds of thousands of very old, very vulnerable people trapped in their
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own homes, still waiting for the boosterjab, the care is coming in and out all day and yet we are now offering boosterjabs to 18—year—olds who have virtually no chance of falling ill. it�*s an absurd situation because by massive delays, bureaucracy and this ridiculous rule that a doctor or nurse has to come, you have to wait 20 minutes, others are minuscule risk of there being any harm. we need action this day first of these people are in danger of dying. will the secretary of state now act in behalf of very old people trapped in their own homes? mr; behalf of very old people trapped in their own homes?— their own homes? my honourable friend is absolutely _ their own homes? my honourable friend is absolutely right - their own homes? my honourable friend is absolutely right to i their own homes? my honourable friend is absolutely right to raise | friend is absolutely right to raise this, mr deputy speaker. those that are either in care homes or are homebound, they have been prioritised, so i can tell him with care homes, i believe that as of the end of november, 99 —— 90% of care
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homes were visited by gps or other primary care teams to deliver vaccinations, cases where the couldn't be visited it is because that care home itself had a lockdown and they will be all revisited. i know he has asked me particularly about people that are homebound, the same approach has been taken and we will absolutely ensure that every single one of those people, as he rightly says, they are more vulnerable than others, they get the visit and they get the boosterjab. thank you, mr deputy speaker. i had a busy weekend, on saturday but my boosterjab a busy weekend, on saturday but my booster jab and a busy weekend, on saturday but my boosterjab and i highly encourage everyone to get that. yesterday i met with my honourable friend for east dunbartonshire, who is a hard—working and dedicated member of this house. and it is an utter shambles that she is unable to speak. she is, however, doing a
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power orwork speak. she is, however, doing a power or work in her constituency, and is an absolute inspiration for all of us. with the danger of this new variant, will the secretary of state agree that this house should follow the leader of the scottish parliament and moved to virtual proceedings to protect vulnerable members, theirfamilies and set proceedings to protect vulnerable members, their families and set a positive example of working from home? mr positive example of working from home? ~ , , , positive example of working from home? ~ ,, positive example of working from home? ~ , , , ., positive example of working from home? ~ ,, ., , ., home? mr deputy speaker, that is not a matter for— home? mr deputy speaker, that is not a matter for my _ home? mr deputy speaker, that is not a matter for my department. - home? mr deputy speaker, that is not a matter for my department. thank i a matter for my department. thank ou ve a matter for my department. thank you very much- _ a matter for my department. thank you very much. you _ a matter for my department. thank you very much. you will— a matter for my department. thank you very much. you will be - a matter for my department. thank you very much. you will be aware i you very much. you will be aware that a couple of days ago the department of health published some social media, ratherjumping the gun and the decision the house is being asked to take tomorrow, and very welcome the secretary of state intervened and said no law is decided until parliament votes on it and he arranged for that traffic to be deleted. it's not entirely true because most covid laws come into force before parliament has voted on them including the mass mandate. but them including the mass mandate. but the prime minister refused three
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times this morning to rule out further restrictions being taken before christmas that i'm not going to ask the secretary of state to conflict with the promise to hurt but what i am going to ask ms s, if the government does decide to announce further restrictions before christmas or indeed after, can i have an assurance at the dispatch box that this house will be recalled to vote on this measure is? it's not acceptable to keep governing this country by decree. i agree with what the honourable gentleman said, use members of parliament, which means involving us in the decision, getting this house to make the laws and then you will find it will be much more of a team approach to this rather than decrees and late night television appearances without taking the house seriously. mr taking the house seriously. m speaker, i would say to him that there are no plans that i'm aware of
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for any further restrictions. what we are focused on is what we —— what i sit at this house at the dispatch box, it will be subject to the will of the house, we will see if those become the regulation put up in terms of his further question about an assurance, that is something i will take back to my right honourable friend the prime minister. . ~ honourable friend the prime minister. ., ,, , ., minister. thank you... studio: _ minister. thank you... studio: the - minister. thank you... studio: the health i minister. thank you... - studio: the health secretary minister. thank you... _ studio: the health secretary there are brief in the house of commons, finishing by saying no plans for any further restrictions but new data will be available on the 18th of december. and as we have been hearing, omicron arromanches spreading very, very quickly. lots more coming up at five o'clock but now let's get all the weather with darren. thanks very much. good evening. it has been a cloudy start to the week for many parts of the country, sunshine will be in short supply over the days ahead as well. it has been very mild across england and wales but we have had the crowd
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thick enough to give some rain and some drizzle and quite wet in some parts. that's been coming from this band of cloud moving southwards. another band of cloud coming in from the atlantic which will bring some rain, heading towards scotland. in between we have a window albeit a closing window of clearer skies and some colder air. that's been affecting scotland through most of the day, when we had the best of any sunshine. the clearer skies are moving southwards, the shower are fading away, the clearer skies come in behind the thick cloud but still bringing some rain and drizzle, that's moving into southern parts and becoming much lighter. we will find some fog forming mainly across northern england. the cloud and rain comes into the north—west of scotland, picking up temperatures. for many it will be more chilly than it was last night. still some milder air and some it was last night. still some milder airand some damp it was last night. still some milder air and some damp and drizzly weather in southern parts. bigger changes coming in for the north. in scotland and northern ireland, a much stronger and milder atlantic wind and we have some rain as well,
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mainly for the highlands and islands. a lot of cloud coming to northern ireland, work out for england and wales, some drizzle in the south, especially in the morning and where the fog forms in northern england, perhaps into north wales in the north midlands it could linger into the afternoon making it feel pretty chilly. at the mildest weather is at the top and tail of the country. as we head towards the middle part of the week, the breeze starts to pick up and we are in this run of milder winds. this weather front heading southwards, the rain becoming lighter as it moves away from northern scotland into southern scotland, northern england and northern ireland, then moves back to the central belt later. still a lot of cloud around, not so much mist and fog because of the breeze. that breeze will bring milder conditions, temperatures while —— widely in double figures. what's left of the rain is getting pushed away because high pressure is going to start to build in across the uk. that's really going to settle things down and once a high pressure arrives later in the week, it looks like it
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is going to hang around for quite some time. with that high pressure, it looks like it's going to be dry, there will be a lot of cloud around, always the chance of some mist and fog and it will turn a little colder later in the week. this is bbc news with me, ben brown. the headlines at five. big queues as people wait to get their covid booster shot after the prime minister warned the omicron variant is spreading more rapidly than any other, and confirms the first death in the uk of a patient with the variant. the idea that this is somehow a milder version of the virus, i think that's something we need to set on one side and just recognise the sheer pace at which it accelerates through the population. but high demand for lateral flow kits and booster appointments overwhelm the government's online systems. rescue teams search for survivors after tornadoes hit the us. almost 100 people have died. a report finds half of families in the uk have

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