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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 11, 2021 7:00pm-7:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at seven: unless the government puts further restrictions in place, the uk faces a substantial wave of omicron infections next month that might overwhelm the nhs that's the stark warning from scientists. another 633 omicron cases are recorded in the last 2a hours, the uk's biggest dailyjump in omicron infections so far. at least 70 people have been killed as a series of devastating tornadoes strike the central usa. this has been the most devastating tornado event in our state's history and for those that have seen it, what it's done here in graves county and elsewhere, it is indescribable. britain warns russia it will face severe consequences if it invades
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if it invades ukraine. a g7 meeting of foreign ministers is discussing rising tensions. and first blood to max verstappen — he beats lewis hamilton to pole position for tomorrow's formula one title decider in abu dhabi with the two men level on points. and in half an hour, mark kermode and jane hill take us through this week's cinema releases in the film review. good evening. health officials have renewed their call for everyone who's eligible to get their covid boosterjab. new modelling suggests the uk could be facing a bigger wave of infections than back injanuary.
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a further 633 omicron cases have been recorded in the past 2a hours. that is the uk's biggestjump in the new variant infection so far. but there's still uncertainty about how many people may need hospital care, and how much pressure will be on the nhs. here's our health correspondent, katharine da costa. at vaccine centres around the uk, including this one in grimsby, the race is on to get even more jabs into arms and boost our defences against what may become the biggest wave of covid infections we've seen so far. it's more worrying, i think, because we don't know exactly what's going to happen, so it's betterjust to be safe. ijust want to protect people as well that i'm going to be in contact with. the new variant omicron is spreading fast, doubling every 2.5 days. new modelling has looked at what that might mean for hospital admissions and deaths in england under plan b with greater use
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of masks and working from home. it's early work, but researchers say further measures may be needed. what we do know is that very stringent restrictions come with their own downsides that can be devastating for individuals, for their families and for businesses especially leading into christmas, so i think policymakers have some very, very difficult decisions to make. so, what does this mean for cases? well, researchers expect there to be a substantial wave, bigger than last winter when daily cases peaked at more than 50,000. there is still a lot of uncertainty about how many people might end up in hospital because we still don't know whether omicron causes a more severe illness and many people are fully vaccinated which should help. by the end of april, deaths may range from 25,000 to 75,000 depending on how well vaccines perform, but scientists are hopeful they will still provide good protection against serious disease. we know that the booster doses do
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give very effective protection. we don't know how long it's going to last. it may not be very long lasting, but those booster doses are going to be critical but we can'tjust rely on the vaccine campaign to control this, we have to also wear masks and do all those other things that we have learned to do. this winter, we're in a better place thanks to vaccines, boosters and new antiviral drugs. the government says current measures in england are proportionate but won't hesitate to take further action if needed to protect lives and the nhs. professor christina pigalle is a member of independence ainge and is professor of research at university couege professor of research at university college london. she told us omicron could put huge pressure on the nhs very quickly. the could put huge pressure on the nhs very quickly-— very quickly. the problem with omicron is _ very quickly. the problem with omicron is that _ very quickly. the problem with omicron is that because - very quickly. the problem with omicron is that because it - very quickly. the problem with omicron is that because it can | omicron is that because it can re—infect people and infect people
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who have had one or two doses of the vaccine, it means we have millions more people who are getting infections with m stick my omicron who would not with delta and if you have high enough numbers, you will have high enough numbers, you will have enough people who need hospital treatment to put severe pressure on health services and because it is so much more transmissible than delta, yourinner much more transmissible than delta, your inner situation where even if your inner situation where even if you do not get that sick, you can potentially infect people who will get really sick. i think as a nation, we want to protect the nhs stop it is already exhausted after nearly two years of this pandemic, they are already under severe pressure and any extra pressure from covid reduces services for everybody, and we do not want to be in a situation where you can't get sick in winter, so i think from just a community point of view, we want to reduce infection. i'm joined by professor rupert pearse, who is an intensive care consultant at a large london hospital and speaks on behalf of the intensive care society. thank you very much for being with
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us this evening. i know you are speaking in a personal capacity, but based on your experience, the first question obviously is how is it at the moment in terms of the pressures that are on acu?_ the moment in terms of the pressures that are on acu?— that are on acu? well, we are having a very hard — that are on acu? well, we are having a very hard winter— that are on acu? well, we are having a very hard winter and _ that are on acu? well, we are having a very hard winter and we _ that are on acu? well, we are having a very hard winter and we kind - that are on acu? well, we are having a very hard winter and we kind of - a very hard winter and we kind of knew we would have a very hard winter as far back as july. we have been dealing with a substantial number of covid cases since then and it hasn't hugely gone up or down, it has been a steady flow, little peaks and troughs, but nothing like the big wave injanuary, but the problem is that it's notjust covid. we are dealing with a lot of other problems, too. 0ur emergency departments and hospitals are under huge pressure and there are long queues of patients waiting for beds in the hospital which makes things very busy in emergency departments. primary care, our gp colleagues are under a lot of pressure as well, so at the moment, this winter, it is notjust about intensive care and funding intensive care beds, it is about the wider strain on the nhs and how wejuggle
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about the wider strain on the nhs and how we juggle the range of problems, one of which is covid. find problems, one of which is covid. and one thing knocks to another, presumably, one of the consequences you do not know yet is whether the restrictions imposed on care homes will delay discharge, for example, for elderly patients who perhaps need to go into a residential care facility and at the moment are still in hospital. there are so many uncommon troubles with this, are in scare, even before you get into whether or not omicron is more dangerous for patients than delta has been? . , , has been? that is exactly right. the roblem has been? that is exactly right. the problem that _ has been? that is exactly right. the problem that the _ has been? that is exactly right. the problem that the nhs _ has been? that is exactly right. the problem that the nhs has _ has been? that is exactly right. the problem that the nhs has its - problem that the nhs has its uncertainty. we have to be prepared for any eventuality, so it doesn't really matter so much what we think is going to happen. unless we can be sure of it, we still need to be prepared for a range of different eventualities which might include a big covid waif, but it might also mean that we still need to do whatever we can do to keep surgery going so that patients who need urgent cancer care, for example, are
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still guessing that, and that is really the challenge, it's the uncertainty. the nhs needs to be as agile and as flexible as possible and i think it has been the most agile and flexible it has been in the last two years than i can ever remember, but still the challenges come. ~ . , ., ., come. what proportion of the atients come. what proportion of the patients who _ come. what proportion of the patients who are _ come. what proportion of the patients who are in _ come. what proportion of the patients who are in icu - come. what proportion of the patients who are in icu at - come. what proportion of the patients who are in icu at the j patients who are in icu at the moment are with covid, or the effects of covid, how many are vaccinated as opposed to unvaccinated?_ vaccinated as opposed to unvaccinated? ~ ., , unvaccinated? well, i can only tell ou in m unvaccinated? well, i can only tell you in my experience of— unvaccinated? well, i can only tell you in my experience of where - you in my experience of where i work, it is about 20% or so, one in five patients who are vaccinated. what is notable at the bedside is they seem to be less ill, they do not seem to need a ventilator when other patients do, but certainly, i mean, this week i was looking after one patient who hasn't needed to be ventilated and had been extremely relieved to have had the vaccine and spoke very strongly of his initial
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doubts about getting vaccinated and how glad he was that he had done it and so i think a big plea to everybody, we realise that sometimes there are worries about treatments like vaccinations, but it really is making a difference, it is saving a huge number of lives. [30 making a difference, it is saving a huge number of lives.— huge number of lives. do you understand — huge number of lives. do you understand how _ huge number of lives. do you understand how difficult - huge number of lives. do you understand how difficult it. huge number of lives. do you understand how difficult it is| huge number of lives. do you i understand how difficult it is for people to start to limit their behaviour on the possibility that this could be very bad but not knowing at this stage whether it will make a difference? [30 i will make a difference? do i understand? _ will make a difference? do i understand? yes. _ will make a difference? do i understand? yes. i- will make a difference? do i understand? yes. i am - will make a difference? do i understand? yes. i am a . will make a difference? drr i understand? yes. lam a member of understand? yes. iam a member of society, too. one of my daughters had her a—levels cancelled, one of my close relatives had major surgery delayed for some time, i have personally experienced all the challenges and difficulties that public health measures have brought for all of us, so, public health measures have brought forall of us, so, yes, of public health measures have brought for all of us, so, yes, of course, we understand, but i think we still
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need to be aware that the nhs is not going to function and be as reliable and be that safety net that we are used to if it gets overwhelmed during the winter. as i say, it is notjust during the winter. as i say, it is not just covid. during the winter. as i say, it is notjust covid. covid is one of a whole series of pressures we are dealing with at the moment. speaking strictl on a dealing with at the moment. speaking strictly on a personal _ dealing with at the moment. speaking strictly on a personal capacity, - strictly on a personal capacity, what would you like to be done in terms of those measures? would you want them to go further than the government is currently outlining or are you content to see how that helps? are you content to see how that hels? ~ ., ., ., , , . helps? well, i am not a public health expert. _ helps? well, i am not a public health expert. there - helps? well, i am not a public health expert. there are - helps? well, i am not a public health expert. there are quitej helps? well, i am not a public. health expert. there are quite a helps? well, i am not a public- health expert. there are quite a few armchair public health experts. you heard from professor pardo who is an expert and i have been a strong supporter and advocate of the advice that she has given throughout the pandemic which has been absolutely excellent, so i would certainly defer to her expertise on something like that, but whatever advice we get, we need to take it very, very
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seriously because there are still people who are dying from covid. thank you very much, i hope you have a kind of tolerable and manageable christmas and sometime at with your family. thank you very much. the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk have just been released, and they show there were just over 5a,000 new infections recorded, in the latest 2a hour period. there were 132 deaths — that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test. and more than 22.5 million people have received their boosterjab. government sources say there will be a series of commons votes on tuesday about new covid measures for england. there will be three separate votes, it is expected, and to tell us all about those, i am joined by our political correspondent, chris mason. chris,
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breakdown for us, if you would, how it is going to work? presumably, there is a reason why the government is notjust going for one vote. i was at a briefing the other day for the implication was that there would be one vote. we have seen since then is this mounting number of conservative mps who really do not like this idea of covid passports, covid state certification to give its formal title, the idea that to get into large venues or venues with lots of people in, including night clubs, you would need to show that you have been double jabbed or that you have been double jabbed or that you have been double jabbed or that you have had a negative test pretty recently. 60 conservative mps about don't like that, so what the government is now saying it is going to do, i understand, is that there will be three votes on this plan be moving england, one on the expansion of the need for facemask in lots of settings, there is not a vast amount of controversy in parliament around that, another on people being able to test their way out of self isolation if they have come into contact with someone who has tested positive for the omicron variant.
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that also will not encounter much resistance. then there will be the vote on the covid passports and there will be resistance to that, we think from around 60 conservative mps. that is a big rebellion, there is no doubt about it, it will mean the government is reliant on labour. get that bit through, but there will be those labour votes. in real world terms, these measures will come into place, in political terms, governments hate having to rely on the opposition to get their business through because it makes them look feeble. 0ne through because it makes them look feeble. one other thing, there will actually be a fourth vote unconnected to the whole question of plan b and the winter plan around the idea of making it mandatory for front line nhs staff in england to be vaccinated. i am told, i understand this evening, labour will also back the government on that. they had previously been posted but they were now back the government on that so irrespective of any conservative rebellion on that, that
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will pass, that will happen. to be fair to the government, - will pass, that will happen. to be fair to the government, this - will pass, that will happen. to be fair to the government, this is i will pass, that will happen. to be fair to the government, this is no surprise that they were going to do this, is it? they havejust decided this, is it? they havejust decided this is the obvious legislative opportunity to get it all out of the way in one go. opportunity to get it all out of the way in one go— opportunity to get it all out of the way in one go. yes, exactly, so they have been — way in one go. yes, exactly, so they have been saying — way in one go. yes, exactly, so they have been saying for _ way in one go. yes, exactly, so they have been saying for some - way in one go. yes, exactly, so they have been saying for some time - way in one go. yes, exactly, so they| have been saying for some time that they were keen on the idea of nhs staff having to get a vaccine, plenty in government and beyond that point to the fact that there are precedents, other jabs point to the fact that there are precedents, otherjabs and precedents, other jabs and vaccinations precedents, otherjabs and vaccinations that are mandatory for front line nhs staff, so in that sense, they can point to that president. they have already done it as far as care homes are concerned. the next step to nhs staff, so it looks like all of those votes will come on tuesday before parliament packing up for christmas on thursday. packing up for christmas on thursday-— packing up for christmas on thursda . ~ . ,., ., thursday. which is also the day of the north shropshire _ thursday. which is also the day of the north shropshire by-election,j thursday. which is also the day of i the north shropshire by-election, of the north shropshire by—election, of course, so who knows what that might mean, but i want to pick up your thoughts on this about where the government finds itself this weekend. the kind of pause in hostilities while various reports and investigations go on, but it does not mean the stories have
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stopped altogether or, presumably, this regulation. ida. stopped altogether or, presumably, this regulation.— this regulation. no, i was speaking to someone _ this regulation. no, i was speaking to someone in _ this regulation. no, i was speaking to someone in government - this regulation. no, i was speaking to someone in government too - this regulation. no, i was speaking to someone in government too has bracing themselves with the old metaphorical tin hat on with the arrival of the sunday paper front pages which i know you will talk about later on.— pages which i know you will talk about later on. thank you for the lot, about later on. thank you for the plot. 10:30pm — about later on. thank you for the plot, 10:30pm and _ about later on. thank you for the plot, 10:30pm and 11:30pm - about later on. thank you for the plot, 10:30pm and 11:30pm this | plot, 10:30pm and 11:30pm this evening! plot, 10:30pm and 11:30pm this evenina! , plot, 10:30pm and 11:30pm this eveninu! . ., plot, 10:30pm and 11:30pm this evenin! . ., , evening! this particular person was not exactly licking _ evening! this particular person was not exactly licking their _ evening! this particular person was not exactly licking their lips - evening! this particular person was not exactly licking their lips at - not exactly licking their lips at the prospects of devouring those. they are conscious that it might not be all that comfortable and there is no doubt that this has been as bumpy a period as borisjohnson has faced since he has been elected. hard a period as boris johnson has faced since he has been elected.- since he has been elected. hard to believe it is _ since he has been elected. hard to believe it is two _ since he has been elected. hard to believe it is two years _ since he has been elected. hard to believe it is two years coming - since he has been elected. hard to believe it is two years coming up, | believe it is two years coming up, happy anniversary, prime minister. he has coolly had a very difficult time personally when he was seriously ill with the covid, but politically, this is the most awkward time, there is no doubt about it. plenty of his own supporters privately and, indeed, publicly, supporters within the party but the broader conservative family, the conservative supporting newspapers, for instance, are beginning to ask questions about how
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long he might be around four, is he losing his political magic associate? so it is very difficult but i think we have to draw a distinction between that which is real and the real world consequence of these vaults too, which will pass. of these vaults too, which will ass. , . ~' of these vaults too, which will ass, , ., ~' , . pass. chris, thank you very much. chris mason. _ pass. chris, thank you very much. chris mason, our— pass. chris, thank you very much. chris mason, our political- chris mason, our political correspondence there, and thank you for the plug for the papers. in america, more than 70 people are thought to have died, after a series of tornados hit several states. kentucky has been worst affected, with the governor saying it's been one of the toughest nights in the state's history. in all, 30 tornadoes, were reported across a large swathe of the southeast. nomia iqbal has the full story. the us national weather service had issued several tornado warnings for multiple us states. in illinois this amazon warehouse was ripped apart by the storm after the roof partially collapsed. emergency responders have been working through the night. they had been on the night shift in the run—up to christmas. theirfamily members had been trying to find them.
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he was on the phone with me while it was happening. the tornado was hitting the back of the building, the trucks were coming in. i told him tojump at the track and duck. i decided to come down here to see what was going on. i had no idea the building look that bad, and i'mjust... i'm worried sick. ijust want to know if he's 0k. tornadoes tore a path through 200 miles, hitting the small town of mayfield. it's one thing when we know - the potential of the atmosphere. it's another thing when we it actually becomes a reality. i this was the bank. that's what's left of. the fire department. there used to be two storeys to that building — now there is one. - a black cylinder swept across the ground, slamming into a candle factory. the governor fears dozens may have been killed inside. this will be, i believe, the deadliest tornado system to ever run through kentucky. earlier this morning, about 5am, we were pretty sure we would lose over 50 kentuckians. i'm now certain that
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number is north of 70. it may in fact end up exceeding 100. in arkansas the storm hit a nursing home, killing at least one person, injuring several and trapping more than a dozen others inside. local reports have described it as a mass casualties event. 0ne official called it heartbreaking. millions of americans are being urged to prepare for weather alerts nationwide, as the storm continues to wreak havoc across the country. nomia iqbal, bbc news, washington. well, at least four kentucky counties were left devastated. 0fficials described mayfield in graves county as being �*ground zero'. mayorjesse perry was at a press conference a little earlier describing his feelings when he realised his county was going to be hit. you know, this is probably the toughest day of my life right here. when you run for office, you don't know what to expect, but when you
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see your communities and your county in this kind of situation, it's tough. it's tough on our communities, it's tough on our families. you know, last night, i was with my family and i was watching... we were watching the storm. we were watching noah and trent with the weather on the local six, and those folks did a really good job of informing what was going to happen, but i had an eerie feeling about it, i can tell you that. i didn't really feel good about it and as this thing was, as the governor said, for the 200 miles it was on the ground, watching it head towards graves county, you know, it was a reality at that time.
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so the only thing i can say to you all at this time, what we need from everyone is we need your prayers, we need your help. the mayor of graves county in kentucky there. let's go live to los angeles and speak to our north america correspondent peter bowes. this was a terrible night notjust in kentucky but in surrounding states as well. do we have yet a proper picture of the damage and the loss of life? we proper picture of the damage and the loss of life? ~ ., ., ., ., loss of life? we do not have a complete _ loss of life? we do not have a complete picture _ loss of life? we do not have a complete picture and - loss of life? we do not have a complete picture and i - loss of life? we do not have a complete picture and i think. loss of life? we do not have a - complete picture and i think that's going to take several hours, perhaps even several days or weeks before we can really gauge the full extent of this unimaginable tragedy, to use the expression of presidentjoe
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biden earlier today. we are, as every hour passes, getting a better idea of the scale of what has happened and clearly kentucky seems to have been the epicentre, this candle factory where more than 110 people were working as of a couple of hours ago, only a0 of those people have been rescued and it is a real problem that mistake make an difficulty for the local emergency services, the local police station being destroyed, part of the fire station and to respond initially to this, firefighters had to fight their way out of their own building. a lot of their equipment had been destroyed, so you can imagine how difficult it was and how difficult it continues to be, but the positive news is that equipment is beginning to arrive from other regions. now, this is quite a remote area, but they are getting some assistance, we expect, in the next few hours, a federal disaster being declared by the white house, which will provide
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extra funds and alleviate the financial nightmare for the local authorities, but as far as their search and rescue operation is concerned, it is a painstaking task and it is likely to go on for some time. , ., , ., ,, and it is likely to go on for some time. , .,, ., ,, , ., time. remind people, tin taki is a relatively rural _ time. remind people, tin taki is a relatively rural state, _ time. remind people, tin taki is a relatively rural state, isn't - time. remind people, tin taki is a relatively rural state, isn't it? - time. remind people, tin taki is a relatively rural state, isn't it? so i relatively rural state, isn't it? so just the logistics of operating there and getting federal help into kentucky from the federal emergency administration, even that will take time. , ., , administration, even that will take time. ,,, time. exactly and it is because it is remote _ time. exactly and it is because it is remote as _ time. exactly and it is because it is remote as is _ time. exactly and it is because it is remote as is many _ time. exactly and it is because it is remote as is many of - time. exactly and it is because it is remote as is many of the - time. exactly and it is because it| is remote as is many of the other areas which have been affected. we areas which have been affected. we are talking about six states here, so arkansas, illinois, missouri, mississippi, tennessee as well as kentucky, so a huge operation if you think from a federal perspective in terms of the assistance that they have to provide and this is also quite an unprecedented situation just in sheer scale and also the fact that it is happening in december. these tornadoes normally strike in the middle of the year,
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april, may, june is generally the time that local people can expect tornadoes like this, but it seems to be, to use that expression, a perfect storm of conditions, very unusually warm weather over the past few days, perhaps what you might expect in april or may, that contributes towards these tornadoes. tornadoes are not fully understood in terms of why they happen and what can cause this kind of ferocity that we have seen, but all of these factors making it extremely for the authorities in the first place to have predicted what has happened and now to deal with it. peter have predicted what has happened and now to deal with it.— now to deal with it. peter in los anueles, now to deal with it. peter in los angeles, thank _ now to deal with it. peter in los angeles, thank you _ now to deal with it. peter in los angeles, thank you very - now to deal with it. peter in los angeles, thank you very much. | a man has died after being shot by armed police near kensington palace in west london. officers say they stopped a vehicle at about 3.20pm this afternoon, shots were fired and a man was pronounced dead at the scene. police say they are not treating the incident as terrorism. new guidance has been issued
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for care home visits in england as a result of the surge in omicron infections. from wednesday, residents will be limited to three visitors as well as a friend or relative nominated as their essential care giver. megan paterson reports. in care homes around the country, festive celebrations are well under way. but as well as the usual trimmings, for some families, fears about covid guidelines on separation from loved ones are making an unwelcome return. i run a family of seven and it's a limit of three, so i'm very worried about how this is going to impact on mum. the department of health say people living in care homes in england will only be allowed to receive visits from three people plus one essential care worker. staff will have to take three lateral flow tests and one pcr test every week. and there will be a £300 million fund to recruit and retain care workers. further clarity is expected on the guidance next week but for now it's up to care
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home staff to plan how they will implement the measures and to reassure the people they will affect. it will be disappointing for relatives, it will be extremely disappointing for the residents, but it's the world that we live in. we can't risk getting this virus back into our care services. the vaccination programme remains key to controlling the spread of omicron. extra resources will be sent to bolster protection but in care homes like this one in norwich, another change to visiting rules hasn't brought much cheer. i wouldn't like that. i'd have to put up with it. once again, the delicate balance between offering covid protection but maintaining vital family contact comes into focus. the government insistent these guidelines will help manage growing risk. the treasury has admitted some officials did have drinks in their office in november last year but has denied this amounted to a party.
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the times has reported that about two dozen civil servants held a drinks party to celebrate finishing work on the chancellor's spending review. a treasury spokesperson described what happened as "impromptu drinks around their desks" and added that there was no in person departmental party last christmas. foreign ministers from the g7 group of wealthy nations, are meeting in liverpool, with talks focused on how to counter threats posed by china and russia. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james landale told us the build up of russian troops on the border with ukraine is high on the agenda. they estimate there's about 100,000 russian troops on the border of the ukraine. russia says that is merely defensive manoeuvres. the west fears that actually the potential, at least, of an invasion, so they are doing everything they possibly can to deter that invasion. i spoke a few moments ago to the eu foreign policy chief and he told me we are in deter mode. they are doing that by threatening
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what they call severe economic consequences if russia were to invade, but they have not been specific about that at the moment and one of the issues that is being debated here in liverpool is what should those severe economic conditions be? one example is the issue of this big new pipeline which is being laid between russia and germany to provide a huge amount of gas. if that were to be shut down, that would certainly hit russia hard, but it would also hit euro's economy, too, so those are the kinds of trade—offs that the g7 foreign ministers are trying to grapple with today so they can get the issue right of deterring russia but also being credible at the same time. time for a look at the weather, we definitely need the christmas lights out and about, what a dreary day. it is turning milder, but with it, a lot of cloud and rain, really
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changing the feel of the weather now. it has been so cold for so long at the start of december, the end of november, before the upcoming week, it looks like it will remain pretty mild with high pressure and lighter winds, we could start to see overnight fog and mist, but no problems with frost for the next few days. certainly do today, there is a wedge of milder air spreading across the uk but with it a lot of weather fronts, outbreaks of rain, mainly light and patchy with the odd heavier burst in there across england and wales over the past few hours. the heaviest of the rain clearing away and we are left with some light and patchy rain, a lot of cloud around but another front is pushing into the end of the night. much of england and wales stays rather down through the course of this evening and overnight, scotland and northern ireland apart from a few showers in the north, largely dry and clear here, so temperature is not as high as they will be for england and wales, much milder tonight than the previous night especially across the eastern part of the country. we sort of mild, rather cloudy for england
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and wales, the new weather front spreading northwards across the irish sea, affecting north wales, northern england, northern ireland and then pushing into scotland in the afternoon. north of it cooler and brighter, south of it is much milder with temperatures touching 13 or 1a, milder with temperatures touching 13 or1a, it milder with temperatures touching 13 or 1a, it will not be surprised if we see 15 but lots of clout around in such a limited. as we look to the west, a potent area of low pressure skirts past the north—west of the country, could bring a swathe of severe gales to parts of northern ireland and west of scotland especially the outer hebrides through sunday night, a breezy one forfurther through sunday night, a breezy one for further south and east with a legacy of cooler air for scotland and northern ireland on monday but there will be blustery showers, wintry on the hills across scotland, england and wales seeing this weather front pretty much stationary the central area so some areas could be quite wet through the day and despite there being a lot of cloud, it will be another mild one here with ten to maybe 13 degrees, single figures for the north. the weather front clears away is going to tuesday from england and wales, stays windy and wet for the northern
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part of the uk as we head into the middle part of the week and then this area of high pressure we think want to start building in here which will push the weather fronts northwards, taking milder air to all areas once again, so things are settling down with lighter winds towards end of the week, saying on the mild side, double figure values for most areas there through the week after an unsettled start, turning quieter and drier, but there will not be much sunshine around, pretty cloudy at the moment and we will see a return to some overnight mist and fog as well. that is how it is looking. see later.

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