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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 10, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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them as the real police refer to them as the real police because — refer to them as the real police because they have been a shining example. — because they have been a shining example, what would have expected from the _ example, what would have expected from the outset that did not get, we thank_ from the outset that did not get, we thank them — from the outset that did not get, we thank them from the bottom of our hearts— thank them from the bottom of our hearts for— thank them from the bottom of our hearts for their consideration and kindness — finally, but most importantly, we want _ finally, but most importantly, we want to— finally, but most importantly, we want to say— finally, but most importantly, we want to say to the victims that you will never— want to say to the victims that you will never be forgotten. we feel your loss — will never be forgotten. we feel your loss every minute of every day and we _ your loss every minute of every day and we will — your loss every minute of every day and we will forever wonder how your lives would — and we will forever wonder how your lives would have turned out but you lives would have turned out but you live on _ lives would have turned out but you live on strongly in our cherished memories _ live on strongly in our cherished memories. thank you. questions. if ou “ust memories. thank you. questions. if you just want _ memories. thank you. questions. if you just want to _ memories. thank you. questions. if you just want to raise _ memories. thank you. questions. if you just want to raise your - memories. thank you. questions. if you just want to raise your hands. .
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you just want to raise your hands. emily, thank you. flan you just want to raise your hands. emily, thank you.— you just want to raise your hands. emily, thank you. can i “ust ask the families how — emily, thank you. can i “ust ask the families how they _ emily, thank you. can i “ust ask the families how they felt _ emily, thank you. can i just ask the families how they felt and - emily, thank you. can i just ask the families how they felt and the - emily, thank you. can i just ask the families how they felt and the most damning possible conclusions, how did you feel about this? and damning possible conclusions, how did you feel about this?— damning possible conclusions, how did you feel about this? and some of the families — did you feel about this? and some of the families of— did you feel about this? and some of the families of the _ did you feel about this? and some of the families of the victims _ did you feel about this? and some of the families of the victims of- the families of the victims of stephen port there along with their solicitor, neil had dual, who has been speaking. let'sjust solicitor, neil had dual, who has been speaking. let's just hear what's coming up. i been speaking. let's “ust hear what's coming ugh been speaking. let's “ust hear what's coming up. i was elated that we were right _ what's coming up. i was elated that we were right and _ what's coming up. i was elated that we were right and obviously - what's coming up. i was elated that we were right and obviously that. what's coming up. i was elated that| we were right and obviously that the 'ury we were right and obviously that the jury agreed — we were right and obviously that the jury agreed with _ we were right and obviously that the jury agreed with us _ we were right and obviously that the jury agreed with us as _ we were right and obviously that the jury agreed with us as well. - we were right and obviously that the jury agreed with us as well. it's - jury agreed with us as well. it's sad that— jury agreed with us as well. it's sad that we _ jury agreed with us as well. it's sad that we shouldn't - jury agreed with us as well. it's sad that we shouldn't have - jury agreed with us as well. it's sad that we shouldn't have got| jury agreed with us as well. it's - sad that we shouldn't have got this far if they— sad that we shouldn't have got this far if they had _ sad that we shouldn't have got this far if they had listened _ sad that we shouldn't have got this far if they had listened to - sad that we shouldn't have got this far if they had listened to me. - sad that we shouldn't have got thisi far if they had listened to me. none of the _ far if they had listened to me. none of the people — far if they had listened to me. none of the people would _ far if they had listened to me. none of the people would be _ far if they had listened to me. none of the people would be sat - far if they had listened to me. none of the people would be sat here - far if they had listened to me. none. of the people would be sat here now. i'm quite _ of the people would be sat here now. i'm quite pleased _ of the people would be sat here now. i'm quite pleased with— of the people would be sat here now. i'm quite pleased with the _ of the people would be sat here now. i'm quite pleased with the result - i'm quite pleased with the result that the — i'm quite pleased with the result that the jury _ i'm quite pleased with the result that the jury has _ i'm quite pleased with the result that the jury has agreed - i'm quite pleased with the result that the jury has agreed with - i'm quite pleased with the result that the jury has agreed with us.
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and do— that the jury has agreed with us. and do you — that the jury has agreed with us. and do you think— that the jury has agreed with us. and do you think that _ that the jury has agreed with us. and do you think that the - that the jury has agreed with us. and do you think that the police | and do you think that the police officers involved... i and do you think that the police officers involved. . ._ officers involved... i think they should definitely _ officers involved... i think they should definitely be _ officers involved... i think they should definitely be disciplinesj should definitely be disciplines because — should definitely be disciplines because instead _ should definitely be disciplines because instead they- should definitely be disciplines because instead they have - should definitely be disciplinesl because instead they have been promoted _ because instead they have been romoted. �* . because instead they have been promoted-— because instead they have been romoted. . , ., promoted. and i 'ust came in on that. there — promoted. and i 'ust came in on that. there is — promoted. and i 'ust came in on that. there is no— promoted. and ijust came in on that. there is no accountability. that. there is no accountability whatsoever. everybody, wherever you are, there's— whatsoever. everybody, wherever you are, there's accountability. these cost three — are, there's accountability. these cost three lives. somewhere down the line, something has to happen. there has to— line, something has to happen. there has to he _ line, something has to happen. there has to be some sort of accountability.- has to be some sort of accountabili . ., ., . accountability. you mentioned that ou felt accountability. you mentioned that you felt does _ accountability. you mentioned that you felt does mag _ accountability. you mentioned that you felt does mag why _ accountability. you mentioned that you felt does mag why do - accountability. you mentioned that you felt does mag why do you - accountability. you mentioned that you felt does mag why do you feel| accountability. you mentioned that l you felt does mag why do you feel so strongly about the issue? we
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you felt does mag why do you feel so strongly about the issue?— strongly about the issue? we feel that we are _ strongly about the issue? we feel that we are still _ strongly about the issue? we feel that we are still quite _ strongly about the issue? we feel that we are still quite strong - strongly about the issue? we feel that we are still quite strong on . that we are still quite strong on that we are still quite strong on that one — that we are still quite strong on that one because every one of the boys _ that one because every one of the boys was — that one because every one of the boys was not treated like individual humans _ boys was not treated like individual humans. and we said that they were discriminated against from the very beginning. — discriminated against from the very beginning, whether that had been they were just seen as drug addicts, homeless, _ they were just seen as drug addicts, homeless, gay, it's not acceptable. regardless— homeless, gay, it's not acceptable. regardless of what you are in this world, _ regardless of what you are in this world, you — regardless of what you are in this world, you should be treated as an individual— world, you should be treated as an individual and it's appalling that they weren't. | individual and it's appalling that they weren't-— they weren't. i think it's fair to sa that they weren't. i think it's fair to say that the — they weren't. i think it's fair to say that the families _ they weren't. i think it's fair to say that the families have - they weren't. i think it's fair to | say that the families have been vindicated _ say that the families have been vindicated on— say that the families have been vindicated on everything - say that the families have been vindicated on everything else . say that the families have been - vindicated on everything else that's come _ vindicated on everything else that's come out _ vindicated on everything else that's come out over— vindicated on everything else that's come out over the _ vindicated on everything else that's come out over the course _ vindicated on everything else that's come out over the course of- vindicated on everything else that's come out over the course of the - come out over the course of the inguests, — come out over the course of the inguests, so— come out over the course of the inquests. so why— come out over the course of the inquests, so why wouldn't - come out over the course of the inquests, so why wouldn't it - come out over the course of the inquests, so why wouldn't it bei come out over the course of the i inquests, so why wouldn't it be the case that— inquests, so why wouldn't it be the case that they _ inquests, so why wouldn't it be the case that they would _ inquests, so why wouldn't it be the case that they would also - inquests, so why wouldn't it be the case that they would also be - inquests, so why wouldn't it be the case that they would also be right. case that they would also be right about _ case that they would also be right about an — case that they would also be right about an issue _ case that they would also be right about an issue that _ case that they would also be right about an issue that wasn't - case that they would also be right about an issue that wasn't put - case that they would also be right about an issue that wasn't put toi about an issue that wasn't put to the jury— about an issue that wasn't put to the jury because _ about an issue that wasn't put to the jury because of _ about an issue that wasn't put to the jury because of legal - about an issue that wasn't put to l the jury because of legal argument more _ the jury because of legal argument more than — the jury because of legal argument more than anything. _ the jury because of legal argument more than anything. as _ the jury because of legal argument more than anything. as we - the jury because of legal argument more than anything. as we said . the jury because of legal argument more than anything. as we said in| more than anything. as we said in the statement, _ more than anything. as we said in the statement, is _ more than anything. as we said in the statement, is clear— more than anything. as we said in
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the statement, is clear that - the statement, is clear that homophobia _ the statement, is clear that homophobia wasn't - the statement, is clear that homophobia wasn't left - the statement, is clear that homophobia wasn't left to i the statement, is clear that . homophobia wasn't left to the the statement, is clear that - homophobia wasn't left to the jury for a variety — homophobia wasn't left to the jury for a variety of _ homophobia wasn't left to the jury for a variety of reasons. _ inaudible. i would say go back to ben william's' report because that's what _ william's' report because that's what he — william's' report because that's what he recommended in the first place _ what he recommended in the first place before it went to his boss. his report— place before it went to his boss. his report was totally different. yes _ his report was totally different. yes. ' :: :: , .. his report was totally different. yes. if :: , .. , his report was totally different. yes. i“, ii , ~' , , ., , yes. 100%. i think they should rip that u- yes. 10096. i think they should rip that up and _ yes. 10096. i think they should rip that up and start _ yes. 10096. i think they should rip
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that up and start again. _ yes. 10096. i think they should rip l that up and start again. inaudible. yes, i would like to get a meeting with her— yes, i would like to get a meeting with her for— yes, i would like to get a meeting with her for my family and i would like to— with her for my family and i would like to say— with her for my family and i would like to say to her personally that she needs — like to say to her personally that she needs to stand up and be counted and just— she needs to stand up and be counted and just be _ she needs to stand up and be counted and just be a — she needs to stand up and be counted and just be a human being and put herself— and just be a human being and put herself in— and just be a human being and put herself in our shoes and instead of 'ust herself in our shoes and instead of just giving — herself in our shoes and instead of just giving us a verbal apology and telling _ just giving us a verbal apology and telling us — just giving us a verbal apology and telling us that things would change, actually— telling us that things would change, actually show us that things are going _ actually show us that things are going to — actually show us that things are going to change and hold people accountable for what they have done. any other _ accountable for what they have done. any other questions,?
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accountable for what they have done. any other questions, ? it�*s accountable for what they have done. any other questions, ?_ any other questions,? it's been said that cressida — any other questions,? it's been said that cressida dick _ any other questions,? it's been said that cressida dick should _ any other questions,? it's been said that cressida dick should resign? i l that cressida dick should resign? i don't think she should resign. she was in _ don't think she should resign. she was in a _ don't think she should resign. she was in a part of this from the very beginning — was in a part of this from the very beginning but i do believe that she needs— beginning but i do believe that she needs to _ beginning but i do believe that she needs to stand up and do something about— needs to stand up and do something about what— needs to stand up and do something about what happens, hold people accountable, make an example to officers _ accountable, make an example to officers that if they do what they have _ officers that if they do what they have done what they haven't done, put this— have done what they haven't done, put this right, so that it never happens — put this right, so that it never happens again to anybody else. the in . uests happens again to anybody else. inquests on happens again to anybody else. tue: inquests on the happens again to anybody else. he inquests on the jury happens again to anybody else. tte: inquests on the jury made very clear that people have been failing... tote that people have been failing... we knew all along in our hearts that
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they were — knew all along in our hearts that they were probably— knew all along in our hearts that they were probably all _ knew all along in our hearts that they were probably all definitely| knew all along in our hearts that i they were probably all definitely —— they were probably all definitely —— they would — they were probably all definitely —— they would probably _ they were probably all definitely —— they would probably or— they were probably all definitely —— they would probably or definitely. they were probably all definitely ——| they would probably or definitely be walking _ they would probably or definitely be walking around _ they would probably or definitely be walking around. to _ they would probably or definitely be walking around. to actually - they would probably or definitely be walking around. to actually hear - they would probably or definitely be walking around. to actually hear it, | walking around. to actually hear it, in one _ walking around. to actually hear it, in one respect, _ walking around. to actually hear it, in one respect, we _ walking around. to actually hear it, in one respect, we are _ walking around. to actually hear it, in one respect, we are quite - walking around. to actually hear it, in one respect, we are quite elated| in one respect, we are quite elated that somebody _ in one respect, we are quite elated that somebody is _ in one respect, we are quite elated that somebody is listening, - in one respect, we are quite elated that somebody is listening, finally, and the _ that somebody is listening, finally, and the jury— that somebody is listening, finally, and the jury have _ that somebody is listening, finally, and the jury have agreed _ that somebody is listening, finally, and the jury have agreed with - that somebody is listening, finally, and the jury have agreed with that. in another, — and the jury have agreed with that. in another, we— and the jury have agreed with that. in another, we really— and the jury have agreed with that. in another, we really do _ and the jury have agreed with that. in another, we really do feel - and the jury have agreed with that. in another, we really do feel the i in another, we really do feel the loss of— in another, we really do feel the loss of that _ in another, we really do feel the loss of that. it _ in another, we really do feel the loss of that. it just _ in another, we really do feel the loss of that. it just brought - in another, we really do feel the loss of that. it just brought the i loss of that. it just brought the loss of that. it just brought the loss home _ loss of that. it just brought the loss home today. _ loss of that. it just brought the loss home today. how - loss of that. it just brought the loss home today. how much i loss of that. it just brought thei loss home today. how much we loss of that. it just brought the - loss home today. how much we miss him and _ loss home today. how much we miss him and how— loss home today. how much we miss him and how much— loss home today. how much we miss him and how much we _ loss home today. how much we miss him and how much we have - loss home today. how much we miss him and how much we have missed l loss home today. how much we miss . him and how much we have missed out on and _ him and how much we have missed out on and how— him and how much we have missed out on and how we — him and how much we have missed out on and how we are _ him and how much we have missed out on and how we are going _ him and how much we have missed out on and how we are going to _ him and how much we have missed out on and how we are going to —— - him and how much we have missed out on and how we are going to —— how- on and how we are going to —— how much _ on and how we are going to —— how much we _ on and how we are going to —— how much we are — on and how we are going to —— how much we are going _ on and how we are going to —— how much we are going to— on and how we are going to —— how much we are going to miss - on and how we are going to —— how much we are going to miss out - on and how we are going to —— how much we are going to miss out on.| much we are going to miss out on. and so— much we are going to miss out on. and so in— much we are going to miss out on. and so in that _ much we are going to miss out on. and so in that respect, _ much we are going to miss out on. and so in that respect, nothing - much we are going to miss out on. and so in that respect, nothing is. and so in that respect, nothing is over— and so in that respect, nothing is over but— and so in that respect, nothing is over but we — and so in that respect, nothing is over but we are _ and so in that respect, nothing is over but we are pleased - and so in that respect, nothing is over but we are pleased that - and so in that respect, nothing is over but we are pleased that the i over but we are pleased that the 'ury over but we are pleased that the jury have — over but we are pleased that the jury have agreed _
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over but we are pleased that the jury have agreed. you— over but we are pleased that the jury have agreed-— over but we are pleased that the jury have agreed. you heard from the 'u jury have agreed. you heard from the jury... inaudible. _ jury have agreed. you heard from the jury... inaudible. is _ jury have agreed. you heard from the jury... inaudible. is it— jury have agreed. you heard from the jury... inaudible. is it possible - jury have agreed. you heard from the jury... inaudible. is it possible to i jury... inaudible. is it possible to pinpoint in your mind where it started to go wrong, what was the critical turning point? is there one thing that was a turning point? it thing that was a turning point? it was literally as soon as i had found out and _ was literally as soon as i had found out and as— was literally as soon as i had found out and as soon _ was literally as soon as i had found out and as soon as _ was literally as soon as i had found out and as soon as i _ was literally as soon as i had found out and as soon as i had _ was literally as soon as i had found out and as soon as i had started i out and as soon as i had started contact — out and as soon as i had started contact with _ out and as soon as i had started contact with the _ out and as soon as i had started contact with the police - out and as soon as i had started contact with the police the - out and as soon as i had started contact with the police the facti contact with the police the fact that i_ contact with the police the fact that i kept _ contact with the police the fact that i kept telling _ contact with the police the fact that i kept telling them - contact with the police the fact that i kept telling them that i contact with the police the fact| that i kept telling them that he contact with the police the fact - that i kept telling them that he was murdered. — that i kept telling them that he was murdered, literally— that i kept telling them that he was murdered, literally from _ that i kept telling them that he was murdered, literally from the - that i kept telling them that he was murdered, literally from the first i murdered, literally from the first moments. — murdered, literally from the first
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moments. they— murdered, literally from the first moments, they pushed - murdered, literally from the first moments, they pushed it - murdered, literally from the first moments, they pushed it off. . murdered, literally from the first moments, they pushed it off. if. murdered, literally from the first - moments, they pushed it off. if they had just— moments, they pushed it off. if they had just listened _ moments, they pushed it off. if they had just listened to _ moments, they pushed it off. if they had just listened to any _ moments, they pushed it off. if they had just listened to any of _ moments, they pushed it off. if they had just listened to any of us, - moments, they pushed it off. if they had just listened to any of us, the i had just listened to any of us, the family. _ had just listened to any of us, the family. all— had just listened to any of us, the family. all of— had just listened to any of us, the family, all of his _ had just listened to any of us, the family, all of his friends _ had just listened to any of us, the family, all of his friends and - family, all of his friends and investigated _ family, all of his friends and investigated properly, - family, all of his friends and investigated properly, theni family, all of his friends and l investigated properly, then as family, all of his friends and i investigated properly, then as i said. _ investigated properly, then as i said. none _ investigated properly, then as i said. none of— investigated properly, then as i said, none of these _ investigated properly, then as i said, none of these would - investigated properly, then as i said, none of these would be i investigated properly, then as i. said, none of these would be sat here _ said, none of these would be sat here because _ said, none of these would be sat here because they— said, none of these would be sat here because they would - said, none of these would be sat here because they would have i said, none of these would be sat i here because they would have done the job _ here because they would have done the job lt— here because they would have done the 'ob. ., . here because they would have done the 'ob. ., , . here because they would have done the'ob. . here because they would have done the 'ob. . . . the job. it was basic policing that the job. it was basic policing that they missed _ the job. it was basic policing that they missed out _ the job. it was basic policing that they missed out on. _ the job. it was basic policing that they missed out on. nothing - they missed out on. nothing difficult~ _ they missed out on. nothing difficult. it was not checking the laptop — difficult. it was not checking the laptop. with all of those things together, they would have caught stephen _ together, they would have caught stephen port and these three would be enjoying christmas their families. ., . . families. daniel, go ahead. inaudible. _
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can you just give us some sense of your personal point of view and weight makes you cross? because we do believe that _ weight makes you cross? because we do believe that it _ weight makes you cross? because we do believe that it happens _ weight makes you cross? because we do believe that it happens and - weight makes you cross? because we do believe that it happens and it - do believe that it happens and it did take — do believe that it happens and it did take place and it does take place — did take place and it does take place around the world and i think it's something that should have been looked _ it's something that should have been looked into. it definitely should have _ looked into. it definitely should have been looked into. we've gone through— have been looked into. we've gone through enough, we will continue to id through enough, we will continue to go through— through enough, we will continue to go through enough and we need answers— go through enough and we need answers and we still don't have all the answers because that's just answers and we still don't have all the answers because that'sjust been taken _ the answers because that'sjust been taken to— the answers because that'sjust been taken to the side and that should have _ taken to the side and that should have been— taken to the side and that should have been something that was looked into. have been something that was looked into lerma _ have been something that was looked into. lerma and i ask you the same question— into. lerma and i ask you the same question as — into. lerma and i ask you the same question as well? my into. lerma and i ask you the same question as well?— question as well? my thoughts and they always — question as well? my thoughts and they always have _ question as well? my thoughts and they always have been _ question as well? my thoughts and they always have been and - question as well? my thoughts and they always have been and they . they always have been and they always — they always have been and they always will— they always have been and they always will be. _ they always have been and they always will be. if— they always have been and they always will be. if this _ they always have been and they always will be. if this had - they always have been and they always will be. if this had beeni they always have been and they i always will be. if this had been for -irls always will be. if this had been for girls in— always will be. if this had been for girls in their— always will be. if this had been for girls in their early _ always will be. if this had been for girls in their early 20s _ always will be. if this had been for girls in their early 20s like - girls in their early 20s like anthony. _ girls in their early 20s like anthony, dumped - girls in their early 20s like anthony, dumped outside| girls in their early 20s like - anthony, dumped outside against a wall like _
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anthony, dumped outside against a wall like the — anthony, dumped outside against a wall like the other— anthony, dumped outside against a wall like the other three _ anthony, dumped outside against a wall like the other three boys, - anthony, dumped outside against a wall like the other three boys, all. wall like the other three boys, all in a graveyard _ wall like the other three boys, all in a graveyard etc, _ wall like the other three boys, all in a graveyard etc, they- wall like the other three boys, all in a graveyard etc, they would . wall like the other three boys, all. in a graveyard etc, they would have been _ in a graveyard etc, they would have been a _ in a graveyard etc, they would have been a lot _ in a graveyard etc, they would have been a lot more _ in a graveyard etc, they would have been a lot more press— in a graveyard etc, they would have been a lot more press interest - in a graveyard etc, they would have been a lot more press interest and| been a lot more press interest and there _ been a lot more press interest and there would — been a lot more press interest and there would have _ been a lot more press interest and there would have been _ been a lot more press interest and there would have been a _ been a lot more press interest and there would have been a lot- been a lot more press interest and there would have been a lot morei there would have been a lot more investigation _ there would have been a lot more investigation from _ there would have been a lot more investigation from the _ there would have been a lot more investigation from the police. - there would have been a lot more| investigation from the police. and there would have been a lot more i investigation from the police. and i will always— investigation from the police. and i will always stand _ investigation from the police. and i will always stand by _ investigation from the police. and i will always stand by that. _ before we finish up, ijust before we finish up, i just want to ask the families if anyone wants to say anything else that you have not already said. no. i think we are done. thank you. so, the responses there from the families of the three men killed by the serial killer stephen port. scathing attacks on the conduct of the metropolitan police. the inquestjury, of course, finding that police failings in the
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initial investigation into stephen port�*s first victim probably contributed to the deaths of the three later victims. well, in a statement, the police said. 'we know there were failings in the initial police investigations and we're truly sorry. the families and friends of these young men rightly expected professional and thorough police investigations into the deaths of their loved ones and they didn't get that. it is hugely disappointing that the initial investigations were not better. we do not believe the met is institutionally homophobic. the coroner has directed the jury away from any findings that are not supported by the evidence and this includes the notion of institutional homophobia. baroness casey of blackstock has been appointed to lead an independent review into our standards and culture in the met as we work to rebuild trust.�* so those are some of the comments from the metropolitan police to that inquestjury�*s findings
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from the metropolitan police to that inquest jury's findings that failings in the initial investigation into the killings by stephen port potentially contributed to the deaths of three later victims. our correspondent helena wilkinson is outside barking town hall. that police statement making it clear that the coroner was pretty categorical that the jury could not find, because there was no evidence, suggestions of institutionalised homophobia within the met police. yes, that's right. thejury were not asked to consider that in their conclusions when they were asked questions during this inquest but families and friends as you just heard then that press conference from the bereaved family members that they are sure themselves that they think there was bias towards these four young men who were in their early 20s, all gay men. there
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was bias towards them, there was prejudice. it's probably worthjust repeating some of those statements made on behalf of the family members through their solicitor that we had just a moment ago. the family said that they were incensed by the police's successful attempt to prevent the jury from examining whether it's played any part in the police actions. they added in a statement, and were firmly held polices that —— firmly held belief is that the metropolitan police actions were... during this inquest, as you just mentioned there are not statements, the police have admitted that there were feelings. we're not talking about one, two, three failings in these investigations, there were a catalogue of mistakes made by officers who were investigating the deaths of these four young men. the investigation is
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really driven by loved ones of those four young men and their friends, theirfamilies, they were four young men and their friends, their families, they were the ones who were curious, who were suspicious about the circumstances and they feel very much that they were dismissed by officers along the way. we heard during the conclusions from the inquest from the jury that the coroner, said earlier on today that these inquests have on any view raised a number of serious concerns. she also said that she would be preparing a prevention of future deaths report. the family are very angry again as we heard there that some of those offices, whose behaviour fell below the standards when they were investigated by the independent office of police conduct and some of those police officers have been promoted in the families say that they should have been
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sacked. so, very angry, the families are as it is understandable given that the jury have found that the police failings in these three investigations into the national —— into the investigation into the initial death of the victim of the serial killer, then these could have been stopped and he would not have been stopped and he would not have been able to continue and kill three other men. ., .. been able to continue and kill three other men. . ,, , ., been able to continue and kill three other men-— the prime minister is facing continued pressure after it was revealed that his director of communications, jack doyle, attended a christmas party in downing street on 18th december last year. the gathering, as well as two others, are the subject of an investigation by cabinet secretary simon case. number 10 have this lunchtime said they have full confidence in mr doyle. our correspondent lone wells has the latest:
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many won't have heard the namejack doyle before. he is borisjohnson's director of communications and we now know he was at the infamous downing street christmas party on the 18th of december. this matters because he is _ the 18th of december. this matters because he is in _ the 18th of december. this matters because he is in charge _ the 18th of december. this matters because he is in charge of - the 18th of december. this matters because he is in charge of the - because he is in charge of the government's messaging and their message, first that no party happens, then that no rules were broken has come underfire happens, then that no rules were broken has come under fire this week. ministers have told this party line saying they don't know what went on but will that stand the test of an investigation? the went on but will that stand the test of an investigation?— of an investigation? the cabinet secretary is. — of an investigation? the cabinet secretary is, i'm _ of an investigation? the cabinet secretary is, i'm sure, - secretary is, i'm sure, investigating all of these questions, so we will see the results of that in due course. but last christmas, i was spending my time getting trade deals over the line. time getting trade deals over the line, ., time getting trade deals over the line. . ., line. some have gone further with the chief weight _ line. some have gone further with the chief weight claiming - line. some have gone further with the chief weight claiming it - line. some have gone further with the chief weight claiming it was i line. some have gone further with the chief weight claiming it was a | the chief weight claiming it was a business meeting, despite bbc were told that food and drinks were served, games are played an invite were sent out in advance. while the government's transparency and
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honesty is under scrutiny she can, love the tory party has been fined nearly £18,000. in may, boris johnson's independent adviser cleared him of wrongdoing and said he wasn't aware of how the costs were paid until february this year. the electoral commission said yesterday that boris johnson had watts at the jonah yesterday that boris johnson had watts at thejonah —— had sent a message to the donor. the bbc have understand that lords guide is unhappy of what has happened. this is 'ust the unhappy of what has happened. t't 3 isjust the latest unhappy of what has happened. t't 3 is just the latest allegation of dishonesty from the prime minister. we have had lie upon lie of parties going on in downing street. the prime minister is not fit for office. .,
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prime minister is not fit for office. . ., office. the heat on the prime minister isn't _ office. the heat on the prime minister isn't just _ office. the heat on the prime minister isn'tjust coming - office. the heat on the prime l minister isn'tjust coming from office. the heat on the prime - minister isn'tjust coming from the opposition. there is a mounting tory rebellion over his plans to introduce covid—i9 passports in england. t introduce covid-19 passports in encland. ., , ,, ., england. i do wish him well. i know he can do this _ england. i do wish him well. i know he can do this but _ england. i do wish him well. i know he can do this but at _ england. i do wish him well. i know he can do this but at the _ england. i do wish him well. i know he can do this but at the moment i | he can do this but at the moment i think, ifi he can do this but at the moment i think, if i was him looking in the mirror, i would think, if i was him looking in the mirror, iwould be think, if i was him looking in the mirror, i would be saying, surely i can do this better. mp5 mirror, i would be saying, surely i can do this better.— mirror, i would be saying, surely i can do this better. mps will vote on the new coronavirus _ can do this better. mps will vote on the new coronavirus regulations - can do this better. mps will vote on the new coronavirus regulations in l the new coronavirus regulations in england on tuesday that the vote on thursday, were people in shropshire will be electing a new mp. it's new test will be held about whether this foreign minister is starting to cost the party votes. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, has warned the country is facing a "potential tsunami" of new covid infections. she said the spread of the omicron variant of the virus presented a "very severe challenge", and it was likely to overtake the delta variant possibly as soon as the beginning of next week. she announced new restrictions to tackle the spread — from saturday, the advice is that
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all household contacts of any confirmed covid case should isolate for 10 days regardless of vaccination status, even if they get a negative pcr test. some exemptions will be made for critical services. non—household contacts should isolate pending a pcr result. if it is negative, they can leave isolation at this point as long as they are double vaccinated. and ms sturgeon said it would be sensible to defer work christmas parties, given the impact and significant concerns of the omicron covid variant. we are going to take you over to the metropolitan police. they are responding to that inquestjury�*s findings. let's hear it got to say... findings. let's hear it got to sa , ., findings. let's hear it got to sa... , . . findings. let's hear it got to sa , . . ., . say... they have also found that the deaths of three _ say... they have also found that the deaths of three of _ say... they have also found that the deaths of three of those _ say... they have also found that the deaths of three of those young - say... they have also found that the deaths of three of those young men | deaths of three of those young men could probably have been prevented had the initial police responses and
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investigations been better. it is a devastating finding. our thoughts are with everybody who love these young men and we are so sorry for their loss. we are also deeply sorry that there were failings in the police investigations and the responses to their murders. i give my own and the metropolitan police's heartfelt apology. all of those who loved the victims, expected a thorough and professional police investigation into their deaths and it's a great sadness for me and for everybody at the metropolitan police that this did not happen. we want to give the families and daniel's partner the opportunity to talk to us, so that we can hear their views and listen to their concerns. the commissioner has offered to meet with them personally and so have i and we will take this forward
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according to their wishes. we have been working to rebuild trust in the met for some time now and we completely accept that people's trust in us has been damaged by a number of recent events. what has happened in connection with the deaths of these four young men is part of that damage and we know has a particular impact in communities local to barking and lgbt communities across london. it's very important now to show that we are trustworthy, that we care, that we have changed and that we are learning, so that we can work with every person and every community to help protect them. we will examine the jury's findings and the recommendations that the coronet makes in the report to prevent future deaths and we will act on those findings and recommendations. the whole of the met is committed to
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improving our investigations, our relationships and the trust that people have in us. thank you. that was assistant _ people have in us. thank you. that was assistant commissioner via making it clear that it was a devastating finding on the part of the inquestjury that police failings potentially contributed to stephen port is going on to kill three other men. she said the victims' family expected a thorough investigation and they didn't get that. we realise people's trust in us has been damaged as a result of recent events. pointing to a number of recent past issues concerning met police conduct. she said we as a force need to show we care and that we are trustworthy and the met is working to change. so, that is the first response on camera at least
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from the metropolitan police. assistant commissioner in response to the jury's findings, damning findings, that police failings potentially allowed stephen port, the serial killer, to go on and kill more young men. now, just before that, we were telling you about scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, saying that the country was facing a tsunami of interest —— infections. she said it could become the dominant form of coronavirus by the dominant form of coronavirus by the beginning of next week. let's see what more she had to say... public health advice that we have no alternative to agree to given the evidence of risk that i know about and have shared with you is that we should all think a bit more carefully about unnecessary contact, especially in crowded places just now and that it would be sensible to defer work christmas parties. i know this has a big impact on businesses, which is why we are considering and pressing the uk government
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on financial support. once again, we face a situation that frankly has no easy options. we know that any additional protective measures will cause social and economic harms, especially after almost two years of this pandemic but we also know from past experience that only action is often needed when dealing with this virus. —— early action. in fact, acting early is often the best way of acting proportionately, so we cannot rule out further measures and i'm afraid we can't avoid the advice that i have shared with you today. that was the first minister, nicola sturgeon. i'm joined by professorjason leitch, the national clinical director for the scottish government. how bad can it get in scotland? i'm afraid how bad can it get in scotland? tn afraid the similar story is of the uk. we published an evidence paper,
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very short paper that i would recommend on the scottish website. we are already seeing 15% of our cases as omicron. it is doubling every two days and that would suggest that we would have a dominant form being omicron by the beginning of the week. we know it is more transmissible, we don't know what kind of disease it gives you and we don't know if it can escape the vaccines a little, so all of that mix us very cautious. the one thin we that mix us very cautious. the one thing we do _ that mix us very cautious. the one thing we do seem _ that mix us very cautious. the one thing we do seem to _ that mix us very cautious. the one thing we do seem to know- that mix us very cautious. the one thing we do seem to know is - that mix us very cautious. the one thing we do seem to know is that. that mix us very cautious. the one | thing we do seem to know is that it is much more transmissible than delta. ., �* . ., is much more transmissible than delta. . �* , . ., ., delta. that's what the world would su: est, delta. that's what the world would suggest, wouldn't _ delta. that's what the world would suggest, wouldn't it? _ delta. that's what the world would suggest, wouldn't it? if— delta. that's what the world would suggest, wouldn't it? if you - delta. that's what the world would suggest, wouldn't it? if you look. delta. that's what the world would | suggest, wouldn't it? if you look at the couple of maps about where it is, there are thousands of variants every day this virus mutates every time. the only ones that win the race are the ones that you start to see everywhere around the world. this is the fourth time that has happened. we are now seeing numbers globally and that's exactly what is happening. in scotland and across the uk, we are very good at finding
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them genetically, so we are probably them genetically, so we are probably the same as other countries, we are just really good at finding it that worries us. what we need to know is what kind of disease it gives you. the arithmetic would suggest that if it is the same disease as delta, if you get more cases, you get more sick people, it's pretty blunt but it's the arithmetic. if you have 1000 delta cases, that could be about 30 cases in hospital. if you have 1000 omicron cases, what does that give you? is at 30? because you're going to get to 10,000 omicron cases much quicker than you would with delta. taste omicron cases much quicker than you would with delta.— would with delta. we also don't know then whether — would with delta. we also don't know then whether or _ would with delta. we also don't know then whether or not _ would with delta. we also don't know then whether or not the _ would with delta. we also don't know then whether or not the vaccines - would with delta. we also don't know then whether or not the vaccines at i then whether or not the vaccines at then whether or not the vaccines at the moment are able to deal with it. we know to some extent they are. we know for sure that they are not useless. they are far from useless, so the most important thing you can do is get vaccinated and test every day if you are going to see people from outside your household. i
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vaccinated yesterday. i did an actual vaccinated shift yesterday afternoon and it was fantastic to be able to protectjust a afternoon and it was fantastic to be able to protect just a few individuals of the millions that we have protected across scotland and the uk and they were also delighted to have it. it's still the most important thing you can do with your booster or your first important thing you can do with your booster or yourfirst or important thing you can do with your booster or your first or second dose if you haven't had one. before you go to a social event, before you go to your man's house tonight, before you have a drink after work, test and that will break the strains of transmission. taste and that will break the strains of transmission.— transmission. we will leave it there. thank _ transmission. we will leave it there. thank you _ transmission. we will leave it there. thank you for - transmission. we will leave it there. thank you forjoining l transmission. we will leave it l there. thank you forjoining us. the wikileaks founder, julian assange, is again facing extradition to the united states, after the american authorities won an appeal at the high court in london. washington wants him to face charges relating to the publication of hundreds of thousands of leaked documents on the afghanistan and iraq wars. a britishjudge had previously ruled he couldn't be extradited, over fears he would face highly restrictive prison
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conditions in the us. but the american authorities have provided assurances about his custody, and judges at the high court now say he can be sent to the us to face trial. let's talk to our diplomatic correspondent paul adams. this is a reversal in fortune for julian assange. what other lines of appeal does he have now or is? is not it. it's not quite clear how close to the end of this process we are but what the judges have directed is that he should go back to the magistrates court with now furnished with these american assurances aboutjulian assange's assurances about julian assange's treatment assurances aboutjulian assange's treatment should he be extradited to the united states and that whatever decision comes out of that should then be referred to the home secretary, priti patel, to sign off on an extradition order. now, julian assange's legal team are obviously not going to give up the fight. they
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are outraged by today's decision and they are saying they will take it to they are saying they will take it to the supreme court. it's not quite clear what the mechanism for that will be that they absolutely seem determined to carry on the fight for now. ., ., determined to carry on the fight for now, , ,, determined to carry on the fight for now. _ ,, determined to carry on the fight for now. _ ~ ., now. so, possibly some kind of heafina now. so, possibly some kind of hearing from — now. so, possibly some kind of hearing from the _ now. so, possibly some kind of hearing from the supreme - now. so, possibly some kind of. hearing from the supreme court. now. so, possibly some kind of- hearing from the supreme court. do we know the nature of the assurances that will be given by the americans? we do. they've been around for a while now. thejudges today we do. they've been around for a while now. the judges today said that thejudge back injanuary should that the judge back in january should have that thejudge back injanuary should have given that the judge back in january should have given the that thejudge back injanuary should have given the americans an opportunity to give these assurances but that did not happen for technical reasons. anyway, the assurances are thatjulian sands will not be held in a maximum security prison under specially administrative measures, the highest, most extreme form of incarceration. the kind of thing because the judge incarceration. the kind of thing because thejudge in incarceration. the kind of thing because the judge injanuary to conclude that he would be at risk of committing suicide and also that he would receive appropriate
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psychological and medical treatment during his incarceration in the us and crucially that he can appeal to save his sentence back in his own country, australia. there was a clear indication from the americans that they would be happy for him to make that request, so i think that is very much sway the opinion of the judges. taste is very much sway the opinion of the 'udees. ~ ., ~ . judges. we will leave it there. much more coming _ judges. we will leave it there. much more coming up. — judges. we will leave it there. much more coming up, stay _ judges. we will leave it there. much more coming up, stay with - judges. we will leave it there. much more coming up, stay with us. - judges. we will leave it there. much more coming up, stay with us. is. judges. we will leave it there. much | more coming up, stay with us. is the weather. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. hello. quiet on the weather front today. a little bit chilly out there. there is a cold, north—west wind that is also bringing some showers to north—western coasts of the uk. the temperatures are around 7 degrees or so and they will drop tonight. the winds will fall lights, the skies are clear. nothing particularly in the eastern and central areas of the uk. we will see a frost and even
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larger towns and cities will be freezing or below. out towards the west, it won't be quite as cold and that's because milder air with cloud and rain is advancing and you can see where the wet weather is through the morning and into the afternoon. i don't think it's going to be a very inviting day out there tomorrow, even though it's relatively mild out towards the west, it's cloudy and damp. it will turn milder as we go through the course of the weekend and into next week. temperatures in one or two spots especially across the south and the south—east could hit iii degrees. hello this is bbc news. the headlines. failings by the met police meant the serial killer stephen port was free to kill again, after the death of his first victim an inquets finds. the families of the victims say the mets actions were driven in part by homophobia. the prime minister faces further
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questions about a gathering in number 10 last christmas after it emerges that his director of communications was present. and number 10 has confirmed it's christmas party this year won't now be going ahead. the high court rules that the wikileaks founder julian assange can be extradited to face charges in the united states/. the united states. football clubs have potentially made hundreds of millions of pounds selling controversial crypto "fan tokens" — the bbc estimates more than two hundred and sixty million pounds been spent on the virtual currencies. sport now...and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's olly foster. good afternoon. england have dragged themselves back into the first ashes test after a much better day in brisbane but they still trailed by 58 runs at the close on day 3. travis head hit 152 in australia's first innings before they were bowled out for 425. in reply, england reached 220—2 withjoe root and dawid malan both
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closing in on centuries. withjoe root and dawid malan both here's our sports correspondentjoe wilson (vt) written, and expanding sporting city, it will host the olympics. ashes cricket, let's remember, it's a marathon. so england began the third day of this test still trying to take australian wickets, optimism and energy running on empty. ben stokes was fit enough to bell, travis head was thrilled about. —— fit enough to goal. australia built a lead of 208, travis head 152 and all that was just a start. now england batted. rory burns a touch from the glove, that was him gone for 13. from the glove, that was him gone for13. hattie from the glove, that was him gone for 13. hattie pammy, from the glove, that was him gone for13. hattie pammy, glance from the glove, that was him gone for 13. hattie pammy, glance of the bat, he was outjust when he was
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setting in. 2021 has been a record—breaking year of run—scoring forjoe root. the captain's was greeted by plenty of england fans, it is queensland. now with milan was part 52. now this was getting interesting. encouraging. as the shadows lengthened, the league reduced, evening came, root and mallan remained. with two days to come, it felt like a victory, just 58 runs behind. it's the climax to the formula one season this weekend. the abu dhabi grand prix could be one for the ages. max verstappen and lewis hamilton level on points, verstappen only top by virtue of winning 9 races to the reigning champions 8. it's the briton who topped the timesheets in friday's second practice. he was more than half a second quicker than his title rival, which is a huge margin in formula one. although the dutchman was fastest
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in the morning session. remember, it's a straight shootout for the title between hamilton and verstappen, presuming that they finish in the points, whoever crosses the line first on sunday is world champion, or if neither car finishes, verstappen can take the title that way. the premier league has instructed all of their 20 clubs to revert to emergency covid measures in light of the new government guidance with cases of the new omicron variant on the rise. tottenham are dealing with an outbreak that saw their match postponed in the europa league last night and their game at brighton on sunday is also off. leicester have cases in their squad and norwich have revelaed today that they have covid related issues, chelsea's matteo kovacic tested positive for the virus today, every club is on high alert. the more important thing is all the players must be vaccinated, because
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we play every three days now and we met a lot of players, and it is important because if something happens with the vaccine, it is slow, without the vaccine, it is a big risk. i understand content and i hope here in watford everything continues to be ok. england forward zoe aldcroft is the women's world rugby player of the year. the 25—year—old, who plays for gloucester hartpury, is the fourth england women's player to take the global award. the red roses won their third successive six nations title earlier this year and she captained the team for the first time during their unbeaten autumn series last month. lam iamso i am so proud to be alongside all the other amazing females that have won it, but i was saying to a lady earlier that it is not about these individual awards, that is not
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likely rugby, but all my team—mates, they have made me be able to achieve this award, if that makes sense. it is not the main reason i do it, i very privileged and honoured to accept the award. —— i am very. the accept the award. -- i am very. the men's award _ accept the award. -- i am very. the men's award went _ accept the award. —— i am very. the men's award went to antoine du pont. that's all the sport for now. let's get more on our top story — an inquestjury has ruled that failings by the metropolitan police probably contributed to the deaths of three men murdered by the serial killer stephen port. there have been allegations that the metropolitan police failed to investigate the murders properly because it was "institutionally homophobic". but while the force has admitted that there were failings, they have denied homophobia was a factor, as daniel de simone reports. daniel whitworth and ricky walmsley were an ordinary couple. he daniel whitworth and ricky walmsley were an ordinary couple.— were an ordinary couple. he was my first boyfriend. _
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were an ordinary couple. he was my first boyfriend, a _ lot a lot. danielwas lot a lot. daniel was murdered lot a lot. danielwas murdered by stehen lot a lot. danielwas murdered by stephen port. — lot a lot. danielwas murdered by stephen port, the _ lot a lot. danielwas murdered by stephen port, the met _ lot a lot. danielwas murdered by stephen port, the met police - lot a lot. daniel was murdered by - stephen port, the met police refused to cast his partner as next of kin. we had been relationship forfour years. we had been living together for three. we even had a joint bank account. he for three. we even had a 'oint bank account. . for three. we even had a 'oint bank account. , . , for three. we even had a 'oint bank account. , ., , , , account. he says it was because they were ea . account. he says it was because they were gay- police _ account. he says it was because they were gay. police have _ account. he says it was because they were gay. police have admitted - were gay. police have admitted ricky's treatment was wrong. i felt ricky's treatment was wrong. i felt like i was being _ ricky's treatment was wrong. i felt like i was being put _ ricky's treatment was wrong. i felt like i was being put to _ ricky's treatment was wrong. t felt like i was being put to one side and ifelt like they were like i was being put to one side and i felt like they were being homophobic towards me. if it was a straight woman who had been found dead, and that was my partner, i think i would have been treated very differently. by, think i would have been treated very differentl . �* ., .. think i would have been treated very differentl . . w , . ., differently. a fake suicide note, falsely linked _ differently. a fake suicide note, falsely linked daniel— differently. a fake suicide note, falsely linked daniel to - differently. a fake suicide note, falsely linked daniel to another| falsely linked daniel to another victim, gabriel. it stated daniel had killed gabriel, but it had really been written by their merger, stephen port. but police would not
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show ricky the note, meaning he couldn't say what he thought of the content and handwriting. officers also ignored an alibi ricky gave daniel, showing he was at home in kent when the fake note claimed he was in london. i kent when the fake note claimed he was in london.— was in london. i 'ust assumed that bein: the was in london. ijust assumed that being the police, _ was in london. ijust assumed that being the police, they _ was in london. ijust assumed that being the police, they would - was in london. ijust assumed that being the police, they would look i being the police, they would look into all of this. because that is theirjob. into all of this. because that is their 'ob. ~ ., into all of this. because that is their 'ob. ~ . ., ,, ., i] their 'ob. what do you think now? i am theirjob. what do you think now? i am shocked. _ theirjob. what do you think now? i am shocked, appalled. _ theirjob. what do you think now? i am shocked, appalled. a _ theirjob. what do you think now? i am shocked, appalled. a friend - theirjob. what do you think now? i am shocked, appalled. a friend of. am shocked, appalled. a friend of gabriel, am shocked, appalled. a friend of gabriel. the _ am shocked, appalled. a friend of gabriel, the second _ am shocked, appalled. a friend of gabriel, the second man - am shocked, appalled. a friend of gabriel, the second man to - am shocked, appalled. a friend of gabriel, the second man to be - gabriel, the second man to be killed, says he also experienced prejudice from the met. the force ignored john's warnings about the threat to gay men and links between the deaths. i threat to gay men and links between the deaths. , ., , . the deaths. i feel strongly that the deaths. i feel strongly that the 'ust the deaths. i feel strongly that they just didn't _ the deaths. i feel strongly that theyjust didn't value - the deaths. i feel strongly that theyjust didn't value those - the deaths. i feel strongly that i theyjust didn't value those young men _ theyjust didn't value those young men. �* . . . theyjust didn't value those young men. �* , , , , ., . theyjust didn't value those young men. 2, , . men. the uk's biggest police force has rarely faced _ men. the uk's biggest police force has rarely faced such _ men. the uk's biggest police force has rarely faced such a _ men. the uk's biggest police force has rarely faced such a challengingj has rarely faced such a challenging year. accused of harbouring corruption, racism and misogyny,
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with homophobia now added to the list. john, who is himself gay, says the port case resonates with the finding of institutional racism after an earlier scandal. the murder of stephen lawrence in the 19905. the definition of institutional racism — the definition of institutional racism was a collective failure of an institution to provide an appropriate and professional service to a minority group. i think if you co-opt _ to a minority group. i think if you co-opt that— to a minority group. i think if you co—opt that as a definition of institutional homophobia, this investigation takes —— ticks every box~ _ investigation takes -- ticks every box. ~ . . . , , investigation takes -- ticks every box. ~ ,_, box. the met accepts failing the victims but _ box. the met accepts failing the victims but denies _ box. the met accepts failing the victims but denies that - box. the met accepts failing the | victims but denies that prejudice played a role. i victims but denies that pre'udice played a mei victims but denies that pre'udice -la eda role. ., �* ~' ~ played a role. i don't think the met is institutional _ played a role. i don't think the met is institutional homophobic, - played a role. i don't think the met is institutional homophobic, i - played a role. i don't think the met is institutional homophobic, i do i is institutional homophobic, i do think— is institutional homophobic, i do think that — is institutional homophobic, i do think that we _ is institutional homophobic, i do think that we need _ is institutional homophobic, i do think that we need to _ is institutional homophobic, i do think that we need to make - is institutional homophobic, i do think that we need to make a i is institutional homophobic, i do i think that we need to make a great deal of— think that we need to make a great deal of change _ think that we need to make a great deal of change to _ think that we need to make a great deal of change to our— think that we need to make a great deal of change to our investigativel deal of change to our investigative practices, — deal of change to our investigative practices, we _ deal of change to our investigative practices, we have _ deal of change to our investigative practices, we have done _ deal of change to our investigative practices, we have done that. i deal of change to our investigative i practices, we have done that. people need to— practices, we have done that. people need to be _ practices, we have done that. people need to be reassured _ practices, we have done that. people need to be reassured that _ practices, we have done that. people need to be reassured that we - practices, we have done that. people need to be reassured that we have i need to be reassured that we have done _ need to be reassured that we have done that — need to be reassured that we have done that. .,, ., need to be reassured that we have
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done that. ., ~' need to be reassured that we have done that. ., ,, . ., done that. those who knew and love the dead men _ done that. those who knew and love the dead men say _ done that. those who knew and love the dead men say there _ done that. those who knew and love the dead men say there must - done that. those who knew and love the dead men say there must be i done that. those who knew and love the dead men say there must be a i the dead men say there must be a full acceptance of what went wrong before change can occur. with me is human rights activist, protestor and founder of peter tatchell foundation — peter tatchell. thanks forjoining us. i don't know if you heard that report, assistant commissioner making clear that the met police i5 commissioner making clear that the met police is no institutional homophobic, we have changed our investigative practices, she says, it is a devastating finding what the jury it is a devastating finding what the jury found, and we accept that people's trust in us has been damaged but we are not institutionally homophobic. what do you make of that? just institutionally homophobic. what do you make of that?— you make of that? just look at the evidence. the _ you make of that? just look at the evidence. the inquest _ you make of that? just look at the evidence. the inquest evidence i evidence. the inquest evidence showed that the police were incompetent, negligent, unprofessional and homophobic. incompetent, negligent, unprofessionaland homophobic. every unprofessional and homophobic. every single unprofessionaland homophobic. every single gay person who raised concerns about the deaths of these
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young gay men was ignored, dismissed and treated with contempt. even the partner of one of the murder victims. more than a year the police made no public appeals for help and did not warn the gay community. they failed to liaise with lgbt+ organisations and they failed to alert the gay press. all of that amount to institutional homophobia, and some of these officers have got to face serious disciplinary action. but the coroner directed the jury not to reach any findings as regards homophobia and without notice was institutionalised within the met police because she made it clear that she didn't feel the evidence was there. that she didn't feel the evidence was there-— that she didn't feel the evidence was there. . . , ., was there. the evidence that you have heard _ was there. the evidence that you have heard in _ was there. the evidence that you have heard in your— was there. the evidence that you have heard in your report - was there. the evidence that you have heard in your report and i was there. the evidence that you have heard in your report and my was there. the evidence that you i
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have heard in your report and my own comments just now show that clearly there was a homophobic bias. the idea that the police will learn the lessons just doesn't wash. we have had three major serial killings of gay men in the last llo years, dennis nelson, michael lupo and colin ireland. after each of those serial killings, the metropolitan police and other forces promised killings, the metropolitan police and otherforces promised to killings, the metropolitan police and other forces promised to learn the lessons, they put in place guidelines which were ignored totally in this investigation into the stephen port murders. i can have no confidence that police will learn the lessons because they promised to learn the lessons previously and they clearly haven't. fsine learn the lessons previously and they clearly haven't.— they clearly haven't. one of the relatives of— they clearly haven't. one of the relatives of one _ they clearly haven't. one of the relatives of one of _ they clearly haven't. one of the relatives of one of those - they clearly haven't. one of the relatives of one of those who i they clearly haven't. one of the i relatives of one of those who died said that they didn't feel that cressida dick should resign over this. because she was no in post at the time of the investigation. but
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they said she had to stand up and she had to make changes. do you agree with that or do you think cressida dick should resign? i agree with that or do you think cressida dick should resign? i agree she was rrot — cressida dick should resign? i agree she was rrot in _ cressida dick should resign? i agree she was not in post _ cressida dick should resign? i agree she was not in post at _ cressida dick should resign? i agree she was not in post at the _ cressida dick should resign? i agree she was not in post at the time, i i she was not in post at the time, i do think she needs to stop the denials of police homophobia and her offer to meet the victims' families is good but clearly not enough. there has to be disciplinary action against these officers. what is so shocking is that the independent officer of police did find that nine officers behaved in ways that were substandard and unprofessional. the metropolitan police commissioner now needs to respond by taking action against those officers, simply saying that the lessons had been learnt is not good enough. this case has really seriously damaged lgbt+
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confidence in the police, because many of us went to the police, either a sales or through third parties, to raise our concerns after the second and third killings, and we were all fobbed off by the police. itjust won't we were all fobbed off by the police. it just won't wash to we were all fobbed off by the police. itjust won't wash to say that lessons had been learned. taste that lessons had been learned. we will leave it there, peter, thanks forjoining us. the headlines on bbc news... failings by the met police meant the serial killer stephen port was free to kill again, after the death of his first victim an inquets finds. the families of the victims say the mets actions were driven in part by homophobia. nicola sturgeon warns a new wave of the pandemic is about to begin in scotland, with the variant likely to replace delta as the dominant form of the virus within days. the prime minister faces further questions about a gathering
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in number 10 last christmas after it emerges that his director of communications was present. and numb er 10 has confirmed it's christmas party this year won't now be going ahead. football supporters around the world have spent at least £260 million on newly—launched virtual coins sold by a growing number of clubs. the 'fan tokens' are promoted as offering big benefits and can be traded for profit like other cryptocurrencies. but critics say they're risky investments because the system's not regulated. let's speak to the bbc�*s cyber reporterjoe tidy. just explain what the clubs were trying to do. just explain what the clubs were trying to do— trying to do. they are offering these coins, _ trying to do. they are offering these coins, these _ trying to do. they are offering these coins, these fan - trying to do. they are offering| these coins, these fan tokens, through a company called socio— is, 24 through a company called socio— is, 2a different sides in the european league across europe, eight of those clubs in the premier league, most recently crystal palace yesterday signed up to this system. it is
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offering fans a chance to buy coins, virtual coins, a bit like bitcoin, a miniature version of a crypto currency. the more coins they hold, the biggerfan currency. the more coins they hold, the bigger fan they are, they get to vote on club issues ago in four competitions. previously critics have said the offers and perks given to the token holders are not good enough, they are not significant. what kind of things? by, enough, they are not significant. what kind of things? b. lat enough, they are not significant. what kind of things?— enough, they are not significant. what kind of things? a lot of it is vote on what _ what kind of things? a lot of it is vote on what song _ what kind of things? a lot of it is vote on what song should - what kind of things? a lot of it is vote on what song should be i what kind of things? a lot of it is i vote on what song should be played as the team players walk out into the stadium, or what should the front cover... the stadium, or what should the front cover. . ._ the stadium, or what should the front cover... ., . ., . front cover... how much would that cost? you — front cover... how much would that cost? you have _ front cover... how much would that cost? you have to _ front cover... how much would that cost? you have to have _ front cover... how much would that cost? you have to have a _ front cover... how much would that cost? you have to have a certain i cost? you have to have a certain number of— cost? you have to have a certain number of coins _ cost? you have to have a certain number of coins to _ cost? you have to have a certain number of coins to do _ cost? you have to have a certain number of coins to do the i cost? you have to have a certain number of coins to do the vote. | cost? you have to have a certain | number of coins to do the vote. i would like to what the clubs want, thinking about, i have e—mailed and heard nothing back, one got back to me, brighton and hove albion, they said they have no plans to enter the
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crypto world and sell products like this. from speaking and listening to previous commentary from clubs, they say this is about fan engagement, they say it could be the future of football fans. offering crypto products like these fan tokens, it is notjust them, nfts also been offered by some size, and another programme which is like a player card version of nfts, you can do fantasy football. bill card version of nfts, you can do fantasy football.— fantasy football. all this fatal stuff, fantasy football. all this fatal stuff. crypto _ fantasy football. all this fatal stuff, crypto currency, - fantasy football. all this fatal i stuff, crypto currency, non-fungible stuff, crypto currency, non—fungible tokens —— virtual stuff. i won't bother try to explain it, i have got a clue, it is a growing market in which corporations, businesses are getting involved and one suspects it is notjust getting involved and one suspects it is not just football clubs. getting involved and one suspects it is notjust football clubs. no, it has to be said, there are lots of sport clubs, sports stars, footballers, individual footballers releasing these products, i suppose
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there is a clamour and excitement around crypto currencies, we have seen that in the uk alone, we now have about 2.3 million people investing in crypto currency. that is up from 1.9 million last year, it is up from 1.9 million last year, it is growing and we know big stories of success, people were becoming millionaires of bitcoin and other types of crypto currency, they are having an impact. the clubs are looking for a new way to make revenue, they have had a tough time in a pandemic, but there are lots of concerns about these types of unregulated products, so for example there have been horror stories about companies and individuals starting their own crypto currencies, selling them and disappearing when people's money. no one is saying that will happen in this case, these are legitimate companies, but there are concerns. ., ~' legitimate companies, but there are concerns. . ~ , ., families are facing a 'double—whammy�* of rising bills
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next year, according to bbc research, as council tax across much of england is likely to increase at the same time as national insurance. two—thirds of councils in england that responded to a bbc survey said they were considering a rise in council tax to help fund services. our political correspondent alex forsyth reports. ryanis ryan is an entertainer, he is also a dj, artist and is employed as a youth worker. he has multiplejobs but he says fine 905 are still tight. it but he says fine 90s are still tieht. . , , ., tight. it has hit us hard, the constant — tight. it has hit us hard, the constant rise _ tight. it has hit us hard, the constant rise in _ tight. it has hit us hard, the constant rise in utility i tight. it has hit us hard, the constant rise in utility bills, | constant rise in utility bills, especially gas and electricity, everything isjust especially gas and electricity, everything is just a especially gas and electricity, everything isjust a constant especially gas and electricity, everything is just a constant worry. i became reliant on credit cards to survive. he i became reliant on credit cards to survive. . survive. he lives in norton, north yorkshire and _ yorkshire and his council tax could be going up next year. another growing bill on the pile. it is always in my mind, i never stop thinking about paying things off. always in my mind, i never stop thinking about paying things off, it
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has hit me very — thinking about paying things off, it has hit me very hard. _ thinking about paying things off, it has hit me very hard. the - thinking about paying things off, it has hit me very hard. the council. thinking about paying things off, it| has hit me very hard. the council is facin: has hit me very hard. the council is facing rising — has hit me very hard. the council is facing rising course _ has hit me very hard. the council is facing rising course and _ has hit me very hard. the council is facing rising course and demand i has hit me very hard. the council isj facing rising course and demand for services. this particular pressure on care for children and adults. the government is already putting up national insurers to pay for social care but initially most of that will go towards the nhs, so some councils say they are still facing funding shortfalls. h say they are still facing funding shortfalls. , ., ., ., ~' say they are still facing funding shortfalls. , ., ., ., ,, . shortfalls. if you look at the ten ear shortfalls. if you look at the ten year record _ shortfalls. if you look at the ten year record of— shortfalls. if you look at the ten year record of this _ shortfalls. if you look at the ten year record of this council, i i shortfalls. if you look at the ten i year record of this council, i think we have _ year record of this council, i think we have been moderate in our increases _ we have been moderate in our increases. there comes a point where increases. there comes a point where in actual— increases. there comes a point where in actual fact — increases. there comes a point where in actual fact those people on lower incomes— in actual fact those people on lower incomes are probably the people that we need _ incomes are probably the people that we need to— incomes are probably the people that we need to increase council tax to raise _ we need to increase council tax to raise money— we need to increase council tax to raise money to actually provide the services _ raise money to actually provide the services to— raise money to actually provide the services to help them.— services to help them. council tax has been creeping _ services to help them. council tax has been creeping up _ services to help them. council tax has been creeping up in _ services to help them. council tax has been creeping up in recent i services to help them. council tax i has been creeping up in recent years because the government has told local authorities they can increase it by a certain amount to bring in money to help pay for services. it isn'tjust money to help pay for services. it isn't just this authority, money to help pay for services. it isn'tjust this authority, north yorkshire, in fact two thirds of councils across england have told us they are looking at putting up
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council tax and acl. no final decisions had been taken but councils are expecting to be able to increase tax by up to 3% from april. that is less than in recent years. it could mean an average of around £40 more on bills, it all depends on where you live. some councils of the also lower property values, which council tax is based on, means they can raise a less than inner parts of the south. h can raise a less than inner parts of the south. _, . can raise a less than inner parts of the south-— the south. if council tax was the only source _ the south. if council tax was the only source of— the south. if council tax was the only source of council— the south. if council tax was the only source of council funding, l only source of council funding, poorer areas would lose out, but councils get a lot of their funding directly from government, and how that money is distributed will be crucial in making sure that poorer areas do not see a funding fall behind. ., , areas do not see a funding fall behind. ., _ , , behind. the government says it is fittine behind. the government says it is fitting £5-4 _ behind. the government says it is fitting £5.4 billion _ behind. the government says it is fitting £5.4 billion over— behind. the government says it is fitting £5.4 billion over the - behind. the government says it is fitting £5.4 billion over the next i fitting £5.4 billion over the next years to improve the lives of those who receive care as well as an additional 1.6 billion in court local government funding for egf. that will allow councils to increase their spending on vital public services. back in north yorkshire, there is understanding about the
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need to pay for services. but some wor . need to pay for services. but some worry- we — need to pay for services. but some worry- we do _ need to pay for services. but some worry- we do rrot _ need to pay for services. but some worry. we do not like _ need to pay for services. but some worry. we do not like it _ need to pay for services. but some worry. we do not like it going i need to pay for services. but some worry. we do not like it going up i worry. we do not like it going up but we are happy with the service we get. t but we are happy with the service we net. ., �* but we are happy with the service we let, ., �* , ., , but we are happy with the service we net. ., �* _ ., get. i don't mind paying more council tax — get. i don't mind paying more council tax if _ get. i don't mind paying more council tax if it _ get. i don't mind paying more council tax if it means - get. i don't mind paying more council tax if it means help i get. i don't mind paying more| council tax if it means help for get. i don't mind paying more i council tax if it means help for the orderly. _ council tax if it means help for the orderly, infirm, care budgets, fire brigade _ orderly, infirm, care budgets, fire brigade do — orderly, infirm, care budgets, fire brieade. ., brigade. do you mind paying more? no, i hate brigade. do you mind paying more? no. i hate paying — brigade. do you mind paying more? no, i hate paying more. _ brigade. do you mind paying more? no, i hate paying more. i _ brigade. do you mind paying more? no, i hate paying more. i am i brigade. do you mind paying more? no, i hate paying more. i am a i no, i hate paying more. iam a single-parent. _ no, i hate paying more. iam a single—parent, it— no, i hate paying more. iam a single—parent, it is— no, i hate paying more. iam a single—parent, it is ridiculous, i no, i hate paying more. iam a i single—parent, it is ridiculous, my council— single—parent, it is ridiculous, my council tax — single—parent, it is ridiculous, my council tax is _ single—parent, it is ridiculous, my council tax is crazy, _ single—parent, it is ridiculous, my council tax is crazy, i— single—parent, it is ridiculous, my council tax is crazy, i struggle i single—parent, it is ridiculous, my council tax is crazy, i struggle to. council tax is crazy, i struggle to pay it _ council tax is crazy, i struggle to -a it. ., . , ., , pay it. councils were not set their tax rates until— pay it. councils were not set their tax rates until next _ pay it. councils were not set their tax rates until next year - pay it. councils were not set their tax rates until next year by i pay it. councils were not set their tax rates until next year by the i tax rates until next year by the prospect of another bill going up doesn't, for many, feel very bright. the american actorjussie smollett has been found guilty of disorderly conduct after faking a hate crime against himself. known for his role in the tv series empire, smollett claimed he'd been attacked by two men in an assault that was both racist and homophobic. but a jury found he had lied to the police — prosecutors say he'd staged the incident in order to raise his profile. our north america correspondent nomia iqbal has more.
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he was once a rising star. but for the last three years jussie smollett has been fighting for his reputation and career. the 39—year—old has always maintained he was the victim of a racist and homophobic attack. but a jury didn't believe him. they found him guilty of lying to police. the story goes back to january 29, 2019. smollett was known then for his role in the hip—hop drama, empire. he had claimed he was set upon by two men who targeted him for being black and gay. there was huge support for him from celebrities and politicians, including the now vice president kamala harris. but a police investigation eventually claimed he staged the whole thing, and he was arrested. at his trial, prosecutors said he did it to boost his profile and help his tv career. the two alleged assailants, brothers from nigeria, ended up being key witnesses, testifying
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againstjussie smollett. they said he had paid them to carry out the fake attack. but he repeatedly told the jurors the money was for personal training sessions and there was no hoax. jussie smollett now faces a possible prison sentence. huge support for him turned into deep anger when he was charged, with many who once stood by him now accusing him of taking advantage of the pain and anger of racism. nomia iqbal, bbc news, washington. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. not a bad day today, a lot of clear weather out there, just a speaking of showers. a noticeable chilly north—west breeze, but it is turning milder through the weekend, having said that it will also turn cloudy, outbreaks of rain on the way. on the
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saturday picture you can see the big gap in the clouds, the fine weather over us right now, this is the weather front here that is approaching from the atlantic. just off the west coast of ireland. today, right through the course of the day, a case of clear skies, a view showers and a north—west. the wind falling light, this evening and overnight, skies will remain clear, particularly across central and eastern areas. we will have an air frost in many towns and cities around freezing or below, but notice the temperature is already picking up the temperature is already picking up because western areas. this undulating pattern in thejet up because western areas. this undulating pattern in the jet stream means we will see a push of warmer airfrom the south, means we will see a push of warmer air from the south, milder means we will see a push of warmer airfrom the south, milder airfrom the southern climes, in place over us during the course of saturday. saturday morning start frost free in the west, outbreaks of rain, remaining cold in the east of the country after that chilly night. the cloud and rain spreading in, not a particularly inviting day out there,
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tomorrow. grey skies for most, outbreaks of rain, chilly in the east all day long. the rain will come and go through the evening. saturday, here is a look at sunday, low pressure approaching us, focus on that in a second, the bulk of the uk on sunday actually a relatively quiet day, not particularly sunny and quite a lot of cloud, but wind blowing from the south—west, should be relatively mild. temperatures around 13—14 south—east across northern ireland, wales and england, calder in scotland, let's mention this area of low pressure, could be nasty, quite compact manner small storm speaking to the north—west about bringing severe gales the western isles. we are keeping a close eye on that. the outlook on next week, staying relatively mild. try also. —— dry also.
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this is bbc news. i'm clive myrie. the headlines... failings by the met police meant the serial killer stephen port was free to kill again, after the death of his first victim according to an inquest. inadequate investigation by the metropolitan police into the deaths of the victims should be one of the most widespread institutional failings of history. nicola sturgeon warns a new wave of the coronavirus pandemic is about to hit scotland, with the omicron variant likely to become the dominant cause of infections within days because of the much greater and faster transmissibility of this new variant, we may be facing, indeed, we may be starting to experience a potential tsunami of infections.
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the prime minister faces further questions about a gathering in number 10 last christmas after it emerges that his director of communications was present. and no10 has confirmed it's christmas party this year won't now be going ahead. the high court rules that the wikileaks founder julian assange can be extradited to face charges in the united states. football clubs have potentially made hundreds of millions of pounds selling controversial crypto "fan tokens" — the bbc estimates more than £260 million been spent on the virtual currencies. good afternoon. an inquestjury has concluded that police errors
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men, who were murdered by the serial killer, stephen port. the jury found that flaws in the investigation into the first death in east london, meant he was free to kill three more times before he was caught. port is serving life for the murders in 2014 and 2015. our correspondent helena wilkinson is outside barking town hall, where the families of the victims have been giving their reaction today. well, these conclusions by the jury are damning for the metropolitan police, for the families, they absolutely devastating. the families have always wondered if they would have always wondered if they would have been different outcomes if the police investigating had done their job differently and now they know. we're talking about when, two, three mistakes that officers made, we are talking about a catalogue of mistakes that officers made since the death of the first victim, in
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the death of the first victim, in the hours after that. {lilia the death of the first victim, in the hours after that.— the death of the first victim, in the hours after that. ok, we clearly have some — the hours after that. ok, we clearly have some sound _ the hours after that. ok, we clearly have some sound problems - the hours after that. ok, we clearly have some sound problems there i the hours after that. ok, we clearly i have some sound problems there with helena wilkinson outside barking town hall,. for lives cruelly cut short by a serial killer. fashion student anthony walgate from whole. gabriel kovari from slovakia, young chef daniel whitworth from kent and jack taylor from daniel whitworth from kent and jack taylorfrom dagenham, all murdered with a drug ghb but the police could have stop the killing. the men's body had all been discovered in a small area of barking in east london over a period of less than a year and a quarter but detective simply did notjoin the dots. thea;r and a quarter but detective simply did not join the dots.— did not join the dots. they did not investigate- _ did not join the dots. they did not investigate. they _ did not join the dots. they did not investigate. they did _ did not join the dots. they did not investigate. they did not - did not join the dots. they did not investigate. they did not do i did not join the dots. they did not investigate. they did not do the i investigate. they did not do the smallest— investigate. they did not do the smallest of things that you would expect— smallest of things that you would expect a — smallest of things that you would expect a police officer to do. they
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didn't do their _ expect a police officer to do. they didn't do theirjob, _ expect a police officer to do. they didn't do theirjob, simple as that. it all— didn't do theirjob, simple as that. it all began — didn't do theirjob, simple as that. it all began in _ didn't do theirjob, simple as that. it all began injune _ didn't do theirjob, simple as that. it all began injune 2014, - didn't do theirjob, simple as that. it all began injune 2014, when i it all began injune 2014, when 23—year—old anthony walgate was found dead outside stephen port�*s flat in barking. almost immediately, the police errors started mounting up. the mistakes are too many to list but they went on for 15 months before port was finally arrested for murder, and by that time, three other young men were also dead. after anthony walgate died and port reported the body, detectives missed this record in the police national database of port as barking station with a man who could barely walk after taking ghb and they failed to examine port�*s computer which would have shown him repeatedly searching for videos of young men being raped while unconscious on drugs. anthony's mother is convinced that better police investigation would have stopped port within weeks of her son's death. bill
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have stopped port within weeks of her son's death.— her son's death. all the other victims would _ her son's death. all the other victims would have _ her son's death. all the other victims would have been i her son's death. all the other victims would have been safe j her son's death. all the other i victims would have been safe if they could _ victims would have been safe if they could have _ victims would have been safe if they could have just actually been bothered to investigate anthony's murden _ bothered to investigate anthony's murder. ,, , l, l, , l, murder. stephen port was arrested on susicion murder. stephen port was arrested on suspici°n of — murder. stephen port was arrested on suspici°n of lying _ murder. stephen port was arrested on suspicion of lying about _ murder. stephen port was arrested on suspicion of lying about moving - suspicion of lying about moving anthony's body but the investigation of the death went no further and he remained on bail, free to kill again. ten weeks later, a second body was found in a church graveyard, less than 400 metres from stephen port�*s front door. it was gabriel kovari, another gay man in his 20s. detectives did not connect the two deaths and did so little that the officer tasked with liaising with gabriel's family never spoke to them. just over three weeks later, in the same corner of the same graveyard, the body of daniel whitworth was found he had a suicide note around his neck, in which he also said he had taken gabriel's life. detectives had accepted what
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was written, when in fact, simple investigation would have shown that he was nowhere near barking when gabrielle died. police were telling the family that they killed himself and gabriel. it the family that they killed himself and gabriel. ., , the family that they killed himself and gabriel-— the family that they killed himself and gabriel. ., , .,~ ., , and gabriel. it does make you angry and gabriel. it does make you angry and uset and gabriel. it does make you angry and upset and _ and gabriel. it does make you angry and upset and distressed _ and gabriel. it does make you angry and upset and distressed because i and gabriel. it does make you angry| and upset and distressed because he has obviously had tragic consequences that might it has obviously had tragic consequences. for now. _ obviously had tragic consequences. for now, the killings stopped but so did any further investigation of the first three deaths. in september 20 15, three months after stephen port was released from prison, the body of jack taylor was found, metres from where the previous two bodies have been discovered. this time, there was cctv covered not by detectives but by a parked police officer on his bike. it showed the dead man beating a tall stranger in the middle of the night. it still
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took the persistence of jack taylor's sisters to persuade officers to make a public appeal using pictures. we officers to make a public appeal using pictures-_ officers to make a public appeal using pictures. officers to make a public appeal usina ictures. ~ ., ., using pictures. we asked and we were told no. using pictures. we asked and we were told n0- we — using pictures. we asked and we were told no. we asked _ using pictures. we asked and we were told no. we asked again _ using pictures. we asked and we were told no. we asked again and - using pictures. we asked and we were told no. we asked again and we - using pictures. we asked and we were told no. we asked again and we were | told no. we asked again and we were told no. we asked again and we were told no _ told no. we asked again and we were told no. eventually, they listen to us and _ told no. eventually, they listen to us and they did put out. and thank god they— us and they did put out. and thank god they did do that because, obviously, we found out who that was _ obviously, we found out who that was. ~ ., ~' ., obviously, we found out who that was. ~ ., ~ ., ., ., was. working from google late at niuht was. working from google late at ni . ht and was. working from google late at night and making _ was. working from google late at night and making handwritten - was. working from google late at. night and making handwritten notes, the sisters had spotted many of the key suspicious factors linking the deaths that the police have missed. they told me they now want some of the incompetent officers involved to be sacked. i the incompetent officers involved to be sacked. ., �* ~' , the incompetent officers involved to be sacked. ~ , , ., be sacked. i don't think they should be sacked. i don't think they should be in the position _ be sacked. i don't think they should be in the position that _ be sacked. i don't think they should be in the position that therein. - be sacked. i don't think they should be in the position that therein. i - be in the position that therein. i don't _ be in the position that therein. i don't think— be in the position that therein. i don't think they should have that 'ob. don't think they should have that iob~ we — don't think they should have that job. we have ended up in anxieties and things— job. we have ended up in anxieties and things that we didn't even know existed~ _ and things that we didn't even know existed. sleepless nights, ourwhole world_ existed. sleepless nights, ourwhole world tipped upside down and they -et world tipped upside down and they get promoted. they get to carry on with their_ get promoted. they get to carry on with their lives and that is shocking. it's very shocking. the metmpolitan _ shocking. it's very shocking. tue metropolitan police shocking. it's very shocking. tte metropolitan police has refused to
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accept that the four men's deaths were investigated so badly because they were gay that officers are either made prejudice assumptions or just didn't care enough about the men but it has agreed that officers were incompetent, describing some of the errors is astonishing. there was a press conference with members of the bereaved family members of the bereaved family members here in the last hour or so and on behalf of the family members in a statement was read out that said the met�*s inadequate investigation should be on public record is one of the most widespread institutional failures in record is one of the most widespread institutionalfailures in modern history and as daniel touched on in history and as daniel touched on in his report, the families believe that there was bias towards the four young men because they were gay. that is something that the jurors were not asked to reach conclusions on but the metropolitan police have denied there was any prejudice at all but we can hear now from neil
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hudgell, who is the solicitor representing the families. we are incensed by the police's successful attempts to prevent the jury from examining whether prejudice played any part in the police's actions. the coroner did not rule that the police were not homophobic and our position remains unchanged. based on the treatment we received, our firmly held belief is that the metropolitan police's actions were in part driven by homophobia. had four white heterosexual girls been found in the same manner as anthony, gabriel, daniel and jack, then the police's actions and outcomes would have been different. the approach of the met on the issue of homophobia demonstrates to us that even today, seven years on, they have led very little. well, the metropolitan police throughout the inquest and also in a statement after those conclusions apologised for those feelings made
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by offices in the investigations and said it is a devastating finding, those conclusions, by the during here that mike durie here as barking town hall. —— thejury here that mike durie here as barking town hall. —— the jury here as barking town hall. 0ur our thoughts are with everybody who love these young men and we're so sorry for their loss. we also deeply sorry for their loss. we also deeply sorry that there were feelings in the police investigations. and the responses to their murders. i give my own and the met�*s heartfelt apologies. all of those who loved anthony and gabrielle and daniel and jack —— gabriel, expected a thorough police investigation into their deaths and it's a great sadness for me and for everybody at the met that this did not happen. the me and for everybody at the met that this did not happen.— this did not happen. the 'ury in their conclusions * this did not happen. the 'ury in
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their conclusions said h this did not happen. the jury in their conclusions said that - this did not happen. the jury in| their conclusions said that there had been a complete breakdown in oversight of the investigation into the first death. the coroner here, had said that after those conclusions, these inquests have on any view raised a number of serious concerns and she said that she will be preparing a prevention of future death report. thank you for that, helena. the prime minister is facing continued pressure after it was revealed that his director of communications, jack doyle, attended a christmas party in downing street on 18th december last year. the suggestion is that this party to place on the 18th of december. the gathering, as well as two others, are the subject of an investigation by cabinet secretary simon case.
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number 10 have this lunchtime said they have full confidence in mr doyle. 0ur correspondent lone wells has the latest: many won't have heard the namejack doyle before. he's borisjohnson's director of communications and we now know he was at the infamous downing street christmas party on the 18th of december. this matters because he's in charge of the government's messaging and that message — first, that no party happened, then that no rules were broken — has come under fire this week. ministers have towed this party line, saying they don't know what went on but will that stand the test of an investigation? the cabinet secretary is i'm sure investigating all of these questions, so we will see the results of that in due course, but last christmas, i was spending my time getting trade deals over the line. some have gone further with the chief whip, mark spencer, claiming to the bbc this was a covid—i9 meeting, despite bbc being told food and was served, games were played and invites
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were sent out in advance. while the government's transparency and honesty is under scrutiny, the prime minister is facing separate allegations of misleading his advisers over a £54,000 donation from tory peer lord brownlow towards the refurbishment of his flat in downing street. the tory party is being fined nearly £18,000 for not properly declaring the donation. in may, borisjohnson's independent adviser on standards, lord geidt, cleared him of wrongdoing and said he wasn't aware of how the costs were paid until february this year. but the electoral commission said yesterday, borisjohnson had sent a message to the donor in november last year to ask for extra money for the works. number 10 say the prime minister did not withhold information from lord geidt at the bbc understands lord geidt is unhappy with what has emerged and labour have accused the prime minister of misleading his own adviser. this is just the latest allegation of dishonesty from the prime minister. we have had lie upon lie in relation to the party going on in downing street. the prime minister
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is not fit for office. the heat on the prime minister isn't just coming from the opposition. there is a mounting tory rebellion growing over his plans to introduce covid passports in england and former ministers are among those publicly criticising his leadership. i do wish him well, i know he can do this, but at the moment, i think if i was him looking in the mirror, i would be saying, surely, i can do this better. mps will vote on the new coronavirus regulations in england on tuesday but the more telling will be the vote on thursday, where people in north shropshire will be electing a new mp. it's there a true test will be held of whether this prime minister is starting to cost the party votes. let's speak to our political correspondent iain watson.
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they said it was their intention to hold a party. they said that the guidelines meant that they didn't have to do is get rid of their festivities. it turns out now that those plans have been cancelled. did not have anything to do with the fact that last year's party was featuring so prominently in questions were being asked about who went to that party. apparently, not. it simply because they move to plan the this week. —— plan b. the downing street party is off. as forjack doyle, the director of communications, downing street say that the prime minister has full confidence in him, so although it was reported that he was at the event on december the 18th, gave a speech and handed out some
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mock awards, we are told that he is staying inside downing street in his currentjob. hat staying inside downing street in his current 'ob. ., ., , ,, current 'ob. not the only issue the prime current job. not the only issue the prime minister _ current job. not the only issue the prime minister is _ current job. not the only issue the prime minister is facing _ current job. not the only issue the prime minister is facing at - current job. not the only issue the prime minister is facing at the - prime minister is facing at the moment is the question over the party, there is also the investigation into the refurbishment of his flat, what's in it on matt? the question there is really how the director of standards would react. his predecessor resigned when boris johnson didn't take on board his report into allegations about home secretary's pretty motels bullying. —— prissy patel —— prissy patel stop the first he knew about any questions of donations into the downing street flat was just after the report in february. they got hold of messages in the previous
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november showing that last year borisjohnson was asking for some cash for this. the explanation is complicated but it is that boris johnson did not know that lord brownlow, the person who was doing the refurbishment was doing it out of his own pocket. they thought he was setting up a trust to do so. when it comes to trust, the question is whether lord geidt does make the. it's not up to whether he has an enquiry or not, it's up to the prime minister. . , enquiry or not, it's up to the prime minister. ., , , , ., minister. finally, the suggestion that there could _ minister. finally, the suggestion that there could well— minister. finally, the suggestion that there could well be - minister. finally, the suggestion that there could well be a - minister. finally, the suggestion that there could well be a plan i minister. finally, the suggestion that there could well be a plan c| minister. finally, the suggestion i that there could well be a plan c on dealing with the omicron variant. yes, a meeting with michael gove and the first ministers of the devolved
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administrations, the suggestion is not a new set of regulations in england are going to be announced. downing street are saying that no documents are setting out a plan c proposals has been prepared but they also say that there is an array of things which they can do which are available to them should the situation deteriorate stop they are not commenting on any specifics yet but various questions were asked, could this mean the closure of schools, could this mean a fire after christmas? but they say at the moment that they have appropriate measures in place to deal with the omicron variant. they are talking about prospects of a plan c at this stage —— talking down. we can talk now to sirjohn curtice, professor of politics at the university of strathclyde. so, john, it's good to see you.
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thanks for being with us. i suspect you have been busy in the last few days getting a bit of polling data on all of this. can borisjohnson feel secure in the future from your polling? feel secure in the future from your ollina ? ., , ., polling? no, the truth is that we are into the _ polling? no, the truth is that we are into the pantomime - polling? no, the truth is that we are into the pantomime season l polling? no, the truth is that we i are into the pantomime season and polling? no, the truth is that we - are into the pantomime season and i think borisjohnson is at serious risk of being the pantomime villain at whom the villain shouts, we don't believe you! we have heard half a dozen companies now all of whom have been doing some kind of polling, asking people about what they think about the events surrounding the alleged gathering, party on the 18th of december and the polling universally makes bad news of the prime minister. so, on the issue which is apparently endowed, which is whether the gathering was a party, the polls suggest that between two thirds and three quarters of people think it was a
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party, and crucially, that's true of well over a half of those people who voted conservative in 2019. meanwhile, so far as whether or not the rules were being broken in downing street this time last year, which is where the prime minister is still saying that it did not happen, the truth is that between two thirds and three quarters of people think the rules were broken. perhaps what's most waiting for the prime minister is that polls have asked people directly, do you think the prime minister is telling the truth or not? in both cases, around two thirds of people, including nearly half of conservative voters say they do not think the prime minister is telling the truth. all of this is extremely redolent of the kind of polling that we got in the immediate break of dominic cummings' trips to barnard castle. they try to convince
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us that it was within the rules but they utterly failed to convince the public at that time with a lot of damage to them politically and they seem to be in exactly the same boat this time around. we seem to be in exactly the same boat this time around.— this time around. we always have this time around. we always have this discussion _ this time around. we always have this discussion after _ this time around. we always have this discussion after there - this time around. we always have this discussion after there has - this time around. we always have i this discussion after there has been some kind of scandal or whatever within westminster, whether or not it actually cuts through to ordinary people, ordinary voters around the rest of the country. it seems pretty clear and probably because of the circumstances surrounding the lockdown of last winter, it's pretty clear that this has cut through to the public. clear that this has cut through to the ublic. , ., clear that this has cut through to the public— the public. yes, there are two asects the public. yes, there are two meets to _ the public. yes, there are two aspects to this, _ the public. yes, there are two aspects to this, clive. - the public. yes, there are two aspects to this, clive. first. the public. yes, there are two aspects to this, clive. first of| aspects to this, clive. first of all, it's got emotional resonance. it's clearly an area where people are deeply upset, particularly those people who lost loved ones or had loved ones in hospital particularly at this time last year. they went able to visit them, and they see
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what allegedly happened. it also got a picture. that video clip that itv news were able to require has been watched —— acquire. that's broad drama to the story. to give you some indication, a poll said that more people have been following this story than were following the budget, and equally, yugo's is saying three quarters of people, when asked how did you feel about that video, three fifths of people said they felt angry about it. you just should not underestimate how strongly people can field in the midst of a pandemic about those who are responsible for setting the rules seemingly not following them as ever, good to see you.
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scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, has warned the country is facing a "potential tsunami" of new covid infections. she said the spread of the omicron variant of the virus presented a "very severe challenge", and it was likely to overtake the delta variant possibly as soon as the beginning of next week. she announced new restrictions to tackle the spread: from saturday, the advice is that all household contacts of any confirmed covid case should isolate for 10 days regardless of vaccination status — even if they get a negative pcr test. some exemptions will be made for critical services. non—household contacts should isolate pending a pcr result. if it is negative, they can leave isolation at this point as long as they are double vaccinated. and ms sturgeon said it would be sensible to defer work christmas parties, given the impact and significant concerns of the omicron covid variant. public health advice that we have no alternative to agree to given the evidence of risk that i know
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about and have shared with you is that we should all think a bit more carefully about unnecessary contact, especially in crowded places just now and that it would be sensible to defer work christmas parties. i know this has a big impact on businesses, which is why we are considering and pressing the uk government on financial support. once again, we face a situation that frankly has no easy options. we know that any additional protective measures will cause social and economic harms, especially after almost two years of this pandemic but we also know from past experience that only action is often needed when dealing with this virus. —— early action. in fact, acting early is often the best way of acting proportionately, so we cannot rule out further measures and i'm afraid we can't avoid the advice that i have shared with you today.
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that was the first minister speaking earlier today. that was the first minister speaking earlier today. let's speak to our scotland correspondent james shaw. yes, it was a stark warning from nicola sturgeon at her covid—i9 briefing this lunchtime. the kind of warning that we heard from leaders like the first minister perhaps a year ago, when we were looking at the earlier waves of coronavirus, and that i think is the way she is looking at the potential of what is happening with the omicron variant at the moment. the way she described it, it is spreading faster than previous variants, the delta variant which is the main variant of the uk at the moment. omicron spreads much faster and it has what they call in technical language a higher tax rate and that is a really important concept. —— attack rates. what this means is the extent that the virus can spread in crowded, enclosed
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environments. if you have a party, 50% of the people at the event will be infected if there is a single infected person at the gathering. she pointed to situations that the government is aware of, a party where a large number of people in accident and emergency became infected, and also, the fact that a lot of the staff are ill at the moment and the services have had to be cancelled. fees she said the early warning signs of what omicron could do and therefore there is a concern that rates will stock to go up concern that rates will stock to go up very quickly in the coming weeks. we have heard she expects that may be they will be new measures and we expect an update on that early next week, probably on tuesday. thank you for that. new rules about face coverings have come into force in england —
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meaning wearing a mask is compulsory in indoor settings including cinemas, theatres, museums and places of worship, unless you're medically exempt. ministers hope the move will slow the spread of the new omicron variant. it brings england's covid measures more into line with the other uk nations, as our business reporter esyllt carr reports. claire saunders is a member of the union of shop, distributive and allied workers. she is also a store manager herself, and joins me now from romford in essex. hello. is the concern for some of the people that you represent in the store is that you are not going to be able to enforce these mask mandates?— be able to enforce these mask mandates? , ., ., ~ mandates? yes, the retailer i work for has obviously _ mandates? yes, the retailer i work for has obviously gone _ mandates? yes, the retailer i work for has obviously gone very - mandates? yes, the retailer i work for has obviously gone very public. for has obviously gone very public and said that we will not enforce it, we are not going to put ourselves and our colleagues at risk. obviously, all of these signs are up and everyone knows the rules but from what has happened
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previously, the abuse, and sadly physical abuse, that we saw from trying to enforce it. i know myself add to 10pm on a friday night when people have come in and had some drinks, i don't want to be enforcing that when i'm on my own at all, so we provide masks and we've got all of the sign up but it's really down to the individual to make sure that they are doing it. but to the individual to make sure that they are doing it.— they are doing it. but there is no suggestion _ they are doing it. but there is no suggestion that _ they are doing it. but there is no suggestion that a _ they are doing it. but there is no suggestion that a shop _ they are doing it. but there is no suggestion that a shop worker i they are doing it. but there is no j suggestion that a shop worker or they are doing it. but there is no l suggestion that a shop worker or a store manager like yourself could get into trouble for not enforcing it, is there? or is that part of the problem here?— it, is there? or is that part of the problem here? previously, on the revious problem here? previously, on the previous lockdowns, _ problem here? previously, on the previous lockdowns, there - problem here? previously, on the previous lockdowns, there were i problem here? previously, on the i previous lockdowns, there were the covid—i9 marshals and the councils were out but as long as we are putting the signage up and we are displaying everything legally that we should be, there is no way you can honestly... i could not physically make a huge man twice the
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size of me put on a mask. i'm not going to put myself in that kind of position to do that, where i'm putting myself at risk of physical and mental abuse, putting myself at risk of physical and mentalabuse, it's putting myself at risk of physical and mental abuse, it'sjust not going to happen. that's the challenge with this. we want everyone wearing masks, obviously, to protect themselves and to protect us but it gets to a point where people have to take ownership of their own actions. but people have to take ownership of their own actions.— people have to take ownership of their own actions. but to be clear, are ou their own actions. but to be clear, are you mandated _ their own actions. but to be clear, are you mandated by _ their own actions. but to be clear, are you mandated by law- their own actions. but to be clear, are you mandated by law to - their own actions. but to be clear, l are you mandated by law to enforce the law when it comes to mask wearing. you're saying that you're not going to take on some big guy, of course, you're not but are used legally supposed to?— of course, you're not but are used legally supposed to? were meant to follow the government _ legally supposed to? were meant to follow the government guidelines, l legally supposed to? were meant to l follow the government guidelines, so we do all we can but i think when it comes down to that moment, i'm not going to not allow someone in and put myself at risk because they're not wearing a mask. there are exemptions and a lot of the are
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unseen as well, so it's one of these things that we could all argue about constantly all the time but the problem is now, especially from what is coming out from the government's christmas parties, no one is taking it seriously any more because every day something is coming out. before, people were following it slightly better but now people are very much think they will do what they once because they want. i don't get it because they want. i don't get it because it's challenging for us because it's challenging for us because we need to keep ourselves safe and everyone else a.— because we need to keep ourselves safe and everyone else a. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. hello. quiet on the weather front today. a little bit chilly out there. there is a cold, north—west wind that is also bringing some showers to north—western coasts of the uk. the temperatures are around 7 degrees or so and they will drop tonight. the winds will fall lights, the skies are clear. nothing particularly in the eastern
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and central areas of the uk. we will see a frost and even larger towns and cities will be freezing or below. out towards the west, it won't be quite as cold and that's because milder air with cloud and rain is advancing and you can see where the wet weather is through the morning and into the afternoon. i don't think it's going to be a very inviting day out there tomorrow, even though it's relatively mild out towards the west, it's cloudy and damp. it will turn milder as we go through the course of the weekend and into next week. temperatures in one or two spots, especially across the south and the south—east, could hit 14 degrees. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... an inquestjury has ruled that failings by the met police contributed to the deaths of serial killer stephen port�*s final three victims, all gay men in their 20s.
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inadequate investigation by the metropolitan police into the deaths of anthony, a gabriel, daniel and jack should be on record as one of the most widespread institutional failings in modern history. it meant that for months _ failings in modern history. it meant that for months people _ failings in modern history. it meant that for months people were - failings in modern history. it meant that for months people were telling prodl family... —— daniel's family. the families of the victims say the metropolitan police's actions were driven in part by homophobia — a charge the met denies. nicola sturgeon warns a new wave of the coronavirus pandemic is about to hit scotland, with the omicron variant likely to become the dominant cause of infections within days. because of the much greater and faster transmissibility of this new variant, we may be facing, indeed we may be starting to experience a potential tsunami of infections. the prime minister faces further questions about a gathering in number 10 last christmas after it emerges that his director of communications was present. meanwhile number 10 has confirmed it's christmas party this year won't now be going ahead.
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the high court rules that the wikileaks founder julian assange can be extradited to face charges in the united states. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's olly foster. good afternoon. david malan says england can't get ahead of themselves just yet, but they have dragged themselves back into the first ashes test. malan and captainjoe root are closing in on centuries after helping england to 220—2 in their second innings. they still trail australia by 58 runs at the close on day 3 in brisbane, but they've given themselves half a chance. i think that willows be the thought in people's head, we need to learn, we later in the last series, soon as we later in the last series, soon as we think too far ahead, you open the doorfor them and they we think too far ahead, you open the door for them and they are so brilliant at closing that door —— i think that will be the thought.
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important for us tomorrow, then we could think about how we can play, we need one more good 100 run partnership to put a good score on the board, then who knows what could happen? the bbc�*s henry moeran is in australia with the test match special team, he's been speaking to former england bowler steven finn about engfland's chances with 2 days left to play. only 50 runs in arrears now, if fantastic effort by the batters, showing defiance against the aussie bowlers, and regardless of the result today, it was so important that those guys did show that fight and resolve to show the way through the rest of the series. tomorrow, same again? yes, no wickets all day would be ideal, but it is that mantra, if they focus on the method with which they want to score the runs, the end column will look after itself, it sounds a cliche, but we are allowed to because we are depressed, if the players in the dressing room start looking too far ahead and setting them this or that,
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that's when your mindset gets carried away, you lose two quick wickets and australia are all over you again. if you think about the little building blocks to keep you into a position, potentially be able to force something out of this game on the last day, hopefully a deteriorating pitch, then it is those small targets you need to look at. it's the climax to the formula one season this weekend. the abu dhabi grand prix could be one for the ages. max verstappen and lewis hamilton level on points, verstappen only top by virtue of winning nine races to the reigning champions' eight. it's the briton who topped the timesheets in friday's second practice. he was more than half a second quicker than his title rival, which is a huge margin in formula one, although the dutchman was fastest in the morning session. remember, it's a straight shootout for the title between hamilton and verstappen, presuming that they finish in the points, whoever crosses the line first on sunday is world champion, or if neither car finishes, verstappen can take the title that way. one of the standout matches in the premier league this weekend is at anfield. liverpool welcoming back one of their favourite sons. it's steven gerrard's first
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return as an opposition manager when he takes his aston villa side there. he had 17 years as a liverpool player, and the current boss was asked whether he could see gerrard in the liverpool dugout one day. yes. yes, ithink, absolutely. the only problem is, when is the right moment for that? a similar story to chelsea. i think he has done really well because he is very young. still, for a manager stop when is the right moment to take the job? not that he is not able but how long he wants to do it. i respected understand all the noise around _ to do it. i respected understand all the noise around again _ to do it. i respected understand all the noise around again for - to do it. i respected understand all the noise around again for obvious| the noise around again for obvious reasons_ the noise around again for obvious reasons because i am going to back to a club— reasons because i am going to back to a club paris made many years, it begs _ to a club paris made many years, it begs a _ to a club paris made many years, it begs a smile — to a club paris made many years, it begs a smile to my face because i'd have a _ begs a smile to my face because i'd have a good — begs a smile to my face because i'd have a good relationship with a lot of people. — have a good relationship with a lot of people, a fantastic time there, a
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local boy. _ of people, a fantastic time there, a local boy, a — of people, a fantastic time there, a local boy, a team i supported growing — local boy, a team i supported growing up, i always will support that team, of course. at the same time _ that team, of course. at the same time it_ that team, of course. at the same time it means a smile to my face because — time it means a smile to my face because at— time it means a smile to my face because at the opportunity to go there _ because at the opportunity to go there and — because at the opportunity to go there and compete against a good team, _ there and compete against a good team, good manager, try and win the game _ team, good manager, try and win the game and _ team, good manager, try and win the game and that is my only main focus. lots of concerns among maanger today about the number of cases at premier league clubs, spurs the hardest hit , having to call off their trip to brighton on sunday. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. let's get more now on our top story — an inquestjury has concluded that police mistakes probably contributed to the deaths of three gay men. the hearing in barking in east london was told officers missed repeated opportunities to catch stephen port who went on to murder three other men over a 16—month period jack taylor was the fourth young man to be murdered by port,
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who administered fatal doses of "date rape" drug ghb. jack's sisters donna and jenny gave evidence to the inquiry and spoke to the bbc. just felt like they couldn't be bothered to do theirjob, that's what it felt like. bothered to do their 'ob, that's what it felt likeh bothered to do their 'ob, that's what it felt like. sitting there and listenin: what it felt like. sitting there and listening to _ what it felt like. sitting there and listening to the _ what it felt like. sitting there and listening to the inquest, - what it felt like. sitting there and listening to the inquest, even - listening to the inquest, even simple — listening to the inquest, even simple policing, thinks they should have been— simple policing, thinks they should have been doing, they were not even doing _ have been doing, they were not even doing the _ have been doing, they were not even doing the simplest of things. for what _ doing the simplest of things. for what reason? they are supposed to protect _ what reason? they are supposed to protect us — what reason? they are supposed to protect us. and look after and investigate, they didn't do any of that _ investigate, they didn't do any of that had — investigate, they didn't do any of that. had they done that, jack would still be _ that. had they done that, jack would still be hell. we understand stephen port to _ still be hell. we understand stephen port to jack roles light, but the police _ port to jack roles light, but the police are — port to jack roles light, but the police are just as much to blame because — police are just as much to blame because they have blood on their hands _ because they have blood on their hands -- — because they have blood on their hands —— stephen port tookjack's lie. hands —— stephen port tookjack's lie they— hands —— stephen port tookjack's lie. they might as well given him a lui'i lie. they might as well given him a gunand— lie. they might as well given him a gun and loaded it, they didn't do anything. — gun and loaded it, they didn't do anything, jack would still be here. we have _ anything, jack would still be here. we have ended up with anxiety and things we didn't know existed.
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sleepless nights, god knows what, our whole world tipped upside down. but they get promoted. they get to carry on day lives, and that is shocking. it is very shocking. should never have had to investigate and do _ should never have had to investigate and do everything behind—the—scenes ourselves _ and do everything behind—the—scenes ourselves, we should never have had to do— ourselves, we should never have had to do that, _ ourselves, we should never have had to do that, we were growing too ehough. — to do that, we were growing too enough, devastating, heartbroken. not enough much upwards to even describe _ not enough much upwards to even describe what we were going through. to have _ describe what we were going through. to have to— describe what we were going through. to have to investigate your own loved _ to have to investigate your own loved one's debt and be brushed to decide _ loved one's debt and be brushed to decide constantly, continuously ad for you _ decide constantly, continuously ad for you to — decide constantly, continuously ad for you to be right, these are pleas -- your— for you to be right, these are pleas -- your own — for you to be right, these are pleas —— your own loved one's death. it should _ —— your own loved one's death. it should never— —— your own loved one's death. it should never happen again, they should _ should never happen again, they should learn from this and make sure this never_ should learn from this and make sure this never happens again. on should learn from this and make sure this never happens again.— this never happens again. on the cctv this never happens again. on the cm image. _ this never happens again. on the cctv image, which _ this never happens again. on the cctv image, which we _ this never happens again. on the cctv image, which we all - this never happens again. on the cctv image, which we all know. this never happens again. on the| cctv image, which we all know is ultimately what caused another police officer to say, i know who thatis, police officer to say, i know who that is, that is the guy who was
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concerned in anthony's body being found, how hard did you have to push the police to release that image of stephen port and jack? taste the police to release that image of stephen port and jack?— stephen port and jack? we had to ush hard stephen port and jack? we had to push hard for _ stephen port and jack? we had to push hard for the _ stephen port and jack? we had to push hard for the cctv _ stephen port and jack? we had to push hard for the cctv footage i stephen port and jack? we had to push hard for the cctv footage to | stephen port and jack? we had to i push hard for the cctv footage to be released _ push hard for the cctv footage to be released. we had seen a clip, a photo _ released. we had seen a clip, a photo of— released. we had seen a clip, a photo of them together and we couldn't— photo of them together and we couldn't understand how they did it now and _ couldn't understand how they did it now and why they were not tried to find out _ now and why they were not tried to find out who that was, he was a lot bigger— find out who that was, he was a lot bigger than— find out who that was, he was a lot bigger thanjack, find out who that was, he was a lot biggerthanjack, straightaway we bigger than jack, straightaway we knew— biggerthanjack, straightaway we knew something is not right. he was so much _ knew something is not right. he was so much bigger thanjack and it went through— so much bigger thanjack and it went through us— so much bigger thanjack and it went through us straightaway, we thought, we want _ through us straightaway, we thought, we want to— through us straightaway, we thought, we want to fight out who this person is, we want to fight out who this person is he _ we want to fight out who this person is he has _ we want to fight out who this person is, he has done something or he knows _ is, he has done something or he knows something. surely you need to find out _ knows something. surely you need to find out who — knows something. surely you need to find out who that person is, surely. truthfully— find out who that person is, surely. truthfully i— find out who that person is, surely. truthfully i do believe if that was a woman— truthfully i do believe if that was a woman walking down the road with a man and _ a woman walking down the road with a man and she _ a woman walking down the road with a man and she has been found dead, they would — man and she has been found dead, they would straightaway be looking at trying _ they would straightaway be looking at trying to find out who that man
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is, at trying to find out who that man is it— at trying to find out who that man is it makes— at trying to find out who that man is, it makes no sense why they were not doing _ is, it makes no sense why they were not doing that. so we boosted, asked. — not doing that. so we boosted, asked. we _ not doing that. so we boosted, asked, we were told no. we asked again. _ asked, we were told no. we asked again. told — asked, we were told no. we asked again, told no, and eventually they listen _ again, told no, and eventually they listen to— again, told no, and eventually they listen to us— again, told no, and eventually they listen to us and put up. thank god they did. — listen to us and put up. thank god they did, because obviously we found out who— they did, because obviously we found out who that was. i'm joined by former chief superintendent of the metropolitan police, dal babu. we have talked over the years about institutional racism in the met, allegations of misogyny, institutional misogyny effectively institutional misogyny effectively in the met as well following the death of sarah everard. now talking about allegations of institutional homophobia. is that a charge that you think it's fair towards the metropolitan police, that you served? given the circumstances of this case. ., ., ~' this case. furthermore, iwould like to extend myself— this case. furthermore, iwould like to extend myself super _ this case. furthermore, iwould like to extend myself super days - this case. furthermore, iwould like to extend myself super days to i to extend myself super days to the families of the victims. —— extent
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my sympathies. they are right, in effect if the police had done their job effectively, three other young men who died perhaps could have been saved. —— three of the. there were a litany of mistakes and shortcomings but i think the thing that struck me to go to your question was that when the partner of one of the victims, who had lived with his partnerfor years, asked to see a suicide note, that opportunity was not given to him. that suicide note was actually written by stephen port, forged by him. had they allowed the partner to see that note, you do have to wonder whether that individual would have said straightaway, that is a forgery, but is not my partner's handwriting. whether the individual
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crime could have been solved more quickly and further victim could have stopped, so when you talk about that, would that have happened if it was a straight couple? i don't think it would, if a straight couple had been living together for four years, and one of them had died, and they would have showed the note to the partner. so i think there is something here around institutional issues around homophobia but also individual understanding of issues around homophobia. the individual understanding of issues around homophobia.— individual understanding of issues around homophobia. the police have made it clear — around homophobia. the police have made it clear that _ around homophobia. the police have made it clear that they _ around homophobia. the police have made it clear that they admit - made it clear that they admit mistakes will be made that the finding of the inquestjury is damning, but it is not homophobic the institutionally full of problems. is this simply incompetence, then? is this simple stupidity? notjoining the dots, the taylor sisters, they had to turn
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detectives themselves and found clues that pointed to these murders being linked. it seems... it beggars belief. , ., belief. there is no saving grace here, belief. there is no saving grace here. this _ belief. there is no saving grace here, this was _ belief. there is no saving grace here, this was a _ belief. there is no saving grace here, this was a level - belief. there is no saving grace here, this was a level of - belief. there is no saving grace i here, this was a level of mistakes, a litany of failures, a high degree of incompetence. but i think, i go back to not allowing the partner for years to be allowed to see the note written, which turned out to be a forgery, written the murderer, a lot of this is about baking policing —— basic policing. joining the dots, i think there was a failure of a whole range of individuals, at what the institution needs to do is look at, i have written a piece in the guardian around this, this constant taking away of resources and leaving front line officers to do a job with one hand tied behind their back. this is about making sure the police
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services resource properly and in that we do not have senior officers flitting around, making cutbacks, politicians asking for cutbacks, then being absently shot enterprise when crime goes up. this is about making sure we understand workloads of individual officers and understanding you need resources to stop this system of the invention will be cut resources and are shocked and surprised to see crime going out and be put resources back in there. we are trying to increase the police by 20,000 police officers, which should never have been cut. taste officers, which should never have been cut. ~ , officers, which should never have been cut. . , ., , ., , been cut. we believe that there stop thank ou. been cut. we believe that there stop thank you- -- _ been cut. we believe that there stop thank you- -- we — been cut. we believe that there stop thank you. -- we will _ been cut. we believe that there stop thank you. -- we will leave - been cut. we believe that there stop thank you. -- we will leave it - thank you. —— we will leave it there. the wikileaks founder, julian assange, is again facing extradition to the united states, after the american authorities won an appeal at the high court in london. washington wants him to face charges relating to the publication of hundreds of thousands of leaked documents on the afghanistan and iraq wars. a britishjudge had previously ruled he couldn't be extradited, over fears he would face highly restrictive prison
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conditions in the us. but the american authorities have provided assurances about his custody, and judges at the high court now say he can be sent to the us to face trial. speaking earlier outside the high court, julian assange's fiancee, stella moris, gave this emotional speech. this goes to the fundamentals of press freedom and democracy. we will fight. every generation has an epic fight to fight and this is ours, becausejulian represents the fundamentals of what it means to live in a free society, of what it means to have press freedom, every generation has an epic fight to fight and this is ours, becausejulian represents the fundamentals of what it means to live in a free society, of what it means to have press freedom, of what it means for journalists to do their jobs without being afraid of spending the rest of their lives in prison. the uk imprisons journalists. they are imprisoning julian on behalf of a foreign power which is taking an abusive, vindictive prosecution against a journalist, and this is what it is about. i urge everyone to come together and fight forjulian. julian represents all our liberties and all our rights.
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the headlines on bbc news.... an inquest jury finds failings by the met police meant the serial killer stephen port was free to kill again, after the death of his first victim. nicola sturgeon warns a new wave of the coronavirus pandemic is about to hit scotland, with the omicron variant likely to become the dominant cause of infections within days. the prime minister faces further questions about a gathering in number 10 last christmas after it emerges that his director of communications was present. meanwhile number 10 has confirmed it's christmas party this year won't now be going ahead. football supporters around the world have spent at least £260 million on newly—launched virtual coins sold by a growing number of clubs. the 'fan tokens' are promoted as offering big benefits and can be traded for profit like other
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cryptocurrencies. but critics say they're risky investments — because the system's not regulated. earlier i spoke to our cyber reporterjoe tidy — i started by asking him where fans have been buying these tokens. through a company called socios, 24 different sides in the european league across europe, eight of those clubs in the premier league, most recently crystal palace yesterday signed up to this system. it is offering fans a chance to buy coins, virtual coins, a bit like bitcoin, a miniature version of a crypto currency. the more coins they hold, the bigger fan they are, they get to vote on club issues or go in for competitions. previously critics have said the offers and perks given to the token holders are not good enough, they are not significant.
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what kind of things? a lot of it is vote on what song should be played as the team players walk out into the stadium, or what should the front cover... how much would that cost? you have to have a certain number of coins to do the vote. i would like to know what the clubs want, thinking about, i have e—mailed and heard nothing back, one got back to me, brighton and hove albion, they said they have no plans to enter the crypto world and sell products like this. from speaking and listening to previous commentary from clubs, they say this is about fan engagement, they say it could be the future of football fandom. offering crypto products like these fan tokens, it is notjust them, nfts also been offered by some sides, and another programme which is like a player card version of nfts, you can do fa ntasy football.
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all this virtual stuff, crypto currency, non—fungible tokens — i won't bother trying to explain it, i haven't got a clue, it is a growing market in which corporations, businesses are getting involved and one suspects it is notjust football clubs. no, it has to be said, there are lots of sport clubs, sports stars, footballers, individual footballers releasing these products, i suppose there is a glamour and excitement around crypto currencies, we have seen that in the uk alone, we now have about 2.3 million people investing in crypto currency. that is up from 1.9 million last year, it is growing and we know big stories of success, people becoming millionaires of bitcoin and other types of crypto currency, they are having an impact. the clubs are looking for a new way to make revenue, they have had a tough time in a pandemic, but there are lots of concerns
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about these types of unregulated products, so for example there have been horror stories about companies and individuals starting their own crypto currencies, selling them and disappearing with people's money. no one is saying that will happen in this case, these are legitimate companies, but there are concerns. it is against the law for anyone under 18 in england to be given dermal fillers or botox—style injections for cosmetic reasons. but a bbc investigation has found some beauty practitioners are still offering them to younger teenagers on social media, despite the government saying businesses who do not check clients ages will face prosecution. our health correspondent anna collinson has been speaking to liv — she first had lip filler when she wasjust 16. so, this is the first time i'd ever had my lips done. and that's is when i was 16. and she said, like, you are going to be addicted now.
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now 19, liv has visited multiple practitioners for lip fillers. she often found them on social media. some were still in training. it will be discounted usually, like, a lot cheaper, and it is obviously more directed at people that are younger, that probably have less money. no mandatory training is required to buy or inject fillers. complications include disfigurement and even blindness. a few months ago, it became illegal for under—18s to receive fillers in england, but is the law working? we created a facebook account for a fictitious teenager called jenny, including an image of a 16—year—old girl, generated by an a! programme. it is against the site's rules to promote the sale of fillers, butjenny was able to send hundreds of messages. so, more than 180 businesses replied tojenny, and the majority of the responses were "no". here is an example. "hi, jenny, sorry, i can't book you in, because you are under the age of 18." but, we found more than one in five
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beauticians appeared willing. we shared our findings with some of those who fought for the under—18 ban. that's devastating. so, it's either absolute negligence, or they are completely unaware, and eitherfactor, poses a significant risk. following our investigation, facebook says it's now blocked certain search terms, to make it harder for its users to find treatments like fillers. liv supports the filler ban, but understands the pressures to look a certain way. when i was 15, 16, you look at someone who is getting all these, i something like, like mine, - and you think wel i'm going to make myself look like that, then, because that's what everyone wants to look like. people are making filters that make your lips look bigger. they change your entire face. they are so damaging. anna collinson, bbc news. in indonesia, a powerful volcanic eruption last week killed at least 45 people and left thousands homeless. search operations by
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the red cross continue, as some people are still missing. our correspondent valdya baraputri reports from east java. holmes decimated. they were standing on the part of the eruption of mount semeru on the indonesian island of java. and now heavy rain has created all this mod. a nearby river burst its banks and destroyed more houses. dozens have been killed. volunteers believe the number of missing as high as reported. translation: to high as reported. translation: “to the past few days, we have been evacuating bodies, two days ago we evacuated seven bodies. yesterday we advocated for more. the number from today will get updated. —— we
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evacuated for more. the today will get updated. -- we evacuated for more. the volcanic ash means the ground _ evacuated for more. the volcanic ash means the ground is _ evacuated for more. the volcanic ash means the ground is scorching i evacuated for more. the volcanic ash means the ground is scorching hot. l means the ground is scorching hot. painful to walk on. trees were torn down by the power of the eruption. the indonesian red cross are deploying this specialist vehicle, to help with evacuations. translation:— to help with evacuations. translation: , , . ., ., translation: the special thing about this, it translation: the special thing about this. it never — translation: the special thing about this, it never gets _ translation: the special thing about this, it never gets stuck, _ translation: the special thing about this, it never gets stuck, it _ translation: the special thing about this, it never gets stuck, it can - translation: the special thing about this, it never gets stuck, it can go i this, it never gets stuck, it can go through terrain that regular cars cannot. ,, ., ., ~ through terrain that regular cars cannot. ,, ., ., , , cannot. small tank but mighty. this is one of the — cannot. small tank but mighty. this is one of the two _ cannot. small tank but mighty. this is one of the two units _ cannot. small tank but mighty. this is one of the two units deployed i cannot. small tank but mighty. this is one of the two units deployed by | is one of the two units deployed by the indonesian red cross, as you can see, hear, the with of this vehicle is comparable to a year regular truck, at what makes it special is that we'll —— to a regular truck. it cannot only go through harsh road conditions but also open ways for other rescue vehicles and therefore helping with the evacuation process.
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with these vehicles, the team hope to get you hard to reach areas and rescue people trapped under the rubble. so far there have been no signs of life. but they say they are doing all they can. translation: fist doing all they can. translation: gift least we can reach further with this vehicle. when we find a victim, we can transport them to the main road where an ambulance can reach. the worst thing — where an ambulance can reach. the worst thing for people who live near ethel kano has happened to these people. —— live near a volcano. many are living in shelters. those who have avoided tragedy this time are afraid of a familiar piece of the landscape that now threatens their very existence. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. not a bad day today, a lot of clear weather out there, just a sprinkling of showers.
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a noticeable chilly north—west breeze, but it is turning milder through the weekend, having said that it will also turn cloudy, outbreaks of rain on the way. on the saturday picture you can see the big gap in the clouds, the fine weather over us right now, this is the weather front here that is approaching from the atlantic, just off the west coast of ireland. —— satellite picture. today, right through the course of the day, a case of clear skies, few showers in the north—west. the wind falling light this evening and overnight, skies will remain clear, particularly across central and eastern areas. we will have an air frost in many towns and cities, around freezing or below, but notice the temperatures already picking up in western areas. this undulating pattern in the jet stream means we will see a push of warmer airfrom the south, milder airfrom the southern climes, in place over us during the course of saturday.
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saturday morning starts frost free in the west, outbreaks of rain, remaining cold in the east of the country after that chilly night. the cloud and rain spreading in, note particularly inviting day out there tomorrow. grey skies for most, outbreaks of rain, chilly in the east all day long. the rain will come and go through the evening. here is a look at sunday, low pressure approaching us, focus on that in a second, the bulk of the uk on sunday actually a relatively quiet day, not particularly sunny and quite a lot of cloud, but wind blowing from the south—west, should be relatively mild. temperatures around 13—14 celsius across northern ireland, wales and england, colder in scotland, let's mention this area of low pressure, could be nasty, quite compact, small storm spreading to the north—west
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bringing severe gales in the western isles. we are keeping a close eye on that. the outlook on next week, staying relatively mild and dry.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... an inquestjury has ruled that failings by the met police contributed to the deaths of serial killer stephen port�*s final three victims — all gay men in their 20s. inadequate investigation by the metropolitan police into the deaths of anthony, gabriel and jack should be on public record is one of the most widespread institutional failings of modern history. the families of the victims say the metropolitan polices actions were driven in part by homophobia — a charge the met denies. nicola sturgeon warns a new wave of the coronavirus pandemic an online predator who blackmailed victims and is jailed for 40 years.
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nicola sturgeon warns a new wave of the coronavirus pandemic is about to hit scotland, with the omicron variant likely to become the dominant cause of infections within days. because of the much greater and faster transmissibility of this new variant, we may be facing, indeed we may be starting to experience a potential tsunami of infections. the prime minister faces further questions about a gathering in number 10 last christmas after it emerges that his director of communications was present. meanwhile number 10 has confirmed it's christmas party this year won't now be going ahead. the un calls for urgent aid for madagascar, after a prolonged drought has left more than a million on the brink of starvation. a week after a devastating volcanic eruption killed 45 people in indonesia — the bbc accompanies rescue workers as they search for survivors.
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welcome to bbc news. an inquestjury has concluded that police errors probably contributed to the deaths of three young men who were murdered by the serial killer, stephen port. the jury found that flaws in the investigation into the first death in east london, meant he was free to kill three more times before he was caught. port is serving life for the murders in 2014 and 2015. the families of the victims believe the police failures were partly driven by homophobia. our correspondent helena wilkinson is outside barking town hall where the families of the victims have been giving their reaction today. thejury the jury conclusions thejury conclusions for the jury conclusions for the family is absolutely devastating. the conclusions for the metropolitan police are absolutely damning. the
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families have always wondered whether there would be different outcomes if the officers who were investigating had done theirjob properly and now they know. the inquest had heard that police had made a catalogue of failings within hours of port killing, murdering the first of his four victims. earlier on, the families said in a statement that the met�*s inadequate investigations should be on public record is one of the most widespread institutional failures in record is one of the most widespread institutionalfailures in modern history. my colleague, daniel sanford, now looks at what went wrong. four lives cruelly cut short by serial killer. fashion student anthony walgate from hull. gabriel kovari from slovakia. young chef daniel whitworth from kent and forklift driver jack taylorfrom dagenham — all murdered with the date rape drug ghb but the police could have stop the killing.
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the men's bodies had all been discovered in the same small area of barking in east london over a period of less than a year and a quarter but detectives simply didn'tjoin the dots. they didn't investigate, they didn't do the smallest of things that you would expect a police officer to do. they didn't do the job, it's as simple as that. it all began injune 2014, when 23—year—old anthony walgate was found dead outside stephen port�*s flat in barking. it was port who called the ambulance and almost immediately the police errors started mounting up. the mistakes are too many to list but they went on for 15 months before port was finally arrested for murder, and by that time, three other young men were also dead. after anthony walgate died and port reported the body, detectives missed this record in the police national database of port at barking station with a man who could barely walk
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after taking ghb and they failed to examine port's computer, which would have shown him repeatedly searching for videos of young men being raped while unconscious on drugs. anthony's mother is convinced a better police investigation would have stopped port within weeks of her son's death. all of the other victims would have been safe if they could have just actually been bothered to investigate anthony's murder. stephen port was arrested on suspicion of lying about moving anthony's body but the investigation of the death went no further and he remained on bail, free to kill again. ten weeks later, a second body was found in a church graveyard less than 400 metres from stephen port�*s front door. it was gabriel kovari, another gay man in his 20s. detectives didn't connect the two deaths and did so little that the officer tasked with liaising with gabriel's family never spoke to them. and just over three weeks later, in the same corner
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of the same graveyard, the body of daniel whitworth was found. he had what appeared to be a suicide note around his neck, in which he also said that he had taken gabriel's life. detectives just accepted what was written, when in fact simple checks would have shown he was nowhere near barking when gabriel died. it meant that for months police were telling daniel's family that he had killed himself and gabriel, when in fact, he had been murdered. it does make you angry and upset. and distressed because it has obviously had tragic consequences, you know. in march 2015, port was jailed for lying to police about moving the first victim's body. for now, the killing stopped but so did any further investigation of the first three deaths. then in september 2015, three months after stephen port
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was released from prison, the body of jack taylor was found metres from where the previous two bodies had been discovered. this time, there was cctv, recovered not by detectives but by a parked police officer on his bike. it showed the dead man meeting a tall stranger in the middle of the night but it still took the persistence of jack taylor's sisters to persuade officers to make a public appeal using the pictures. we asked and we were told no. we asked again and they told us no, and then, eventually, they listen to us and they did put it out _ and thank god they did do that because, obviously, we find out who that was. working from google late at night and making handwritten notes, the sisters had spotted many of the key suspicious factors linking the deaths that the police had missed. they told me they now wanted some of the incompetent officers involved to be sacked. i don't think they should be in the position that therein.
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i don't think they should have thatjob. we have ended up with anxieties and things that we didn't even know existed. sleepless nights, god knows what. our whole world tipped upside down but they get promoted. they get to carry on with their lives and that's shocking. it's very shocking. the metropolitan police has refused to accept that the four men's deaths were investigated so badly because they were gay, that officers either made prejudice assumptions orjust didn't care enough about the men but it has agreed that officers were incompetent, describing some of the errors as astonishing. well, as daniel outlined fair, not just one, two, three mistakes but a catalogue of failings by officers investigating the deaths of these four young men and as daniel mentioned there, they described some of those failings as astonishing. earlier on, after those jury conclusions were read to court, we
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heard from the assistant commissioner of the metropolitan police. the deaths of three of those young men, gabriel, danieland jack could probably have been prevented, had the initial police responses and investigations been better. it is a devastating finding. our thoughts are with everybody who loved these young men. we are so sorry for their loss and we are also deeply sorry that there were failings in the police investigations and the responses to their murders. i give my own and the met�*s heartfelt apologies. all of those who loved anthony and gabriel and daniel and jack expected a thorough and professional investigation into their deaths and it's a great sadness to me and everybody at the met but this didn't happen.
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we want to give the families and daniel's partner the opportunity to talk to us so that we can hear their views and listen to their concerns. the commissioner has offered to meet with them personally and so have i and we will take this forward according to their wishes. we have been working to rebuild trust in the met for some time now and we completely accept that people's trust in us has been damaged by a number of recent events. what has happened in connection with the deaths of these four young men is part of that damage and we know has a particular impact in communities local to barking and lgbt plus communities across london. and so it's very important now to show that we are trustworthy, we care, that we have changed and that we are learning, so that we can work with every person and every community to help protect them. we will examine the jury's findings
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and recommendations that the coroner makes in her report to prevent future deaths very carefully and we will act on those findings and those recommendations. the whole of the met is committed to improving our investigations, our relationships and the trust the people happiness. —— and the trust that people have in us. that is something that the metropolitan police have denied. they say there wasn't any prejudice despite accepting that there were failings in their investigations and earlier on, we heard from the bereaved families, who spoke through their solicitor neil hudgell. we are incensed by the police's successful attempts to prevent
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the jury from examining whether prejudice played any part in the police's actions. the coroner did not rule that the police were not homophobic and our position remains unchanged. based on the treatment we received, our firmly held belief is that the metropolitan police's actions were in part driven by homophobia. had four white heterosexual girls been found in the same manner as anthony, gabriel, daniel and jack, then the police's actions and outcomes would have been different. the approach of the met on the issue of homophobia demonstrates to us that even today, seven years on, they have led very little. one of the things that the families are incredibly angry about it some of those officers who were found their performance to be below standard have since been promoted and we have heard this afternoon from the independent office for police conduct, they have said they are considering reopening the investigation into the met police handling of the deaths of the four
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young men. thank you for that. an online paedophile blackmailer, who targetted thousands of victims while orchestrating 'graphic, upsetting and sickening' sexual abuse, has been sentenced to 40 years in prison. abdul elahi told investigators the offences were 'a job,�* to make as much money as possible. abdul elahi told investigators the offences were 'a job,�* to make recovered from hard drives. our correspondent, andrew plant reports. from his bedroom keyboard in birmingham, abdul elahi trawled the internet, offering money to women for explicit photos and then blackmailing them into increasingly extreme sexual acts, threatening to expose them if they did not comply. as soon as he's got one picture of
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you, that's it. asking if i've got younger siblings, you, that's it. asking if i've got youngersiblings, if you, that's it. asking if i've got younger siblings, if i knew any close people that were younger than me. itjust got more and more graphic, asking me to hit myself, just really degrading stuff. you put them in a position, _ just really degrading stuff. you put them in a position, where - just really degrading stuff. you put them in a position, where they i just really degrading stuff. you putj them in a position, where theyjust couldn't— them in a position, where theyjust couldn't escape because he had so much _ couldn't escape because he had so much control over them.— much control over them. officers from the national _ much control over them. officers from the national crime - much control over them. officers from the national crime agency | from the national crime agency described the material are some of the most to prove they'd ever seen. the more material he got, the more control— the more material he got, the more control he _ the more material he got, the more control he had animal threats he could _ control he had animal threats he could make. that's what he did. he -ot could make. that's what he did. he got them _ could make. that's what he did. he got them to— could make. that's what he did. he got them to do worse and worse acts as the _ got them to do worse and worse acts as the scale — got them to do worse and worse acts as the scale of his offending increase _ as the scale of his offending increase-— as the scale of his offending increase. �* , . , . , increase. abdul elahi repeatedly blackmailed _ increase. abdul elahi repeatedly blackmailed dozens _ increase. abdul elahi repeatedly blackmailed dozens of— increase. abdul elahi repeatedly blackmailed dozens of victims, i blackmailed dozens of victims, systematically storing the material and selling them online, including acts of incest and thousands of sexual images of children.
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abdul elahi made a business out of his blackmail, selling the pictures and videos online for tens of thousands of pounds but he also sold his victim's contact details which meant that some of them were approached by people who bought that material and try to blackmail them all over again. material and try to blackmail them all overagain. it material and try to blackmail them all over again. it meant the videos and images were spread to the very darkest corners of the internet. experts had spent months trying to delete that material.— delete that material. some of the women are _ delete that material. some of the women are sobbing _ delete that material. some of the women are sobbing as _ delete that material. some of the women are sobbing as they i delete that material. some of the women are sobbing as they are i delete that material. some of the i women are sobbing as they are doing what they are told to do because they are so frightened that some of they are so frightened that some of the other images will be shared and devastate their lives, and of course, that's ultimately what happened. knowing that your content is out there, particularly the nature of its contents, which are some the most extreme we have ever of seen has had a devastating impact on the lives, the mental health, the
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well—being, whole life prospects every single person affected. deul every single person affected. abdul elahi was described _ every single person affected. abdul elahi was described in _ every single person affected. abdul elahi was described in court - every single person affected. abdul elahi was described in court as i every single person affected. abdul elahi was described in court as one of the most prolific online sexual predators the uk had ever seen. one victim telling police all he wanted was to control people and he did. he destroyed their lives. a former conservative minister has been found to have raped and physically abused his wife. afamily courtjudge concluded 51—year—old andrew griffiths pressurised his wife kate griffiths who is now the mp for burton—upon—trent, into engaging in sexual activity. the former mp has denied allegations made by ms griffiths and "adamantly denied" rape. the prime minister is facing continued pressure after it was revealed that his director of communications, jack doyle, attended a christmas party in downing street on 18th december last year. the gathering, as well as two others, are the subject of an investigation
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by cabinet secretary simon case. number 10 have this lunchtime said they have full confidence in mr doyle. our correspondent lone wells has the latest: many won't have heard the namejack doyle before. he's borisjohnson's director of communications and we now know he was at the infamous downing street christmas party on the 18th of december. this matters because he's in charge of the government's messaging and that message — first, that no party happened, then that no rules were broken — has come under fire this week. ministers have towed this party line, saying they don't know what went on but will that stand the test of an investigation? the cabinet secretary is i'm sure investigating all of these questions, so we will see the results of that in due course, but last christmas, i was spending my time getting trade deals over the line. some have gone further with the chief whip, mark spencer, claiming to the bbc this was a covid—19 meeting, despite bbc being told
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food and was served, games were played and invites were sent out in advance. while the government's transparency and honesty is under scrutiny, the prime minister is facing separate allegations of misleading his advisers over a £54,000 donation from tory peer lord brownlow towards the refurbishment of his flat in downing street. the tory party is being fined nearly £18,000 for not properly declaring the donation. in may, borisjohnson's independent adviser on standards, lord geidt, cleared him of wrongdoing and said he wasn't aware of how the costs were paid until february this year. but the electoral commission said yesterday, borisjohnson had sent a message to the donor in november last year to ask for extra money for the works. number 10 say the prime minister did not withhold information from lord geidt at the bbc understands lord geidt is unhappy with what has emerged and labour have accused the prime minister of misleading his own adviser. this is just the latest allegation of dishonesty from the prime minister. we have had lie upon lie
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in relation to the party going on in downing street. the prime minister is not fit for office. the heat on the prime minister isn't just coming from the opposition. there is a mounting tory rebellion growing over his plans to introduce covid passports in england and former ministers are among those publicly criticising his leadership. i do wish him well, i know he can do this, but at the moment, i think if i was him looking in the mirror, i would be saying, surely, i can do this better. mps will vote on the new coronavirus regulations in england on tuesday but the more telling will be the vote on thursday, where people in north shropshire will be electing a new mp. it's there a true test will be held of whether this prime minister is starting to cost the party votes. let's speak to our political correspondent iain watson. what are the backbenchers making of
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all of this? l what are the backbenchers making of all of this? ~ �* , ., ., all of this? i think it's fair to sa that all of this? i think it's fair to say that they _ all of this? i think it's fair to say that they are _ all of this? i think it's fair to say that they are not - all of this? i think it's fair to say that they are not in i all of this? i think it's fair to say that they are not in a i all of this? i think it's fair to i say that they are not in a festive spirit at this stage. dismayed by the events in downing street, they are getting complaints from some of their constituents. some of them are questioning the timing of the press conference which announced those planned be measured this week. they think it was too blatant for the prime minister to do that. on the day where he was under pressure of the questions about the party on december 18. they have a vote next tuesday on the new regulations, working from home advice but most specifically and most dangerously for the prime minister, there is a question of what they call covid—19 certification, sometimes known as vaccine passports but they point out you can also use a lateral flow test to get into big venues. it is not a vaccine passport as such, but whatever you call it, and i think there are some pretty choice words
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for it among some conservative mps there is going to be potentially the biggest rebellion of this parliament. those have said they were opposed to this measure and would vote against it... they expect that number to rise not to fall over the next few days. there's been no attempt by downing street to try and compromise or move the vaccine passports from the other measures. we are expecting some revoke at that stage. the question is whether that will put... one member said to me what has to be proven is a electoral consequence to the current mess and there is of course the shropshire by—election at the end of next week. if borisjohnson holds on as keir starmer did in his constituency, perhaps this will come down over
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christmas. others are saying it depends what the scale of the victory is. at the moment, the conservatives are expected to hold the seat but at the same time, if it's a low turnout with a low majority, they think the pressure on borisjohnson could continue. there are many mps at the moment saying it's notjust a problem with boris johnson but a problem with the party. they feel the government is going on the wrong direction. thank ou ve going on the wrong direction. thank you very much- _ let's speak tojo maugham, the director of the good law project, which has written to the metropolitan police asking them to open an investigation into the downing street parties. hello, thanks for joining hello, thanks forjoining us. the met police have already said and i quote, there is an absence of evidence and its policy is not to investigate retrospective breaches of coronavirus regulations. how do you think you can convince them? lt you think you can convince them? lit does say that. we are slightly puzzled by the met�*s defence as it
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were. if further evidence is required, you'd think it was the met�*sjob to go required, you'd think it was the met�*s job to go and get that evidence. it's not a prosecutor, it's not a judge, it is an investigator of crime. the ways in which it might gather that evidence are not difficult to imagine. there are, in my experience, invariably police officers stationed at the entrance to downing street. the other point that they take is that they have a policy of not enforcing retrospective lockdown regulation breaches and we are baffled by that as well because all breaches are retrospective. we don't live in a torn retrospective. we don't live in a tom cruise minority world, where the police go after prospect of future breaches. all breaches are retrospective. the other point to make is that parliament intended that it would be possible to prosecute cases for breaches of lockdown regulations for up to three
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years after the date upon which the events took place. if that's what parliament once, we don't really understand why the mets refuses to do it. we have our suspicions, frankly, that's what the met really is doing is keeping number ten's suite rather than doing itsjob and we think that involves really some quite serious problems. there is a basic fairness point. lots of people have been prosecuted for breaches and why not the people at number ten? how does it support public trust in the coronavirus instructions that the pm gave earlier this week? how does it support trust in public health measures? how does it support public trust in policing? how does it support public trust in the rule of law? in democracy, we all understand
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ourselves to be equal under the law and the way in which the met is behaving, prosecuting normal people but not prosecuting those connected with number ten is very dangerous territory indeed. l with number ten is very dangerous territory indeed.— territory indeed. i take your point about the retrospective _ territory indeed. i take your point about the retrospective nature i territory indeed. i take your point about the retrospective nature of| about the retrospective nature of the claim by the police that they don't do this. and events have got to have taken place, so within a split second of that event is taking place, it is retrospective by definition. i suppose the argument is it took place over a year ago. there is no suggestion that infections came out of that party. we have got a lot on our plate to have to deal with and the idea that we are going to spend time and resources on something that may or may not have happened a year ago just seems a bit frivolous. well. just seems a bit frivolous. well, that's not _ just seems a bit frivolous. well, that's not really _ just seems a bit frivolous. well, that's not really what _ just seems a bit frivolous. well, that's not really what they i just seems a bit frivolous. well, that's not really what they say l that's not really what they say actually and i also don't accept that they didn't know about it a
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year ago. as i say, it's my invariable experience that there are police officers stationed as you would expect at the entrance to downing street. they must have known about it then as they know about it now. but i think the really important point here is the point that i was making about public trust in public health. how do you persuade people to act in the public interest and exercise self restraint, not go into the office as the prime minister encouraged people to do earlier this week, when people can see that number ten is talking the talk but is walking very much in the talk but is walking very much in the opposite direction. you know, those points about public trust in policing are really important it seems to me as well. lots of your viewers, who are black or who are gay will know that the police of the
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experience of those of us who are might, —— white, middle—aged men is not a uniformed experience. lots of us now are starting to ask questions about the political neutrality of the police. whether that's a rather helpful outcome to come out of this... you know, it is vitally important if we are to live in a country governed by the rule of law that everyone understands that the law applies equally and if you commit a crime or you are suspected of having committed a crime the police will investigate you regardless of how powerful you are. i think that's incredibly important for the functioning of democracy. rome were going to leave it there. thank you forjoining us. let's take a look at the latest coronavirus figures for the uk. another 58,194 people have tested positive for the virus. a further 120 people have died —
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that's within 28 days of a positive test. and over 22 million people have now received their boosterjab. the united nations is warning that madagascar is on the brink of famine. over1 million people on the island are battling severe hunger. endemic poverty, poor agricultural practices and climate changes are cited as some of the causes. our africa correspondent, catherine byaruhanga is one of the few journalists to visit the south of the country, where the un is calling for urgent aid. barely able to stand or walk, bone thin, and fighting off the infections that come from a lack of food. more than one quarter of the children in this district of southern madagascar are malnourished. this boy is 13 years old and should
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weight 45 kilograms, but is nearly half that weight. mahawazi and mahawani look like toddlers, but the twin girls are actually six years old. their grandmother brought them in this morning for their checkup. it didn't go well. despite months of treatment, they are still severely malnourished. the children do not have food at home, then we avoid the worst for them, but they don't get out of that situation of malnutrition. it is a ten—mile walk in the scorching heat to get back home, but there is no relief to be found here. ranwasi tells me that despite her best prayers, the rains have failed, wiping out her family's crops and livestock. translation: we couldn't find anything to eat here. _ the vegetation of this area is like you see, no greens and no harvest. we just eat anything
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as long as it's not bitter. families here have been forced to eat wild fruit, cacti and insects to temporarily fill their stomachs. the world food programme has said this could become the first climate—change famine if the hunger here persists, but some leading climate scientists say there is not a clear link between rising levels of carbon dioxide and this drought that has destroyed food supplies, though they both agree if global temperatures continue to go up, we could see more severe dry spells in the future. this used to be one of madagascar�*s biggest and longest rivers, but now it's dry and turned into a dust bowl. it illustrates the size of the crisis here. what used to be a vital source of water for millions of people has disappeared.
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these are scenes you would expect to see when refugees flee war, but here, they are terrorised by a worsening climate. they came from villages where they owned herds of cattle and fed themselves from their gardens. now, they are forced to wait for hand—outs. but it's notjust possessions they have lost. mahasowa tells me four of his young children died after not eating for a week. translation: they died one by one, day by day. l they starved to death. there was nothing to eat and nothing to drink. this should be the wet season, but i didn't see a drop of rain here during my visit and aid agencies warned the situation will get worse as people eat all that remains in their stores. after decades of self—reliance, there is now very little that stands between families like ranwasi's and outright hunger. catherine byaruhanga,
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bbc news, madagascar. i'm joined now byjean benoit manhes, the deputy representative and programme coordinatorfor unicef madagascar. thank madagascar. you forjoining us. madagascar is thank you forjoining us. madagascar is an island that has prone to drought. why are the effects of this drought. why are the effects of this drought much more severe this time around? ., .,, drought much more severe this time around? ., around? thanks, as you say, madagascar. _ around? thanks, as you say, madagascar, south of - around? thanks, as you say, i madagascar, south of madagascar, frequently facing drought, but every four years, every three years, it gave time to families to gather a little bit of possessions to be able to survive. but now it is the third year any row we are facing drought,
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thatis year any row we are facing drought, that is why families have nothing else, that is what makes it different. in addition, we see things we didn't see before, sandstorms, the impact of the drought on water, much stronger than usual. ., . ., , usual. how much worse could it get over the coming _ usual. how much worse could it get over the coming months? _ usual. how much worse could it get over the coming months? it - usual. how much worse could it get over the coming months? it is i usual. how much worse could it get over the coming months? it is a i usual. how much worse could it get over the coming months? it is a big season traditionally _ over the coming months? it is a big season traditionally between - over the coming months? it is a big | season traditionally between january season traditionally betweenjanuary and march, lean season in any situation, it would be worse because we are coming out of a season with already little to eat, little to survive, in addition to that there has been less than average. dare survive, in addition to that there has been less than average. are you -aointin to has been less than average. are you pointing to climate _ has been less than average. are you pointing to climate change - has been less than average. are you pointing to climate change is part i pointing to climate change is part of the problem? lt is pointing to climate change is part of the problem?— pointing to climate change is part of the problem? it is never a single source but — of the problem? it is never a single source but definitively, _ of the problem? it is never a single source but definitively, six - of the problem? it is never a single source but definitively, six years, l source but definitively, six years, i have seen droughts become more frequent, in addition to climate change of course i would say the
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covid impact on the local economy, structural issues the south is facing, making ita structural issues the south is facing, making it a different storm. the suggestion also that children are being particularly affected as a result of all this. lt is are being particularly affected as a result of all this.— result of all this. it is a fact, any type _ result of all this. it is a fact, any type of— result of all this. it is a fact, any type of crisis, _ result of all this. it is a fact, any type of crisis, children l result of all this. it is a fact, i any type of crisis, children are the first affected, but you need to remember that drought is a lack of water, children are drinking heavy —— heavily contaminated water, in addition to that they are poorly fed, that gives a background for any disease, a lot of disease in the south, to claim their lives. what is the solution? _ south, to claim their lives. what is the solution? certainly _ south, to claim their lives. what is the solution? certainly in - south, to claim their lives. what is the solution? certainly in the i the solution? certainly in the short—term, one —— one was a down contributions from the international community are important, but are there any mate or longer—term solutions that might be helpful? ==
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solutions that might be helpful? -- made solutions that might be helpful? » made or longer—term. we don't need to wait for long—term to build a sustainable system, there is a need for immediate relief and providing that, we need to provide more in the coming months, but it must be accompanied in the area of water by sustainable equipment building, which also we are doing, but it requires longer term investment and additional amounts.— additional amounts. thank you for 'oinin: additional amounts. thank you for joining us- — time foran time for an update from the sports centre. good afternoon. england have dragged themselves back into the first ashes test after a much better day in brisbane but they still trailed by 58 runs at the close on day 3. travis head hit 152 in australia's first innings before they were bowled out for 425. in reply, england reached 220—2 withjoe root and dawid malan both closing in on centuries. here's our sports
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correspondentjoe wilson. brisbane, an expanding sporting city, it will host the olympics. ashes cricket, let's remember, it's a marathon. so england began the third day of this test still trying to take australian wickets, optimism and energy running on empty. ben stokes was fit enough to bowl, travis head was thrilled to bat. australia built a lead of 208, travis head 152 and all that was just a start. now england batted. rory burns a touch from the glove, that was him gone for 13. hameed, glance of the bat, he was outjust when he was setting in. 2021 has been a record—breaking year of run—scoring forjoe root. the captain was greeted by plenty of england fans,
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it is queensland. dawid malan was past 52. now this was getting interesting. encouraging. as the shadows lengthened, the league —— lead reduced. with two days to come, it felt like a victory to be just 58 runs behind it's the climax to the formula one season this weekend. the abu dhabi grand prix could be one for the ages. max verstappen and lewis hamilton level on points, verstappen only top by virtue of winning nine races to the reigning champions' eight. it's the briton who topped the timesheets in friday's second practice. he was more than half a second quicker than his title rival, which is a huge margin in formula one, although the dutchman was fastest in the morning session. remember, it's a straight shootout for the title between hamilton and verstappen, presuming that they finish
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in the points, whoever crosses the line first on sunday is world champion, or if neither car finishes, verstappen can take the title that way. andy murray has split with long—time coach jamie delgado. murray brought delgado into his team during the 2016 season when he won a second wimbledon title and finished the year as the world number one. former british davis cup player delgado took over as full—time coach in late 2017. murray has decided to give a trial to germanjan de witt, who has previously coached gael monfils, gilles simon and nikoloz basilashvili. one of the standout matches in the premier league this weekend is at anfield. liverpool welcoming back one of their favourite sons. it's steven gerrard's first return as an opposition manager when he takes his aston villa side there. he had 17 years as a liverpool player, and the current boss was asked whether he could see gerrard in the liverpool dugout one day. oh, yes. yes, ithink, absolutely.
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the only problem is, when is the right moment for that? a similar story to chelsea. i think he has done really well because he is very young, still, for a manager. when is the right moment to take the job? not that he is not able but how long he wants to do it. i respect and understand all the noise around again for obvious reasons because i am going back to a club where i spent many years, it brings a smile to my face because i'd have a good relationship with a lot of people, a fantastic time there, a local boy, a team i supported growing up, i always will support that team, of course. at the same time it brings a smile to my face because the opportunity to go there and compete against a good team, good manager, try and win the game, that is my only main focus. well, ahead of this weekend's premier league matches, there's lots
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of concerns among managers about the number of covid cases affecting clubs, spurs the hardest hit, having to call off their trip to brighton on sunday. there are more details on the bbc sport website. that's all the sport for now. as we've been reporting, an inquestjury has concluded that police errors probably contributed to the deaths of three young men who were murdered by the serial killer, stephen port. the jury found that flaws in the investigation into the first death in east london meant he was free to kill three more times before he was caught. jack taylor was the fourth young man to be murdered by port, who administered fatal doses of "date rape" drug ghb. jack's sisters donna and jenny gave evidence to the inquiry and spoke to the bbc. just felt like they couldn't be bothered to do theirjob, that's what it felt like. sitting there and listening
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to the inquest, even simple policing, things they should have been doing, they were not even _ doing the simplest of things. for what reason? they are supposed to protect us. and look after and investigate, they didn't do any of that. had they done that, jack would still be here. we understand stephen port took jack's life, but the police are just as much to blame because they have blood on their hands. they might as well have given him a gun and loaded it, they didn't do anything, and jack would still be here. we have ended up with anxiety and things we didn't know existed. sleepless nights, god knows what, our whole world tipped upside down. but they get promoted. they get to carry on their lives, and that is shocking. it is very shocking. should never have had to investigate and do everything behind—the—scenes ourselves, we should never
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have had to do that, we were going through enough, devastated, heartbroken. not enough words to even describe what we were going through. to have to investigate your own loved one's death and be brushed to the side constantly, continuously and for you to be right — these are police. it should never happen again, they should learn from this and make sure this never happens again. on the cctv image, which we all know is ultimately what caused another police officer to say, i know who that is, that is the guy who was concerned in anthony's body being found, how hard did you have to push the police to release that image of stephen port and jack? we had to push hard for the cctv footage to be released. we had seen a clip, a photo
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of them together and we couldn't understand how they didn't know and why they were not trying to find out who that was, he was a lot bigger thanjack, straightaway we knew something was not right. he was so much bigger than jack and it went through us straightaway, we thought, we want to find out who this person is, he has done something or he knows something. surely you need to find out who that person is, surely. truthfully i do believe if that was a woman walking down the road with a _ man and she had been found dead, they would straightaway be looking at trying to find out who that man is, it makes no sense why they were not doing that. so we pushed, asked, we were told no. we asked again, told no, and eventually they listened to us and put up. thank god they did, because obviously we found out who that was.
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there have been allegations that the metropolitan police failed to investigate the murders properly because it was "institutionally homophobic". but while the force has admitted that there were failings, they have denied homophobia was a factor, as daniel de simone reports. daniel whitworth and ricky walmsley were an ordinary couple. he was my first boyfriend. i love him a lot. when daniel was murdered by stephen port, the met police refused to cast his partner as next of kin. we had been in a relationship for four years. we had been living together for three. we even had a joint bank account. he says it was because they were gay. police have admitted ricky's treatment was wrong. ifelt like i was being put to one side and i felt like they were being homophobic towards me. if it was a straight woman who had been found dead, and that was my partner, i think i would have been treated very
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differently. a fake suicide note falsely linked daniel to another victim, gabriel. it stated daniel had killed gabriel, but it had really been written by their murderer, stephen port. but police would not show ricky the note, meaning he couldn't say what he thought of the content and handwriting. officers also ignored an alibi ricky gave daniel, showing he was at home in kent when the fake note claimed he was in london. ijust assumed that being the police, they would look into all of this. because that is theirjob. what do you think now? i am shocked, appalled. a friend of gabriel, the second man to be killed, says he also experienced prejudice from the met. the force ignored john's warnings about the threat to gay men and links
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between the deaths. i feel strongly that theyjust didn't value those young men. the uk's biggest police force has rarely faced such a challenging year. accused of harbouring corruption, racism and misogyny, with homophobia now added to the list. john, who is himself gay, says the port case resonates with the finding of institutional racism after an earlier scandal — the murder of stephen lawrence in the 1990s. the definition of institutional racism was a collective failure of an institution to provide an appropriate and professional service to a minority group. i think if you co—opt that as a definition of institutional homophobia, this investigation ticks every box. the met accepts failing the victims but denies that prejudice
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played a role. idon't think the met— is institutionally homophobic, i do think that we need to make a great | deal of change to our investigativej practices, we have done that. people need to be reassured that we have done that. i those who knew and loved the dead men say there must be a full acceptance of what went wrong before change can occur. in the past few minutes the uk health security agency have published the latest data into omicron. evidence shows the variant is growing much faster than delta in england. it's projected to become the dominant variant in the uk my mid—december. new data suggests that vaccine protection against mild symptomatic disease from omicron may be substantially reduced. effectiveness against severe disease is still unknown but expected to be
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higher. boosters showed good effectiveness, although with some reduction compared to delta. drjenny harries — head of the uk health security agency said: once again, we urge everyone who is able to get a boosterjab to come forward and do so. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, has given a dire warning about the spread of coronavirus. she said the omicron variant presented a "very severe challenge", and announced new restrictions to tackle its spread. from saturday, the advice is that all household contacts of any confirmed covid case should isolate for ten days regardless of vaccination status — even if they get a negative pcr test. some exemptions will be made for critical services. non—household contacts should isolate pending a pcr result. if it is negative, they can leave isolation at this point as long as they are
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double vaccinated. and ms sturgeon said it would be sensible to defer work christmas parties, given the impact and significant concerns of the omicron covid variant. the public health advice that we have no alternative to agree to given the evidence of risk that i know about and have shared with you is that we should all think a bit more carefully about unnecessary contact, especially in crowded places just now, and that it would be sensible to defer work christmas parties. i know this has a big impact on businesses, which is why we are considering and pressing the uk government on financial support. once again, we face a situation that frankly has no easy options. we know that any additional protective measures will cause social and economic harms, especially after almost two years of this pandemic but we also know from past experience that only
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action is often needed when dealing with this virus. —— early action. in fact, acting early is often the best way of acting proportionately, so we cannot rule out further measures and i'm afraid we can't avoid the advice that i have shared with you today. here's our scotland correspondent james shaw. it was a very stark warning from nicola sturgeon at her covid breathing, the kind of warning that we heard from leaders like the first minister, perhaps a year ago, when we were looking at those earlier waves of coronavirus. that i think is the way she is looking at the potential of what is happening with omicron at the moment. the way she described it, it is spreading faster than previous varieds, ththey delta variant, the main one in the uk, omicron spreads faster, it has what they call a high attack rates, that
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is a really important concept because what it means is the extent to which the virus can spread in crowded enclosed gatherings. it is reckoned that with omicron, according to what the first minister said, if you have something like a party, some sort of event, 50% of the people at that event will be infected if they are is a single infected if they are is a single infected person at that gathering. she pointed to situations that the scottish government is aware of, a party where a large number of people in accident and emergency became infected in lanarkshire, and also the fact that a lot of scotrail staff are ill at the moment and services have had to be cancelled. these, she said, with the early warning signs of war omicron to do, and therefore there is a concern that rates will start to go up quickly in the coming weeks. we have
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heard she expects there may be new measures, we expect an update on that early next week, probably, on tuesday. in indonesia, a powerful volcanic eruption last week killed at least 45 people and left thousands homeless. search operations by the red cross continue as some people are still missing. our correspondent valdya baraputri reports from east java. homes decimated. they were standing in the path of the eruption of mount semeru on the indonesian island ofjava. and now heavy rain has created all this mud. a nearby river burst its banks and destroyed more houses. dozens have been killed. volunteers believe the number of missing is higher than reported. translation: through the past
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few days, we have been - evacuating bodies, two days ago we evacuated seven bodies. yesterday we evacuated four more. the number from today will get updated. the volcanic ash means the ground is scorching hot, painful to walk on. trees were torn down by the power of the eruption. the indonesian red cross are deploying this specialist vehicle, to help with evacuations. translation: the special thing about this, it never gets stuck, l it can go through terrain that regular cars cannot. small tank, but mighty. this is one of the two units deployed by the indonesian red cross, as you can see, here the width of this vehicle is comparable to a regular truck, and what makes it special is the wheel.
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it cannot only go through harsh road conditions but also open ways for other rescue vehicles and therefore helping with the evacuation process. with these vehicles, the team hope to get to hard—to—reach areas and rescue people trapped under the rubble. so far there have been no signs of life. but they say they are doing all they can. translation: at least we can reach further with this vehicle. _ when we find a victim, we can transport them to the main road where an ambulance can reach. the worst thing for people who live near a volcano has happened to these people. many are living in shelters. those who have avoided tragedy this time are afraid of a familiar piece of the landscape that now threatens their very existence.
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controversial surrounding whether there was a downing street party last christmas, sources have told the bbc that the director of duplications jack doyle has offered the prime minister his resignation after his attendance at the christmas party was revealed. boris johnson has apparently not accepted it, according to sources. downing street today denied the director of human occasions offered to quit, his role in the event is likely to be part of the official enquiry into what happened, which is expected to report soon. typhoid look at the weather.
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it will be a cold night, the windfall in light after a pretty nippy day, it has been a notable north—west breeze, when the following light, sky clearing, frost on the way. overall, the opposite happening, turning milder, cloud and rain on the way. temporary chilly weather caused by a gap in the clouds, clear across most of the uk through the day, light wind, 10 which is dropping quite sharply through this evening. the frost will form across many central and eastern areas, around —1 minus two celsius in town senseit around —1 minus two celsius in town sense it is, but at the same time towards the already at this stage early morning saturday, tebbit is lifting to 2—4 c, and advancing one front. the mild air is arriving because of this jet stream boxing, this arc coming in from the south, mild air all this arc coming in from the south, mild airall the this arc coming in from the south, mild air all the way from the
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azores, so i think temperatures will get into double figures, but not looking particularly appealing, we have all this cloud at outbreaks of rain coming and going through the course of the afternoon. across eastern areas, still could be chilly, 6—7 c in hull, not particularly appetising. outbreaks of rain continuing through the course of the evening. a bit of a mixed bag on saturday. sunday, focusing on this nasty layer of low pressure, heading our way, focusing on this nasty layer of low pressure, heading ourway, bringing really ferociously strong wind to the very far north—west, but the rest of the country very far from it. mostly calm, often cloudy skies, a little sunshine, the temperatures, 13 in the midlands, 13 in belfast, could even be a degree higher in more southern areas. colder in
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scotland, but across—the—board it is above the average. low pressure, turning stormy, in the outer hebrides, and the northern ireland. met office anticipates gusts of around 90 miles power around exposed coasts at the hebrides, take it steady, take care in that part of the country, but for most it will not be anywhere near that, calmer. next week, staying mild, temperatures into double figures across—the—board. have a great weekend.
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an inquestjury has ruled that failings by the met police contributed to the deaths of serial killer stephen port�*s final three victims — all gay men in their 20s (new evidence shows that the omicron variant of coronavirus is growing much faster than delta in england. nicola sturgeon warns a new wave of the coronavirus pandemic is about to hit scotland, with the omicron variant likely to become the dominant cause of infections....within days

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