Skip to main content

tv   Newsday  BBC News  December 7, 2021 1:00am-1:31am GMT

1:00 am
welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore. i'm christmas money. the headlines. the united states announces a diplomatic boycott of the 2022 winter olympics because of china's record on women's rights. china calls the boycott a pretentious act and insists it's against the spirit of the games. condemnation from across the world as the former elected leader of myanmar, aung san suu kyi, is given a prison sentence. and we talk to the hollywood legend mel brooks who, at 95, is looking back on his eventful life. live from our studio in singapore, this is bbc news —
1:01 am
it's newsday. it is 9am in singapore and 8pm in washington, where the white house has an out a diplomatic boycott of the 2022 winter olympics in beijing. it says no official government delegation will be sent to the games because of concerns about china's human rights record. tanya dandino�*s reports. beijing 2022. as the snow settles olympic venues are taking shape, but the pinnacle of sport is no stranger to politics. the us has drawn a line, saying it won't contribute to the fanfare nor pretend it's business as usual in the face of china's egregious human rights record. the biden administration will not send any diplomatic or
1:02 am
official representation to the beating 2022 winter olympics and paralympic games given the prc�*s ongoing genocide and crimes against humanity and other human rights abuses. there is precedent here, but the move falls short of the 19805 us the move falls short of the 1980s us led boycott of the moscow games, were team usa athletes were pulled from the competition.— athletes were pulled from the competition. the athletes will be participating, _ competition. the athletes will be participating, we _ competition. the athletes will be participating, we will- competition. the athletes will be participating, we will be i be participating, we will be rooting for the athletes from home. i am and olympics obsessed person so i'm looking forward to doing that, but i think this isjust forward to doing that, but i think this is just an indication that it cannot be business as usual, that not sending a diplomatic delegation since that message. but sending a diplomatic delegation since that message.— since that message. but is raising paying _ since that message. but is raising paying attention? l raising paying attention? judging by the reaction of the foreign ministry in a press conference prior to official confirmation from the us, labelling it wishful thinking, grandstanding, and politically manipulative, the answer is yes.
1:03 am
translation: ~ ., yes. translation: ~ . ,, yes. translation: ~ . ., translation: what the us should do is correct _ translation: what the us should do is correct its _ translation: what the us should do is correct its attitude, _ do is correct its attitude, practice a more united olympic spirit, and take china's concerns seriously. do not politicise a sport and stop calling for the so—called diplomatic boycott of the beijing olympics so as not to affect the dialogue and cooperation between china and the us in important areas. if the us in important areas. if the us in important areas. if the us insists on wilfully clinging to its course, china will definitely take resolute countermeasures. the will definitely take resolute countermeasures.- will definitely take resolute countermeasures. the uk and australia are _ countermeasures. the uk and australia are among _ countermeasures. the uk and australia are among other- australia are among other nations considering a beating boycott. the move backed by human rights organisations which have long argued china should never have been awarded the games to begin with, as they edged closer it seems concerns are reaching a crescendo. tanya dandino's, bbc news. welcome in the last few minutes we're getting news from tvnz, saying that the new zealand
1:04 am
deputy prime minister robertson says diplomats won't be attending the winter olympics in china. tvnz is exciting covid—i9 is the reason for why the new zealand diplomats won't be attending the winter olympics, a distinction from what the united states has said. we will be sure to get you more on that story as we are able to again from tvnz. our north america correspond to peter bowes has been watching the story very closely for us as well and has more from los angeles. i think this ignall here is that the united states is not backing down over as long held belief that china should be held accountable over human rights abuses, the repression of people, the uyghurs in the xinjiang region specifically —— i think the signal. there has been considerable support— pressure in washington on the white house from both parties,
1:05 am
from the democrats and republicans. there is bipartisan support for this move that the us should be taking this stance and it means the diplomats will not be heading to the olympics. it is symbolic, to a large extent, it is nothing on the scale of the 1980 boycott of the moscow games, which was a protest at the salvio's invasion of afghanistan a year earlier and athletes were withdrawn that year. not on that scale. but it is making a very significant political point. d0 is making a very significant political point.— political point. do you see other countries _ political point. do you see other countries following l political point. do you see i other countries following suit with their own diplomatic boycotts?— with their own diplomatic bo cotts? ~ �* , boycotts? well, there's quite possible- _ boycotts? well, there's quite possible. now— boycotts? well, there's quite possible. now that _ boycotts? well, there's quite possible. now that the - boycotts? well, there's quite | possible. now that the united states has ta ken possible. now that the united states has taken this stance that others will follow suit. we're not looking at and i think a lot of people in the sporting world are making this point, a lot of people in the sporting world don't the fact that the olympics are used in some senses as a political
1:06 am
tool, but the point is being made that whatever action is taken politically or diplomatically by the united or potentially other countries, it isn't going to affect nature the games themselves and the sporting activities, although china clearly, as you referred to, are protesting the sensing game shouldn't be used to, essentially, make political points. we're also hearing from china saying simply, look, at stage american diplomats haven't even been invited to the games. almost playing down the games. almost playing down the american action.— the american action. peter bowes on _ the american action. peter bowes on that _ the american action. peter bowes on that story - the american action. peter bowes on that story for - the american action. peter| bowes on that story for us. the american action. peter - bowes on that story for us. you can get much more on this story on our website. including a look at how china has been preparing for the winter olympics and its plan to let foreigners enter again in large numbers, something it has not been doing, you will remember, for some time now, evidence the pandemic began, in fact. head
1:07 am
over to our website or download the bbc news app. in other headlines myanmar�*s military rulers are facing international condemnation, after the deposed civilian leader aung san suu kyi was given a four year prison sentence. she was convicted of inciting unrest and violating covid restrictions during last year's election campaign. state media said her sentence was reduced from four to two years after a partial pardon by the head of the militaryjunta. although she still faces further charges as our south east asia correspondentjonathan head reports. it has been an extraordinaryjourney. aung san suu kyi has gone from acclaimed human rights icon to elected leader unrivalled in her popularity and then something of a fallen idol when she defended her generals against charges of genocide at the international court ofjustice. those same generals over
1:08 am
through her government in february. they've now imposed to the first of what is expected to be a series of dubious criminal convictions on her. these fleeting courtroom photos are all we've seen of herfor more than ten months. today is simply a shameful day for law and justice and accountability in myanmar. the brutal military junta have confirmed that they see themselves as above the law. the huge rallies seen earlier this year in the support of democracy that she'd hoped to build have long gone, driven off the streets by volleys of military gunfire. young activists are now arming themselves instead, conducting drive—by shootings and bombings. actions that might horrify aung san suu kyi with her non—violent beliefs.
1:09 am
a few brave souls came out today to show their anger over the verdict, but quickly dispersed. peaceful protest is no longer possible in myanmar is the country slides ever deeper into armed conflict. jonathan head, bbc news, bangkok. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines. the solomon islands prime minister has survived a no confidence motion in parliament. riots broke out in late november over government policies, fuelled by poverty, unemployment, and inter island rivalries in the nation of 800,000. mr sogavare's administration has also faced popular anger over its decision to switch diplomatic allegiance to beijing from taiwan. the world health organization says there was a surge in malaria last year as the covid pandemic disrupted health services.
1:10 am
it said there were 1a million more cases in 2020, and that two thirds of the 69,000 additional deaths were attributable to the disruption to treatment and prevention. a second woman who says jeffrey epstein sexually abused her has been testifying in the ghislaine maxwell trial in new york. ms maxwell has pleaded not guilty to eight counts of sex trafficking and other charges. our corresponent nada tawfik�*s been following events in court. well today we heard from a second woman in the indictment, she is going by the student mk. what is interesting here is that the defence and prosecution have been both arguing over her age, because she was 17 at the time of the alleged abuse and that is the age of consent in britain. and so thejudge ruled on age of consent in britain. and so the judge ruled on this saying that she could testify as a witness but the jury was not to view the sex acts she
1:11 am
talked about as illegal acts. this is really key here because this indictment is in regard to alleged crimes committed against underage girl. but her testimony did become important for the prosecution in terms of laying out the so—called idea of grooming, that ghislaine maxwell allegedly groomed young girls forjeffrey epstein. what we heard from kate on the stand was that she met ghislaine maxwell at 17 years old, had tea at her home in london, they got on very well, she said she wanted to be like her when she grew up and was exhilarated by the prospect of a friendship with someone as wealthy and connected as she was. she says ghislaine maxwell even offered for her boyfriend at the time, jeffrey epstein, to help her with her music career. she says though that the next time she visited ghislaine maxwell allegedly asked her to massage jeffrey epstein and that turned into a sexual encounter. she said that continued for a number of years. so, again,
1:12 am
really hitting home this point by prosecutors about ghislaine maxwell, her role with recruiting and grooming young girls, allegedly, forjeffrey epstein. what we saw from that is —— defence and cross examination talking to her, they really tried to poke holes in her memory, saying that at that point she was addicted to drugs and alcohol and questioning if her memories were accurate. she said they absolutely were. nada tawfik on that story for us. if you want to get in touch with me. what we were just talking about. i'm on twitter — @bbckarishma. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme: the bbc�*s 100 women list is being published. with half dedicated to women from
1:13 am
afghanistan. john lennon was shot at the entrance to the dakota building, in the centre of new york. there's been a crowd here standing in more or less silent vigil and the flowers have been piling up. the 14th ceasefire of this war ended at the walls of the old city of dubrovnik. this morning, witnesses said shells were landing every 20 seconds. people are celebrating the passing of a man they hold responsible for hundreds of deaths and oppression. elsewhere, people have been gathering to mourn his passing. imelda marcos, the widow of the former president i of the philippines, hasi gone on trial in manila. she's facing seven charges of tax evasion, estimated i at £120 million. she pleaded not guilty. the prince and princess of wales are to separate. a statement from buckingham palace said the decision had been reached amicably.
1:14 am
this is newsday on the bbc. i'm karishma vaswani in singapore. our headlines: the us announces a diplomatic boycott of the 2022 winter olympics because of china's record on human rights. china calls the boycott �*a pretentious act�* and insists it's against the spirit of the games. president biden and the russian leader vladimir putin have agreed to hold talks after weeks of rising tension over ukraine. the discussions will be via a video call later on tuesday. russia has recently boosted its military presence near ukraine's border, but denies that it's preparing an attack on its neighbour. a senior us official has said joe biden will warn vladimir putin of the severe economic consequences of an attack, and the white house had been working with european allies to co ordinate a strong response.
1:15 am
i'm joined now by evelyn farkas, former deputy assistant secretary of defense for russia, ukraine and asia in the us government. it's wonderful to have you on newsday, evelyn. want to start by asking you, how serious you think the current situation is? well, it is very serious and isolated a number of reasons. obviously there are almost 100,000 troops on the border with ukraine and in crimea, not just the number of troops but the types of military capability that the russian government has at its disposal is also alarming, but more importantly i would say is the rhetoric coming out of the kremlin. the recent paper that vladimir putin issued which was a river onjust vladimir putin issued which was a river on just revisionist to look at russian and ukrainian history. all of that telegraphs to me that he is serious and then finally i would add he has got a domestic problem and unfortunately this all goes
1:16 am
back to regime survival for vladimir putin.— back to regime survival for vladimir putin. evelyn, you know ahead _ vladimir putin. evelyn, you know ahead of _ vladimir putin. evelyn, you know ahead of the - vladimir putin. evelyn, you know ahead of the video i vladimir putin. evelyn, you | know ahead of the video call vladimir putin. evelyn, you i know ahead of the video call we are hearing from the white house that president biden will warn vladimir putin of severe economic consequences if he does indeed decide to invade ukraine. will this be enough of a deterrent, given what you know of his personality in the way he manages things? i don't think that in — way he manages things? i don't think that in and _ way he manages things? i don't think that in and of _ way he manages things? i don't think that in and of itself, i think that in and of itself, severe economic consequences. he would have to detail exactly what kind of economic consequences. doesn't mean taking a rush of the swift international banking system? does it mean banning us and european banks from servicing sovereign russian debt, even past debt, because future debt is off the table already? what does that mean? but even that, even banning all of the putin cronies from travelling to the european union to visit their children in private schools, even that probably isn't enough. in addition to that we
1:17 am
need to make sure that the russian government understands that there will be blood on their hands and it will include russian blood if they invade ukraine, and that is to say we need to provide examples and show, demonstrate that we are providing additional military defence of lethal assistance to ukraine. , ., ., , ukraine. evelyn, what does russia then _ ukraine. evelyn, what does russia then want _ ukraine. evelyn, what does russia then want out i ukraine. evelyn, what does russia then want out of i ukraine. evelyn, what does| russia then want out of this call, i should russia then want out of this call, ishould be russia then want out of this call, i should be more precise there. what does mr putin want out of this call and what does his strategy appeared to be? this is a hard one for me to answer, to be honest. he clearly what he wants beyond the call is to have influence over ukraine, to control ukraine politically, to control all the countries around russia, the former soviet space. that's what vladimir putin wants, he doesn't want the united states involved and he doesn't want ukraine to be a functioning democracy because thatis functioning democracy because that is a threat. the example of the ukrainian democracy as a threat to his regime. so what
1:18 am
does he want in the call? he would love to relieve him from sanctions. he would love to have a say we promise that ukraine will never become a member of nato. some kind of security guarantee, some kind of back down from the united states. he is not going to get that. , . , ., that. evelyn farkas, former senior pentagon _ that. evelyn farkas, former senior pentagon official, i senior pentagon official, wonderful to have you on newsday, thank you for your thought. newsday, thank you for your thou:ht. ., ~ newsday, thank you for your thou:ht. . ,, i. the bbc�*s 100 women list is published on tuesday, celebrating the achievements of women from grassroots activists to global leaders. half of this year's list is dedicated to women from afghanistan. the bbc�*s yalda hakim has this special report. every year, the bbc names 100 inspiring and influential women as part of the bbc 100 women season. and this year, for the first time, 50 of these women are from one country. afghanistan. this year's season will recognise the stories of afghan women.
1:19 am
the scope of their bravery and their achievements. after the taliban took control of the country earlier this year. over the next four days, the bbc 100 women will also share the stories of women around the globe who are hitting the reset and creating lasting change. 2021 has been a year where many women, especially those in afghanistan have had to reinvent their lives. women's rights activist and one of the women named on today's list spoke to me in kabul. the trouble that afghanistan is in right now, apart from the whole political whatever, is poverty, it is brain drain, a collapse of society in a country on the verge of becoming in pieces, of being destroyed. you've become the public face of afghan women afghanistan. someone who has remained and calling on others to come back.
1:20 am
but what are they coming back to? what they're coming back to is not really very, very different from what they have left. that is something i want to tell them. but by not working on it and by not being around and by not raising our voices and by not asking the right questions at the right time, and by not bringing everything to the attention of the ones that are taking care of things, whether they are the taliban, afghans, the international community, it can get a lot worse. for them to come back now, we can start working again and make things happen again for afghanistan. because i'm sure there's going to be a day when taliban are going to realise that without women, it's just not going to happen. and are you willing to work within the sharia system? they are saying, we allow anything, as long as it's
1:21 am
within sharia. we really want to make sure that whatever it is that the sharia says, it is not the interpretation only of a group of people. that's not what we want. there's a lot of islamic countries that have women in there and how do they thrive? we want to be a thriving, beautiful, a successful muslim country. what is wrong with that? and if the taliban don't listen? well, they have to listen if they want to survive. do they want to survive? afghanistan is a country and we have to keep it as a country and make it better. do they want to understand this? if they do, then they will work at it. if they don't, then though do with the doing right now and afghanistan will disappear. and you can find out more about the bbc 100 women list online. do head over to bbc.com/100women where you can learn all about this year's season find out which football club pays
1:22 am
women the same as men and read inspirational stories including the rollerskating star who beat disability stigma. that's at bbc.com/100women and there'll be plenty of coverage across the day here on bbc news. the hollywood legend mel brooks is still going strong at 95 years old. the man behind blazing saddles and the producers has a new autobiography, called �*all about me'. he recounts the highlights of a life in show business, and his long marriage to the legendary actress anne bancroft. brooks has been speaking with the bbc�*s alan yentob. another word can be overused but mel brooks is a legend. oscars, emmys, baftas, tonys, grammys, he has won them all many times over. # springtime for hitler and germany... mel
1:23 am
brooks was fearless, he broke every rule, but he stuck to the ones for lockdown, even telling his son to go away. he's been locked in writing his autobiography and after some persuasion, let me into talk about it. it all starts in brooklyn. about it. it all starts in brooklyn-— about it. it all starts in brooklyn. about it. it all starts in brookl n. , , . , brooklyn. everybody and my buildin: brooklyn. everybody and my building worked _ brooklyn. everybody and my building worked in _ brooklyn. everybody and my building worked in the i brooklyn. everybody and my i building worked in the garment centre and i've figured i would probably end up there too. my unclejoe probably end up there too. my uncle joe looked probably end up there too. my unclejoe looked a little like you. a little better looking, changed my life. he said mel and i said yes unclejoe? he said, how would you like to see a cole porter musical on broadway called anything goes? what an experience! when the show was over i said joe, i'm not gonna go into the garment centre! i'm gonna go into show business. i want to do what they were doing on that stage
1:24 am
and i never deviated from that plan, show business. i was going into show business. plan, show business. iwas going into show business. don't ou ever going into show business. don't you ever want _ going into show business. don't you ever want to _ going into show business. don't you ever want to become i going into show business. don't you ever want to become a i you ever want to become a butterfly? don't you want to spread your wings and flip your way to glory? you're gonna jump on me. you are gonna jump on me, i know you are going to jump me, i know you are going to jump on me. filming the producers taught mel a valuable lesson about how to handle studio executives.— lesson about how to handle studio executives. after the third or fourth _ studio executives. after the third or fourth day, - studio executives. after the third or fourth day, he i studio executives. after the third or fourth day, he says| third or fourth day, he says i'll give you another $25,000 if you get rid of that curly haired guy. hisjust funny haired guy. his just funny looking, haired guy. hisjust funny looking, is not, there is no leading man here. and i said ok, i said leading man here. and i said ok, isaid he's leading man here. and i said ok, i said he's out stopping his out, he's gone. and that was a lesson, a great lesson for me. lie to the studio. mei
1:25 am
for me. lie to the studio. mel met and _ for me. lie to the studio. mel met and bancroft _ for me. lie to the studio. mel met and bancroft in _ for me. lie to the studio. mel met and bancroft in 1961. his life changed.— met and bancroft in 1961. his life chanted. , ., , ., life changed. there she was, on state life changed. there she was, on stage singing — life changed. there she was, on stage singing beautifully. i i stage singing beautifully. i saw her backstage and we talked and they never stopped seeing her and talking to herfor and they never stopped seeing her and talking to her for the next 45 years. her and talking to her for the next 45 years-— her and talking to her for the next 45 years. one of his most cherished _ next 45 years. one of his most cherished awards _ next 45 years. one of his most cherished awards as _ next 45 years. one of his most cherished awards as a - next 45 years. one of his most cherished awards as a medal. next 45 years. one of his most| cherished awards as a medal of arts he received from barack obama at the white house. the president was a big fan of blazing saddles. he president was a big fan of blazing saddles.— president was a big fan of blazing saddles. he loved the film. he loved _ blazing saddles. he loved the film. he loved the _ blazing saddles. he loved the film. he loved the film i blazing saddles. he loved the film. he loved the film and i blazing saddles. he loved the| film. he loved the film and he cheated. well _ film. he loved the film and he cheated. well he _ film. he loved the film and he cheated. well he was - film. he loved the film and he cheated. well he was 12 i film. he loved the film and he cheated. well he was 12 years| cheated. well he was 12 years old, it cheated. well he was 12 years old. it was — cheated. well he was 12 years old, it was listed _ cheated. well he was 12 years old, it was listed for - cheated. well he was 12 years old, it was listed for 16 i cheated. well he was 12 years old, it was listed for 16 and i old, it was listed for 16 and above, and i think he cheated. mel brooks fell in love with words and music when he was five years old. he chose this for his first performance. and he's been singing at ever since. �* .., , he's been singing at ever since. �* , _ he's been singing at ever since. �* , _ .,
1:26 am
since. # because baby, look at ou since. # because baby, look at you now- _ what a great story and what a great life. that is all the time that we have for you. do stay with bbc news. hello there. we await the arrival of the second named storm of the season. storm barra will bring the worst of the weather during tuesday as windy weather develops widely. added to that later on snow and blizzards over some of the hills in the north. this is the centre of the storm approaching western parts of ireland. it will push a band of heavy rain northwards and eastward across the uk. but ahead of that we start the day with a frost widely and some icy patches in western scotland and the northwest of england. a very cold start then. we got that rain sweeping its way across northern ireland, wales and the southwest in the morning, the winds picking up as well. that will be followed by some sunny intervals in heavy, blustery showers in the afternoon as that band of weather weather continues to push its way northwards
1:27 am
and eastwards. may make double figures again in the southwest but it's much colder elsewhere, especially north of england and scotland where into that cold air the rain will fall as snow. particularly in the hills, a couple of centimetres, peak district, pennines, cumbria and the fells. heavier snowfall, blizzards likely in the southern opulence and that snowy weather will work its way up into the highlands later on in the day as the main rain band sweeps away from eastern parts of england, heavy showers follow and it stays very windy. strongest winds are likely to be through the irish sea, english channel, gust 70, 80mph near coast. generally a0 or 50 or so but could get windier around some north sea coast in the evening. now, after steaming into the uk storm barra isjust going to stall overnight and into wednesday. and it will weaken as well. wednesday is still a windy day, just not as windy. the strongest winds are going to be in south wales and the southwest of england. and around that area of low pressure showers or longer spells of rain rotating with some brief glimpses of sunshine.
1:28 am
but it's still cold, temperatures around five to 7 was up by the time we get to thursday our storm really is no more. it's continuing to weaken, the winds are continuing to drop. this band of rain from the atlantic will arrive into northern ireland later in the day. but otherwise, it's a much quieter day on thursday. a fair bit of cloud around, many places are going to be dry, some sunshine at time but we are still in cold air, temperatures typically at sixes and sevens.
1:29 am
1:30 am
this is bbc news. we will have the headlines and all the main news stories for you at the top of the hour straight after this programme. hello. what is the relationship between journalists and their audiences? this week, some reporters covering the omicron variant say they've received a torrent of abuse from people angry about the government's response and blaming the journalists. nothing new in much of this, of course. people have been shooting the messenger for centuries. but have we reached a new low?

34 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on