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tv   The Papers  BBC News  December 5, 2021 9:30am-10:01am GMT

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let's get all the sport new from the bbc sports centre, and chetan pathak. thank you, good morning. we are going to start with football. manchester city leapfrogging chelsea manchester city lea pfrogging chelsea in the manchester city leapfrogging chelsea in the table getting their seventh win in all competitions in a row as they beat watford by 3—1 at vicarage road. pep guardiola very happy with this. bernardo silva scoring twice and the city boss was happy with another dominant performance from his side. the game could be over after 10, 15 minutes. and in the premier league after 2—0, even 3—0, never is over. but the most important thing, of course, we won, three more points, but the most important thing is that again we played in a consistent way that made us controlled and played a good game again. liverpool are just a point behind city,
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they moved ahead of chelsea thanks to a 94th minute winner from divock origi. further cementing his cult hero status with another crucial goal. the longer the game goes and it's still 0—0, then of course you feel the pressure because we wanted this result so badly. that we got it feels really good at the moment. does it make it, in a way, make it feel even bigger the way the win came? absolutely. chelsea are third. defender arthur masuaku's extraordinary goal gave west ham a 3—2 win. was it a shot or a cross? he said afterwards on twitter he was as surprised as anyone to see that beat the keeper. the goalkeeper could have done better here, too. it's taken until december but newcastle finally have their first win of the season. callum wilson gave eddie howe's side a 1—0 win over burnley. elsewhere, southampton drew with brighton. there are four second—round ties today in the men's fa cup.
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what a story for harrogate town at portsmouth yesterday winning at fratton park. jack diamond scored the winner in the 95th minute as the league two side knocked out two—time winners portsmouth with a 2—1 win at fratton park. it might be december but it's the women's fa cup final. the conclusion of last season's tournament was delayed by the pandemic. they picked up in septemberfor the quarterfinals onwards. over 16,000 people are expected at wembley as arsenal look to win the trophy for a record extending 15th time whilst chelsea are hoping to complete a domestic treble. arsenal know that winning the trophy would give them a record extending 15th win. yes, this is a trophy that is part of last yea r�*s success, and it is one that we want to win. but i don't think we will be defined any more by winning it.
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we are a successful team, we are a competitive team, we do year—on—year compete for every single title and that is what i'm most proud of, because it's really difficult to stay at the top end. i think we've developed drastically. and we are much, much more mature team, and we have lived through a lot of experience. we have learned from that. so both in defence and offence, i think we have developed. and so have chelsea, though. to the scottish premiership where rangers are seven points clear at the top after their 3—0 win was a fifth straight league victory — which puts pressure on celtic, who are at dundee united today. alfredo morelos got rangers�* third. elsewhere hibs drew with motherwell and aberdeen beat st mirren. australia have named their team for the first test of the ashes which starts at midnight on tuesday evening our time. travis head is included
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in the batting line up ahead of usman khawaja, while left—arm fast bowler mitchell starc keeps his place in the side despite competition from fellow seamerjhye richardson. here's the reaction of england captainjoe root. we have tried not to focus too much on what their exact 11 was going to be, making sure we prepare for the whole squad. and ultimately looking after ourselves as well, making sure we are readying ourselves and we are clear on how we want to approach the series and the test match individually. we know what to expect now and we have two days to it is a huge day in the formula 1 title fight as contenders lewis hamilton and max verstappen battle it out at saudi arabian grand prix. hamilton starts the penultimate race of the season on pole but if verstappen manages to outscore hamilton by 18 points today he will win his maiden title. the first happenstance in third after crashing in qualifying on the final lap. earlier i spoke to the bbc�*s f1 reporterjennie gow, and started by asking her whether the pressure is getting to verstappen. he was on the most incredible lap,
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it would have been one of the poles of our generation for sure, rivalling that of lewis hamilton in singapore a few years ago. it was world—class. but it meant that he was pushing it to the absolute limits. and unfortunately, when you are doing that, sometimes it goes wrong and that's what happened. it was just a ragged lock—up towards the end of the lap which saw him hit that barrier, and unfortunately, that was the end of his qualifying. otherwise, he would have been on pole by a really healthy margin. so verstappen goes from third. any word on the gearbox because that would have course then have an effect on where he is on the grid? yes, the hit meant he could have damaged his gearbox. the fia will release a document later on today to tell us of that is the case. if it is, he'd go back five places and start p8. so it's a big difference and it will have a huge factor on this championship battle. the stakes are so high. notjust verstappen making mistakes. hamilton looked edgy at times across this weekend too. butjust how important do
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you think his experience could prove to be as a seven time champion? well, he's been very clear in the fact that he is the elder statesman of formula 1, he's done this before. he said on thursday, "it's not my first rodeo." so he's trying to draw on that and use this in a psychological battle between he and max verstappen. but i think when it comes to it, both are very calm. they go into today knowing the significance, the importance, max verstappen could end today with a first world title to his name. but both of them seem calm, cool and ready for action later. if verstappen out scott hamilton by 18 points he will win his maiden title this afternoon. next to rugby union — in the premiership there were wins for london irish, northampton saints and worcester warriors. meanwhile tries from tom o'flaherty and player of the match luke cowan—dickie helped exeter to an 18—5 win over their big rivals saracens. exeter are fourth in the table, while sarries remain second after just their second loss
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of the season. in the united rugby championship 1a points from stephen myler set up an ospreys victory over third—place ulster. ospreys are fourth. elsewhere wins for glasgow warriors and lions. we'll have a new name on snooker�*s uk championship trophy this evening when zhao xintong will face belgium's luca brecel at the york barbican. zhao thrashed former world championship finalist barry hawkins 6—1. whilst the belgian luca brecel beat kyren wilsen 6—4 as he recorded four century breaks. the best—of—19 final will be live across the bbc today. that's all the sport for now. now it is time for the papers. hello and welcome to our look
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at this morning's newspapers. with me are the independent�*s features writerjames rampton and laura hughes, who's the political and diplomatic correspondent from the financial times. welcome, both of you, nice to see sunday morning. let's quickly run through the front pages. the sunday mirror has spoken to relatives of covid victims, who describe number ten holding parties last christmas as "a slap in the face". there's a poll in the observer from yougov, which says trust in politicians has fallen dramatically since borisjohnson become pm. the sunday times says doctors are angry that unvaccinated people are taking up hospital beds and delaying vital procedures. recollections from prince william about his mother is the top story in the sunday express. he's also on the front of the sunday telegraph, which also reports on ministers planning to roll out an anti—viral covid treatment by christmas. and the mail on sunday also leads with prince william speaking out about his mental health.
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that's the front pages. let's talk about those and some of the stories inside. good morning, both of you. let's start with actually the story of arthur —— arthur labinjo—hughes. it continues after the conviction of his father and stepmother. the sunday times says the prime minister will order a national inquiry. the paper says it is expected to consider whether to introduce safeguarding guidelines for at—risk children, should there be future national lockdowns. there is a serious case review already under way so this would be supplementary to that. we have heard this so many times, haven't we and it is something that has been remarked on, which is that they have been serious case reviews and two previous cases of abuse and it has happened again.
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the observer has on its inside pages more on this saying social workers must not be fooled by deceitful parents, according to one of the top child experts. what are your thoughts on the coverage of this in the papers today and the prospect of that national inquiry. weill. the papers today and the prospect of that national inquiry.— that national inquiry. well, first of all i'd like — that national inquiry. well, first of all i'd like to _ that national inquiry. well, first of all i'd like to express - that national inquiry. well, first of all i'd like to express my - that national inquiry. well, firstl of all i'd like to express my deep sympathy to the remaining family members of arthur. i found sympathy to the remaining family members of arthur. ifound it sympathy to the remaining family members of arthur. i found it hard to watch the story a lot this week. some of the detail was so horrendous. i'm not going to repeat them now because i think people find them now because i think people find them very upsetting. but you are right, we have been here before. i'm old enough to remember the abp scandal and others as well. there is a sense that sometimes any amount of hand—wringing doesn't help because there will always be devious parents who are able to fooled social services and i wouldn't always blame
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the social services but here there were three warnings about the way arthur was being mistreated which were being ignored and i never thought i would say this but i agree with borisjohnson, a national inquiry is an excellent idea. this is a case that has rightly shocked the nation. pictures of arthur were at football matches yesterday, paying tribute to him. he was only six years old, his whole life ahead of him, and we have to be able to heed the warning signs and listen to alarm bells when they are ringing, try our best to stop this happening again because it's just try our best to stop this happening again because it'sjust appalling try our best to stop this happening again because it's just appalling to imagine the suffering that that little boy went through. the little boy went through. laura? the oint this little boy went through. laura? the point this article _ little boy went through. laura? the point this article has _ little boy went through. laura? the point this article has made - little boy went through. laura? the point this article has made and - little boy went through. laura? the point this article has made and the| point this article has made and the reason _ point this article has made and the reason why— point this article has made and the reason why there needs to be such an in-depth_ reason why there needs to be such an in—depth inquiry is that concerns were _ in—depth inquiry is that concerns were raised by teachers and the wider— were raised by teachers and the wider family of this young boy. but it turns _ wider family of this young boy. but it turns out — wider family of this young boy. but it turns out that the west midlands police _ it turns out that the west midlands police didn't actually respond and needed _ police didn't actually respond and needed did social services so this
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is clearly— needed did social services so this is clearly an issue of different parts — is clearly an issue of different parts of — is clearly an issue of different parts of our society that are meant tojoin_ parts of our society that are meant tojoin up— parts of our society that are meant tojoin up to — parts of our society that are meant tojoin up to prevent parts of our society that are meant to join up to prevent this sort of thing _ to join up to prevent this sort of thing from — to join up to prevent this sort of thing from happening not working together— thing from happening not working together —— neither did social services _ together —— neither did social services. why this case is so tragic and why— services. why this case is so tragic and why there does need to be some sort of— and why there does need to be some sort of review in case there is another— sort of review in case there is another lockdown is clearly it would have ireen— another lockdown is clearly it would have been much harder in some respects— have been much harder in some respects for all these different bodies — respects for all these different bodies to assess the situation if this child — bodies to assess the situation if this child or children are stuck at home _ this child or children are stuck at home and — this child or children are stuck at home and not having contact with wider— home and not having contact with wider family and they are not having contact _ wider family and they are not having contact with teachers in schools. how _ contact with teachers in schools. how does — contact with teachers in schools. how does the government ensure that children— how does the government ensure that children are _ how does the government ensure that children are protected in that scenario _ children are protected in that scenario. and as has been reported this morning, there are often cases when _ this morning, there are often cases when parents get very good at pretending everything is ok, diverging social workers when they come _ diverging social workers when they come round. it is an incredibly complex— come round. it is an incredibly complex situation here, and i don't think— complex situation here, and i don't think it's _ complex situation here, and i don't think it's as — complex situation here, and i don't think it's as simple as one organisation, orjust social organisation, or just social workers _ organisation, orjust social workers. there clearly wasn't a joined — workers. there clearly wasn't a joined up — workers. there clearly wasn't a joined up approach here, which is
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why everyone is going to be seriously— why everyone is going to be seriously looked into in this inquiry _ seriously looked into in this inquiry. but it is a really difficult _ inquiry. but it is a really difficult situation because i cannot imagine _ difficult situation because i cannot imagine how hard it must be in a lockdown— imagine how hard it must be in a lockdown scenario to make sure that children _ lockdown scenario to make sure that children are — lockdown scenario to make sure that children are safe. we lockdown scenario to make sure that children are safe.— children are safe. we will go on to the sunday _ children are safe. we will go on to the sunday mirror _ children are safe. we will go on to the sunday mirror which _ children are safe. we will go on to the sunday mirror which is - the sunday mirror which is continuing to follow on from its exclusive earlier in the week with pippa crerar reporting on the partying at no 10, and they have spoken to families whose loved ones died while no 10 party. the picture on the front page there is farrell harris and elaine, the mother who died, she was 86, she died on the day that the party was happening at no 10 and her daughter has spoken to the paper saying mum was by herself because the rules meant i wasn't allowed to be at her side in her final hours. yet at the same time, no 10 chucked the rule book out of
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the window to have a knees up. she makes the point that if she had had a party at christmas she would have been fined £10,000. laura, your thoughts on this? the papers keep talking about it. is it cutting through? i talking about it. is it cutting throu~h? ~ , . through? i think it is cutting throu~h through? i think it is cutting through and _ through? i think it is cutting through and labour- through? i think it is cutting through and labour have . through? i think it is cutting i through and labour have called through? i think it is cutting - through and labour have called and written _ through and labour have called and written to _ through and labour have called and written to the metropolitan police to investigate these parties. they have said — to investigate these parties. they have said that normally they wouldn't _ have said that normally they wouldn't go retrospectively back but they witt— wouldn't go retrospectively back but they will consider the correspondence they have received from labour. because politically, the optics — from labour. because politically, the optics of this are really damaging to a no 10. it was a really strange _ damaging to a no 10. it was a really strange week where we were asking the prime _ strange week where we were asking the prime minister's spokespeople, did this _ the prime minister's spokespeople, did this party happen? and at no point _ did this party happen? and at no point did — did this party happen? and at no point did either they or boris johnson _ point did either they or boris johnson himself in the house of commons — johnson himself in the house of commons chamber deny that these parties _ commons chamber deny that these parties happened, theyjust kept repeating the line that all rules were _ repeating the line that all rules were followed. but we know from looking _ were followed. but we know from looking at — were followed. but we know from looking at the rules at the time that that — looking at the rules at the time that thatjust doesn't looking at the rules at the time that that just doesn't add up and doesn't — that that just doesn't add up and doesn't make any sense, and that's the bit _ doesn't make any sense, and that's the bit that— doesn't make any sense, and that's the bit that i think will frustrate
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people. — the bit that i think will frustrate people, is that they are not being entirety— people, is that they are not being entirely open and honest and clear, and questions are going to keep coming — and questions are going to keep coming. i've spoken to people that were _ coming. i've spoken to people that were at— coming. i've spoken to people that were at these parties and they are sort of— were at these parties and they are sort of suggested to me and tried to defend _ sort of suggested to me and tried to defend their position and that they were att— defend their position and that they were all working together in one bubble. — were all working together in one bubble, they were the only people are realty— bubble, they were the only people are really working in whitehall, and therefore _ are really working in whitehall, and therefore i— are really working in whitehall, and therefore i think at the time they sort of— therefore i think at the time they sort ofjustified it in their own minds — sort ofjustified it in their own minds that because they were working in close _ minds that because they were working in close proximity it was all right to have — in close proximity it was all right to have a — in close proximity it was all right to have a party. but clearly it wasn't — to have a party. but clearly it wasn't all _ to have a party. but clearly it wasn't all right for anyone else in any other— wasn't all right for anyone else in any other workplace and they would have had _ any other workplace and they would have had a — any other workplace and they would have had a really strict covid regulations in place and they would absolutely not have had parties. jameis? — absolutely not have had parties. jameis? |— absolutely not have had parties. jameis? ., ., ., , jameis? i agree with laura entirely. it's a jameis? i agree with laura entirely. it's a smack — jameis? i agree with laura entirely. it's a smack of _ jameis? i agree with laura entirely. it's a smack of the _ jameis? i agree with laura entirely. it's a smack of the old _ jameis? i agree with laura entirely. it's a smack of the old dominic - it's a smack of the old dominic cummings and barnard castle story here. it's one rule for them and one rule for the rest of us. i think this one has cut through. there is a real sense of anger, and congratulations, by the way, to the mirror who did a fantasticjob this
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week on this story. the sense of anger and outrage that the government canjust do anger and outrage that the government can just do what it likes, apparently, and just not care about what anyone else is going through. a very powerful testimony try through. a very powerful testimony by these relatives who lost loved ones on the day that this party was taking place. what could be a more vivid illustration of a government that doesn't give a fig about what everyone else is doing? it makes me very, very angry that they are so arrogant that they think they can get away with this and just shrug it off and say, "what's the problem? it was all a year ago." and as laura said, obfuscate about what will happen. i think this may come back to haunt them and it may be the new barnard castle moment, you heard it here first. the barnard castle moment, you heard it here first. , , ., , ., ., here first. the observer has got a oll here first. the observer has got a poll talking _ here first. the observer has got a poll talking about _ here first. the observer has got a poll talking about people's - here first. the observer has got a poll talking about people's faith l here first. the observer has got a | poll talking about people's faith in mps, poll talking about people's faith in mp5, it poll talking about people's faith in mps, it doesn't specifically mention this, actually, it is actually polling that was carried out in the wake of the owen paterson situation.
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but the polling indicates a real drop voters' trust in politicians. it was 48% of voters in 2014 when david cameron was prime minister, believed politicians were out merely for themselves. when borisjohnson became prime minister... sorry, it was 57% in may 2021 after nearly two years of borisjohnson in no 10, and then last week after the owen paterson affair it was 63% of voters only believe politicians are out for themselves. so is that something, james, that you think is going to bother no 10?— bother no 10? yes, i think it is. this is bother no10? yes, i think it is. this is another— bother no 10? yes, i think it is. this is another issue _ bother no 10? yes, i think it is. this is another issue that - bother no 10? yes, i think it is. this is another issue that really| this is another issue that really does appear to be cutting through. only 5% of people think that politicians aren't in it for themselves. i mean, that's really shocking the level of cynicism people feel about politicians, money
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grabbing, and any other grabbing approach to thejob. grabbing, and any other grabbing approach to the job. what is intriguing is the polling in this observer story also suggests the tory lead in shropshire north, owen paterson's constituency, is really tightening. they won by 63% and the last election. but their lead is now down to only 6% over the lib dems, 44% compared to the lib dems�*s 38. some people have said you could put a cow up for election there as a tory and it would win because it is such a solid tory constituency. but this suggestion that there may be a tightening of the race, like amersham and chesham earlier this year does suggest that the sleaze issueis year does suggest that the sleaze issue is cutting through. people are thinking, these people all have their noses in the trough, and again, they don't care about it, i'm going to make them pay at the ballot box and that's where it will really, really hurt. box and that's where it will really,
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really hurt-— box and that's where it will really, really hurt.- the _ box and that's where it will really, really hurt.- the article - really hurt. laura? the article makes the — really hurt. laura? the article makes the point _ really hurt. laura? the article makes the point that - really hurt. laura? the article makes the point that in - really hurt. laura? the article makes the point that in the i really hurt. laura? the article i makes the point that in the long term _ makes the point that in the long term it — makes the point that in the long term it is — makes the point that in the long term it is incredibly damaging when the public— term it is incredibly damaging when the public lose faith in their etected _ the public lose faith in their elected politicians and their leaders _ elected politicians and their leaders because it means in the future _ leaders because it means in the future they might not bother to voter _ future they might not bother to vote, or— future they might not bother to vote, or they might vote for characters that may be don't have the experience but who says something completely different and appear— something completely different and appear to be on the side of the public— appear to be on the side of the public that might not necessarily be, really — public that might not necessarily be, really populist politicians in that case — be, really populist politicians in that case. i think it's interesting this pott— that case. i think it's interesting this poll was carried out before the party— this poll was carried out before the party story~ — this poll was carried out before the party story. but it shows how much the sleaze — party story. but it shows how much the sleaze allegations have cut through — the sleaze allegations have cut through and i think the opposition are really— through and i think the opposition are really using this to paint the conservative party as the party of sleaze. _ conservative party as the party of sleaze, the owen paterson scandal of course _ sleaze, the owen paterson scandal of course was _ sleaze, the owen paterson scandal of course was an extraordinary situation _ course was an extraordinary situation where you saw downing street _ situation where you saw downing street trying to change the rules at the last— street trying to change the rules at the last minute in order to save one of their— the last minute in order to save one of their own — the last minute in order to save one of their own. it was a complex story but it— of their own. it was a complex story but it did _ of their own. it was a complex story but it did really cut through because _ but it did really cut through because itjust looked unfair and it feeds— because itjust looked unfair and it feeds into — because itjust looked unfair and it feeds into this narrative that we
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have _ feeds into this narrative that we have at— feeds into this narrative that we have at the moment about the parties and them _ have at the moment about the parties and them notjust being clear with the public— and them notjust being clear with the public about what really happened. it's really damaging but also presents an opportunity, i think. — also presents an opportunity, i think. for— also presents an opportunity, i think, for smaller parties and the labour— think, for smaller parties and the labour party to set themselves out differently. i think keir starmer etecting — differently. i think keir starmer electing his new shadow cabinet this week has— electing his new shadow cabinet this week has really made the point to his new— week has really made the point to his new team that you need to practice — his new team that you need to practice what you preach and you need _ practice what you preach and you need to— practice what you preach and you need to be — practice what you preach and you need to be above board in every area of public— need to be above board in every area of public life, otherwise you will be punished like the tories. that leads us on _ be punished like the tories. that leads us on neatly _ be punished like the tories. that leads us on neatly to _ be punished like the tories. trust leads us on neatly to the next story we are going to talk about in the mail on sunday. an article asking, will keir starmer get rid of angela rayner by axing her deputy leader role? when he announced the reshuffle there was quite a row over whether angela rayner knew anything about it in advance. she was interviewed on the radio in the morning and said she didn't know anything about it but then keir starmer did give her a call, apparently, but didn't give
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any of the specifics. so there has been that sort of history between them. it happened with the previous reshuffle. and now the paper is saying they have been looking potentially at whether to scrap the deputy leader role. because it is a role that is voted for so it is not something that he actually could reshuffle on. so laura, what are your thoughts on the relationship between those two and the importance of that in the labour party? i the importance of that in the labour pa ? ~ the importance of that in the labour pa ? ., ., the importance of that in the labour pa ? ~' ., ., , party? i think whether or not this sto is party? i think whether or not this story is true _ party? i think whether or not this story is true it — party? i think whether or not this story is true it is _ party? i think whether or not this story is true it is reflective - party? i think whether or not this story is true it is reflective of - story is true it is reflective of the current mood in the top team of the current mood in the top team of the labour— the current mood in the top team of the labour party, and we know that the labour party, and we know that the relationship between sir keir starmer— the relationship between sir keir starmer and his deputy is not good. there _ starmer and his deputy is not good. there was— starmer and his deputy is not good. there was a — starmer and his deputy is not good. there was a story about angela rayner — there was a story about angela rayner not being informed of the reshuffle — rayner not being informed of the reshuffle earlier this week, this idea that — reshuffle earlier this week, this idea that sir keir starmer was trying — idea that sir keir starmer was trying to— idea that sir keir starmer was trying to reassert his authority, but he — trying to reassert his authority, but he didn't need her consultation, but he didn't need her consultation, but he _ but he didn't need her consultation, but he didn't need her consultation, but he didn't really need her input or advice — but he didn't really need her input or advice on moving around the shadow— or advice on moving around the
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shadow cabinet, and i think this story— shadow cabinet, and i think this story is— shadow cabinet, and i think this story is an — shadow cabinet, and i think this story is an interesting one because jeremy— story is an interesting one because jeremy corbyn notably also looked into whether or not he could get rid of the _ into whether or not he could get rid of the position because tom watson was a _ of the position because tom watson was a bit _ of the position because tom watson was a bit of— of the position because tom watson was a bit of a thorn in his side toor _ was a bit of a thorn in his side too, it— was a bit of a thorn in his side too, it was— was a bit of a thorn in his side too, it was very critical of leadership. it's a funny dynamic between — leadership. it's a funny dynamic between and deputy. angela rayner's allies say— between and deputy. angela rayner's allies say keir starmer is sort of nervous — allies say keir starmer is sort of nervous of— allies say keir starmer is sort of nervous of her, can't handle her because — nervous of her, can't handle her because she plays out well with the public _ because she plays out well with the public but — because she plays out well with the public. but you know, this story and the fact— public. but you know, this story and the fact these sorts of stories are being _ the fact these sorts of stories are being briefed in the sunday papers, is definitely reflective of tensions and a _ is definitely reflective of tensions and a real— is definitely reflective of tensions and a real low point, and we know this is— and a real low point, and we know this is being — and a real low point, and we know this is being experienced by the labour— this is being experienced by the labour leader and his deputy. james, our labour leader and his deputy. james, your thoughts — labour leader and his deputy. james, your thoughts on _ labour leader and his deputy. james, your thoughts on this _ labour leader and his deputy. james, your thoughts on this dynamic? - labour leader and his deputy. james, your thoughts on this dynamic? yes, | your thoughts on this dynamic? yes, i aaree your thoughts on this dynamic? yes, i agree with — your thoughts on this dynamic? yes, i agree with laura. _ your thoughts on this dynamic? yes, i agree with laura. i— your thoughts on this dynamic? yes, i agree with laura. i do _ your thoughts on this dynamic? yes i agree with laura. i do think there is an element of the dead cat about this. the mail on sunday, traditionally a tory supporting paper, is seeing the catastrophic coverage that borisjohnson is getting and thinking, well, let's
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try and distract people with a story about trouble in the labour party. having said that, i do think there is something, there were severe rows between them after the hartlepool by—election when starmer tried to oust angela rayner and she resisted and it resulted in her being promoted. and again this week, the suggestion that she has been sidelined, had no idea of the full extent of the reshuffle, reports are saying when angela rayner confronted him afterwards. i think there is a personality clash there. it might not play badly for keir starmer if he emerges as somebody authoritative. i think part of the problem is is he is seen as a bit wooden, and not very human. he doesn't seem to have the qualities like angela rayner does that can connect with people but if he reassert his authority on the party and brings in a new team, which i have to say i'm very pleased about, i think yvette cooper is a superb signing. i saw her on your channel
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last night and thought she was excellent. people like that will give the labour party more credibility after the dire horrors of corbynism. if labour can become a credible opposition again, that is fantastic for our democracy because this government is running out of control and hasn't had a proper position before. if there is somebody who can challenge the tories, hurray, iwould somebody who can challenge the tories, hurray, i would say. somebody who can challenge the tories, hurray, iwould say. let’s tories, hurray, iwould say. let's end on some _ tories, hurray, iwould say. let's end on some of _ tories, hurray, iwould say. let's end on some of the _ tories, hurray, iwould say. let's end on some of the coverage - tories, hurray, iwould say. let's end on some of the coverage on| end on some of the coverage on prince william, because it is in lots of the papers. is been interviewed on a podcast talking about his mental health but i wanted to pick up on sunday times are covering the story because it is probably quite reminiscent for a lot of families. music in the car, singing along, and how much of a joy and a way to bring people together that can be when it is sometimes a bit stressful on the school run or whatever. he talks about going back to school with his mum in the car and they used to
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listening to simply the best and he says, my mother would be driving along singing at the top of her voice and the policeman in the car would occasionally sing along and we would occasionally sing along and we would be listening and singing to the music right to the gates where they would drop us off. he said there is a sad element to this because he said it was to help him with these anxiety of going back to school. there is lots of fun talked about, charlotte and george talking about, charlotte and george talking about what they will listen to every morning. laura, what did you think as you read that? i morning. laura, what did you think as you read that?— as you read that? i agree i think it's interesting, _ as you read that? i agree i think it's interesting, everyone - as you read that? i agree i think it's interesting, everyone else i as you read that? i agree i think. it's interesting, everyone else has chosen to focus on him talking about his time as an air ambulance pilot and how dramatic that was but this is the sunday times focusing on a lighter aspect of the interview he did for a podcast. i think it is relatable, and clearly prince william is trying to come across as human, prince harry was very good at that, and this was an interview where he really was talking as if he
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was just a normal dad where he really was talking as if he wasjust a normal dad getting his kids ready for school in the morning. and of course it is sad him talking about his mother but i'm sure lots of people reading the piece today would find it quite touching really and very human from the prince. ~ ., ., , ., ~' the prince. what do you think, james? absolutely, _ the prince. what do you think, james? absolutely, i- the prince. what do you think, james? absolutely, i agree . the prince. what do you think, | james? absolutely, i agree with laura. james? absolutely, i agree with laura- there — james? absolutely, i agree with laura. there is _ james? absolutely, i agree with laura. there is a _ james? absolutely, i agree with laura. there is a very _ james? absolutely, i agree with laura. there is a very human, i laura. there is a very human, relatable _ laura. there is a very human, relatable quality in this. i love the detail you mentioned the policeman was almost reluctantly singing _ policeman was almost reluctantly singing along to simply the best. i also love _ singing along to simply the best. i also love the fact he talked about his perhaps woeful singing abilities and taylor swift dragged him on stage _ and taylor swift dragged him on stage at— and taylor swift dragged him on stage at a centrepoint charity gig to sing _ to sing #- to sing # livin' on a to sing — # livin' on a prayer byjon bon jovi~ _ # livin' on a prayer byjon bon jovi. and — # livin' on a prayer byjon bon jovi. and he _ # livin' on a prayer byjon bon jovi. and he didn't remember the words _ jovi. and he didn't remember the words i— jovi. and he didn't remember the words. i would jovi. and he didn't remember the words. iwould be jovi. and he didn't remember the words. i would be where you wake up in a nightmare thinking i've forgotten the words. i think it is
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brilliant — forgotten the words. i think it is brilliant he is talking about his mental— brilliant he is talking about his mental health, he cries on the podcast, — mental health, he cries on the podcast, he talks about his devastation when he rescues a young boy who _ devastation when he rescues a young boy who was severely injured who was the same _ boy who was severely injured who was the same age as his son george. i think— the same age as his son george. i think the — the same age as his son george. i think the more people we respect like prince — think the more people we respect like prince william talking about the mental health issue the more it stigmatises it and that can only be a brilliant — stigmatises it and that can only be a brilliant thing for all of us to think— a brilliant thing for all of us to think it — a brilliant thing for all of us to think it is _ a brilliant thing for all of us to think it is ok not to be ok and to talk about— think it is ok not to be ok and to talk about it. it think it is ok not to be ok and to talk about it.— talk about it. it is lovely to start our sunday _ talk about it. it is lovely to start our sunday with _ talk about it. it is lovely to start our sunday with you _ talk about it. it is lovely to start our sunday with you both, - talk about it. it is lovely to start| our sunday with you both, thank talk about it. it is lovely to start - our sunday with you both, thank you so much, laura hughes and james rampton. so much, laura hughes and james ramton. �* so much, laura hughes and james ramton. . _ hello again. we have something of an east—west split with our weather, certainly for today, with eastern england having the thickest of the cloud, where we have pantry outbreaks of rain feeding in. elsewhere, largely day with spells of sunshine developing, the best sunshine always across west in most areas and it has been a glorious
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start already across parts of devon. that was the early morning sunrise from the torquay area. on the satellite picture you can see this scale of cloud, the same area of pressure that brought rain and cold winds to the uk yesterday and are still feeling in my fabrics of rain across eastern areas of england in particular, one to showers elsewhere, wales, south—west england and a few in northern scotland but increasingly these areas become dry with sunshine, more widespread through the day. across eastern england the rain will become more patchy in nature, probably seeing a few brighter spells pushing on. temperatures for the most part around 6—8 , maybe nine or ten in parts of the south—west, slightly cooler in northern and western scotland and northern ireland. overnight with clearing skies, for a time, it will turn cold, cold enough for some patches of frost but later in the night we get a band of rain moving in of the atlantic. this is a weather front and as that front bumps into the cold air, we could see the rain turned to snow, particularly in scotland. north of
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the central belt we may see accumulations of around five centimetres through monday morning, but even across higher reaches of the southern uplands, the peaks and pennines we may well see as per speu pennines we may well see as per spell of snow for a time. at low levels across england and way is its cold rain that will fall and as the cold rain that will fall and as the cold front pushes through colder air follows with a mixture of sunshine and showers and some of their showers wintry and a much chillier feel to the weather, particularly for northern areas, temperature is around 3—5 , for northern areas, temperature is around 3—5, in the for northern areas, temperature is around 3—5 , in the south around seven or eight. on tuesday we are watching the development of a very powerful looking storm. you can see tightly packed isobars developing on this rapidly deepening area of low pressure. at the moment the strongest winds looked set to buffet the republic of ireland, gusts could reach 80 odd miles an hour and even in the uk we will have some strong winds, could bring some impacts. if that weren't enough we could see some of the rain turning to snow across the high ground of scotland and northern england for a time. that lot clears through and by thursday the weather should become a
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little bit quieter. that's the latest. this is bbc world news. our top stories... the uk becomes the latest country to tighten its travel rules — as the omicron variant spreads. from tuesday, all arrivals will need a pre—departure covid test. we've been clear that we will take action if it is necessary. but it is important that, whilst we are introducing these new border measures today, to remember that vaccinations, remember, they are our first line of defence. at least 13 people have been killed — after a volcano erupts on the indonesian island ofjava — for the second time in less than a year. pope francis is visiting a migrant camp on the greek island of lesbos as he seeks to highlight the plight of refugees. translation: migration is not a problem of the middle east. | not a problem of north africa

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