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tv   The Papers  BBC News  December 3, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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prosecutors in michigan have charged the parents of the teenager accused of a deadly school shooting with involuntary manslaughter. jennifer and james crumbley bought the handgun allegedly used in the attack last sunday. the who has warned that all countries should prepare for an omicron surge with the number of countries detecting the variant increasing daily. it also said it was too soon to say if omicron causes more serious illness. british scientists have found that the pfizer and moderna vaccines are the most effective to use as boosterjabs. they also found signs that a third jab protects against the new variant. and pope francis has visited cyprus. at a prayer service, he condemned what he said was slavery and torture being suffered by people fleeing war and poverty.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are benedicte paviot, france 24's uk correspondent and broadcaster and journalist, james lewer. about journalist, james lewer. to sit into the chair on tirr radio about to sit into the chair on times radio for early morning. i don't know how this can affect your late nights with us. little arthur labinjo—hughes is on the front page of the mail — his father and stepmother have been handed lengthyjail sentences after subjecting the 6—year—old to horrific levels of abuse which led to his death — the prime minister says he'll leave no stone unturned in finding out why arthur had not been protected. the i reports on claims from some health chiefs that the omicron variant can infect the double—jabbed, and easily re—infect those who've already suffered from other coronavirus variants. a wave of christmas party cancellations is hitting hospitality venues,
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according to the ft — with many businesses blaming the government's mixed messaging over the omicron variant. the guardian claims some government scientists have called for an end to those mixed messages and immediate action, to avoid the nhs becoming overwhelmed by a significant wave of covid infections. the telegraph leads on government plans to outlaw the pestering of women in the street or in pubs — it's part of an overhaul of laws to protect women and girls from male violence. and the chancellor's plans to cut taxes is the lead for the times — the paper suggests rishi sunak is drawing up proposals to slash both income tax and vat before the next general election. so let's begin... james, do you want to kick us up this time on the mail and that heartbreaking photograph of arthur labinjo—hughes. boris heartbreaking photograph of arthur labinjo-hughes-— labinjo-hughes. boris johnson the prime minister _ labinjo-hughes. boris johnson the prime minister said _ labinjo-hughes. boris johnson the prime minister said he's _ labinjo-hughes. boris johnson the prime minister said he's going - labinjo-hughes. boris johnson the prime minister said he's going to l prime minister said he's going to leave no stone unturned to try and find answers to what happened. of course we've all been reading and watching and listening to what has
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been quite some harrowing descriptions of arthur who lost his life so tragically. now question marks on social services and the police in terms of what they might have missed, in terms of lessons learned, diverse two drawing comparisons with lots of other cases. the wand that sticks in my mind even though it was such a long time ago, 1a years as the baby be we are all deeply shocked with what we see and we can't believe that another human could do that especially to a child. obviously, the prime minister says that he wants to push forward as we all want to know the answers to why this happened and maybe it been prevented. quite a disturbing story. one that's left a lot of us shocked, of course. it one that's left a lot of us shocked, of course. . , , one that's left a lot of us shocked, of course. ., , , ~ of course. it was very striking, the
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'udue of course. it was very striking, the judge saying- -- — of course. it was very striking, the judge saying- -- he _ of course. it was very striking, the judge saying... he sadly _ of course. it was very striking, the judge saying... he sadly would've| judge saying... he sadly would've dealt with many cases of child abuse and child murder. he said it was one of the most harrowing he'd had to with not least because there were warnings, concerns raised by one of arthur's grandmothers. but somehow it seems to has fallen through the gaps in the system. like it seems to has fallen through the gaps in the system.— it seems to has fallen through the gaps in the system. like with baby p. and victoria _ gaps in the system. like with baby p. and victoria and _ gaps in the system. like with baby p. and victoria and others. - gaps in the system. like with baby p. and victoria and others. and i gaps in the system. like with baby. p. and victoria and others. and this is where _ p. and victoria and others. and this is where this — p. and victoria and others. and this is where this poor little helpless as the _ is where this poor little helpless as the daily mail says little boy, six years — as the daily mail says little boy, six years old, his life was not saved — six years old, his life was not saved by— six years old, his life was not saved by the police, by the social services — saved by the police, by the social services. these warnings were missed~ — services. these warnings were missed. so how can we stop these signals— missed. so how can we stop these signals from being missed? this was not a _ signals from being missed? this was not a one—off. this was weeks of abuse _ not a one—off. this was weeks of abuse by— not a one—off. this was weeks of abuse by his— not a one—off. this was weeks of abuse by his father, it has to be said _ abuse by his father, it has to be said that — abuse by his father, it has to be said that his stepmother. a stepmother who didn't even come up
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and face _ stepmother who didn't even come up and face the judge to hear that she was being — and face the judge to hear that she was being sentenced to a minimum of 29 years— was being sentenced to a minimum of 29 years for— was being sentenced to a minimum of 29 years for murder put up her father— 29 years for murder put up her father thomas hughes, got a 21 year term _ father thomas hughes, got a 21 year term in_ father thomas hughes, got a 21 year term. in that sense there is some justice _ term. in that sense there is some justice being served. but it doesn't bring _ justice being served. but it doesn't bring irack— justice being served. but it doesn't bring back this little boys life. if only lessons could be learned. that resolved _ only lessons could be learned. that resolved needs to come through with concrete _ resolved needs to come through with concrete results, away from the glare _ concrete results, away from the glare of — concrete results, away from the glare of the media. although the glare _ glare of the media. although the glare of— glare of the media. although the glare of the media. although the glare of the media. although the glare of the media and that accountability is important for that we need _ accountability is important for that we need to be able to measure these things— we need to be able to measure these things irr— we need to be able to measure these things in the future. goods word, good _ things in the future. goods word, good sentiments are simply not enough — good sentiments are simply not enou:h. . ~ good sentiments are simply not enou:h. ., ,, , ., ., enough. indeed. take us onto the guardian. this _ enough. indeed. take us onto the guardian. this is _ enough. indeed. take us onto the guardian. this is interesting - guardian. this is interesting suggesting there might be some moves among some of the scientist to give advice to the government for the government to go further, we are seeing tonight ireland in this
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increasing restrictions, closing my class. you'll only be able to drink and eat at a table again. you will be able to stand at a bar. we obviously have friends made significant restrictions aimed at people who are not vaccinated. germany is on the safe as a netherlands under partial lockdown. act now says the paper. what's the case is made or at least the people is talking to cook what's the case is talking to cook what's the case is making was not the case they're making is that it simply not good enough to say there were going to wait to find out the answers to the many questions that omicron poses. that that may be too late. i think it's really— that that may be too late. i think it's really inviting the prime minister— it's really inviting the prime minister and the government to act not slowly— minister and the government to act not slowly as they have done previously, not too late but to listen — previously, not too late but to listen to — previously, not too late but to listen to the warnings of some scientist — listen to the warnings of some scientist saying you must act now to prevent _ scientist saying you must act now to prevent a _ scientist saying you must act now to prevent a potentially "very
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significant wave of infection. it's significant wave of infection. it's not — significant wave of infection. it's not rocket science to know where — it's not rocket science to know where it — it's not rocket science to know where it being winter to know that the nhs _ where it being winter to know that the nhs is — where it being winter to know that the nhs is always under pressure in these _ the nhs is always under pressure in these months. of course we meet indoors _ these months. of course we meet indoors far— these months. of course we meet indoors far more at the start of year— indoors far more at the start of year and — indoors far more at the start of year and the united kingdom than we do outdoors. that many people are still not _ do outdoors. that many people are still not really aware enough ventilation and renewing the air. that— ventilation and renewing the air. that by— ventilation and renewing the air. that by some magic therefore in supermarkets and shops, on public transport _ supermarkets and shops, on public transport we have to wear, were told it's mandatory to a mouse but sonrehow, _ it's mandatory to a mouse but somehow, all funny that, omicron and covid _ somehow, all funny that, omicron and covid are _ somehow, all funny that, omicron and covid are not— somehow, all funny that, omicron and covid are not to be a problem in crop _ covid are not to be a problem in crop clubs— covid are not to be a problem in crop clubs and restaurants. that's simply— crop clubs and restaurants. that's simply not — crop clubs and restaurants. that's simply not the way a virus works. it's simply not the way a virus works. it's very— simply not the way a virus works. it's very much urging the scientist saving _ it's very much urging the scientist saving to — it's very much urging the scientist saying to tell people to work from home 0t— saying to tell people to work from home. of course those who can. don't make _ home. of course those who can. don't make it _ home. of course those who can. don't make it obligatory. i think there's still that— make it obligatory. i think there's
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still that balance between the economic consequences of cancellations of parties, whether their— cancellations of parties, whether their private parties or work office parties. _ their private parties or work office parties, etc. ithink their private parties or work office parties, etc. i think time their private parties or work office parties, etc. ithink time is their private parties or work office parties, etc. i think time is upon us and _ parties, etc. i think time is upon us and caution is upon us. if we want _ us and caution is upon us. if we want to— us and caution is upon us. if we want to try— us and caution is upon us. if we want to try and have some sort of meaningful, if that's important to us, whether religious reasons are not religiously reasons but getting together— not religiously reasons but getting together then surely some precautions now are a wise way to act. therefore the prime minister, the government is being invited to introduce — the government is being invited to introduce measures immediately. james. _ introduce measures immediately. james, have you got your party had him for christmas yet? are you being a bit more cautious because not enjoy acustmed it all ties. a bit more cautious than you would normally be. more cautious than you would normally be— more cautious than you would normally be. more cautious than you would normall be. ,., ., , ~ normally be. personally, ifeel like i like to normally be. personally, ifeel like i like to be — normally be. personally, ifeel like i like to be more _ normally be. personally, ifeel like i like to be more cautious - normally be. personally, ifeel like i like to be more cautious in - normally be. personally, ifeel like i like to be more cautious in terms| i like to be more cautious in terms of christmas parties. i personally would not be ok with being part of a bigger gathering. i think personal responsibility comes into the so much. this is a trade—off
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constantly. this article is focusing on what the scientists are saying. government saying look, let's be cautious, i think we should do this, this could stop any potential threat of the omicron variant spreading more with it working from home. you've got the other side of this as well. hospitality industry are to be like, well, does this do to us, we are rock—bottom. we can't go through this again. so the government have a really difficult decision to make our other side. they are caught between two things. they can't get it right either way. they'll either go one—way, they can't go one—way or the other and they have to find something in the middle. of course we are right, putting masks on tubes and injobs is one thing but it doesn't stop it spreading in other parts that we socialise in. i don't there is a wrong or right answer to this. honestly, ithink
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there is a wrong or right answer to this. honestly, i think we have to be given the owners a little bit more in terms of what we do. trust the public. obviously, some more than others. it's not simple, it's not black and white on this at all. this guardian article focuses on the science side of it. i think we can look at anotherfront science side of it. i think we can look at another front page which looks at a completely different rate late which is the ft.— late which is the ft. sean, 'ust before we fl late which is the ft. sean, 'ust before we do, i late which is the ft. sean, 'ust before we do, may i late which is the ft. sean, 'ust before we do, may i i late which is the ft. sean, 'ust before we do, may i askh late which is the ft. sean, 'ust before we do, may i ask is h late which is the ft. sean, just - before we do, may i ask is that it's inrportant. — before we do, may i ask is that it's important, thank you, what the guardian— important, thank you, what the guardian underlines i think very wisely— guardian underlines i think very wiseiv is— guardian underlines i think very wisely is that the warning therefore about— wisely is that the warning therefore about acting early comes as ministers have given gps in england certainty— ministers have given gps in england certainly the green light to provide a tower— certainly the green light to provide a lower level of care to millions of patients— a lower level of care to millions of patients for the next four months or they can _ patients for the next four months or they canjoin the patients for the next four months or they can join the national mission to deliver— they can join the national mission to deliver boosters. of course this nreans— to deliver boosters. of course this nreans for— to deliver boosters. of course this means for older people, over 75, peopie _ means for older people, over 75, people with heart conditions in diabetes — people with heart conditions in diabetes and heart problems, this is
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very bad _ diabetes and heart problems, this is very bad news. they've been subject to that _ very bad news. they've been subject to that for— very bad news. they've been subject to that for months already. tiers; to that for months already. very aood to that for months already. very good point. _ to that for months already. very good point, well-made. - to that for months already. - good point, well—made. just picking up good point, well—made. just picking up on the ftu. christmas party cancellations. tell us what is the situation in france at the moment for the power those extra restrictions gone down in terms of the public mood but also have they appeared to have been affected? hagar appeared to have been affected? how the 've appeared to have been affected? how they've gone — appeared to have been affected? horror they've gone down is we've gone over they've gone down is we've gone over the pandemic from a very sceptic public, not really wanting to be vaccinated. that was a very different initial reaction for example here in the uk which surprised everyone. how eager people were to be vaccinated. and then france is caught up overtaken at times the 90 kingdom on the level of second vaccinations. and now for the
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booster people are very eager to do that. because if you don't do that vaccine passport you can't go to the restaurant, cinema, theatre and they want to try and lead a normal as life as possible. but looking at the figures today. although the death toll is far lower in france i see that france is rivalling the united kingdom today with nearly 50,000 cases. a huge rise over the last week. that of course is a source of concern in france.— concern in france. that raises concern- - - — concern in france. that raises concern... delta _ concern in france. that raises concern... delta variant. - concern in france. that raises concern... delta variant. 12 i concern in france. that raises l concern... delta variant. 12 only concern in france. that raises - concern... delta variant. 12 only on the ground virus was up you can see the ground virus was up you can see the situation where if the omicron virus goes away its own in africa, the economists said the variant has not taken off in different places. sometimes it's been geographically confined. beta may have been in africa and didn't spread in england, i think i'm right in saying. if the omicron variant was spread then people would say what what was the
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point of all this restriction? there's always a danger as well, isn't there?— there's always a danger as well, isn't there? , , ., ._ , ., isn't there? yes, there is always a dan . er. isn't there? yes, there is always a danger- that _ isn't there? yes, there is always a danger. that fact _ isn't there? yes, there is always a danger. that fact is _ isn't there? yes, there is always a danger. that fact is the _ isn't there? yes, there is always a danger. that fact is the delta - danger. that fact is the delta variant which is dominant in uk and france and is dominant in many countries, i think i've counted 30 countries, i think i've counted 30 countries that have put quite big restrictions on movements, particularly of people who are unvaccinated. which remained, it has to be underlined a minority of people in these countries. nevertheless, there are more and more restrictions. the delta variant is no joke. more restrictions. the delta variant is nojoke. long covid is nojoke. i've met quite a few people now who have still got really bad migraines. have got very bad headaches. perhaps more than a — have got very bad headaches. perhaps more than a year _ have got very bad headaches. perhaps more than a year after _ have got very bad headaches. perhaps more than a year after they've - have got very bad headaches. perhaps more than a year after they've had - more than a year after they've had the infection.— the infection. correct. we don't understand _ the infection. correct. we don't understand all— the infection. correct. we don't understand all the _ the infection. correct. we don't understand all the different - understand all the different problems that this can cause. and let's remember, the nhs of focusing
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on the uk, the nhs was never supposed to be a covid service. there are people who need cancer treatment, but he diabetes, dialysis, transplants, all these things that have been so delayed over such a long time. this is really very worrying time, i continued whirring time for them. so let's just be cautious. continued whirring time for them. so let'sjust be cautious.— let'sjust be cautious. james, the telegraph. _ let'sjust be cautious. james, the telegraph, pestering _ let'sjust be cautious. james, the telegraph, pestering women - let'sjust be cautious. james, the telegraph, pestering women in l let'sjust be cautious. james, the i telegraph, pestering women in the street to be outlawed. i don't know what your experiences of this but i was very struck talking to colleagues here when that story came out. you may remember schoolchildren were actually encouraging people to come forward about harassment they suffered in school, boys and girls club stop talking to young women producers who work on our channel and having my eyes open, i have nieces but i don't have children of my own. to the kind of routine daily harassment from about the age of 11 or 12 that they headaches. front man. forthem it or 12 that they headaches. front man. for them it was almost kinder
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shoulder shrug and, it had become so endemic in their life that theyjust treated it as something they had to put up with. it looks like the government is now saying you don't. yes. the sarah everard opened up a lot of— yes. the sarah everard opened up a lot of conversation amongst men and wonren _ lot of conversation amongst men and wonren and _ lot of conversation amongst men and women and women and women and men and men _ women and women and women and men and men in— women and women and women and men and men. in some way it's created some _ and men. in some way it's created some realty— and men. in some way it's created some really important discussions for that— some really important discussions for that now i think it's led to this— for that now i think it's led to this in— for that now i think it's led to this in some way. conversations that my girlfriend and i have had about her experiences and being actually quite _ her experiences and being actually quite shocked by some of told me. similarly— quite shocked by some of told me. similarly i've sister as well and it's difficult to comprehend and understand why they've gone through some of— understand why they've gone through some of the things they've gone through— some of the things they've gone through in their lives which is nreant — through in their lives which is nreant we _ through in their lives which is meant we don't have to go through. this is— meant we don't have to go through. this is obviously a really positive step forward and hopefully part of something that the event better.
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this is— something that the event better. this is good in terms of... taking us back to _ this is good in terms of... taking us back to toxic _ this is good in terms of... taking us back to toxic max _ this is good in terms of... taking us back to toxic max skill - this is good in terms of... taking us back to toxic max skill entity l us back to toxic max skill entity again. i us back to toxic max skill entity a . ain. . , , again. iam. i believe it is a problem- — again. iam. i believe it is a problem. and _ again. iam. i believe it is a problem. and it _ again. iam. i believe it is a problem. and it - - again. i am. i believe it is a i problem. and it - masculinity. problem. and it — masculinity. advocates _ problem. and it — masculinity. advocates can take time for that to be broken — advocates can take time for that to be broken down. i really do. an education — be broken down. i really do. an education is so important to that as weit~ _ education is so important to that as weit~ this _ education is so important to that as well. this focuses on this side of things— well. this focuses on this side of things in— well. this focuses on this side of things in terms of prosecutions and stuff but _ things in terms of prosecutions and stuff but i _ things in terms of prosecutions and stuff but i think the evident side of this— stuff but i think the evident side of this is— stuff but i think the evident side of this is difficult as well. i think— of this is difficult as well. i think we _ of this is difficult as well. i think we all have to take a responsibility to gather and talk about— responsibility to gather and talk about these things and learn and hopefully things get better when i have children or violent daughter than things will be better for her. for her— than things will be better for her. for her than they were for her mom, absolutely. it's very interesting, the government says it's not going to make misogyny a criminal offence. partly because they thought it was a problem about how you define it in such a way that you capture all the things you want to capture? this approach which is pacifically about
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behaviour, they've decided actually, you can make that enforceable. yes. the have you can make that enforceable. yes. they have and _ you can make that enforceable. yes. they have and i _ you can make that enforceable. yes. they have and i think— you can make that enforceable. yes. they have and i think it _ you can make that enforceable. jazz they have and i think it is very much needed. because again, harking back to the sarah everard murder, kidnapping, rape, murder. we see that that guilty of off—duty policeman had been exposing himself there are some time some very serious warning signs that need to be taken far more seriously because that behaviour can escalate as it unfortunately did. and those signals were a mess. what's interesting, this is a review by the law commission and it's a government commission review that's been a long time coming that was actually all the way backwards for avid javid was home secretary. it is being led by a
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100 and 20 page reese port. a pair who been reviewing various. she’s who been reviewing various. she's also done the _ who been reviewing various. she's also done the wimbley _ also done the wimbley report. she's a very busy person. also done the wimbley report. she's a very busy person-— a very busy person. she is indeed. what the telegraph _ a very busy person. she is indeed. what the telegraph says, - a very busy person. she is indeed. what the telegraph says, i - a very busy person. she is indeed. what the telegraph says, i think. what the telegraph says, i think this is a really important story they're covering here. as you said in our first they're covering here. as you said in ourfirst paper they're covering here. as you said in our first paper reviewed this evening i think it's very commendable and i hope it will be picked up by other papers. here it's quoted, this fits with other work that government is doing with criminalising intimate image of use and will be more productive and better in protecting women. because those aspects of men and it is generally men, abusing and publishing naked pictures and harassing all the way to publishing pictures, all of that is part of it and escalating part of behaviour both in a trend and also sometimes in an individual behaviour that leads to other things like stocking
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or murderer. these are very important things to be dealt with and it is much needed. it's proposed let's hope that it is quickly passed and implemented. you let's hope that it is quickly passed and implemented.— let's hope that it is quickly passed and implemented. you talk about a number of pressures _ and implemented. you talk about a number of pressures there. - and implemented. you talk about a number of pressures there. again | and implemented. you talk about a i number of pressures there. again one alien to my generation and possibly to yours that the pressure that young women, is not exclusively young women, is not exclusively young women, is not exclusively young women but mainly young women come over photographed themselves naked or parts of their bodies to send to boyfriends, to effect they lose control or part of a identity because they don't know what happens to those photographs afterwards. it's extraordinary for the pressures of day—to—day life. give us some sense of comparison. how do you think in britain, the uk compares with france on this question of the harassment of women in public places? harassment of women in public laces? ~ ~' ., harassment of women in public laces? ~ ., ., , places? well, i know you can only seak places? well, i know you can only speak from _ places? well, i know you can only speak from your _ places? well, i know you can only speak from your own _ places? well, i know you can only speak from your own experience. | speak from your own experience.
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yeah. social media didn't exist like that when i was a teenager. but i do remember, it went from cringe making do actually very scary. what might have been deemed a joke or funny by an individual, let alone a pack of young men for example oil workers on the building site, can actually be quite intimidating all the way to scary. you would probably change your route for that one thing i learned from living in new york. when in doubt obviously try and walk sometime in the street, literally. rather than the other side of the road. ., , , .,, rather than the other side of the road. ., , , ., �* road. yeah. sometimes people don't realise by walking _ road. yeah. sometimes people don't realise by walking very _ road. yeah. sometimes people don't realise by walking very silently - road. yeah. sometimes people don't realise by walking very silently to - realise by walking very silently to close to someone, that can be quite scary. not being paranoid, there are out of time. you scary. not being paranoid, there are out oftime— scary. not being paranoid, there are out of time-— out of time. you may well have had the experience _ out of time. you may well have had the experience i've _ out of time. you may well have had the experience i've had _ out of time. you may well have had the experience i've had with - out of time. you may well have had the experience i've had with i've . the experience i've had with i've been late at night walking behind a
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woman not knowing what is the best way. should i draw attention to myself in that case can be a scary thing, if i say hello. should ifall back quite a wild? that's a good one. i walk very fast is fast and wide as i can to get ahead of them. that's good. if they can see me ahead of them are less frightening thanif ahead of them are less frightening than if theyjust hear me. the conversation _ than if theyjust hear me. the conversation with _ than if theyjust hear me. the conversation with a _ than if theyjust hear me. the conversation with a couple of people and they— conversation with a couple of people and they say different things. it is trickv~ _ and they say different things. it is trickv~ i_ and they say different things. it is tricky. i think crossing the road, teaving — tricky. i think crossing the road, leaving descendents. yeah, there are little things that you can do i think— little things that you can do i think in— little things that you can do i think in that sense. the conversation is the biggest part. you're _ conversation is the biggest part. you're exactly right. actually i lot of the men, if they heard from some of the men, if they heard from some of the girls and women they say and do these things do, how it seems to them they would slightly change their own behaviour. some of them generally don't realise how frightening they are being when
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they're behaving, particularly showing off in a group with other lads. lovely to speak to you both. james, good luck with those early start. you don't get out of it. we still expect you here late night. will be looking at the bags under your eyes. have a lovely weekend both of you. hope you have a good weekend as well. the papers will be back again tomorrow evening with yasmin alibhai—brown and annabel denhamdo join us then if you can but for now, goodnight. good evening i'm chetan pathak with your sports news. yorkshire cricket coach andrew gale says the county's decision to sack him has come as a 'surprise.�* the former captain
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had already been suspended as part of an investigation into a tweet he sent in 2010. earlier today yorkshire announced 16 coaching staff — including gale and director of cricket martyn moxon — had left the club. the announcement follows a report which found former player azeem rafiq was a victim of "racial harassment and bullying" at the club. yorkshire's new chairman lord patel said today "significant change is required. the decisions were difficult to make, but are in the best interests of the club." this evening gale released a statement to the bbc pledging to "fight the decision legally". it might only be december but a big game tonight in the championship title race, with the top two bournemouth and fulham meeting at craven cottage. it was a first return to the ground for ex—fulham boss scott parker, who left them in the summer to take charge of bournemouth.
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and his side took the lead when dominic solanke scored straight from the restart after half time. but with 84 minutes on the clock toshin adara—bioyo headed in a deserved equaliser. it finished 1 all, leaving fulham top and a point clear. in the fa cup tonight, there was no upset at gateshead where charlton have won 2—0 to safely make it through to the third round. meanwhile national league stockport — who beat bolton in the last round — lost at the league one leaders rotherham1—0. in the women's fa cup — it's the final on sunday. this is the completion of last season's competition which was delayed by the pandemic. the quarter finals onwards have been played this season with chelsea and arsenal meeting on sunday at wembley. chelsea boss emma hayes admits the timings strange, especially off an international break, but says she's looking forward to it. it's weird coming off the back after into a cup final. because of being there so many time i don't really put any different energy into it than i do a normal game. what changes is there is more press.
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but everything else stays the same. yeah, weird circumstances going into a cup final. but one that i'm really excited about. wigan manager leam richardson has called for more people in football — including fans — to undergo cpr training like he did after one of his players suffered a cardiac arrest. striker charlie wyke collapased during a practice session last month and says his manager saved his life by beginning the resuscitation process before the doctor arrived. speaking today richardson says he hopes others are able to respond in the same way. just to echo charlie's statement and his words, it is important that we make it that we make as many people as aware as possible, not just for the players and the staff, but the many thousands of fans that come and watch football on a regular basis, it's notjust the players have had a couple of incidents in the stands, if the person next to you or two seats behind you has the knowledge to be able
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to save someone's life. manchester united's interim boss ralf rangnick has been speaking to the press for the first time since taking over at old trafford. he admitted "it was a job offer he couldn't turn down" and said he's "not ruling out staying—on as manager" beyond his initial six months in charge. and he also spoke about his longer term ambitions for the team. it's about winning titles, winning the league, winning cup. being as successful as you can be in the champions league. and this is also an issue for the new year that we the draw can overly get further in that competition. and into a half years i think the dna of the team of the club is clear, you have to be as successful as you can be. the record seven time champion ronnie o'sullivan has been knocked out of the uk snooker championship by kyren wilson, following a dramatic final frame decider.
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in a repeat of last year's world championship final — which o'sullivan won — wilson made three half—century breaks and two centuries as he put in one of the best performances of his career. the rocket fought back from 2—0 and 5—3 down to level the match but wilson took the deciding frame to win by 6 frames to 5. obviously, he's hungry to win titles. he wantsto do what i've done in the game you know so i was like that when i hadn't won a major and stuff like that. you have all the desire at that stage and it's great to see. it shows that he's got a real passion for the game. and wilson will face belgium's luca brecel in the semi final after the belgian knocked out scotland's anthony mcgill — who conceded in the final frame as he lost by 6 frames to 2. it's the inaugral saudi arabian grand prix this weekend and lewis hamilton has turned up the heat on championship rival max verstappen.
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hamilton — eight points behind verstappen in the drivers�* championship — was fastest in second practice for the penultimate race of the season, nearly two tenths quicker than verstappen, who was fourth fastest. the session was called to a halt five minutes early because of this crash — charles leclerc lost control of his ferrari at turn 22. there wasn't much left of the car but thankfully he walked away from the crash unharmed. in rugby union there was one game in the premiership tonight as gloucester beat bristol bears 27—10 at kingsholm to move into the top four. chris chapman amongst the try scorers here after running with the ball from the half way line. meanwhile, edinburgh kept up their good form in the united rugby championship with a 24—10 win over benetton. this try from emiliano boffelli on his home debut amongst the pick. elsewhere leinster beat connacht 47—19 and sharks were also victorious against bulls. and that's all the sport for now. more on those stories — including all the snooker results and reaction —
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on the bbc sport website, but from me and the team goodnight.
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this is bbc news. i'm krupa padhy with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. american prosecutors charge the parents of a teenager accused of a massacre at a school, saying they share responsibility. i will be reiterating today the gun ownership is a right, and with that right comes great responsibility. the first data on the omicron variant of covid suggests vaccines are less effective at stopping it spreading, but they do make the symptoms less serious. it's possible that the omicron variant is able to overcome and cause infections, even in previously vaccinated people. however, if they develop only mild illness, that means that the vaccines are still providing protection. scientists say they can now use gene—editing technology to determine the sex
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of mice, creating female

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