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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 1, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm james reynolds. the headlines at 8pm — the prime minister hasn't denied that christmas gatherings took place in downing street during lockdown, and someone who was at one of them on december 18th last year tells the bbc that several dozen people were there for drinks, food and games. as preparations for christmas go ahead, some doctors say it's best to avoid large gatherings, but ministers say it's the individual�*s responsibility. we've all got a role to play in this. this is a national mission what we've set out in vaccinations. we can all play a role. police in new mexico are investigating whether a reloaded bullet may have killed the cinematographer halyna hutchins on a film set.
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the act or bala says he did not pull the trigger of the gun. the women's tennis association suspends all tournaments in china amid concern for peng shuai, the chinese tennis player who accused a top official of sexual assault. the government outlines more details of its ten—year plan to reform the social care system in england, including £300 million investment to help people live longer independently. tens of thousands of people face a sixth night without power following outages in scotland and the north of england caused by storm arwen. array collective! array collective is the winner of this year's turner prize. borisjohnson has not denied reports that christmas parties were held in downing street last year, but he insisted that no covid rules were broken.
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at prime minister's questions, the labour leader, sir keir starmer, accused mrjohnson of hypocrisy for ignoring the rules that he'd imposed on everyone else. the bbc has spoken to a source who attended a downing street gathering on the 18th of december, as first reported in the mirror newspaper. the source said "several dozen" people were at the event, where party games were played and food and drink served. our political editor laura kuenssberg has the story. a warning — her report contains some flashing images. good cheer? was there too much of it in number ten last year? when covid rules meant schmoozing like this in downing street was most definitely not allowed? is that good gin, prime minister? reports this morning suggested a boozy party happened behind the shiny black door. should we cancel christmas parties? a political opportunity too tempting for the opposition leader to let pass.
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ias millions were locked down last| year, was a christmas party thrown in downing street for dozens on december the 18th? - what i can tell the right honourable gentlemen is that all guidance was followed completely during number ten. and can i recommend to the right honourable gentleman that he does the same with his own christmas party? borisjohnson wasn't at the said event, but didn't squash the suggestion it happened. he's not denied it. he says no rules were broken. both of those things can't be true, prime minister. - he's taking the british public for fools. - at a time when public health messaging is so vital,
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how can the public trust a prime minister when he thinks it is one rule for him and one for everybody else? they should concert their line of attack more closely. i have said before he is talking total nonsense. this mightjangle nerves for the government right now as this place is waiting anxiously for more information about the new covid variant. will mps be asked to back tighter rules again? will the government repeat the sudden clamp—down of last christmas? we've spoken to an attendee of the alleged gathering on the 18th of december last year. they said there were several dozen people there with food, drink and games, and it went on past midnight. reasonable interactions in a workplace were then allowed, but socialising was meant to be off—limits. lockdown was back the next day. 12 months on, with doubts again about this christmas, it is deeply awkward for number ten. three, two, one! cheering. for now, the prime minister and, of course, the public must wait in a kind of limbo. the countdown to clarity about the new covid variant
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could still take a couple of weeks, and until then, none of us can know what this christmas will bring. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, downing street. let's talk to our political correspondent ben wright. why has it taken so long for this to come out? did no one hear the noise last year? laughter. i don't think you heard what i was saying. hello. i don't think you heard what i was saying- hellm— i don't think you heard what i was saying. hello. james, i did not hear ou, saying. hello. james, i did not hear you. hello! — saying. hello. james, i did not hear you. hello! i'm _ saying. hello. james, i did not hear you, hello! i'm sorry, _ saying. hello. james, i did not hear you, hello! i'm sorry, we _ saying. hello. james, i did not hear you, hello! i'm sorry, we are - you, hello! i'm sorry, we are on-air- _ you, hello! i'm sorry, we are on-air. your— you, hello! i'm sorry, we are on-air. your voice _ you, hello! i'm sorry, we are on-air. your voice has - you, hello! i'm sorry, we are on-air. your voice has just . you, hello! i'm sorry, we are i on-air. your voice hasjust been on-air. your voice has 'ust been down to me. i on-air. your voice has 'ust been down to me. let _ on-air. your voice has 'ust been down to me. let me _ on-air. your voice hasjust been down to me. let me start - on-air. your voice hasjust been | down to me. let me start again. on-air. your voice hasjust been - down to me. let me start again. why did it take so — down to me. let me start again. why did it take so long _ down to me. let me start again. why did it take so long for _ down to me. let me start again. why did it take so long for the _ down to me. let me start again. why did it take so long for the story - down to me. let me start again. why did it take so long for the story to - did it take so long for the story to come outmy did no one hear the noise last year? it come outmy did no one hear the noise last ear? , ., , ., last year? it is a good question. it is stran . e last year? it is a good question. it is strange it _ last year? it is a good question. it is strange it has _ last year? it is a good question. it is strange it has taken _ last year? it is a good question. it is strange it has taken 12 - last year? it is a good question. it is strange it has taken 12 months l is strange it has taken 12 months for the deals to emerge, you are right because clearly there were many people in downing street if these reports were true. we believe
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them to be. bbc has a source that says on the eight to the december there was a party that went on beyond midnight involve people from the press team in the events team in number ten but were did not get out until the daily mirror reported this this morning. labour then went hard and this is i'm sure you said before you came to me at prime minister's questions, the leader accusing the prime minister of hypocrisy because the party on the 18th of december last year to which the prime minister did not attend, he was not there according to reports, came just after london had input into tears regulations which meant there was meant to be no socialising indoor for people other than those within your bubble or your family. so it seems that it does breach the rules, but number ten had been emphatic all day that it did not. and that remains the sort of standoff really at the end of the day. standoff really at the end of the da . ~ , ., . day. member will have with dominic cumminas, day. member will have with dominic cummings. the _ day. member will have with dominic cummings, the prime _ day. member will have with dominic cummings, the prime minister's- day. member will have with dominicl cummings, the prime minister's than adviser, going to check his eyesight
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and there was a huge amount of national attention and perhaps even outrage because that happened while restrictions were coming on it. this effect we learned about this a year later somewhat dampened the attention or the outrage? i later somewhat dampened the attention or the outrage? i think it miuht. attention or the outrage? i think it might- labour's — attention or the outrage? i think it might. labour's hope _ attention or the outrage? i think it might. labour's hope is _ attention or the outrage? i think it might. labour's hope is a - attention or the outrage? i think it might. labour's hope is a clearly l might. labour's hope is a clearly this is linked in the public�*s mind with the barnett castle incident and they want to make the accusation that there is one rule for the government and people that work in number ten and waterfor government and people that work in number ten and water for everybody else. it was a very damaging charge back when dominic cummings was found to have driven to barnett castle and all the rest of it when britain really was gripped by covid—i9 and regulations and restrictions were still in place. perhaps for residents now it's different as we head into a christmas it does feel very different to last year even as there is this new variant, even though england posit restrictions around facemasks are now in step with those of the other nations in the uk. he does not feel anything like last christmas at the moment and people have freedoms that they
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did not have, did not have them. so perhaps it will resonate in quite the same way. it perhaps it will resonate in quite the same way-— perhaps it will resonate in quite the same way. it is downing street ”lannin the same way. it is downing street planning any _ the same way. it is downing street planning any christmas _ the same way. it is downing street planning any christmas parties - the same way. it is downing street planning any christmas parties this year? i planning any christmas parties this ear? , , ., �* ., ., year? i bet they are. i've not had my invitation _ year? i bet they are. i've not had my invitation yet _ year? i bet they are. i've not had my invitation yet for _ year? i bet they are. i've not had my invitation yet for it _ year? i bet they are. i've not had my invitation yet for it though . year? i bet they are. i've not had | my invitation yet for it though but there will be parties galore around westminster. in fact i can hear one close to where i'm speaking to you now. not bbc party but within the building there is a party going on. it is not a party season in westminster.— it is not a party season in westminster. �* ., , ., westminster. being right, we got you in the end, thank— westminster. being right, we got you in the end, thank you _ westminster. being right, we got you in the end, thank you so _ westminster. being right, we got you in the end, thank you so much. - mark drakeford, the first minister of wales, has been in talks this afternoon with the cabinet minister michael gove and the first ministers of scotland and northern ireland. they're coordinating their efforts to offer every adult a booster vaccine to deal with the new variant of coronavirus called omicron. england and scotland have both agreed a target of the end of january, but as yet, that target has not been agreed by wales and northern ireland. nhs england is issuing detailed guidance to hospitals, pharmacists and gps about expanding the booster roll—out. at westminster, the health secretary, sajid javid, urged people to be "sensible" around christmas and consider
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taking regular tests. here's our health editor hugh pym. a vaccination centre on anglesey, preparing like so many others around the uk to fire up the booster programme. it's a big ask for the nhs at a time of intensifying winter pressures. and the welsh health minister says help will be sought across local communities. we recognise that the workforce is absolutely exhausted, which is why we are really making sure that the net is really cast much wider this time to make sure that we can ask those volunteers to come back in and for everybody to step up and understand that we are all in this together. the minister said firefighters and military personnel could be deployed, but gps in wales have warned it'll need big vaccination centres to be set up again rather than relying on their practices. where gps have the time and aren't exhausted and wish to contribute as they did initially,
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then they could help with these centres, but at the moment, from a general practice point of view within our own infrastructure, we really are under the cosh. this pharmacist in hull, like others, is increasing opening hours to offer boosterjabs seven days a week, just some of the range of health workers expected to deliver the booster plan. now we're asking them to do a lot more through the step up in - the national vaccination programme. i know that they're up to it, but we want to make sure i they're provided with all. the support that's needed, that includes the volunteers, the 500 or so personnel- we're getting help from in terms of the military personnel. - hospitals will be part of the push to get more boosters done, expanding their existing vaccination hubs to give more slots to members of the public. this centre and others like it have been asked to create a lot more capacity. that'll mean extra appointments, but also possibly having to find more space, which will be far from straightforward.
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of course, it'll also mean more staff from the hospital moving to do the jabs. the medical director told me that however busy, her colleagues would rise to the challenge. i can't overstress the commitment there is amongst nurses and doctors to make sure that people get vaccinated. if i was to askjust every one of our doctors and every one of our nurses to do one extra shift to do some vaccination, that would be a lot of vaccinators. today, monica, who's a teacher, came to getjabbed. she was eligible and had her booster. i feel i need to protect the people i work with cos i'm surrounded by people all day every day and children from different backgrounds, different family set—ups, and ijust felt it was, you know, my duty to come and get the booster. health officials in scotland have repeated advice to people to get a lateral flow test before going to family gatherings over christmas, a point also made by the health secretary at westminster. and in northern ireland, there've been warnings of disruptions in schools before the christmas break
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because of a shortage of teachers partly linked to covid isolation. there's much uncertainty over the weeks ahead, but the world health organization has at least said that we should know more about the new variant within days. hugh pym, bbc news. the latest coronavirus figures in the uk show there were just over a8,000 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. 171 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—i9 test. 0n vaccinations, more than 18.5 million people have now had a boosterjab. earlier, the health secretary and the prime minister both said there is no need to cancel christmas parties this month despite the emergence of the 0micron variant. but businesses have already reported a rise in cancellations over the last number of days, causing concern for many in the hospitality and events industries. i'm joined by cathy martin, owner of cmpr, a pr and events company in northern ireland.
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thanks so much forjoining us. people phoning up and cancelling? yes and in fact i was supposed to have an event this evening, and it's been cancelled, so it's been cancelled already. and that was cancelled already. and that was cancelled just last week, and it was a brand being very risk—averse and not taking any risks whatsoever and i must say at outdoor event so even when events are outdoors that is happening. lots of friends and clients working in hospitality are also telling me it is one quote saying dropping like flies this week. so all of their bookings are falling rapidly like dominoes with people who maybe are facing some kind of fear or worry that going out might lead them to catching this new variant. and we don't know whether the vaccine is working against that or not, we are in that state of unknown at the minute. so there is a bit of fear around and it is definitely having an impact on business. �* ,., definitely having an impact on business. ,, business. are some businesses thinkina business. are some businesses thinking of _ business. are some businesses thinking of adapting _
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business. are some businesses thinking of adapting are - business. are some businesses thinking of adapting are eitherl thinking of adapting are either having smaller scale events or of telling everyone wrap up warm and we are going outside? yes telling everyone wrap up warm and we are going outside?— are going outside? yes come in we have been doing _ are going outside? yes come in we have been doing that _ are going outside? yes come in we have been doing that for— are going outside? yes come in we have been doing that for last - are going outside? yes come in we have been doing that for last year. have been doing that for last year in a bit. we are 20 months into this and lots of events businesses and other businesses have been hustling and they have been changing things around, doing hybrid events, doing some in person events or on a much smaller scale or completely flipping and changing to having events online. ifor one have got complete fatigue of zoom. online. i for one have got complete fatigue of zoom.— fatigue of zoom. eight or two because of— fatigue of zoom. eight or two because of party _ fatigue of zoom. eight or two because of party is _ fatigue of zoom. eight or two because of party is not - fatigue of zoom. eight or two because of party is not quite| fatigue of zoom. eight or two i because of party is not quite the thing i guess! mat because of party is not quite the thing i guess!— because of party is not quite the thin i cuess! ., ., ., , thing i guess! not for me. i am very luc i'm thing i guess! not for me. i am very lucky i'm not _ thing i guess! not for me. i am very lucky i'm not winnable _ thing i guess! not for me. i am very lucky i'm not winnable and - thing i guess! not for me. i am very lucky i'm not winnable and need - thing i guess! not for me. i am very lucky i'm not winnable and need to l lucky i'm not winnable and need to stay inside but some people who do and we have to be respectful of. and therefore a zoom party is as much as they can do and i think whilst i am a real champion of personal responsibility, i also think we have to be respectful of everybody�*s needs and wants within that situation that we are in. we are in
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an ever—changing situation, just today's news about boris and the party last year surprise me? no, not in the slot it's been that way since we kind of caught dominic cummings heading up north to get his eyes tested. ijust think he was maybe a bit of a scapegoat and it was probably going on a whole lot more thanjust dominic probably going on a whole lot more than just dominic cummings and his one trip and ijust think than just dominic cummings and his one trip and i just think the growing frustration within business especially with a small businesses in those businesses really putting all their efforts into this end of year, if you are in consumer products or services, christmas is the busiest time for year and for some people it can contribute 80% of your overall turnover and your profit. so for that we kind of went from under you and especially by someone like boris and senior government ministers who are out there partying themselves, it's very normal to understand the frustrations with people who are so employed a small businesses and even larger businesses, it does seem like one row for them in one room for us and it's not fair. can
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one row for them in one room for us and it's not fair.— and it's not fair. can i 'ust ask as and it's not fair. can i 'ust ask as a notice in the h and it's not fair. can i 'ust ask as a notice in the last _ and it's not fair. can i just ask as a notice in the last few _ and it's not fair. can i just ask as a notice in the last few weeks i a notice in the last few weeks people i've dealt with, a lot of people i've dealt with, a lot of people have cancelled christmas parties and they said we are going to have them injanuary or february if we have to. might we see a transportation of all christmas events to sometime in the spring we have chris's parties in the spring? don't forget lockdown last year on boxing day none of us thought it was going to last as long as it did. none of us thought we were going to be getting out ofjail and kind of april time, and that could happen again if these numbers increase and if this new variant proves to be as deadly as previous ones. so we cannot plan a predicting it's very difficult for us in the events industry and also for the hospitality industry. we have lost so much business, so much revenue as when people have lostjobs and many have lost all the hoods and yes we can put contingency plans in place but i just feel like we're can put contingency plans in place but ijust feel like we're in a constant state of contingency and whilst difficult to do that, we have
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to roll with it as we don't have any choice. . ~ to roll with it as we don't have any choice. ., ~' , ., to roll with it as we don't have any choice. ., ~ i. to roll with it as we don't have any choice. . ~' ,, . to roll with it as we don't have any choice-_ thanki choice. thank you so much. thank ou. and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30pm and 11:30pm this evening in the papers. 0ur guestsjoining me tonight are sienna rodgers, editor of labourlist, and tom newton dunn, chief political commentator at times radio. the headlines on bbc news — the prime minister hasn't denied that christmas gatherings took place in downing street during lockdown, and someone who was at one of them on december 18th last year tells the bbc that several dozen people were there for drinks, food and games. as preparations for christmas go ahead, some doctors say it's best to avoid large gatherings, but ministers say it's the individual�*s responsibility. the women's tennis association suspends all tournaments in china amid concern for peng shuai, the chinese tennis player who accused a top official of sexual assault.
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sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's tulsen. good evening. the women's tennis association has announced the immediate suspension of all tournaments in china amid concern for chinese tennis player peng shuai. peng disappeared from public view after accusing a top chinese official of sexual assault then retracted her claims. wta chief steve simon said he had "serious doubts" that peng was "free, safe and not subject to intimidation". the wta has repeatedly called for a full investigation into peng's claims. wta chairman and seo steve simon said... it's a busy night of premier league
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action with six matches in total, including the merseyside derby between everton and liverpool. that game has just kicked off at goodison park, goalles there, as has second—placed manchester city, who are at aston villa, with steven gerrard's side looking for a third consecutive win. while leaders chelsea kicked off at 7:30pm. they've just got back under way at vicarage road after the game was interrupted due to a medical emergency in the crowd. goalless also. but for all the latest, head to the bbc sport website. there are four games in the scottish premiership, too. top—of—the—table rangers are at hibs, aiming to gain revenge for being knocked out of the league cup by them last week. that game is currently goalless.
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ryan hedges has a goal early aberdeen and livingston. johanna konta has said she's very grateful for her career in tennis after announcing her retirement from the sport. the 30—year—old won four titles on the wta tour and holds the record for the longest time as women's british number one. konta reached the semifinals at wimbledon in 2017, eventually losing to simona halep. she moved to the position of world number four that year, the highest ranking by a british woman since virginia wade in 1978. however, konta has struggled with her fitness. an abdominal injury, then contracting covid, meant she missed both wimbledon and the olympics this year. she's also been suffering from heart palpitations, but she said whatever she does next, it will involve tennis. i definitely see myself staying in this sport to a certain extent. i don't know to what capacity, but i love the sport and the sport has given so much to me, so i would definitely love to share that with other people. scottish swimmer hannah miley has also announced her retirement.
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miley won world, european and commonwealth titles, only 0lympic medals eluding her. she represented great britain at three olympic games. and glasgow has been chosen to host the world athletics indoor championships in 202a. they'll be staged at the emirates arena, where the european indoors were held two years ago. former england captain michael vaughan has been dropped from bt sport's coverage of the ashes following the accusation made by former yorkshire cricketer azeem rafiq that he made a racist comment to a group of asian players. vaughan has repeatedly denied the allegation, specifically in a recent interview with bbc breakfast a few days ago, where he also apologised for the pain azeem rafiq experienced during his time at yorkshire. the allegation was mentioned in rafiq's testimony to a dcms select committee looking into historical racism at yorkshire county cricket club. bt sport's decision comes after the bbc dropped vaughan from their ashes coverage. bt sport said in a statement...
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ronnie 0'sullivan is through to the quarterfinals of the uk snooker championship in york. the seven—time champion saw off thailand's noppon saeng—kham, winning four straight frames to take the match 6—3, finishing with a century break. he faces kyren wilson or ben wollaston next. in the other fourth round match, zhao xintong beat england's peter lines 6—4. plenty of support happening and more on the website but that is it for me now. thank you so much. alec baldwin has denied pulling the trigger of the gun that was fired and killed a cinemetographer on the set of the movie rust. in his first interview since the incident, the actor told abc news he would "never point a gun
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at anyone or pull a trigger at them" and he had no idea how a live round got onto the film set. the trigger was not pulled, i did not pull the trigger. you the trigger was not pulled, i did not pull the trigger.— the trigger was not pulled, i did not pull the trigger. you never pull the trigger? _ not pull the trigger. you never pull the trigger? no. — not pull the trigger. you never pull the trigger? no, i— not pull the trigger. you never pull the trigger? no, i would _ not pull the trigger. you never pull the trigger? no, i would never- the trigger? no, i would never pull the trigger? no, i would never pull the trigger. — the trigger? no, i would never pull the trigger, never. _ the trigger? no, i would never pull the trigger, never. what _ the trigger? no, i would never pull the trigger, never. what do - the trigger? no, i would never pull the trigger, never. what do you . the trigger, never. what do you think happened? _ the trigger, never. what do you think happened? counted - the trigger, never. what do you think happened? counted a - the trigger, never. what do you i think happened? counted a real think happened? counted areal bullet_ think happened? counted a real bullet get on that set? | think happened? counted a real bullet get on that set?- think happened? counted a real bullet get on that set? i have no idea. someone _ bullet get on that set? i have no idea. someone put _ bullet get on that set? i have no idea. someone put a _ bullet get on that set? i have no idea. someone put a libel- bullet get on that set? i have no idea. someone put a libel in - bullet get on that set? i have no idea. someone put a libel in the| bullet get on that set? i have no - idea. someone put a libel in the gun and someone got it on the property. that was alec baldwin speaking of the incident the end it with the fatal shooting of halyna hutchins cinematographer. peter bowes is in los angeles. i don't know if you've seen any of that was the extract but if we have do we know any more about put this bullet in? we do we know any more about put this bullet in? ~ ., ., , . bullet in? we have not seen much more than — bullet in? we have not seen much more than this _ bullet in? we have not seen much more than this trailer. _ bullet in? we have not seen much more than this trailer. this - bullet in? we have not seen much more than this trailer. this is - more than this trailer. this is season— more than this trailer. this is season interview— more than this trailer. this is season interview which - more than this trailer. this is season interview which we i more than this trailer. this is -
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season interview which we broadcast in the _ season interview which we broadcast in the us— season interview which we broadcast in the us in— season interview which we broadcast in the us in the— season interview which we broadcast in the us in the next— season interview which we broadcast in the us in the next 24 _ season interview which we broadcast in the us in the next 24 hours - season interview which we broadcast in the us in the next 24 hours and i in the us in the next 24 hours and it really— in the us in the next 24 hours and it really raises _ in the us in the next 24 hours and it really raises more _ in the us in the next 24 hours and it really raises more questions- in the us in the next 24 hours and. it really raises more questions than it really raises more questions than it actually— it really raises more questions than it actually answers _ it really raises more questions than it actually answers was _ it really raises more questions than it actually answers was about i it really raises more questions than it actually answers was about and l it actually answers was about and perhaps _ it actually answers was about and perhaps most _ it actually answers was about and perhaps most interesting - it actually answers was about and perhaps most interesting so- it actually answers was about and perhaps most interesting so far. it actually answers was about and | perhaps most interesting so far is alec baldwin's _ perhaps most interesting so far is alec baldwin's claimed _ perhaps most interesting so far is alec baldwin's claimed that i perhaps most interesting so far is alec baldwin's claimed that he i perhaps most interesting so far is| alec baldwin's claimed that he did not pull— alec baldwin's claimed that he did not pull the — alec baldwin's claimed that he did not pull the trigger. _ alec baldwin's claimed that he did not pull the trigger. he _ alec baldwin's claimed that he did not pull the trigger. he is - alec baldwin's claimed that he did not pull the trigger. he is quite i not pull the trigger. he is quite determined _ not pull the trigger. he is quite determined about _ not pull the trigger. he is quite determined about that. - not pull the trigger. he is quite determined about that. he i not pull the trigger. he is quite l determined about that. he would never— determined about that. he would never point — determined about that. he would never point a _ determined about that. he would never point a gun— determined about that. he would never point a gun at _ determined about that. he would never point a gun at anyone, i determined about that. he would never point a gun at anyone, he i never point a gun at anyone, he says. _ never point a gun at anyone, he says. and — never point a gun at anyone, he says. and pull— never point a gun at anyone, he says, and pull the _ never point a gun at anyone, he says, and pull the trigger- never point a gun at anyone, he says, and pull the trigger and i never point a gun at anyone, he says, and pull the trigger and al says, and pull the trigger and a course that— says, and pull the trigger and a course that leaves _ says, and pull the trigger and a course that leaves the - says, and pull the trigger and ai course that leaves the question hanging — course that leaves the question hanging how— course that leaves the question hanging how did _ course that leaves the question hanging how did the _ course that leaves the question hanging how did the gunfire i course that leaves the question hanging how did the gunfire ofl course that leaves the question i hanging how did the gunfire of the bullet— hanging how did the gunfire of the bullet that — hanging how did the gunfire of the bullet that ended _ hanging how did the gunfire of the bullet that ended up _ hanging how did the gunfire of the bullet that ended up killing - hanging how did the gunfire of the bullet that ended up killing halyna hutchins? — bullet that ended up killing halyna hutchins? many— bullet that ended up killing halyna hutchins? many other— bullet that ended up killing halyna hutchins? many other questions . hutchins? many other questions remained — hutchins? many other questions remained outstanding _ hutchins? many other questions remained outstanding and i hutchins? many other questions remained outstanding and it's i hutchins? many other questions . remained outstanding and it's also intriguing — remained outstanding and it's also intriguing white _ remained outstanding and it's also intriguing while he _ remained outstanding and it's also intriguing while he has _ remained outstanding and it's also intriguing while he has chosen- remained outstanding and it's also intriguing while he has chosen to i intriguing while he has chosen to -ive intriguing while he has chosen to give this— intriguing while he has chosen to give this interview _ intriguing while he has chosen to give this interview now— intriguing while he has chosen to give this interview now and i intriguing while he has chosen to give this interview now and he i intriguing while he has chosen to give this interview now and he is| give this interview now and he is asked _ give this interview now and he is asked that — give this interview now and he is asked that question _ give this interview now and he is asked that question and - give this interview now and he is asked that question and he i give this interview now and he is asked that question and he will. give this interview now and he is. asked that question and he will find out the _ asked that question and he will find out the answer _ asked that question and he will find out the answer when _ asked that question and he will find out the answer when the _ asked that question and he will find out the answer when the interviewl out the answer when the interview was broadcast _ out the answer when the interview was broadcast. interesting - out the answer when the interviewl was broadcast. interesting because out the answer when the interview. was broadcast. interesting because a few weeks— was broadcast. interesting because a few weeks ago— was broadcast. interesting because a few weeks ago he _ was broadcast. interesting because a few weeks ago he spoke _ was broadcast. interesting because a few weeks ago he spoke to _ was broadcast. interesting because a few weeks ago he spoke to some i few weeks ago he spoke to some paparazzi — few weeks ago he spoke to some paparazzi photographers - few weeks ago he spoke to some paparazzi photographersjust- few weeks ago he spoke to some paparazzi photographersjust by. few weeks ago he spoke to some| paparazzi photographersjust by a streetside, — paparazzi photographersjust by a streetside, and _ paparazzi photographersjust by a streetside, and he _ paparazzi photographersjust by a streetside, and he was— paparazzi photographersjust by a streetside, and he was saying i paparazzi photographers just by a i streetside, and he was saying then that he _ streetside, and he was saying then that he had — streetside, and he was saying then that he had been— streetside, and he was saying then that he had been told _ streetside, and he was saying then that he had been told not- streetside, and he was saying then that he had been told not to - streetside, and he was saying thenl that he had been told not to discuss publicly— that he had been told not to discuss publicly the — that he had been told not to discuss publicly the details _ that he had been told not to discuss publicly the details of— that he had been told not to discuss publicly the details of this _ that he had been told not to discuss publicly the details of this case. i publicly the details of this case. so publicly the details of this case. 50 he _ publicly the details of this case. 50 he is — publicly the details of this case. so he is clearly _ publicly the details of this case. so he is clearly had _ publicly the details of this case. so he is clearly had a _ publicly the details of this case. so he is clearly had a change i publicly the details of this case. so he is clearly had a change of| so he is clearly had a change of heart _ so he is clearly had a change of heart and — so he is clearly had a change of heart and wants _ so he is clearly had a change of heart and wants to _ so he is clearly had a change of heart and wants to tell- so he is clearly had a change of heart and wants to tell his i heart and wants to tell his version of the _ heart and wants to tell his version of the story— heart and wants to tell his version of the story now. _ heart and wants to tell his version of the story now. do _ heart and wants to tell his version of the story now.— of the story now. do remind us of the status — of the story now. do remind us of the status of _ of the story now. do remind us of the status of any _ of the story now. do remind us of the status of any criminal - the status of any criminal investigations into what happened.
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well, the authorities are still looking — well, the authorities are still looking into _ well, the authorities are still looking into this. _ well, the authorities are still looking into this. and - well, the authorities are still looking into this. and we i well, the authorities are still. looking into this. and we were well, the authorities are still- looking into this. and we were told a number— looking into this. and we were told a number of— looking into this. and we were told a number of weeks _ looking into this. and we were told a number of weeks ago _ looking into this. and we were told a number of weeks ago that - looking into this. and we were told a number of weeks ago that this i a number of weeks ago that this could _ a number of weeks ago that this could be — a number of weeks ago that this could be a — a number of weeks ago that this could be a long _ a number of weeks ago that this could be a long investigation, i a number of weeks ago that this i could be a long investigation, owing to the _ could be a long investigation, owing to the sheer— could be a long investigation, owing to the sheer number— could be a long investigation, owing to the sheer number of— could be a long investigation, owing to the sheer number of people i could be a long investigation, owing to the sheer number of people whol to the sheer number of people who had to— to the sheer number of people who had to be _ to the sheer number of people who had to be questioned, _ to the sheer number of people who had to be questioned, dozens- to the sheer number of people who had to be questioned, dozens and. had to be questioned, dozens and dozens— had to be questioned, dozens and dozens of— had to be questioned, dozens and dozens of people _ had to be questioned, dozens and dozens of people actually - had to be questioned, dozens and dozens of people actually on i had to be questioned, dozens and dozens of people actually on the i had to be questioned, dozens and . dozens of people actually on the set at the _ dozens of people actually on the set at the time — dozens of people actually on the set at the time the _ dozens of people actually on the set at the time the forensic _ at the time the forensic investigation _ at the time the forensic investigation that- at the time the forensic investigation that has . at the time the forensic| investigation that has to at the time the forensic - investigation that has to be at the time the forensic _ investigation that has to be carried out come — investigation that has to be carried out come of— investigation that has to be carried out come of the _ investigation that has to be carried out come of the bullets, _ investigation that has to be carried out come of the bullets, the - investigation that has to be carried out come of the bullets, the gun, i out come of the bullets, the gun, that kind — outcome of the bullets, the gun, that kind of— out come of the bullets, the gun, that kind of thing, _ out come of the bullets, the gun, that kind of thing, so _ out come of the bullets, the gun, that kind of thing, so it— out come of the bullets, the gun, that kind of thing, so it could - out come of the bullets, the gun, | that kind of thing, so it could take some _ that kind of thing, so it could take sometime — that kind of thing, so it could take sometime but _ that kind of thing, so it could take some time. but prosecutors- that kind of thing, so it could take some time. but prosecutors were| that kind of thing, so it could take - some time. but prosecutors were very clear when— some time. but prosecutors were very clear when they — some time. but prosecutors were very clear when they last— some time. but prosecutors were very clear when they last talked _ some time. but prosecutors were very clear when they last talked about - clear when they last talked about this at— clear when they last talked about this at a — clear when they last talked about this at a news— clear when they last talked about this at a news conference - clear when they last talked about this at a news conference again l clear when they last talked about this at a news conference again ai this at a news conference again a few weeks— this at a news conference again a few weeks ago— this at a news conference again a few weeks ago that _ this at a news conference again a few weeks ago that everything i this at a news conference again a few weeks ago that everything is| few weeks ago that everything is open _ few weeks ago that everything is open and — few weeks ago that everything is open and the _ few weeks ago that everything is open and the possibility- few weeks ago that everything is open and the possibility exists . few weeks ago that everything is | open and the possibility exists for crimmat— open and the possibility exists for criminal charges— open and the possibility exists for criminal charges to _ open and the possibility exists for criminal charges to be _ open and the possibility exists for criminal charges to be brought. criminal charges to be brought against — criminal charges to be brought against anyone, _ criminal charges to be brought against anyone, including - criminal charges to be brought against anyone, including alec baldwin, — against anyone, including alec baldwin, if— against anyone, including alec baldwin, if the _ against anyone, including alec| baldwin, if the evidence points against anyone, including alec i baldwin, if the evidence points in that direction. _ baldwin, if the evidence points in that direction.— baldwin, if the evidence points in that direction. peter, thank you so much. tens of thousands of people in the north of england have spent a fifth night without electricity after storm arwen left infrastructure badly damaged. energy networks say at present there are around 30,000 households still without power. 15,500 of those are in the north east of england, 7000 in the north west and 7500 in different regions of scotland.
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power has now been restored to almost every home in wales, as our correspondent fiona trott reports. a new day and a new problem. if we can move all this here... they are working in wooler, 300 miles from home, and will be here for many days yet. their work is welcome, and it comes with an unexpected reward. we've been without power since about, oh, seven o'clock on friday night, and we've coped, but boy am i glad to see these people, and apparently they're from bedford as well. i think they deserve some beer. working to restore electricity here is taking a long time. now the distributor is offering financial support. what we've announced today is a package of measure - for our domestic customers, - asking customers to get in contact
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with us on our dedicated storm support line or e—mail such- that we can help them and agree i with them what we can do forthem. things like a reasonable price l of accommodation or hot meals or even if they've sorted - out their own portable generator to get on. five miles away at doddington farm, they have 300 cows to milk twice a day and are relying on one generator. we have to have electricity to run the machines to milk cows, and it won't wait. otherwise they get very uncomfortable, you get health problems, mastitis, etc. further north in aberdeenshire, linda and paul dunk in torphins are still without power and water. they haven't showered for five days. as time has gone on, _ i think we've become more and more ragged and exhausted. no lighting. and so, it's really been a struggle, and slowly this granite building - is getting colder and colder. here in scotland, local authorities have been told they can apply for funding through the bellwin emergency scheme to help these communities.
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and communities across the uk still need help. when you run a farm, you can't move into a hotel, and they're facing their sixth cold night. fiona trott reporting there. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello there. the winds are turning back into the north or north—west again, which is why it's turning colder. and tomorrow is likely to be a colder day than today, but many places will be dry and quite sunny as well. we've got showers, though, overnight, even some of these down the eastern coasts of england and scotland could be wintry. snow to lower levels even across northern scotland, and a few showers for northern ireland heading into wales and the south west. some of these wintry as well. where we keep the showers through the night, this is where we're more likely to have some icy conditions into tomorrow morning. tomorrow morning will start much colder than this morning, widespread frost, lowest temperatures in scotland. it won't be long before we see the back of the showers in the south wales, south west england. should turn drier in eastern scotland, but showers continue across easternmost parts of england into east anglia. many other areas dry, quite sunny,
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except for northern ireland, where we've got more cloud coming in here quite quickly, and that will arrive into western scotland during the afternoon. ahead of that, in the cold air, despite the sunshine, the temperatures could be no higher than 4—5.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... the prime minister hasn't denied christmas gatherings took place in downing street during lockdown, but says no rules were broken. a source tells the bbc that several dozen people were there for drinks, food, and games. as preparations for christmas go ahead, some doctors say it's best to avoid large gatherings due to the omicron variant. but ministers say it's the individual�*s responsibility. we've all got a role to play in this. this is a national mission, what we've set out in vaccinations, we can all play a role. police in new mexico are investigating whether a reloaded bullet may have killed the cinematographer halyna hutchins on a film set. the actor alex baldwin shot hutchins in october with a gun he believed had been loaded with blanks. no criminal charges have yet been filed. the women's tennis association suspends all tournaments in china amid concern for peng shuai,
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the chinese tennis player who accused a top official of sexual assault. the government outlines more details of its ten—year plan to reform the social care system in england, including £300 million investment to help people live longer independently. are a collective becomes the winner of this year's turner prize. back now to the news that parties were held in downing street in the run—up to christmas last year. someone who said they attended one has told the bbc there were "several dozen" people at the gathering. it's alleged the party was held while lockdown rules were in place, prohibiting people from different households mixing indoors. borisjohnson has said all covid rules were followed. human rights barrister adam wagner says this event broke the government's own guidance. 18 december, we were in tier three in london. if you remember, there were the three tiers which later became the four tiers. and in tier three, you couldn't
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have a gathering of over one person indoors without it being reasonably necessary for work — that's for work purposes. and at the same time, you had government guidance, which was very clear, christmas guidance — you remember there was a lot of talk about what we could and couldn't do over christmas — and at the same time, you had guidance that said, "although there are exemptions for work purposes, you must not have a work christmas lunch or party where that is a primarily social activity and is not otherwise permitted by the rules in your tier." so i think that's pretty clear, actually. the first question is, is it a christmas party? is it a primarily social activity? and from what your source says, there were party games, it went on until after midnight — it was quite clearly a christmas party. so it certainly, in my view, broke that guidance, which is the government's
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on guidance. and then there's the question of, well, is it a criminal offence? you could get, at that time, a £10,000 fixed penalty notice automatically if you were involved in holding, or if you held a gathering of over 30 people indoors. so that's, you know, i think that's a really important question, and there's a few slightly complicated legal questions around the status of number ten downing street and whether the rules even applied there. but without a doubt, the guidance applied there was the government's own guidance, and they would have to keep to it first and foremost. this afternoon, the world health organization have been giving an update on the new variant. dr mike ryan, executive director of the who's health emergencies programme, said there is no evidence that he knows of, that giving boosters to whole populations will provide greater protection. the primary objective, i think, of all governments now must be, in the face of delta and omicron, and others, is ensure that all vulnerable individuals,
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people of older age, people with underlying conditions are immediately offered the vaccine to ensure everyone has had at least a primary course of vaccine. there are others here who can better answer than me, the benefits regarding of a booster, regarding other variants. but right now, there is no evidence that i'm aware of that would suggest boosting the entire population will necessarily provide any greater protection for otherwise healthy individuals against hospitalisation or death. the real risk of severe disease, hospitalisation and death allies in particularly for at risk and vulnerable individuals who do require protection against all variants of covid—19. the who's mike ryan saying the may not be necessary for the entire uk
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population. let's talk about the vaccine situation here, i'm joned by thorrun govind, a community pharmacist and chair of the royal pharmaceutical society in england. thanks so much, it's great to have you with us. the government has set a target for the end ofjanuary for every eligible adult to get the booster jab. every eligible adult to get the boosterjab. is that doable? it is booster 'ab. is that doable? it is doable boosterjab. is that doable? it is doable if we _ boosterjab. is that doable? it s doable if we galvanise the community pharmacy workforce, we engage with the local communities, and we get people on our side and really focus on making sure that we all get involved with regards to vaccine hesitancy. speaking to members of the public and engaging them, there really is a lot of work to be done, but pharmacists and pharmacy teams are really keen to get involved and support the national effort. in support the national effort. in practical terms, support the national effort. in practicalterms, do support the national effort. in practical terms, do you have enough staff to administer the jabs in such a short time? fist staff to administer the “abs in such a short mat staff to administer the “abs in such a short that a short time? at the start of the pandemic. _ a short time? at the start of the pandemic, we were _ a short time? at the start of the pandemic, we were really - a short time? at the start of the pandemic, we were really keenl a short time? at the start of the - pandemic, we were really keen to get involved and, as we've seen throughout this pandemic, we are really agile. so what we saw is that
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people are using pharmacies in newer ways that they perhaps might have done before, they are starting to see they can access self—care advice. so we are making sure people are getting seen where it's most appropriate — so absolutely, we do need resources and support from the government, absolutely but we can deliver on this, and people know they can trust us. we are normally a 20 minute walk away from most people, so we are really accessible late night and over the weekends. so we can absolutely get this done. i we can absolutely get this done. i think as you probably know, there is some degree of confusion amongst people about when they are allowed to get the boosterjab, which ages are meant to come first — what do you do if someone simply pitches up to a pharmacy and says, "i'd really like a booster?" that to a pharmacy and says, "i'd really like a booster?"— to a pharmacy and says, "i'd really like a booster?" at the moment we are encouraging — like a booster?" at the moment we are encouraging people _ like a booster?" at the moment we are encouraging people to - like a booster?" at the moment we are encouraging people to not - like a booster?" at the moment we are encouraging people to not do . are encouraging people to not do that and to follow the guidance, which is to wait for the nhs to contact you, and as soon as you are
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contacted, we can help you. but our pharmacy teams, our gp teams are really busy, and just walking up sometimes as in the most helpful thing to do. wait for us to call you and we will get vaccinated. you talk about those — and we will get vaccinated. you talk about those teams _ and we will get vaccinated. you talk about those teams being _ and we will get vaccinated. you talk about those teams being busy, - and we will get vaccinated. you talk| about those teams being busy, what would happen then if someone entered a pharmacy and they were vaccine hesitant, they might be coming along with someone else — would you have the time to sit down with them and talk about the vaccine, and be able to explain the benefits of getting jab to? or would you simply say, "we are too busy to talk with my" as far as we've seen _ are too busy to talk with my" as far as we've seen throughout - are too busy to talk with my" as far as we've seen throughout the - as we've seen throughout the pandemic, regardless of how busy we are, ourteams pandemic, regardless of how busy we are, our teams are very adaptable. this is something we've done with other vaccines, as well. we've engaged with the vaccine roll—out for many years now, and also as you will be aware, we've had the flu jab administered with the covid boosters, as well. and the most important part is, community
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pharmacies are part of the communities. staff from those local areas might speak the same language, they might know the issues within that community. it is a trusted place where people come to. and we provide more thanjust place where people come to. and we provide more than just medicines at our pharmacy, it's for the whole of the community. our pharmacy, it's for the whole of the community-— our pharmacy, it's for the whole of the community. at westminster, the government has outlined more details of its ten year plan to reform the social care system in england. whilst reforms, including an £86,000 cap on care costs were outlined in september, today's announcement details how they'll spend £1.7 billion of money raised by a new health and social care levy. and £500 million will be spent on the social care workforce over the next few years focusing on training for staff. but labour says the plan "falls
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woefully short of the mark" and fails to deal with immediate pressures facing the social care system. our social affairs editor alison holt reports. tick "clinician" in the corner. and then push "go". this is the sort of gym session that helps steve maintain his strength. it's set for an hour. he broke his neck in a car accident as a teenager. he has live—in support as well as daily visits from care workers like jazzmine. the ambition of the government plans is to make it easierfor more people to live independently, partly with the help of technology and adapted housing. obviously, i can do so much myself, but there is a lot i can't do, and that's where the carers come in. how important is it that the government gets this right and really invests in care? oh, definitely. you know, unless a miracle does happen with me, but it's... i'm going to need it for the rest of my life. there will be money to ensure more
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care staff get the sort of regular training that jazzmine receives, but the plans stop short of a professional register for care workers and don't address pay. it is a skilled role, the things that we have to do out in the community, i don't think people realise, you know? we are taking responsibility when we are administering medication. we are trusting that the pharmacy has filled out a blister pack correctly and we are taking responsibility for that. in the house of commons, the care minister describes the ten year plan as a significant step forward after past governments have failed to act. the reform of social care in this country is an issue that has been ducked for far too long, but we will do whatever it takes on this tough challenge, and we will do this to get it right. ministers have utterly failed to deal with the immediate pressures facing social care as we head into one of the most difficult winters on record. and they have failed to set out the long term vision and more
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fundamental reforms we need to deliver a care system fit for the future. so, i'm going to have a look at other alternatives. and care providers like this hartfordshire home care company are alreadyjuggling increasing demand and staff shortages. they welcome many of the ideas in the government plans, but say the extra funding won't come soon enough to deal with current pressures. 2—3 weeks ago, we had 100 people waiting in our local hospital for home care that couldn't be accommodated, and that's notjust by us as a provider, that's by other providers as well, but they couldn't be accommodated because we just do not have enough people to facilitate that. we are going to get you a drink in a minute. and 102—year—old marjorie's day centre has been closed for more than a year. whilst more support is promised for family carers in the future, her daughter would value help now. i would like to see my mum get used to going on that transport, go off and have... she is an independent personality, and it's her independence to be able
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to go out for the day, do her own thing. for many involved in care, the plans are an important starting point. the next step is to see changes happening on the ground. alison holt, bbc news. let's speak to fazilet hadi, head of policy at disability rights uk. shejoins me from letchworth. thanks so much forjoining us. i wonder how you respond to these measures?— measures? deeply, deeply disappointed. _ measures? deeply, deeply disappointed. throughoutl measures? deeply, deeply. disappointed. throughout the pandemic, we saw health and social care being treated unequally. and i'm sure some of us had a hope that through the pandemic, people saw that both health and social care are different, but they play an equal role. but in this white paper, we see yet again very little money for social care, quite small scale initiatives — whereas its much more
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bold on health, let's deal with the elective surgery backlogs, let's give the health service money now. with social care, it's, let's find £1.7 billion over three years and see what we can do with that. so the scale of the ambition is just not sufficient. scale of the ambition is 'ust not sufficient. ~ ., ~ scale of the ambition is 'ust not sufficient. . . ~ ., , scale of the ambition is 'ust not sufficient. . ~ ., , ., sufficient. what kind of measures do ou think sufficient. what kind of measures do you think would _ sufficient. what kind of measures do you think would make _ sufficient. what kind of measures do you think would make a _ sufficient. what kind of measures do you think would make a difference? | you think would make a difference? well, the health and social care select committee has said that there needs to be a minimum of £7 billion a year extra for social care to enable it to deliver the services for older people and disabled people that are needed. we saw the association of directors of adult services earlier say that everything on the social care dashboard is flashing red. there's hundreds of thousands of people waiting for assessments, 40,000 people who have
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waited over six months, 100,000 vacancies in care staff, with staff moving to hospitality, distribution and retail. there is care providers, including residential care homes really thinking about whether they have a future. so i think we would've liked to see a proper funding package linked with some bold moves to make sure that disabled people and older people could go into 2022 with some confidence about the support they receive. ., ., , ., confidence about the support they receive. ., ., , ., receive. how would you be able to rersuade receive. how would you be able to persuade people _ receive. how would you be able to persuade people to _ receive. how would you be able to persuade people to enter- receive. how would you be able to persuade people to enter the - persuade people to enter the industry of staff, given you've said some people already in it are moving to hospitality?— to hospitality? well, it's a conundrum _ to hospitality? well, it's a conundrum that _ to hospitality? well, it's a conundrum that the - to hospitality? well, it's a - conundrum that the government haven't really addressed. i mean, it's interesting that they are talking about spending £500 million on training professional
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development, health and well—being, but leaving the thorny issue of the fact that care workers are paid a minimum wage. as someone said earlier today, dog walkers are paid £15 an hour, care workers are paid under £10 an hour. so i think we aren't really tackling the issue of pay head—on — particularly as we've lost a lot of european care staff through brexit, we've got a smaller pool and we need to treat that pool with respect and value what it does. thank you so much.— a fourth person has died in a high school shooting in the us state of michigan. seven other people were injured in the shooting in oxford yesterday. a15 has been charged with terrorism resulting in death. —— a 15—year—old. the headlines on bbc news...
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the prime minister hasn't denied christmas gatherings took place in downing street during lockdown but says no rules were broken. a source tells the bbc that several dozen people were there for drinks, food and games. as preparations for christmas go ahead some doctors say it's best to avoid large gatherings due to the omicron variant but ministers say it's the individual�*s responsibility. alec baldwin says he did not pull the trigger of the gun that was fired at a cinematographer on the set of the movie rust. we like to bring you some news which has just been we like to bring you some news which hasjust been broken — police scotland can confirm that a 19—year—old man has been arrested with the death of amber gibson. amber, 16 years old, had been reported missing from the hamilton area on friday, 26 november. her body was discovered at around
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10:10am on 15 november. the investigation is currently ongoing. the university and college unions has workloads have become unmanageable. it's warned that further walk—outs may take place next year. some students have expressed anger at having paid thousands of pounds of fees and their learning is being disrupted again after 18 months of online learning because of the pandemic. bronwyn jeffries has learning because of the pandemic. bronwynjeffries has the latest. university lecturers say they have no option but to strike. shall we p0p no option but to strike. shall we pop in here? i've met freya, who teaches on degree courses — unsure
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what their future is as a university academic. i what their future is as a university academic. ., ., ., , , , ., , academic. i have to reapply for my 'ob eve academic. i have to reapply for my job every year. _ academic. i have to reapply for my job every year. i— academic. i have to reapply for my job every year, i have _ academic. i have to reapply for my job every year, i have no - job every year, i have no guaranteed hours or employment and future. people are being made unwell by their working conditions, and something needs to change. and the money is there to make a change, and that's where the frustration comes from. ., ,., that's where the frustration comes from. ., i. ., . ., . , from. the union said young academics could lose a — from. the union said young academics could lose a third _ from. the union said young academics could lose a third of— from. the union said young academics could lose a third of their _ from. the union said young academics could lose a third of their future - could lose a third of their future pension. there is a hole in the pension. there is a hole in the pension fund, but the size of it is disputed. the issues behind this strike have been brewing for years. but most of all, the feeling that teaching at a university, which used to be a very secure job, is teaching at a university, which used to be a very securejob, is now much more vulnerable and uncertain. in belfast, support from passing drivers. lecturers at some universities in both northern ireland and in scotland are also on strike. so what do students make of the disruption? it strike. so what do students make of the disruption?— the disruption? it worries me a little bit. but _
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the disruption? it worries me a little bit. but i _ the disruption? it worries me a little bit. but i think, _ the disruption? it worries me a little bit. but i think, kind - the disruption? it worries me a little bit. but i think, kind of, | little bit. but i think, kind of, for me, i support it for. i little bit. but i think, kind of, for me, i support it for. i wouldn't want to be — for me, i support it for. i wouldn't want to be there _ for me, i support it for. i wouldn't want to be there for _ for me, i support it for. i wouldn't want to be there for something i want to be there for something we didn't— want to be there for something we didn't get— want to be there for something we didn't get taught. but on the other handr _ didn't get taught. but on the other hand. we _ didn't get taught. but on the other hand, we don't mind too much the situation _ hand, we don't mind too much the situation that we might miss some in person— situation that we might miss some in person lecturers. i�*m situation that we might miss some in person lecturers-— person lecturers. i'm in solidarity with them. _ person lecturers. i'm in solidarity with them, but _ person lecturers. i'm in solidarity with them, but i _ person lecturers. i'm in solidarity with them, but i understand - person lecturers. i'm in solidarity with them, but i understand the l with them, but i understand the students — with them, but i understand the students was _ with them, but i understand the students was my— with them, but i understand the students was my frustrations i with them, but i understand the i students was my frustrations with kevin _ students was my frustrations with kevin make — students was my frustrations with kevin make and _ students was my frustrations with kevin make and every— students was my frustrations with kevin make and every thing - students was my frustrations withj kevin make and every thing that's happened. — kevin make and every thing that's happened. att— kevin make and every thing that's happened, all our— kevin make and every thing that's happened, all our studies- kevin make and every thing that's happened, all our studies have i kevin make and every thing that's . happened, all our studies have been disrupted _ happened, all our studies have been disru-ted. ., , ,, happened, all our studies have been disru-ted. ., , ~ ., �* disrupted. going on strike won't alter the fact _ disrupted. going on strike won't alter the fact that _ disrupted. going on strike won't alter the fact that the _ disrupted. going on strike won't alter the fact that the uss - disrupted. going on strike won't i alter the fact that the uss trustee who runs the scheme has decided that more money is needed.— more money is needed. speaking for universities in _ more money is needed. speaking for universities in the _ more money is needed. speaking for universities in the pension _ more money is needed. speaking for universities in the pension scheme, l universities in the pension scheme, one vice chancellor told me change had to happen. universities in england have been warned to minimise the effect of strikes on students. there are many things that we can do in universities to make sure that the students don't suffer most we can change deadlines, change teaching methods, change assessments.— teaching methods, change assessments. , , assessments. more universities, includin t assessments. more universities, including some _ assessments. more universities,
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including some in _ assessments. more universities, including some in wales, - assessments. more universities, including some in wales, may i assessments. more universities, l including some in wales, may join including some in wales, mayjoin the strikes. union members at another 42 are being revalidated — raising the prospect of more disruption injanuary. bronwyn jeffries, bbc news. a typical uk family will spend £1,700 more on bills and food next year, according to a forecast for bbc panorama. much of that is down to the increase of fuel and energy prices, but it's also a result of problems in the uk's supply chain — from the shortage of hgv drivers, to vegetable pickers and food processors. jane corbin reports. what's for dinner today? roast on a sunday. this family in redford in nottinghamshire are struggling with rising prices. nicki, a nurse and husband, martin, who works for a builders' merchants are on average incomes. we try and budget very carefully around food, whereas going back a couple of years, we'd just buy whatever we wanted to.
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on top of sharp hikes in their energy bills, nicki is finding the prices of many items in their weekly shop have gone up. margarine. that's definitely, definitely doubled in price. meat, definitely that's gone up. yoghurts, definitely. they've gone up for sure. research done for panorama tracked prices of some essentialfood items, fuel and energy in the run—up to christmas. our analysis shows that inflation is expected to stand above 4.5% by the time christmas comes around. and for a typical household in the uk, that means that their monthly spending will be around £109 higher than it was for the same basket of goods and services last year, this time. across the uk's supply chain, there are shortages of lorry drivers and seasonal workers as a result of brexit and covid. the government also says some of the challenges are due to global pressures.
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it offered 30,000 visas for seasonal workers, but growers say that's not enough. in lincolnshire, one company has offered tempting wages to try to lure british workers. we had airline pilots apply and all sorts. there was only actually probably ten that could do the job. the government says a long—term answer to the labour shortage is investment in technology like roboveg, a machine that picks broccoli. well, we've set it up to be as fast as a team of seven people in the field. a machine like this will cost nearly £400,000, a significant investment. and it can't solve richard's problems right now. these machines aren't really going to be commercially used for another two or three years. and until we get there, you need the people to do the work. with all their costs, labour and energy rising, too, this grower says the increases will eventually have to be
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passed on to consumers. the government says it will carry on working with industry to tackle ongoing challenges. jane corbin, bbc news. the winner of this year's turner prize is being announced this evening at coventry cathedral. array collective! they have been named the _ array collective! they have been named the winner _ array collective! they have been named the winner of _ array collective! they have been named the winner of the - array collective! they have been named the winner of the tune i array collective! they have been named the winner of the tune ofj named the winner of the tune of £5,000 price. thejudges praised the group for addressing social and political issues in northern ireland. the group's work includes a mock irish pub and protesting against conversion therapy. for us at the moment, it's quite precarious. people have been moved out of the city, so for us we thought about reinvesting in it and having somewhere permanent to work because we will be kicked out of our space soon enough. we are one of the
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last studios in the city centre, so it's important for us, and our position as city centre is important for the work that we do, rallying and going out onto the streets. thea;t and going out onto the streets. they mitht and going out onto the streets. they mi t ht want and going out onto the streets. they might want to _ and going out onto the streets. they might want to rethink kicking you out - _ might want to rethink kicking you out - you — might want to rethink kicking you out — you might be the first northern— out — you might be the first northern irish artists to win the turner— northern irish artists to win the turner prize, so you've made history — turner prize, so you've made histo . . history. cheering. how will _ history. cheering. how will you - history. cheering. - how will you celebrate? history. cheering. _ how will you celebrate? sorry, final question. _ how will you celebrate? sorry, final question, how will you celebrate? it question, how will you celebrate? a question, how will you celebrate? few pints? question, how will you celebrate? a few pints? laughter _ question, how will you celebrate? a few pints? laughter. _ few pints? laughter. that'll be _ few pints? laughter. that'll be a _ few pints? laughter. | that'll be a celebration. there is a statement which has been released by steve simon, the wta chairman and ceo, i'd like to take you through a little bit of that to explain the wta pulse my thinking.
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he says, "the leadership in china has not addressed the serious issue of peng shuai's allegations of sexual assault in a credible way." the statement goes on to say, "while we know where she is, i have serious doubts that she is free, safe and not subject to censorship, coercion and intimidation. as a result," it is calling for the immediate suspension of all wta tournaments in china, including hong kong, as well for stopping into perspective, the wta holds a large number of events in china. let's speak now to a sports journalist whom we regularly speak to about tennis. thanks so much — how big a move is this by the wta? i much - how big a move is this by the wta? 4' much - how big a move is this by the wta? ~ �* , ., , , wta? i think it's a very, very stront wta? i think it's a very, very strong move. _ wta? i think it's a very, very strong move, especially - wta? i think it's a very, very strong move, especially over wta? i think it's a very, very - strong move, especially over the past ten years, the wta have really strengthened their relationship with
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china, they felt 11 tournaments there including vw to a finals. and it shows that steve simon was not bluffing from the beginning — he meant every word he said, he said he would do that if things did not get better in the situation did not change. and he did what he said he would. ., ~' ., change. and he did what he said he would. ., ~ ., , , would. you know the players very well, will this _ would. you know the players very well, will this move _ would. you know the players very well, will this move have - would. you know the players very well, will this move have support| well, will this move have support amongst players who now don't have tournaments to go to in china? honestly the majority of spoken to off the record, they all feel very proud that they have a ceo that has their back. i think everyone really admires what steve simon has done and what he said. and i think that's what the players want more than anything, they want to feel that they are safe, they want to feel that the organisation that they work with and our partners with has their backs. he with and our partners with has their backs. ., “ backs. he said at the end, "i remain ho erful backs. he said at the end, "i remain hopeful our — backs. he said at the end, "i remain hopeful our pleas _ backs. he said at the end, "i remain hopeful our pleas will— backs. he said at the end, "i remain hopeful our pleas will be _ backs. he said at the end, "i remain hopeful our pleas will be heard - backs. he said at the end, "i remain hopeful our pleas will be heard in i hopeful our pleas will be heard in the chinese authorities will take steps to legitimately address this
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issue." do you know if the wta is in any direct contact with the authorities in china? i authorities in china? i unfortunately don't authorities in china? i unfortunately don't know, i don't have much news about that. taste unfortunately don't know, i don't have much news about that. we know ou've have much news about that. we know you've covered _ have much news about that. we know you've covered the _ have much news about that. we know you've covered the men's _ have much news about that. we know| you've covered the men's tournament, the wt p has released a statement in the wt p has released a statement in the last few weeks. might the men decide to follow the women in cancelling their tournaments, as well? i cancelling their tournaments, as well? .. , cancelling their tournaments, as well? ~' , , ., cancelling their tournaments, as well? ., , , ., ~' well? i think they should. i think there's been _ well? i think they should. i think there's been a _ well? i think they should. i think there's been a lot _ well? i think they should. i think there's been a lot of _ well? i think they should. i think there's been a lot of talk - well? i think they should. i think there's been a lot of talk about | there's been a lot of talk about both tours combining or merging. and this is the only way if they want to be part of one big organisation, then they need to follow suit. i know when i was covering the atp finals last week, i asked a lot of the top male players about it, and novak djokovic said he only stands behind what steve simon said stop so honestly i don't see any other way. i cannot imagine seeing the men compete in china when peng shuai is still not heard from.— still not heard from. thank you so much forjoining _ still not heard from. thank you so
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much forjoining us. _ now it's time for a look at the weather. hello there. the winds are turning back into the north or north—west again, which is why it's turning colder. and tomorrow is likely to be a colder day than today, but many places will be dry and quite sunny as well. we've got showers, though, overnight, even some of these down the eastern coasts of england and scotland could be wintry. snow to lower levels even across northern scotland, and a few showers for northern ireland heading into wales and the south west. some of these wintry as well. where we keep the showers through the night, this is where we're more likely to have some icy conditions into tomorrow morning. tomorrow morning will start much colder than this morning, widespread frost, lowest temperatures in scotland. it won't be long before we see the back of the showers in the south wales, south west england. should turn drier in eastern scotland, but showers continue across easternmost parts of england into east anglia. many other areas dry, quite sunny, except for northern ireland, where we've got more cloud coming in here quite quickly, and that will arrive into western scotland during the afternoon. ahead of that, in the cold air, despite the sunshine, the temperatures could be no higher than 4—5.
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this is bbc news with me, christian fraser. the omicron variant is spreading, with the us tonight reporting its first confirmed case. but as countries respond by tightening travel restrictions, the world health organization says there are better strategies to contain the virus. there are ways that you can de—risk travel in terms of having increased testing, more testing before departure, more testing on arrival. in the united states, the supreme court considers whether a 15—week ban on abortions in mississippi should be upheld. if it is, then abortion could become illegal in almost half the country. is bosnia once again on the brink of war? tonight, we will talk to the man who once shared the presidency and who now leads the main bosniak party. and the american author alice sebold
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has apologised for her part in the conviction of man she had claimed raped her in 1981.

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