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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 30, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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was present in the netherlands 11 days ago — that's before the mutated strain was first reported in south africa. it's not clear whether either of the people who tested positive had been to south africa. three major vaccine makers have said they're looking to tweak their jabs to tackle the new strain, if needed. it comes as britain says it will offer boosterjabs to all adults within the next two months. the seven—year war in yemen may have reached a turning point. houthi rebels are pushing towards the city of marib, the centre of yemen's oil fields and the last stronghold of the internationally recognised government. france has honoured the singer josephine baker, heroine of the wartime resistance movement, with a special ceremony in the centre of paris. the french—american entertainer has been symbolically re—buried at the pantheon. you're watching bbc news.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with us, jane merrick, policy editorfor the i newspaper, and jamie njoku—goodwin, chief executive of uk music and former special adviser to the department of health and social care. jamie, iam jamie, i am not the only one to have noticed that rather elegant gramophone behind you! it has really caught a lot of attention. is it a collectors item? it caught a lot of attention. is it a collectors item?— caught a lot of attention. is it a collectors item? it was a friend of mine's who _ collectors item? it was a friend of mine's who is _ collectors item? it was a friend of mine's who is getting _ collectors item? it was a friend of mine's who is getting rid - collectors item? it was a friend of mine's who is getting rid of- collectors item? it was a friend of mine's who is getting rid of it - collectors item? it was a friend of mine's who is getting rid of it a i mine's who is getting rid of it a couple of years ago, and i saved it from the scrapheap.— couple of years ago, and i saved it from the scrapheap. we're very glad ou did. it from the scrapheap. we're very glad you did- it is—
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from the scrapheap. we're very glad you did. it is most _ from the scrapheap. we're very glad you did. it is most striking, - you did. it is most striking, probably one of the most interesting things anyone has had behind them for a paper review. we will do the papers now, enough of that! the expansions of the government's covid booster programme dominates tomorrow's front pages. the is lead is the pledge by the prime minister that everyone over the age of 18 in england will be offered a booster by the end of january. the army will be mobilised to ramp up the roll—out, says the metro, with 400 troops helping to administer half a millionjabs a day. the times says up to 23 million people will be able to book their booster by the end of next month. the telegraph reports the tightening of covid restrictions could remain in place until march next year. the guardian's splash is borisjohnson clashing with a senior government adviser over whether work christmas parties should go ahead. the prime minister has urged the british public to not cancel their christmas — that's on the lead on the front of the mail. the mirror reports that borisjohnson and his staff have been accused of breaking covid rules by enjoying crowded parties
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last year. the paper says downing street did not deny the story, but insisted "rules were followed". let's start with the i, then, jane, the nhs boosterjab for every adult by the end of january, so they have got to get their skates on.- got to get their skates on. yeah, it's uuite got to get their skates on. yeah, it's quite amazing, _ got to get their skates on. yeah, it's quite amazing, actually, - got to get their skates on. yeah, it's quite amazing, actually, i - it's quite amazing, actually, i think— it's quite amazing, actually, i think it — it's quite amazing, actually, i think it is _ it's quite amazing, actually, i think it is less than a week since the i_ think it is less than a week since the i first — think it is less than a week since the i first broke the story of this new variant, and since then we have had the _ new variant, and since then we have had the world health organization branded _ had the world health organization branded as a variant of concern, the government— branded as a variant of concern, the government brought in the first restrictions in months, in terms of facemasks — restrictions in months, in terms of facemasks on publican sport and in sh0ps, _ facemasks on publican sport and in shops, and — facemasks on publican sport and in shops, and today more details of the booster— shops, and today more details of the booster campaign that is really being _ booster campaign that is really being accelerated, because boris johnson — being accelerated, because boris johnson and ministers are really keen— johnson and ministers are really keen to — johnson and ministers are really keen to not throw away our vaccine success _ keen to not throw away our vaccine success by— keen to not throw away our vaccine success by allowing very small number — success by allowing very small number of cases, at the moment, but alarming this variant— at the moment, but alarming this variant to — at the moment, but alarming this variant to overturn our immunity. there _ variant to overturn our immunity. there is— variant to overturn our immunity. there is a — variant to overturn our immunity. there is a concern with the variant
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that he _ there is a concern with the variant that he could not complete astray but if _ that he could not complete astray but if aid — that he could not complete astray but if aid some immunity of our vaccines — but if aid some immunity of our vaccines. scientists think if we have _ vaccines. scientists think if we have enough people with the boosters, it will give people sufficient protection, but we still don't _ sufficient protection, but we still don't really know and there is more work— don't really know and there is more work scientist need to do to work out to— work scientist need to do to work out to work— work scientist need to do to work out to work out how effective vaccines _ out to work out how effective vaccines can be against omicron. and the vaccine vaccines can be against omicron. fific the vaccine producers, jamie, vaccines can be against omicron. fific the vaccine producers, jamie, saying they can make tweaks if they need to. �* .,. , to. between the race between the vaccine the _ to. between the race between the vaccine the variance _ to. between the race between the vaccine the variance in _ to. between the race between the vaccine the variance in the - to. between the race between the i vaccine the variance in the moment, they need time to work with the... whether it is more or less effective in the vaccine. we may find this is less transmissible, is not nearly as severe as the delta variant and the vaccine works just as well. that is the best case scenario. we might find it is just as transmissible, and the government does not work as
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well, so the government is in a position where, rather than trying to wait to find out, they are acting fast now, introducing measures like masks in shops and on public transport, making sure we get as many people vaccinated to a just in case principal, making sure you are better safe than sorry. in the run—up to christmas, you have natural pressures on the nhs anyway. and jamie, the metro tells us a little of how that is going to happen with its headline armycron. we do. it is going to be a big effort, pop—up centres, doing it in pharmacies, encouraging gps to do it as much as they can, and getting back to that sense last year, that national effort to get the whole country behind the vaccine campaign. you have volunteers signing back
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to get those jabs in arms. the language the pm was using today, get behind the booster and getjabs in arms. behind the booster and get “abs in arms. ., , behind the booster and get “abs in arms. , , arms. there may be some people, jane, arms. there may be some people, jane. who — arms. there may be some people, jane. who have — arms. there may be some people, jane, who have thought, _ arms. there may be some people, jane, who have thought, enough i arms. there may be some people, j jane, who have thought, enough is enough, i do not want another. it is imortant enough, i do not want another. it is important to _ enough, i do not want another. it is important to say — enough, i do not want another. it is important to say that the... no one realised _ important to say that the... no one realised just — important to say that the... no one realised just how effective these boosters — realised just how effective these boosters would be, and attention from _ boosters would be, and attention from if _ boosters would be, and attention from if you — boosters would be, and attention from if you had, say the astrazeneca vaccine, _ from if you had, say the astrazeneca vaccine, 90% coverage from two doses, _ vaccine, 90% coverage from two doses, but — vaccine, 90% coverage from two doses, but there is that waning immunity— doses, but there is that waning immunity that has been seen over six months. _ immunity that has been seen over six months. but — immunity that has been seen over six months, but the booster is just an extra _ months, but the booster is just an extra ordinary amount of coverage of a protection — extra ordinary amount of coverage of a protection you can get, with pfizer— a protection you can get, with pfizer and _ a protection you can get, with pfizer and moderna, something like up pfizer and moderna, something like up to— pfizer and moderna, something like up to 99% _ pfizer and moderna, something like up to 99% against hospitalisations, and you _ up to 99% against hospitalisations, and you can see it in the daily graphs — and you can see it in the daily graphs the government dashboard is producing. _ graphs the government dashboard is producing, cases are cited to plato,
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but deaths — producing, cases are cited to plato, but deaths and hospitalisations are really _ but deaths and hospitalisations are really quite high, but they're really — really quite high, but they're really falling out in the older age groups— really falling out in the older age groups -- — really falling out in the older age groups —— cases are starting to plato. _ groups —— cases are starting to plato. it — groups —— cases are starting to plato. it shows, the boosters being accelerated, if everybody can get one over — accelerated, if everybody can get one over the age of 18, it will get us over— one over the age of 18, it will get us over this — one over the age of 18, it will get us over this difficult winter, regardless of the variance and whether— regardless of the variance and whether it takes off. the mail, jane. whether it takes off. the mail, jane- p- m- _ whether it takes off. the mail, jane. p-m- - _ whether it takes off. the mail, jane. p.m. - don't— whether it takes off. the mail, jane. p.m. - don't cancel- whether it takes off. the mail, jane. p.m. - don't cancelyour| jane. p.m. — don't cancel your christmas. it has been a difficult time for the hospitality industry. the prime minister must have an eye on that when he says this?— on that when he says this? people will think back _ on that when he says this? people will think back to _ on that when he says this? people will think back to last _ on that when he says this? people will think back to last christmas, | will think back to last christmas, we we _ will think back to last christmas, we we are — will think back to last christmas, we we are in lockdown in november, we we are in lockdown in november, we were _ we we are in lockdown in november, we were allowed to go out for a few weeks in _ we were allowed to go out for a few weeks in decemberand we were allowed to go out for a few weeks in december and that it was basically— weeks in december and that it was basically into, at least in london in the _ basically into, at least in london in the southeast, quite strict measures— in the southeast, quite strict measures and you were able to seek family— measures and you were able to seek family but— measures and you were able to seek family but that was in full to
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people — family but that was in full to people wanting to have something like animal christmas and i think there _ like animal christmas and i think there was— like animal christmas and i think there was a slight doubt over that, with the _ there was a slight doubt over that, with the instruction of facemasks and self— with the instruction of facemasks and self isolation rules, more questions _ and self isolation rules, more questions about whether there will be questions about whether there will he more _ questions about whether there will be more restrictions. to be clear, there _ be more restrictions. to be clear, there won't— be more restrictions. to be clear, there won't be as it stands, and the prime _ there won't be as it stands, and the prime minister is making clear today you should _ prime minister is making clear today you should go ahead and still have your christmas celebrations, still have _ your christmas celebrations, still have your— your christmas celebrations, still have your nativity plays, but i think— have your nativity plays, but i think the _ have your nativity plays, but i think the chief executive of uk heatth— think the chief executive of uk health security agency, she is suggesting that people should think about not socialising as much over christmas, — about not socialising as much over christmas, and if he gets really important — christmas, and if he gets really important this is not a rule, it is 'ust important this is not a rule, it is just people's own responsibility —— ithink— just people's own responsibility —— i think it _ just people's own responsibility —— i think it is — just people's own responsibility —— i think it is really important. if people — i think it is really important. if people feel more vulnerable if they are going _ people feel more vulnerable if they are going to go out, if they seem more _ are going to go out, if they seem more vulnerable people at christmas, they may— more vulnerable people at christmas, they may choose not to go out on that christmas due in early december. that christmas due in early december-— that christmas due in early december. ., �* , ., , december. that's look at the times, jamie. december. that's look at the times, jamie- p- m- — december. that's look at the times, jamie. p.m. pledges _ december. that's look at the times, jamie. p.m. pledges booster- december. that's look at the times, jamie. p.m. pledges boosterjabs i december. that's look at the times, | jamie. p.m. pledges boosterjabs for 23 million by next month, promising to throw everything at the vaccine
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drive, but one of the other developers further down in this piece is the rules on self isolation. if you are in contact with this new variant.- isolation. if you are in contact with this new variant. yeah, so as o- osed with this new variant. yeah, so as opposed before. _ with this new variant. yeah, so as opposed before, you _ with this new variant. yeah, so as opposed before, you did - with this new variant. yeah, so as opposed before, you did not - with this new variant. yeah, so as opposed before, you did not do i with this new variant. yeah, so as| opposed before, you did not do so icily if you are in contact with a case, if you are in contact with someone who has got the new variant, you will be needing to isolate for ten days, and these could be in place for until march, as the telegraph reports, although this will be reviewed after three weeks. the rationale for this, essentially, is we are not quite sure how this new variant works. there is a chance it is much more transmissible even if you have been vaccinated, it can be quite dangerous, and therefore while they are so try to work that out this is why they have introduced this, but i think where government is try to get to, compared to this time last year, when we did not have a vaccine being rolled out nationally, the best way to stop people dying wants to stop getting it in the first place, we had to take measures to limit transmission, the strategy now to try maxim to
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vaccinate our way out of this. —— try to vaccinate. it is getting as many people vaccinated as possible, getting everyone vaccinated rather than lockdowns and restrictions. let's move on from nothing other than covid of the still with the times, jane. china now our biggest priority, coming from the head of mi6. , , . ., ., , mi6. this is richard moore, who is known as c- _ mi6. this is richard moore, who is known as c. we _ mi6. this is richard moore, who is known as c. we did _ mi6. this is richard moore, who is known as c. we did not _ mi6. this is richard moore, who is known as c. we did not even - mi6. this is richard moore, who is i known as c. we did not even used to know— known as c. we did not even used to know his _ known as c. we did not even used to know his name, and he gave a speech earlier today, — know his name, and he gave a speech earliertoday, in know his name, and he gave a speech earlier today, in which he said china — earlier today, in which he said china is— earlier today, in which he said china is the single greatest priority— china is the single greatest priority for his agency. that is quite — priority for his agency. that is quite striking, because i think many people _ quite striking, because i think many people would have assumed that it was russia, russia has a lot more impact _ was russia, russia has a lot more impact in — was russia, russia has a lot more impact in terms of incidents that have _ impact in terms of incidents that have happened in the uk in the last 20 years. _ have happened in the uk in the last 20 years, so it really new
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direction, i think, 20 years, so it really new direction, ithink, forthe international awareness of what the external _ international awareness of what the external threats are, and he was talking _ external threats are, and he was talking a — external threats are, and he was talking a lot about data, about the threat _ talking a lot about data, about the threat to _ talking a lot about data, about the threat to cybersecurity, which i underestimated in our general thinking — underestimated in our general thinking about how vulnerable some networks _ thinking about how vulnerable some networks are, so, yeah, a really, really— networks are, so, yeah, a really, really interesting departure, because _ really interesting departure, because i think people would have assumed _ because i think people would have assumed it was russia, was more of a wild card _ assumed it was russia, was more of a wild card in _ assumed it was russia, was more of a wild card in the international community. wild card in the international community-— wild card in the international communi . . ., ., community. and even talks about there being _ community. and even talks about there being large-scale _ community. and even talks about| there being large-scale espionage there being large—scale espionage activities conducted by china the uk, as the case with espionage, we rarely get to hear about them —— even though it talks about. fine rarely get to hear about them -- even though it talks about. one of the challenges _ even though it talks about. one of the challenges with _ even though it talks about. one of the challenges with mig _ even though it talks about. one of the challenges with mig is - even though it talks about. one of the challenges with mig is we've l the challenges with mi6 is we've got 3000 spies, china has hundreds of thousand of operators on the payroll working internationally, and so it looks like one of the things we're going to do is look at detect firms.
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there is an interesting idle logical drive with china. some in government think the rise of china is a threat to the west, others who see it as an inevitability and think we should be working with china and have as positive a religion as possible. richard moore, as you would expect from a career diplomat, being diplomatic. he is not saying the rise of china is a bad thing. he warns a mis—kick relation by china on something like taiwan could be a threat to world peace. let’s on something like taiwan could be a threat to world peace.— threat to world peace. let's look at the daily express _ threat to world peace. let's look at the daily express - _ threat to world peace. let's look at the daily express - france - threat to world peace. let's look at the daily express - france finally i the daily express — france finally agrees to talk over migrants. we have been seeing so many people getting into this tiny boat and risking the perils of the english channel. abs. risking the perils of the english channel. �* , ., risking the perils of the english channel. . , ., ., ., channel. a bit of back-and-forth between britain _ channel. a bit of back-and-forth between britain and _ channel. a bit of back-and-forth between britain and france - channel. a bit of back-and-forth between britain and france over| channel. a bit of back-and-forth i between britain and france over the last couple of days on what to do on
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theissue last couple of days on what to do on the issue of people crossing the channel from calais, especially after the really tragic scene we saw of those poor people drowning in the channel, trying to get over to britain, and france famously uninvited pretty patel from a meeting a —— uninvited t patel. isa is a pretty serious issue. the expressive saying they are going to meet and have talks —— the express is now saying. hopefully opening up some more legal routes, but ultimately, again, it is a story about how we respond to the recent tragic loss of life we have seen in the channel. tragic loss of life we have seen in the channel-— the channel. just how desperate --eole the channel. just how desperate people are _ the channel. just how desperate people are to — the channel. just how desperate people are to get _ the channel. just how desperate people are to get away - the channel. just how desperate people are to get away from - the channel. just how desperate | people are to get away from their home nations, jane. we are in island. that still does not mean we can easily police our own borders, does it was mac which was part of
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the argument for leaving the eu. people discovering it is a lot more complicated than simply leaving the un thinking the solution is solved, but as— un thinking the solution is solved, but asjamie was un thinking the solution is solved, but as jamie was saying, people lost their lives— but as jamie was saying, people lost their lives last week —— leaving the _ their lives last week —— leaving the there _ their lives last week —— leaving the. there has been a lot of posturing _ the. there has been a lot of posturing from both governments and they should've got their heads together much earlier on this, they should _ together much earlier on this, they should not— together much earlier on this, they should not have uninvited priti patel~ — should not have uninvited priti patel. they should've taken a lot more _ patel. they should've taken a lot more seriously and, you would think, the debts _ more seriously and, you would think, the debts of— more seriously and, you would think, the debts of 27 people in such tragic— the debts of 27 people in such tragic circumstances would have focused — tragic circumstances would have focused minds, but clearly it is taken — focused minds, but clearly it is taken until today and they finally agreed _ taken until today and they finally agreed to start negotiate over this issue _ agreed to start negotiate over this issue. �* , agreed to start negotiate over this issue. 3 , ., agreed to start negotiate over this issue. �* , , ._ ., agreed to start negotiate over this issue. �*, , ., issue. let's stay with that same .a i e, issue. let's stay with that same page. page _ issue. let's stay with that same page. page two. _ issue. let's stay with that same page. page two. on _ issue. let's stay with that same page, page "4°: 0" my- issue. let's stay with that same page, page two, on my safety l issue. let's stay with that same . page, page two, on my safety built must do much more to protect women and girls how would he do that, according to this piece? this is an
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interesting _ according to this piece? this is an interesting intervention. - according to this piece? this is an interesting intervention. we - according to this piece? this is an interesting intervention. we have| interesting intervention. we have the bill— interesting intervention. we have the bill going through parliament, and it— the bill going through parliament, and it is— the bill going through parliament, and it is designed to crack down on harassment— and it is designed to crack down on harassment and other disgusting things— harassment and other disgusting things like death threats on social media, _ things like death threats on social media, and to basically hold the internet — media, and to basically hold the internet companies to accounts, but what andrea simon of the violence against _ what andrea simon of the violence against women coalition is saying, is that— against women coalition is saying, is that women and girls needs to be written _ is that women and girls needs to be written into — is that women and girls needs to be written into the legislation because they are _ written into the legislation because they are more likely to suffer harassment and online abuse, there is an intranet —— extraordinary statistic that says black— —— extraordinary statistic that says black women are more like the two abuse _ black women are more like the two abuse from — black women are more like the two abuse from their peers, we know that from mps _ abuse from their peers, we know that from mps. diane abbott has suffered almost _ from mps. diane abbott has suffered almost extraordinary proportion of abuse _ almost extraordinary proportion of abuse against mps as towards her alone, _ abuse against mps as towards her alone, and — abuse against mps as towards her alone, and i think it is a very interesting intervention. it
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alone, and i think it is a very interesting intervention. it can be so difficult to _ interesting intervention. it can be so difficult to track _ interesting intervention. it can be so difficult to track those - interesting intervention. it can be so difficult to track those people | so difficult to track those people who are carrying out the abuse down. they have a lot of anonymity online, jamie. , ., ., , , ., , jamie. they do, and this question is one that has — jamie. they do, and this question is one that has been _ jamie. they do, and this question is one that has been looked _ jamie. they do, and this question is one that has been looked at - one that has been looked at repeatedly. it is a hard one. ifeel the best is to crack down on the abuse and you focus on the abuse itself and you have the structures in place to make sure this abuse cannot happen in their sanctions and penalties to make sure the abuse does not happen in the first place, regardless of who does against, but some of the facts in this piece are shocking, so it is something it does need to be addressed as it goes through parliament today, i think the key thing is to make sure the sort of abuse you're seeing online, whether it is political figures, journalists, sometimesjust members journalists, sometimes just members of journalists, sometimesjust members of the public, is absolutely stamped out. tech firms need to be cracking
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down on it making sure it does not happen. down on it making sure it does not ha en. . �* , down on it making sure it does not ha en, ., �* , , happen. that's finished with the guardian, jamie. _ happen. that's finished with the guardian, jamie. more - happen. that's finished with the guardian, jamie. more than a i happen. that's finished with the - guardian, jamie. more than a quarter of uk bird species at risk, and some of uk bird species at risk, and some of this species would probably surprise people. this of this species would probably surprise people.— of this species would probably surprise people. this is the red list of most _ surprise people. this is the red list of most endangered - surprise people. this is the red list of most endangered birds, | surprise people. this is the red i list of most endangered birds, at risk of extinction. this is a quarter of the birds in britain, and insured injury statistic. —— an extraordinary statistic. the impact of climate on birds, a number of them that you would be very, very surprised that. yeah, from a liquid alarmist, a surprise to many. and alarmist, a surprise to many. and robabl alarmist, a surprise to many. and probably really — alarmist, a surprise to many. and probably really at odds with our national identity of the country thatis national identity of the country that is green and wooded and has decent biodiversity, when we really
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don't. i decent biodiversity, when we really don't. . ~ . �* , decent biodiversity, when we really don't. ., ,, ., �*, ~ ,_, don't. i take that's right. as jamie was saying. _ don't. i take that's right. as jamie was saying. this — don't. i take that's right. as jamie was saying, this is _ don't. i take that's right. as jamie was saying, this is partly - don't. i take that's right. as jamie was saying, this is partly to - don't. i take that's right. as jamie was saying, this is partly to do - was saying, this is partly to do with— was saying, this is partly to do with the — was saying, this is partly to do with the environment change and climate _ with the environment change and climate change, and i think biodiversity is depleted over the last two— biodiversity is depleted over the last two years, i think one of the most striking things during that first lockdown was to hear in the city of _ first lockdown was to hear in the city of either of in south london, birdsong — city of either of in south london, birdsong for the city for who knows how long? — birdsong for the city for who knows how long? because you used to having the planes _ how long? because you used to having the planes any pollution from traffic. — the planes any pollution from traffic, and it is not to say we have — traffic, and it is not to say we have to — traffic, and it is not to say we have to reverse having traffic in a city, _ have to reverse having traffic in a city, but — have to reverse having traffic in a city, but it — have to reverse having traffic in a city, but it wasjust have to reverse having traffic in a city, but it was just the have to reverse having traffic in a city, but it wasjust the contrast that it _ city, but it wasjust the contrast that it is — city, but it wasjust the contrast that it is so _ city, but it wasjust the contrast that it is so unusual now to hear birdsong in— that it is so unusual now to hear birdsong in the city, and i think the figures here are extraordinary, and when — the figures here are extraordinary, and when people think about the environment and climate change, they think about _ environment and climate change, they think about mobile —— global warming, but —— globalwarming, but the issue —— global warming, but the issue of biodiversity— —— global warming, but the issue of biodiversity isjust as —— global warming, but the issue of biodiversity is just as important, as this _ biodiversity is just as important, as this red — biodiversity is just as important,
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as this red list shows. biodiversity isjust as important, as this red list shows.— biodiversity isjust as important, as this red list shows. thank you very much. _ as this red list shows. thank you very much, both _ as this red list shows. thank you very much, both of _ as this red list shows. thank you very much, both of you. - as this red list shows. thank you very much, both of you. jamie, l as this red list shows. thank you i very much, both of you. jamie, we did not give you much warning, but maybe next time we have you on, you could play 78! i next time we have you on, you could -la 78! , ., .., next time we have you on, you could -la 78! , ., ., play 78! i will see what i can do. as somebody — play 78! i will see what i can do. as somebody from _ play 78! i will see what i can do. as somebody from uk _ play 78! i will see what i can do. as somebody from uk music, i play 78! i will see what i can do. i as somebody from uk music, that play 78! i will see what i can do. - as somebody from uk music, that is perfect! from the comfort of your homes, not too bad of a commute for you! that is it for us tonight. buy a paper tomorrow night. 0r you! that is it for us tonight. buy a paper tomorrow night. or subscribe online. up next? it is sport. good evening, i'm tulsen tollett with your sports news, where we start with a record—breaking night for england's
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women on two fronts. ellen white became the highest goal—scorer in the history of the national team while they were 20—0 winners over latvia in their group d world cup qualifier. it was white's second goal of the game that saw her surpass kelly smith's previous mark of 46 for her country. and it got even better when, just after the half—time interval, the 32—year—old completed her match hat—trick. and when lauren hemp scored her fourth of the night, which was england's 20th, it surpassed their previous best of 13—0 against hungary in 2005. conversely, in group b, scotland suffered their heaviest defeat in more than ten years. they were hammered 8—0 by spain in seville in a match that saw them with just three shots compared to the hosts' 37. while in group i, wales remain second after losing 2—0 to france, both goals coming in stoppage time at the end of each half.
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to the men's game, and ten—man newcastle drew h with norwich in a relegation clash at st james park. newcastle had ciaran clark sent off after nine minutes but went ahead in the second half through a callum wilson penalty. it was magpies manager eddie howe's first game in his new club's dugout and he'll have been disappointed when teemu pukki equalised with 11 minutes to go. norwich move up a place to third—from—bottom, with newcastle still propping up the table. an injury time penalty dispatched by raphinha gave leeds united a i—0 win over crystal palace at elland road. leeds move up to 15th. 0ne game in the scottish premiership. motherwell beat dundee united 1—0 at a rain—soaked fir park. a stunning strike from tony watt after ten minutes gave motherwell the win. they're nowjust a point behind fourth—placed united. the former liverpool, arsenal and england player ray kennedy has passed away aged 70.
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paddy gearey has more. kennedy is up, suddenly in space, and onside and scores! _ ray kennedy has given liverpool the lead! - munich �*81, the greatest goal of ray kennedy's career. it sent liverpool to the european cup final, which they'd go on to win, another medalfor the man who won it all. little more than three years later, he was diagnosed with parkinson's disease, the condition he'd have to deal with for the rest of his life. arsenal, too, with their own young hope, numberio, ray kennedy. i kennedy had been rejected by port vale before arsenal signed him up, and yet withjohn radford, he scored the goals which propelled the gunners to the 1970/71 league title. kennedy! and it's 3-0! he sealed it, unforgettably, at the home of their biggest rivals, spurs. kennedy and arsenal would go on to do the double, beating liverpool in the cup final, but he drifted from favour and,
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injuly1974, bill shankly signed him for liverpool. it would be his last act as manager. as i was driving through liverpool, i met the chairman in liverpool, and on a billboard, a newspaper stand, it had, "shankly resigns". and i was about to sign for liverpool! the new man in charge, bob paisley, switched kennedy from a forward to a midfielder. he'd found his place in the gathering wave. kennedy would be a crucial part of the liverpool team that dominated the �*70s, with shankly still watching his final signing admiringly. he's making the other people think, because they say, "where is this fella kennedy again? " and, of course, one of the great things about him is his accuracy of kicking. i mean, he could chip the ball into a bucket, really. five times out of six. only rarely was that touch and technique shown off in an england shirt, though. it's going to come to kennedy's left foot! i and kennedy scores! he couldn't displace
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trevor brooking in the team. but at anfield, he was loved. paisley called him one of liverpool's greatest players and probably the most underrated. the signs of parkinson's had been with him for years before he was diagnosed in �*84. he went public with the news, hoping to raise awareness of the condition. but his marriage broke down, and kennedy struggled to deal with the financial and physical impacts of his disease. just have to sit and wait till it passes. there were bad days, but then also days like this in 2009... applause ..when fans of liverpool and arsenal united to recognise ray and all he'd given them, a quiet man who so often made them roar. there's been another shock exit in the uk snooker championship, with 2011 championjudd trump being knocked out. the world number two was one of the favourites going into the tournament but was beaten in the third round by
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fellow englishman matthew selt, losing six frames to three. he's the latest big name to crash out, with last year's winner neil robertson and world champion mark selby both knocked out earlier in the tournament. tiger woods has said he was lucky not to lose his leg in the horrific car crash he was involved in earlier this year and that he doesn't expect to return to the tour full—time. woods has been speaking to the media a day after giving his first interview since the accident. he said he was back playing golf, but nowhere near the level he had been used to. however, he also said he was grateful to be playing at all because of the severity of his injuries. to see some of my shots fall out of the sky a lot shorter than they used to is a little eye—opening, but at least i'm able to do it again. that's something that, for a while there, it didn't look like i was going to. but i'm able to participate
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in the sport of golf. now, to what level? i do not know that. and i'll keep you abreast, all of you guys abreast, as progress continues to go on, whether or not i'll be out here and at what level and when. great britain are out of the davis cup after losing their quarterfinal to germany in austria. dan evans was the only british winner in the tie, as cameron norrie was beaten in his singles match, before joe salisbury and neal skupski lost the deciding doubles match in straight sets in innsbruck. and, of course, for more on that and everything else, you can go to the bbc sport website, but that is all your sport for now. hello there. after a spell of cold weather, the final day of november brought a return to something milder, something much milder, in fact — westerly winds which fed a lot of cloud across the uk but brought temperatures of 12, 13 or 1a
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degrees in many places. away from the far north, cold air clung on across shetland and that cold air has been staging a return over recent hours. this area of low pressure has worked its way through. and that plunge of cold air will continue to take effect as we head through wednesday, the first day of december, the first day of the meteorological winter. and it will feel like it for many of us. there will be some spells of sunshine, but we'll see showers or longer spells of rain drifting southwards, some wintry weather mixing in over high ground, especially across the northern half of the uk. and if we do see any showers into northern scotland through the afternoon, they are likely to fall as snow to very low levels indeed. it will remain windy, particularly gusty winds around the coasts, gusts of a0 to 50 miles per hour and temperatures, if anything, coming down as the day goes on. so afternoon values between two and nine degrees. with that brisk wind, it will feel cold out there.
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now, through wednesday night, we will see some clear spells, some wintry showers too. could see some snow to relatively low levels across parts of eastern england. certainly snow to low levels in the northern part of scotland and temperatures, well, they will drop very close to freezing, below freezing in places. a widespread frost and perhaps some icy stretches to contend with on thursday morning. still quite breezy to start thursday. still some wintry showers, particularly in the east. but this area of high pressure is going to be trying to build its weight in, so that means we will see more in the way of dry weather. as we go through the day, the showers will become fewer and further between. there will be more dry weather, some spells of sunshine, although our next frontal system will be introducing cloud and some rain into northern ireland and the far west of scotland. a very chilly feeling day indeed, highs between three and nine degrees. and then another change in the weather as we move out of thursday into friday. this frontal system pushes eastwards. some snow on its leading edge, but this will be introducing milder air once again from the atlantic, so a bit of rain around in places on friday. there will be some good spells
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of dry weather as well, but it will feel milder to end the week.
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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... test results from the netherlands suggest omicron had spread globally before it was identified. the human cost of the war in yemen. 0ur middle east editor, jeremy bowen, sends a special report. the way this war ends is not in the hands of yemenis because big regional powers have intervened. the people here are suffering because of the fault lines that run right through the middle east. we have a rare interview with britain's spy chief, who says china is his agency's top priority. she sings.
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legendary singer and activistjosephine baker —

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