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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 30, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news i'm christian fraser. the new covid—19 variant was in europe earlier than previously thought. test samples show cases of omicron were present in the netherlands 11 days before the variant was first identified by south africa. the first of four victims gives evidence against ghillaine maxwell in new york. the woman known only as jane says she was groomed at the age of 1a. the head of britain's security agency mi6 has warns the chinese are conducting large—scale spying operations against the uk and its allies. and barbados has spent its first day as a republic — with a president — and not the queen as its head of state.
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hello. despite all the uncertainty, it is likely the covid vaccines will give us protection from the variant omicron. in fact tonight the chief executive of biontech, told reuters the vaccine they'd developed with pfizer will give �*substantial protection�* from severe disease. but how many times since last year have scientists told us that we only emerge from this pandemic, together. it is a practical, as well a moral obligation, to vaccinate the developing world. because if we don't other variants will appear, and they can't be stopped. within five days of omicron being discovered — and i use the word discovered — in south africa, we now know it is present in 20 countries. it was present in the netherlands and in scotland well before
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the south africans had even told us it existed. so we need a different approach. one that allows developing nations to manufacture and distribute the vaccine themselves. and tonight finally, we have a breakthrough in that fight for greater vaccine equity. the south african company aspen pharmacare tells us it has agreed a deal withjohnson and johnson, to licence that j&j vaccine in africa, which they will sell under their own name. just before we came on i spoke to the company's senior executive stavros nickolaou. a lot of people have campaigned long and hard for this, it's very exciting news for africa. tell us about the deal and what you hope it will look like.— will look like. thank you very much for havin: will look like. thank you very much for having me- _ will look like. thank you very much for having me. today's _ will look like. thank you very much i for having me. today's announcement is a real game changer for the african continent. as you correctly pointed out, the continent has been characterised by vaccine and
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equality and even distribution. africa is only received 3% or less of the worlds global covid vaccine supplies. today's announcement, the partnership betweenjohnson & partnership between johnson & johnson partnership betweenjohnson & johnson and aspen which in the form of a licensing agreement are said to change all of that. in short this now means africa has its own vaccine. aspen licenses the intellectual property and will produce its own vaccine under the name of aspen vacs. this will become readily available to the continent. and significantly widening access ahead of what has been up until now largely inaccessible supply. spell that out for _ largely inaccessible supply. spell that out for me. _ largely inaccessible supply. spell that out for me. what _ largely inaccessible supply. spell that out for me. what are - largely inaccessible supply. spell that out for me. what are you able to supply at the moment, what do you think the difference will be next year? think the difference will be next ear? ., l, l, , , year? right now we are in a slightly different arrangement _ year? right now we are in a slightly different arrangement with - year? right now we are in a slightly
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different arrangement with johnson | year? right now we are in a slightly l different arrangement with johnson & johnson. we are in a contract relationship with them. this is the next evolution, if i could call it that, the current arrangement and we have up to now manufactured hundred and 20,000,000 doses ofjohnson & johnson covid vaccine. that's at present. what we say to china of course is that we are increasing our capacity. by quarter one next year we will have an annualised capacity of a0 million doses was all of which we can dedicate to the african continent. the other difference between manufacturing and licensing is that aspen will have full control of the allocation and distribution of the allocation and distribution of these vaccine. and these were all of these vaccine. and these were all of course go to the african community. of course go to the african community-— of course go to the african community. of course go to the african communi . �*, l, ,, l, l l,
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community. let's talk about omicron. because you — community. let's talk about omicron. because you are _ community. let's talk about omicron. because you are taking _ community. let's talk about omicron. because you are taking over— community. let's talk about omicron. because you are taking over the - because you are taking over the licensing at a rather precarious moment. does thejohnson &johnson vaccine, are your scientists doing any work on it, are you now in the lab looking at how it's going to be affected by the new variant? we are de endent affected by the new variant? we are dependent on _ affected by the new variant? we are dependent on johnson _ affected by the new variant? we are dependent on johnson & _ affected by the new variant? we are dependent on johnson & johnson . affected by the new variant? we are dependent on johnson &johnson to | affected by the new variant? we are i dependent on johnson &johnson to do dependent onjohnson &johnson to do that. we may do the research and development, innovation and there is a lot of ended tonal comments about omicron. how more contagious and possibly avirulent it may be. i think it's too early for anyone to say what the real pictures get a look like. i think you need to give us a couple of weeks. what we do know for certain though is that if you vaccinate significant swathes of the population you are likely to break the chain of transmission. if you do that you also mitigate the variance that began to manifest, with these variance you start seeing
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surges as you are presently sitting around the globe. i think that you need to give us a few more weeks our focus is very much getting as many vaccines manufactured as possible and jabs in arms. that is the best way for us to overcome what has been catastrophic pandemic. i way for us to overcome what has been catastrophic pandemic.— catastrophic pandemic. i want to put u n catastrophic pandemic. i want to put u- some catastrophic pandemic. i want to put up some numbers — catastrophic pandemic. i want to put up some numbers for _ catastrophic pandemic. i want to put up some numbers for our _ catastrophic pandemic. i want to put up some numbers for our viewers i catastrophic pandemic. i want to puti up some numbers for our viewers on the province where the scientist detected the very end. i'm saying detected the very end. i'm saying detected and discovered because i know you've got some views on where it might have originated. but that is where it looked like that a few weeks ago. 125 hook the spin forward three weeks and you see that actually the figure is starting to rise up to 142, two weeks ago. and up rise up to 142, two weeks ago. and up to 234 last week. a doubling of numbers of hospitalisations. should that be cause for concern? i
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numbers of hospitalisations. should that be cause for concern?— that be cause for concern? i think firstl , that be cause for concern? i think firstly. let — that be cause for concern? i think firstly. let me _ that be cause for concern? i think firstly, let me say _ that be cause for concern? i think firstly, let me say that _ that be cause for concern? i think firstly, let me say that we - that be cause for concern? i think firstly, let me say that we were i firstly, let me say that we were able to swiftly identify this variant through our south african genomic surveilled and sequencing capabilities. but it doesn't mean that the variant emanated in south africa. there's no good evidence to demonstrate — there is now good evidence. we've heard in scotland be in effect. none of these were patients that travelled to south africa. in fact many of these instances preceded the discovery of this particular variant for that i think what is relevant is that we are seeing a surge in cases globally. including in europe and south africa. and in south africa we are on the cusp of a fourth wave, regrettably. i think we are starting to see increased hospitalisation was
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up to see increased hospitalisation was up but certainly in south africa this is attributable to patients largely that are unvaccinated. again indicating that we need to vaccinate as many people as quickly as possible to get over this. there is some evidence _ possible to get over this. there is some evidence though, _ possible to get over this. there is some evidence though, we - possible to get over this. there is some evidence though, we heard | possible to get over this. there is - some evidence though, we heard some from doctors in south africa that symptoms are mild. there is is this highly optimistic scenario of a late epidemic mutation that yes, is extremely contagious but while displacing delta does less harm. that it doesn't multiply in the body just the same way that delta does. could this actually perversely be the variant we've been waiting for? as you know, these viruses all mutate, they largely up mutate to try and survive themselves as you try and survive themselves as you try and survive themselves as you try and put them down, they mutate.
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eventually they down mutate. i'm not sure that we are in a position right now to pass any opinion. etiquette too early in the process, quite frankly. we are probably and any dote police experiencing minor symptoms. what whaen also knows that when you are at this spark of a wage or a surge of a new variant it's usually the younger population that gets infected first. and of course they have a much more resilient and robust immune system. the short answer is, ifeel robust immune system. the short answer is, i feel it's a little early in the process to understand exactly what is happening. and it is contagious but less berlin than the previous one and it started to fizzle out for that we will be extremely happy if that is in fact the case many congratulations on the deal you signed today. we
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the case many congratulations on the deal you signed today.— deal you signed today. we look forward to _ deal you signed today. we look forward to talking _ deal you signed today. we look forward to talking to _ deal you signed today. we look forward to talking to you - deal you signed today. we look forward to talking to you more | forward to talking to you more on the programme. forward to talking to you more on the programme-— the programme. thank you, all the best. yes, — the programme. thank you, all the best. yes, really _ the programme. thank you, all the best. yes, really significant - best. yes, really significant development. _ best. yes, really significant development. the - best. yes, really significant development. the first - best. yes, really significant - development. the first licensing deal that's been in south africa. in 1994, a 14—year—old girl, who identified in a new york court today as jane, was attending a michigan summer camp for talented children. and while there she was approached byjeffrey epstein and ghislaine maxwell. epstein introduced himself as a wealthy benefactor, who had given scholarships to several young people. they swapped numbers. soon after they began taking jane on shopping trips, to the cinema, and then he sexually assaulted her. the prosecution allege that ghillaine maxwell was more than an innocent bystander, she was deeply involved they say in the grooming of an unsuspecting minor. lets go to manhattan our correspondent neda tawfiq is outside the court. day 2 of this trial neda and the first alleged victim on the stand.
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yes, that's right, christian. she went into great detail about the circumstances in her life at that time saying her father had circumstances in her life at that time saying herfather had died of leukaemia of the month before she met maxwell and epstein. that her mother was depressed at home, they were bankrupt living in the pool house from a neighbour. she said that she met epstein and maxwell and they had offered to help her with her career, to mentor her. they became friends with her, taking her on shopping trips, by her underwear, giving her cash. she said that's when the abuse started. she said she was confused about what their relationship was whether they were married, best friends are in fact killing maxwelljust worked for jeffrey epstein. but she did go over graphic detail what that abuse entails. sexualise group massages with justjabs entails. sexualise group massages with just jabs to entails. sexualise group massages with justjabs to be absent for the sexual encounters with maxwell and epstein is what she said. she even
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asked the prosecutor at what point what how much detail do you need me to go into? the prosecutor at one point asked her how she felt when she was summoned tojeffrey epstein and that's when she got emotional saying her heart sank into her stomach because she didn't want to go see him. she also talked about how she talked about hurting herself at that time in her life but she felt there was no one she could talk to about what was happening. she said she felt shame, she was confused, she didn't know why everyone was acting in terms of everyone was acting in terms of everyone in jeffrey's everyone was acting in terms of everyone injeffrey�*s orbit everyone was acting in terms of everyone in jeffrey's orbit about the sexual encounters that were happening. that is her account. this first accuser in this happening in the indictment. now maxwell watched the indictment. now maxwell watched the entire time looking directly at the entire time looking directly at the woman as she spoke. maxwell has pleaded not guilty. at this woman insists that for years from when she was 14 the abuse continued about
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every two weeks, every time she visited the couple.— every two weeks, every time she visited the couple. also today the prosecutors _ visited the couple. also today the prosecutors have _ visited the couple. also today the prosecutors have been _ visited the couple. also today the prosecutors have been the - visited the couple. also today the l prosecutors have been the disease billionaire. what do we hear from him? he billionaire. what do we hear from him? l, , billionaire. what do we hear from him? ., , l, l, , , billionaire. what do we hear from him? l, , l, l, him? he really gave a sense of what all of jeffrey — him? he really gave a sense of what all of jeffrey epstein's _ him? he really gave a sense of what all of jeffrey epstein's properties - all of jeffrey epstein's properties look like, all ofjeffrey epstein's properties look like, they put all the exhibits of all the pictures of his different residences from new york to palm beach to a ranch in new mexico. also all of his plays. this pilot really showed that he was an insider being a pilot for 30 years forjeffrey epstein. he said that ghislaine maxwell was a number two in his world. that she really had her own personal assistants are dealt with his expenses. he said that high profile people were often guests on jeffrey epstein's plane including prince andrew, bill clinton, donald trump. but he did say that while the cockpit door was usually closed that
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he would go into the main cabin sometimes and that he never witnessed any sexual interactions on those planes. he also said that he trusted his two young girls to be around ghislaine maxwell at the time during her horseback riding with her and that he never had any feeling of danger from and that he never had any feeling of dangerfrom ghislaine and that he never had any feeling of danger from ghislaine maxwell. thank ou very much. let's look at some of the day's other news. at least three people have been killed and six others wounded in a shooting at a high school in michigan. the incident at oxford high school — about 35 miles north of detroit, drew a massive response from law enforcement, the oakland county sheriff's office said. the suspect is 15—year—old student at the school who used a semi—automatic handgun. a us federaljudge has sentenced the wife of mexican drug lord, wakeen "el chapo" guzman, to three years in prison. emma coronel aispuro pleaded guilty to helping the sinaloa drug cartel with trafficking drugs and money laundering. prosecutors had wanted a longer sentence. but the judge said she was a teenager when she married
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guzman, and that she'd co—operated with authorities. and the singer adele has announced a residency at caesar's palace in las vegas — following in the footsteps of celine dion and sir eltonjohn. her latest album, 30, is the fastest—selling of 2021. stay with us on bbc news, still to come... backing away the royal standard is barbados sever ties with the queen becoming the worlds newest republic. here, a co—founder of the neo—nazi terror group national action has been convicted of remaining a member after it was banned. ben raymond from swindon, was convicted of staying in the organisation after it was banned in december 2016. chief superintendent kenny bell is from west midlands police. we've done an immense investigation. and at the moment now 16 other
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people have been brought tojustice as being member of that prescribed group. in all the evidence we've reviewed from those investigations has led us to conclude and the jury has accepted that he is been the co—founder and the architect and leader of that group. and how much influence did he have on neo—nazis who became involved in serious terrorism plots? our evidence has shown that he's had a lot of contact the editor of gone on to commit the violent acts both in terms of either head crime or violent crime or acts of terrorism for evidence has shown that he has had significant contact with them and he's been able to influence them. it is not often the head of m16 gives a broadcast interview. but today the new boss, richard moore, known in spy cricles as c, stepped out of the shadows to speak to the bbc. his job is to analyse the risk side of the ledger,
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to inform the government what he views as the biggest threats. and currently his sights are fixed firmly on china. the chief believe that technologically, the chinese might soon leapfrog the west and m16 will need to be more open with the tech sector in order to guarantee the uk's national security. i would describe often the way in which china goes goes about for example, its work around developing ai, in particular, it is trying to harvest data from around the world. and it's also tried to use, influence through its economic policies to try and sometimes i think, get people on the hook. i talk about data traps in debt traps in the space. they will use them for leverage. just spell it out if you would. so a debt trap is something i think were all fairly familiar with. if you take on loans and then
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you find it difficult to repay them then we've seen some example of this with the chinese have them been able to acquire significant ports which has a potential to become become navalfacilities, etc. the data trap is this, that if you allow another country to gain access to really critical data about your society, over time that will erode your sovereignty, you would no longer have control of that data. that's something which in the uk we are very alive to and would have taken measures to defend against. it's not true, i think, it all the conversations i have around the globe was of a very keen that people should understand that. richard moore has also today given his first speech to the international institute for strategic studies and we can talk now to nick crawford, a research associate there who's been focusing on china's economic and politcal activity. people we can talk specifically about china, why do you think richard borg in that interview today, with the? i
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richard borg in that interview today, with the?— richard borg in that interview toda , with the? ~ , today, with the? i think the purpose is to inform — today, with the? i think the purpose is to inform the _ today, with the? i think the purpose is to inform the public _ today, with the? i think the purpose is to inform the public both - today, with the? i think the purpose is to inform the public both in - today, with the? i think the purpose is to inform the public both in the i is to inform the public both in the uk and potentially internationally about the risks that he sees in the kind of policies the government might need to pursue to respond to them. it happens from time to time that the head of the intelligence service addresses the public. and it just doesn't happen very often. ida. just doesn't happen very often. no, it doesn't. just doesn't happen very often. no, it doesn't- he _ just doesn't happen very often. no, it doesn't. he talked in that interview about debt trap and data traps. all governments and companies have access to data, a lot of data and why should we be concerned about the data that china is gathering? richard moore's comments pertain to chinese government has been pursued in the last few years focusing initially on physical infrastructure which is why the debt trap comes up we can perhaps return to that. more recently its focus more on providing
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a digital infrastructure, digital services and digital platforms do governments around the world was up in fact, some of my colleagues have been collecting data for a database called china connects we found the chinese digital projects in 137 countries around the world. and there are a few specific concerns around chinese digital projects. the first of these concerns is a concern around back doors. so creating vulnerabilities in the services that they provide which could be exploited at a later stage by the chinese state. there is public, no public evidence of this part of risk none the less. the second concern to china's digital projects as around data gathering, as he mentioned. and be gathering of very large data sets
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and very diverse data sets and lots of different countries can help to train artificial and defence application surveillance applications as it has been in china. and the third concern around these chinese digital projects is around by providing digital services to other countries around the world you're beginning to embed some of the chinese ways of working with personal data around privacy, around the use of the personal data to control the population. it may provide those capabilities and countries get used to using them. there's also this concern that chinese standards around the use of data began to more widely. thank you ve much data began to more widely. thank you very much for— data began to more widely. thank you very much for coming _ data began to more widely. thank you very much for coming on _ data began to more widely. thank you very much for coming on the - very much for coming on the programme. barbados is the world's newest republic. at midnight the royal standard flag
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was lowered in bridgetown to mark the nation's transition to its new constitutional status. the new president dame sandra mason replaces queen elizabeth as head of state. and in the capital bridgetown, the bells rang out to celebrate the moment. let's got to bridgetown and speak to the bbc�*s celestina oluloday. what level of support was there for this move? b5 what level of support was there for this move? �* , ,, what level of support was there for this move? ~ , i. _ what level of support was there for this move?— what level of support was there for this move? ~ , i. _ _, ., this move? as you say, welcome to the worlds — this move? as you say, welcome to the worlds newest _ this move? as you say, welcome to the worlds newest republic. - this move? as you say, welcome to the worlds newest republic. in - this move? as you say, welcome to i the worlds newest republic. in terms of support, the majority of barbadian set i've spoken to say they are very much in favour of this move. the message that this is all about removing or moving away from its colonial past really does resonate with so many barbadian sierra. but some i spoke to said yes, this is all good and great but
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we would've liked a referendum on it. we would've liked to of had a say on how this is all shaped. of course the timing of all of this is quite significant, there is a pandemic and this economy has been hit hard by the coronavirus. tourism is very much linked to the economy here in barbados. yes, people questioning whether this is really the right time to do this. {iii questioning whether this is really the right time to do this. of course there are still _ the right time to do this. of course there are still strong _ the right time to do this. of course there are still strong cultural - there are still strong cultural economic ties between barbados in the uk. but what is being discussed about that, how might that change? as far is the prime minister said, when i spoke to her last week she said that she wants to continue working with britain, she wants to continue working with prince charles. but what will change is the fact that firstly, this is all about
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symbols. the names of things are going to change. we've already seen that we now have a new name for police, the barbados police service which is to be connected to the crowd. so that's gone. and also there will be other symbols that are removed later on that are linked to the colonial past of this country. there is new a new national honour system instead of the british honour system instead of the british honour system that was here before. hand if system that was here before. and if ou are a system that was here before. and if you are a new _ system that was here before. and if you are a new republic— system that was here before. and if you are a new republic what - system that was here before. and if you are a new republic what are - system that was here before. and if you are a new republic what are your priorities, what does the government want to do next?— want to do next? well, a key point of all of this— want to do next? well, a key point of all of this for _ want to do next? well, a key point of all of this for the government i want to do next? well, a key point of all of this for the government is | of all of this for the government is changing the constitution. the prime minister said that she wants to engage with the public on theirs. next year there's going to be a big public debate, consultation about which part of the constitution needs to be changed. because as i've said, all of this is linked to how
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barbados sees itself, how it defines itself now that it is the worlds newest republic. hat itself now that it is the worlds newest republic.— itself now that it is the worlds newest republic. itself now that it is the worlds newest reublic. ., ., ., ., newest republic. not often we go to barbados was _ newest republic. not often we go to barbados was up _ newest republic. not often we go to barbados was up thank _ newest republic. not often we go to barbados was up thank you - newest republic. not often we go to barbados was up thank you very - newest republic. not often we go to. barbados was up thank you very much for that. barbados was up thank you very much forthat. let barbados was up thank you very much for that. let me quickly bring you pictures from minnesota. we can see the democratic senator onstage for the democratic senator onstage for the president biden is visiting to bush's bipartisan infrastructure bill which was signed into law two weeks ago. minnesota will stand to benefit around $6,000,000,000 going to state from that plan for a course we will hear the president mightjust discuss the issue of the new variant, obviously very keen to push the booster programme as was borisjohnson and the uk today. we will perhaps dip into a little bit of that in the second half of the programme. where going to talk about the uk's booster programme. if you were going to hear from the pharmacies who are at the cold face of the roll—out over the next few weeks. i get enough
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support, is there enough vaccine? we will tell you all about it. hello there. it was noticeably milder today across the board compared to what we've had the last couple of days, but it's set to change once again. as we move through tonight, a spell of wet and windy weather will spread across the uk, and that will introduce colder air again from the north or the north—west. so, it will be colder for the first few days of december. here's this area of low pressure spreading southwards. some warm air wrapped into it, or mild i should say. but that will clear away, and you'll notice the blue colours beginning to invade behind the system as it pushes its way south—eastwards. now, some pretty heavy rain on this low pressure as it spreads south—eastwards. that'll be followed by blustery showers and clear spells, these turning increasingly wintry certainly over the hills across scotland. it will be windy pretty much everywhere, but especially across some western coasts, where it will be
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touching gale—force, particularly in exposure. temperature—wise, not particularly cold in the south, but not as mild as what it was the previous night. so, for wednesday, then, the first of december, the last of the mild air clears away from the south east through the morning. you'll notice the blue colours invading. it is going to feel chillier throughout the day, but there will be a bit more sunshine around, which will be a bonus. but plenty of showers around, these wintry over northern hills, even down to lower levels in places. and they'll form to merge bands across parts of england and wales, so some areas could be quite wet throughout the afternoon. temperatures—wise, 3—9 degrees in the south. as we head through wednesday night, it stays showery, temperatures tumble under the clear skies here, so we could see a touch of frost, maybe some ice around. but there'll be further showers across northern and eastern coasts, and these will be of a wintry flavour. certainly it'll still be quite breezy, especially close to the coast. and those temperatures colder than what we've had the last couple of nights, 3—5 degrees, but even cooler than that in some
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sheltered rural locations. thursday's, then a chilly day, but we do have this ridge of high pressure trying to push in. so, that will slowly kill off the showers, particularly across southern and western areas. most of the showers, i think, will be across more northern and eastern areas, and again they will be quite wintry in nature. thicker cloud develops, though, across the west as a new weather front begins to make inroads later in the day. and those temperatures, 3—8 degrees, temperatures coming up a little bit across the west. and that marks a change for friday. again it turns a bit milder for a time throughout friday, but with that comes more rain.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. every adult in england is to be offered a booster vaccination — by the end of january. today, opposition is and always will be immeasurably better than it was a year ago. what we are doing is taking some proportionate precautionary measures while our scientists crack the omicron code. former president donald trump's chief of staff will testify before a congress committee investigating a mob assault on the capitol building in january. more companies are using automated video interviews to hire workers. but is it fair? and in paris — the singer
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and activistjosephine baker becomes the first black woman to be honoured at the pantheon. welcome back. borisjohnson will get his booster on thursday, and he urging everyone else to roll up their sleeves, quite literally, to get that third jab before the new variant omicron spreads further. the prime minister says he wants everyone who is eligible for a booster to have been offered it by the end of january. the trouble is the nhs is not vaccinating at quite the same rate it was in the spring. currently the uk's is processing around 2.5 million boosters a week. and to reach mrjohnson's target it would need to be around 4 million. a third of the vaccines centres have closed since the spring. the government said today the plan is to introduce more pop up centres, and reopen hospital hubs — but for the time being it is the pharmacies picking up the slack.
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are they getting enough help, are they getting enough supply. olivier picard, is a board member of the national pharmacy association. he owns pharmacies in buckinghamshire, he is running two booster sites and one vaccination hub. do you have the vaccine to cope? we have do you have the vaccine to cope? - have been vaccinating since january. we are very well aware of what we need to do and what we are doing. he started obviously with a lot of volunteers and quite a number of vaccinated, some have them have gone back to their dayjob, others have tried to be vaccinated. at the moment, we have a good work for us, and i think pharmacies are generally quite adaptable. we are a place where people like to come, and i think equally with the workers, we have a number of workers who are
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able to help us with the population. the payments or points to a sense of exhaustion that there is with all of this, but imagine the frustration thatis this, but imagine the frustration that is felt by the general public pales into insignificance when you compare it to the fatigue that you lot are facing in the premises. do you think you are able to scale it up you think you are able to scale it up even further to meet the prime minister's target?— minister's target? yes, that is a very good _ minister's target? yes, that is a very good point- _ minister's target? yes, that is a very good point. those - minister's target? yes, that is a very good point. those have - minister's target? yes, that is a i very good point. those have been involved in a vaccination programme have literally been getting vaccinations nonstop since january. you are right, many will have given up you are right, many will have given up their spare times and weekends to do so. pharmacies are currently being underused in this programme. there are as many as 2,000 pharmacies currently participating and have delivered about 60,000,000 jabs, 2,000,000 boosters. there at 11 have thousand pharmacies in england and many more will probably
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be able to participate. now when you talk about scaling up, clearly, and our pharmacies where almost booked up our pharmacies where almost booked up at the moment, and today we where talking about how to increase the capacity, what that looks like. we have contacted more vaccinated is, people who perhaps have not been vaccinated in a while and see if they have any availability to open slots here and there, but i think theissue slots here and there, but i think the issue coming from community pharmacies that are currently perhaps not enrolled in the booster programme and could probably get enrolled quite quickly. i mean pharmacies already participate in the flu vaccination programme and there are thousands of trained vaccinated is in pharmacies, and i'm sure the nhs will come knocking on the pharmacies dressed to take the opera. the pharmacies dressed to take the o era. ~ , ,., the pharmacies dressed to take the oera. ~ , ., opera. the prime minister said today he was going — opera. the prime minister said today he was going to _ opera. the prime minister said today he was going to put _ opera. the prime minister said today he was going to put 400 _ opera. the prime minister said today he was going to put 400 ships - opera. the prime minister said today he was going to put 400 ships in - opera. the prime minister said today he was going to put 400 ships in the | he was going to put 400 ships in the mix to try and increase the staffing problems around the country. is there anyway you could utilise
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those? is it about organising cues getting people in the right order, processing people as they come through cues? and did military personnel, could they do that and help you out?— personnel, could they do that and help you out? that is a good point. a few hundred _ help you out? that is a good point. a few hundred troops _ help you out? that is a good point. a few hundred troops is _ help you out? that is a good point. a few hundred troops is not - help you out? that is a good point. a few hundred troops is not going i help you out? that is a good point. i a few hundred troops is not going to help thousands of community pharmacies. i think pharmacies have already got a network where they are established. what is likely to happen is those pop up site that borisjohnson spoke about happen is those pop up site that boris johnson spoke about today, where they may pop up and literally vaccinate for a number of weeks. what we have to look at beyond that and see what help community pharmacies can do in the long run. for now, i think locally there are plenty of available volunteers, but it's going forward, you know, in six months i'm coming 12 it�*s going forward, you know, in six months i�*m coming 12 months�* time, we are still vaccinating, this is
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where it will kick in for even volunteers and where to help may be required, but for now, i think we accept that we are going to have to work hard, adapt to the situation and hopefully go through this with the nhs and vaccinate everybody by the nhs and vaccinate everybody by the end of january. the nhs and vaccinate everybody by the end ofjanuary. it�*s the nhs and vaccinate everybody by the end ofjanuary.— the end ofjanuary. it's a big challenge — the end ofjanuary. it's a big challenge ahead _ the end ofjanuary. it's a big challenge ahead of - the end ofjanuary. it's a big challenge ahead of you, - the end ofjanuary. it's a big challenge ahead of you, we| the end ofjanuary. it's a big - challenge ahead of you, we wish you the best of luck with that. thank you very much for coming on the programme. thank you.- you very much for coming on the programme. thank you. thank you very much. donald trump�*s former chief of staff mark meadows is cooperating with the house select committee that is investigating the january 6 riot. we are told mr meadows is providing records and agreeing to sit for an initial deposition. it is a significant development, someone of course who had a ring side view of the day within the white house. the seperate to that, a panel ofjudges in the court of appeal in washington is considering mr trumps attempt to block the release of records and conversations he had that day. three weeks ago a district court, ruled the document should be handed over to the commitee. let�*s speak to elizabeth wydra, president of the constitutional accountability
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center. elizabeth, let me tell you —— let me walk me to the programme. let�*s start with mark meadows. —— welcome you to the programme. see ban and relish the idea of going to cry to defy the committee. mark meadows, not so much. i defy the committee. mark meadows, not so much-— not so much. i think the indictment for a steve — not so much. i think the indictment for a steve bannon _ not so much. i think the indictment for a steve bannon for— not so much. i think the indictment for a steve bannon for contempt i not so much. i think the indictment for a steve bannon for contempt of| for a steve bannon for contempt of congress by failing to co—operate in the first place has a lot to do with the first place has a lot to do with the fact that mark meadows has at least agreed to set for a deposition and provides and documents. now, the select committee was pretty clear that they are going to continue to be wary of whether or not mark meadows is sufficiently cooperative, mark meadows�*s layer has been trying to have it both ways and suggest that he might still try to withhold some information, some documents, so cimino, ithink some information, some documents, so cimino, i think that we are in a good spot for the constitutional role of congress and for the american people, and that they at least have this door open to hearing
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what mark meadows knew from that day, and in some ways, he knows a lot about what president trump new on that day, and to get to the ultimate bottom of what happened on january six and how to prevent it from happening in the future. let�*s from happening in the future. let's talk about the _ from happening in the future. let's talk about the appeals _ from happening in the future. let's talk about the appeals court in washington, an interesting constitutional question for the appeal court. can a former president invoke executive privilege and can he override with the current president wants?— he override with the current president wants? right, so it is a little bit odd, _ president wants? right, so it is a little bit odd, because _ president wants? right, so it is a little bit odd, because you - president wants? right, so it is a little bit odd, because you have i president wants? right, so it is a i little bit odd, because you have the generous committee trying to get this information from former president trump to conduct its investigation. president biden recognises the importance of that investigation saying that he does not want to assert any executive privilege on these, with a broad matter with respect to this information from about former president from trying to assert that presidential executive privilege, and the lies that generally the incumbent president decides whether or not to assert executive privilege, so having a former president trying to contradict the
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current president likely sign court todayis current president likely sign court today is an unusual legal situation. the term site has been arguing they had a 20 minute opportunity today to present to the three judges, and they are arguing that the pursuit of the records that the committee is after is so wide, so broad, it could permanently damage the executive branch because that concept of confidentiality that is enjoyed by presidents and everyone they speak to, that would disappear. i presidents and everyone they speak to, that would disappear.— to, that would disappear. i think that's most _ to, that would disappear. i think that's most definitely _ to, that would disappear. i think that's most definitely an - that�*s most definitely an overstatement in the fact that we have president biden and presidents of all parties are generally very protective of their executive privilege, the fact that we have president biden�*s representatives going into court today department of justice layer saying they don�*t believe executive privilege is appropriate in this case i think says a lot aboutjust how important it is for this information to be turned over. certainly, if there were specific claims i think that would make the case that executive
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privilege should apply here stronger, but placed in trump has basically said he wants these documents to be secret. they haven�*t been. that�*s what the judges found in on a lot today, no specific claims about specific documents that should be privileged for an actual reason, it�*s this broad brush. we would like to keep this information secret, and that is not good enough. very quickly, when will they get a result the net and will he go to supreme court? i result the net and will he go to supreme court?— result the net and will he go to supreme court? i think we will get resolved quickly. _ supreme court? i think we will get resolved quickly. the _ supreme court? i think we will get resolved quickly. the judges - supreme court? i think we will get resolved quickly. the judges today j resolved quickly. thejudges today recognise that this is an important matter, coming up to almost a year since january six, and a former president trump loses, his lawyers indicated that they certainly do plan to go quite quickly to the supreme court.— plan to go quite quickly to the supreme court. plan to go quite quickly to the sureme court. ., , ., , ., supreme court. elizabeth, lovely to have and the _ supreme court. elizabeth, lovely to have and the programme. - supreme court. elizabeth, lovely to have and the programme. thank i supreme court. elizabeth, lovely to | have and the programme. thank you very much. have and the programme. thank you ve much. . .. have and the programme. thank you ve much. ., ,, i. let�*s return to minnesota. president biden is visiting a technical college to deliver remarks on his trillion dollar infrastructure plan — iam i am delighted, i am delighted to be
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here. before i get into my remarks, any detail, i was informed after the tour, i learned about a school shooting in michigan. as we learned the full details, my heart goes out to the families during the imaginable grief of losing a loved one. apparently, there is somewhere in the order of nine people shot and several, three, ithink, are dead. and the young man i think, as i understand it from staff, about 15 years old, and he turned himself in. just claimed his right against self—incrimination and... just claimed his right against self-incrimination and... president biden speaking _ self-incrimination and... president biden speaking in _ self-incrimination and... president biden speaking in minnesota i self-incrimination and... president biden speaking in minnesota about the money the state will get to rebuild its roads and broadband and water systems. we are going to keep across that, because we want to know what he will talk about the omicron variant and what he plans he has for
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the united states, and if we get anything from that, we will bring it to you. do you stay with us and bbc news. step to come... my companies are using automated video interviews in their hiring process. we look at the implications for all sides. here, tens of thousands of people in scotland and the north of england still have no electricity 5 days after storm arwen caused, what�*s being described as "unprecedented damage" to the power network. strong winds snapped telegraph poles and knocked out supplies on friday. our correspondent fiona trott sent this report from the north east of england. there we are. emerging pies. here in northumberland, volunteers in rothbury here are cooking for those who can�*t. on the other side of the hall, a local councillor is updating visitors. it�*s not going to be a quick fix. i�*ve got residents in the area that i�*m aware of that are taking water from the river or streams near their properties to actually wash. i have to ask the question why,
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maybe, the emergency services and local authority haven�*t declared a major incident by now. that�*s because hundreds of people like james and lucy still need support. when was the last time you had a shower? about thursday. the day before the storm. since then, it's been wet wipes, hot flannel washes. now it�*s time to grab the hot food and hit the road. a lifeline to families and vulnerable people who haven�*t been able to cook for four days. it�*s villages like this where volunteers have been delivering to and when you get inside whittingham, you can see just how bad the damage is. trees like this, the sheer force of storm arwen blowing them down and bringing down cables. it�*s getting to breaking point. like, it�*s hard, especially when you�*ve got a little one in the house. and not knowing or getting a straight answer of when it is
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actually going to be back on. i don�*t think people get it until you actually live up here and realise how it can affect you. they feel cut off in every way, and are wondering what choices they have the longer this continues. fiona trott, bbc news, northumberland. job interviews are not something we look forward to. i�*ve certainly had my fair share of corkers here at the bbc. but then sometimes there is that odd occasion when you relax into the interview, you manage to build a rapport with the interviewer. but what if the interviewer wasn�*t there. increasingly, many young people find they are speaking to a computer. automated video interviews, which are designed to whittle down the initial applicants to a more manager group of finalists. normally the answers to questions are delivered to a web cam — and often with the timer ticking. here�*s an example of how it works with one of the many companies now
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operating in this field. with video interviewing and games, the apps assessments provide insight into emotional intelligence, communication skills, work style, personality, fluid iq, cognitive ability and more. i personality, fluid iq, cognitive ability and more.— personality, fluid iq, cognitive ability and more. i think i would fail in all of _ ability and more. i think i would fail in all of those. _ let�*s speak to dr zahira jaser, assistant professor at the university of sussex business school — who�*s carried out research into the experiences of people put through this style of interviews. what arguments for this, aside from the time that it saves management and sifting through a load of applications, is that it gets rid of biases in the selection process. everyone is treated the same by the computer. on the surface, that seems like quite a good thing. yes. computer. on the surface, that seems like quite a good thing.— like quite a good thing. yes, so we are told that _ like quite a good thing. yes, so we are told that the _ like quite a good thing. yes, so we are told that the bias _ like quite a good thing. yes, so we are told that the bias is _ like quite a good thing. yes, so we are told that the bias is removed, l are told that the bias is removed, but that�*s to be established. there are many academics that are looking
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into bias and artificial intelligence and all sorts of life, for example, we know that face recognition software which is often used by this interview appear to be that net proceeds with less clarity expressions from people that have a dark skin rather than white skin. 50 dark skin rather than white skin. so there are biases? there _ dark skin rather than white skin. so there are biases? there are - there are biases? there are definitely — there are biases? there are definitely biases _ there are biases? there are definitely biases and - there are biases? there are. definitely biases and artificial intelligence, absolutely. huge amount of research is done on this. the companies that provide these interviews spend huge amounts of time to tell us they are not bias. but people are working to make the technology better, but i�*ve made the technology better, but i�*ve made the technology is in its infancy right now. i technology is in its infancy right now. , , , ., , technology is in its infancy right now. , , ., technology is in its infancy right now. , , . , ., now. i suppose my instinct is that work on any _ now. i suppose my instinct is that work on any level— now. i suppose my instinct is that work on any level is _ now. i suppose my instinct is that work on any level is a _ now. i suppose my instinct is that work on any level is a personal i work on any level is a personal relationship, and if you remove the personal relationship from the interview process, how do you know that the ai system hasn�*t gotten rid of somebody you might warm tail? so of somebody you might warm tail? for when of somebody you might warm tail? 5r when people speak to each other, there is a huge amount of body
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language, expression cues which indicates how we are doing in that conversation, are we connecting, are we not, or be understood? the research really needs that connexion, and it becomes almost like an existential problem and you have to think people don�*tjust have one interview, but they have take ten, some people take 20, especially when you are young, you are trying to check out the job market, there is an intensity that really pushes you to start questioning your south command this is what we actually have found, that a lot of people really start questioning themselves. and ibc are university students, a lot ofjob—seekers who are living in year three in year four. lot ofjob—seekers who are living in year three in yearfour. what lot ofjob—seekers who are living in year three in year four. what is their experience of it? what do they come back and tell you? our research has focused — come back and tell you? our research has focused precisely _ come back and tell you? our research has focused precisely on _ come back and tell you? our research has focused precisely on this -
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has focused precisely on this demographic. precisely on how, not as much as the interviews are biased, but what is the experience of the technology? a lot of them tell us they really feel robotic, so this theme came up a lot, because people try to comply with the technology, they become very rigid, they become postured, so a lot of people really use this kind of fake expression, fake way of being to try to win the ai. i expression, fake way of being to try to win the al— to win the ai. i wonder if you are a confident person _ to win the ai. i wonder if you are a confident person you _ to win the ai. i wonder if you are a confident person you may - to win the ai. i wonder if you are a confident person you may be i to win the ai. i wonder if you are a confident person you may be a i to win the ai. i wonder if you are a i confident person you may be a better performer in front of a webcam then someone from a more disadvantaged background who might not have the same confidence. i wonder if it works in that way.— works in that way. you are absolutely _ works in that way. you are absolutely right. _ works in that way. you are absolutely right. our i works in that way. you are absolutely right. our work| works in that way. you are i absolutely right. our work is focused exactly on how people from different social backgrounds cope with this. we know that people
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internalise ideas of what it means to be professional, so clearly if you are born into a family with, you know, a lawyer in a he might have actually seen parents do certain things that make you internalise that, but if you come from a background which is totally different and you missed this kind of idea, you really need to improvise, and of course, people will pick up these kind of cues in their lifetime at university and so forth, but when you are seeing people for example who have an accent find themselves very disadvantage. i accent find themselves very disadvantage.— accent find themselves very disadvantaue. . , , ~ disadvantage. i was 'ust thinking about the key _ disadvantage. i was 'ust thinking about the key is i disadvantage. i wasjust thinking about the key is because - disadvantage. i wasjust thinking about the key is because i i disadvantage. i wasjust thinking about the key is because i knowl disadvantage. i wasjust thinking i about the key is because i know that you cannot see me command this has been a slight issue through the pandemic and a lot of my guests sit here in the studio in the chair next to me, but you can�*t see me, so you can�*t interact with what i�*m doing, correct? in the same way, that�*s what these interviewees are going through. i�*m what these interviewees are going throu~h. �* ., ., ., through. i'm having a conversation in real time _ through. i'm having a conversation in real time with _ through. i'm having a conversation in real time with you, _ through. i'm having a conversation in real time with you, so _ through. i'm having a conversation in real time with you, so i - through. i'm having a conversation in real time with you, so i asked i in real time with you, so i asked the producer, for example, kenny
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asked chris to entrap me if i�*m speaking for too long, because i will not be able to see his face. so you are doing so, which is fantastic and it�*s giving me guidance, so you have to think that these kind of interviews that you are really recording yourself under time pressure in which you need to enter the job pressure in which you need to enter thejob market, so you do not have... the job market, so you do not have... �* , �* , have... it's the interview's responsibility _ have... it's the interview's responsibility to _ have... it's the interview's responsibility to tease i have... it's the interview's responsibility to tease out| have... it's the interview's i responsibility to tease out the have... it's the interview's - responsibility to tease out the bets that he or she wants to hear. absolutely, so some of these people make it past the next stage, but i think the thing that really shocked us during our research was that the students were extremely confused, they did not know if a human was going to look at the videos, if ai going to look at the videos, if al was going to look at videos, what kind of data was going to be extracted from them? the facial recognition, word recognition, word processing, they did not know. so we
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put out a policy brief and are really advocating for much greater transparency and accountability of employees, i�*m sorry, of employers, but also the platforms to really explain a bit more and to really help people. the platforms over and saw themselves as unbiased, so. that�*s not the case. saw themselves as unbiased, so. that's not the case.— saw themselves as unbiased, so. that's not the case. that's not the case, but that's not the case. that's not the case. but also _ that's not the case. that's not the case, but also the _ that's not the case. that's not the case, but also the students, i case, but also the students, glorifying ai, so they are thinking of a failure, it�*s my fault, there is something wrong with me. so this process, quite relentless, is putting a lot of pressure on student�*s self—esteem, especially from students from certain backgrounds as we just said. backgrounds as we 'ust said. doctor, really fascinating. i backgrounds as we just said. doctor, really fascinating. the _ backgrounds as we just said. doctor, really fascinating. the future, - backgrounds as we just said. doctor, really fascinating. the future, the i really fascinating. the future, the way we are all going to be interviewed, no doubt in the future. thank you so much. thank you. the american born singer and activist, josephine baker, who made her name and her home in france in the 1920s has been
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honoured at the pantheon mausoleum in paris — the resting place for the nation�*s heroes. she�*s the first black woman to be memorialised there in recognition of her work on civil rights, and the part she played in the resistance during the second world war. members of her familyjoined president macron at the ceremony, as our paris correspondent, lucy williamson, reports. idealist and idol, singer and spy. josephine baker, adored by paris a century ago, was the star of france again today. translation: you are entering our pantheon because you loved - france andrew shown the way. born american, at heart, there is no—one more french than you. as the symbolic coffin made its way towards the pantheon, baker�*s journey from poverty and segregation in america was retold — how she used her celebrity here in paris to campaign
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against racism and pass messages for the french resistance during the second world war. this is one of the greatest honours france can bestow, a seat in the resting place of its national heroes. josephine baker is the first black woman to be honoured here, a member of france�*s wartime resistance movement and a lifelong campaigner against racism. that campaign shaped herfamily as well. baker adopted 12 children from around the world, calling it her rainbow tribe. these children represent an example of real brotherhood. they show to people that it is possible to live together if we so wish to. speaking to us before the ceremony, one of her children said he never thought his mother was cool until he learned mick jagger was a fan. she was very protective, very close to us when she was there, because sometimes she was away.
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and she wanted for us a good education. so sometimes, she could be a little bit strict when we were doing bad things. her symbolic coffin contains handfuls of earth from the four corners of her life — paris, missouri, monaco where she is buried, and the village in france where she raised her children. the pantheon today echoed with her trademark song j�*ai deux amours, a love song to paris, as the city that revered her a century ago claimed herforever as its own. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. josephine baker, recognised among some of the greatest names in france, voltaire, victor lugo, john malan, all of them recognised at the pantheon in paris, quite the tribute
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and quite the celebration today. thank you very much for watching. back same time tomorrow, do join us for that. goodbye. hello there. the temperatures during this weather for the week ahead period look like they�*ll be up and down, chopping and changing all the time. we started this week off on a very cold note, but tuesday was very mild in comparison. but the next few days, the first two days of december, look like they�*ll be colder again, with sunshine and showers, some of these wintry in flavour. now, for wednesday, we�*ve got this area of low pressure, which brought the mild wedge of air to our shores on tuesday, out in the near continent. behind it, we�*ve got a run of cold north—north—westerly winds. it�*s arctic air spreading its way southwards. so it�*s going to be a chillier day for the 1st of december, but there will be quite a bit of sunshine around, more, certainly, than what we had on tuesday. there�*ll be sunshine and showers across the north of the country, wintry in flavour. for england and wales, that weather front will be enhancing the showers,
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so here we could see longer spells of rain. some areas could be quite wet through the afternoon. just about double figures in the south, otherwise it�*s a colder day for most, two to eight degrees. now, as we head on into thursday, that weather front slips southwards. the cold air is right across the uk, arctic air, you can see here, from the deep blues. but it won�*t last, because we�*ve got another wedge of milder air trying to work its way in from the atlantic. but thursday�*s going to be a cold day. it could start frosty, a little bit of ice around. most of the showers, i think, will be across eastern areas, again wintry in flavour, because further west we�*ve got that ridge of high pressure, which will kill off the showers. so a lot of dry weather around. despite the brightness, it�*s going to be a cold day, and then out west we�*ll start to see the clouds thickening ahead of this next frontal system, which will spread its way south—eastwards into thursday night into friday. we could see a little bit of snow on its leading edge as it bumps into the cold air. but you can see that wedge of milder air affecting mainly the southern half of the country, so although it�*ll be quite cloudy and wet for england
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and wales to start with, it will feel noticeably milder. i think into the afternoon, as that clears away, it�*ll tend to brighten up with some good spells of sunshine. but the mild air holds on across the far south later on friday. tens and twelves here, otherwise it�*s single digits for most, a bit closer to the seasonal norm, if you like. then, as we move out of friday into the start of the weekend, a deeper area of low pressure�*s expected to move in. a little bit of a way off at the moment, but at this stage it looks like it could be southern and western parts of the country which will see the windiest of the weather. we could see a spell of gales and some heavy rain, too, followed by sunshine and showers. and it will be turning colder again, with temperatures across the board into single digits. at this stage, it looks like that area of low pressure clears away. a ridge of high pressure wants to build into part two of the coming weekend, so i probably think sunday is looking like being the better, the drier and brighter day of the two. we could still see a few showers around coastal areas, but the winds will be lighter, and we should see a good
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deal of sunshine around. but it�*s going to be a chilly day, especially across northern areas, temperatures of four to maybe eight degrees across the south. then, as we head into next week, the following week, it looks like the jet stream�*s going to power up and deliver some very deep areas of low pressure to our shore. some uncertainty to this. you�*ll have to stay tuned to the forecast. but at this stage it looks like we could see some very unsettled weather into next week, which could deliver some wet and very windy weather at times. we could see gales or even severe gales in places. and temperature—wise, generally around the seasonal norm, with milder spells interspersed with brief cold interludes. stay tuned to the weather. bye for now.
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tonight at ten, every adult in england is to be offered a booster vaccination by the end of january. faced with the uncertainty posed by omicron, the new coronavirus variant, the booster programme is to be scaled up significantly. today our position is, and always will be, immeasurably better than it was a year ago.
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what we�*re doing is taking some proportionate precautionary measures

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