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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  November 30, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. officials believe the new covid—19 variant was in europe earlier than thought. test samples show cases of omicron in the netherlands 11 days ago — that's before the variant was first reported by south africa. there are 220 omicron cases in 20 countries, including the uk, which has set a two—month target to give boosters jabs to adults. it's time for another great british vaccination effort. we've done it before, and we're going to do it again. and let's not give this virus a second chance. it's time for another great british vaccination effort.
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also in the programme: we report from yemen as the war reaches a turning point. houthi rebels are gaining ground in the seven—year conflict — a war that's caused shocking levels of suffering and forced many into makeshift desert camps. the people here are suffering because of the fault lines that run right through the middle east. and barbados has spent its first day as a republic with a president — not the queen as its head of state. we'll be live from the capital. there's evidence the omicron variant of covid was present in europe days before international travel restrictions were introduced — and before it was first reported by south africa. a lot to show you on the pandemic. let's start with bbc health correspondent laura foster. we had thought that the first cases
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came to the netherlands over the weekend, but it now transpires that there were two test samples between the 19th and the 23rd. why am i telling you those dates? that's because south africa reported its findings, which started this omicron thing off, on the 24th. so, should you be alarmed that cases were actually in the netherlands before south africa said anything? well, no, actually, the world health organisation says they found the first in a specimen collected on the 9th of november. so, although we only heard about this the other week, it's actually been around for longer. early evidence suggests omicron is more transmissible than many forms of covid. and there are questions about how vaccines will cope with it. moderna makes one of the most used vaccines. its chief executive has told the ft... he goes on...
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european stock markets fell 1.5% off the back of that, a measure of the questions and doubts omicron is raising. but there's not scientific unanimity on this variant. here's one leading immunologist. i do strongly recommend that people get vaccinated and, if they are eligible, that they get boosted. we are still dealing primarily with the delta variant. we don't know whether or not omicron will take off in the rest of the world. but if it does, chances are that the vaccines will still be effective against it — the vaccines have been effective against all the variants so far for the most part. this one looks like it could be a larger problem for vaccines than any of the other previous variants, and that is based on the mutations that are found in the spike protein of this variant. but there is still a very good
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chance of the vaccines will be cross protective to some extent — probably with some reduced efficacy, but hopefully with still a fairly good efficacy, especially against severe illness and death. but we just have to wait and see. it'll take 2—3 weeks to get any of the answers, and multiple people are rushing to get answers to those questions. as well as looking at how effective the vaccines are with omicron, vaccine makers are also saying they could update the vaccines to deal with it if need be. moderna says a reformulated vaccine could be ready by "early 2022". pfizer says a new version could be rolled out "within 100 days". oxford university, wich developed the astrazeneca vaccine, says it can "rapidly" update its jab, but hasn't put a date on that. as laura foster was saying just now — health officials in the netherlands have found omicron in samples taken before the variant was first
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reported by south africa. let's get more on that, from anna holligan. omicron was first identified in the netherlands on the 19—23rd of november. this was confirmed by the dutch public institute today. they noticed an abnormality in the spiked proteins, they went for further testing — and that's when omicron was identified. but you know, it's not perhaps entirely surprising that places are starting to identify cases of omicron from before south africa's identification. because of course, they are conducting additional tests and pcr samples. and it's being found all across the world, including community transmission that we are seeing in scotland means it probably existed prior to last week certainly. and
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maybe we will know never —— never know exactly when or how it first emerged. know exactly when or how it first emer: ed. �* ., know exactly when or how it first emerued. �* ., .,, , emerged. and how was his new briefin: emerged. and how was his new briefing impacting _ emerged. and how was his new briefing impacting on _ emerged. and how was his new briefing impacting on how- emerged. and how was his new briefing impacting on how the l briefing impacting on how the netherlands is more probably seeking to contain covid as we head into the winter? it to contain covid as we head into the winter? , , . ., . ., winter? it is such a challenge here. the new restrictions _ winter? it is such a challenge here. the new restrictions have _ winter? it is such a challenge here. the new restrictions have come - winter? it is such a challenge here. | the new restrictions have come into place, everywhere is basically closed from 5pm until 5am apart from supermarkets. everyone is encouraged to work from home and not go out as much is much as possible. the cases have started to stabilise, but hospital admissions are still going up, so it's a real concern. the uk government announced on monday it'll be accelerating its vaccine programme. the prime minister gave us a further update today. the target that we've set ourselves is to offer a booster to everyone eligible by the end of january. and, as with the firstjabs, we will be working through people by age group, going down in five—year bands, because it is vital that the older
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and more clinically vulnerable get that added protection first. as well as boosters, there are new covid measures coming into force in the uk today. our transport correspondent katy austin has more. they are a familiar sight and, once again, passengers must wear face coverings on public transport in england or risk a fine unless they are exempt. the rule applies in shops too. i think you do it out of respect and dignity to others. an overreaction, basically. doesn't make me or anybody else safer. this brings england in line with scotland, wales, and northern ireland, where masks are already mandatory on public transport and in many indoor areas. also landing today, the requirement for all international travellers to pay for a pcr test within 48 hours of coming into the uk and self—isolate until they get a negative result. for this couple who have just arrived from spain, it's a race against time. it means everything to me,
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because it is my son's wedding. if i'm not there, he will be heartbroken. he's not going to get married again and he has been planning it for years. so you have taken a pcr test and you have to wait for the results? yeah, wait for the results by iopm tomorrow night. we should be ok. hopefully, they will be back in time. previously, a cheaper, quicker lateral flow test was enough. this is one of the drive—in sites where people can come and have their pre—booked covid pcr tests done. and over the past couple of days, the company which runs the space has been converting lots of bookings for antique and lateral flow tests into the pcr that people now need. —— antigen. they can't currently offer an option that gives a result in just three hours because, with the new variant around, the test standard has been raised. the government have set very exacting standards for day two in terms of specificity and sensitivity, which is wholly appropriate. we are looking to modify our rapid tests so that we are able to do a rapid pcr on day two.
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this will take a few days to sort out. one airline to some customers are choosing to postpone imminent holidays. i think that isjust because people are taking the opportunity to perhaps rebook next year, but it is too early to tell if this will stabilise. it is not the same drop—off in the bookings we have seen from previous times when restrictions have been introduced. business travellers ramping up again. the new rules could change that. i myself have travelled a few times recently. people have been coming here, we have seen already, either because people don't want to have to quarantine for a couple of days for shorter trips. and longer trips, it has thrown a degree of uncertainty not dust over changes in the uk but changes in the home markets as well. much uncertainty still surrounds the omicron variant. for now, whether you are taking the bus, train or plane, caution is the direction of travel.
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katy austin, bbc news. in yemen, the seven—year long war between houthi rebels and the government may be at a turning point. houthi forces have been pushing hard to capture the city of marib. it's the last stronghold of the internationally recognised government and is at the center of yemen's oilfields. saudi arabia, backed by the us and uk, intervened in yemen in 2015 after the houthis ousted the government from the capital, sanaa. since then, yemen has been gripped by the world's worst humanitarian crisis. all sides of the conflict have been accused of killing civilians and other abuses. at least 800,000 people displaced by the war have fled to marib. our middle east editorjeremy bowen has managed to reach it.
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this is his report. the plains outside marib are not much a refuge. but it's all there is for more than 16,000 people who have fled the houthi offensive in the last three months. at this camp, the newest arrivals are in flimsy tents with little food and salty water. children don't have schools. in the desert, the nights are cold. they've lost almost everything — except enough trauma to lost stomach at last a lifetime. between them, these two women have fled the fighting with their families 11 times in four years. this woman says her six children freeze in their ripped tent.
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so, she was wounded? this woman's daughter was badly hurt in a houthi attack. her two—month—old son was killed. these are pictures of dead people. she gets them to draw theirfrightening memories. they blame the houthis. mostly women and children are in the camps — the men, the un says, are dead orfighting. what lies beneath all this is the war. war kills people, war makes people move. war creates the crisis — and the way this war ends is not in the hands of the yemenis,
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because big, regional powers have intervened. the people here are suffering because of the fault lines that run right through the middle east. government soldiers took us to the front line. marib has become the key battlefield of the war — but it's about more than yemenis fighting for strategic, oil—rich territories. the houthis, the other side, started a push at the beginning of the year around here. it's really intensified since about september. these were government forces later that evening. they are backed by saudi arabia, who hoped for a quick victory when they intervened in 2015. and now, they can't find a way out. they're shooting at houthi fighters who believe they are winning, despite losing almost 15,000 dead sincejune.
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their big ally is iran. the strategic divide between the salaries and iranians, and their allies that runs through this family continues to cross the middle east. —— saudis and iranians. these government soldiers have been pushed back by the houthis — their commander says that doesn't mean they're losing. but at marib hospital, the pain inflicted by the houthi offensive is clear in the operating theatres in the wards. most of the patients i saw were wounded government soldiers. this is the most important part of the whole procedure.
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absolutely. a team of british surgeons from manchester is here, bringing expertise and equipment the hospitaljust doesn't have. there's a lot of doctors, and the local doctors are exhausted. they're doing long shifts, and the injuries are getting quite complex. so they are providing the minimum treatment with the basic equipment they have. as soon as they are fit again, these men will be rushed back to fight the houthi advance. the grinding battle for marib is being watched closely by influential yemeni tribes. they will make a deal with the winners. and among the wounded, some defiance. you will fight again after all? yes! but you've got one arm?
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the war pushes into every life. marib, a city of more than two million, has two malnutrition centres, each with 11 beds. two others were in areas captured by the houthis. of every 100 children, ten have malnutrition — and of those ten, two our severely malnourished. this baby, six months old, weighs 2.5 kilos — less than many newborns. in ten days of treatment, she's gained 100g. this is what war does. it destroys lives. notjust babies — for everyone. jeremy bowen, bbc news, marib. and we'll be hearing from jeremy bowen more about his reporting in yemen,
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later on the programme. what a day for barbados — it's the world's newest republic — with it, a new president as head of state. barbados is in the south of the caribbean, its population is just below 300,000 — and it became independent from britain in 1966. now, 55 years on, it is a republic. queen elizabeth is no longer head of state. this ceremony in the capital bridgetown marked the moment. at midnight, a final salute was made to the british monarchy, and the royal standard flag was lowered and replaced. then barbados welcomed its first—ever president, dame sandra mason. i, sandra prunella mason, do swear that i will be faithful and bear true allegiance to barbados according to law, so help me god.
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the ceremony marks the beginning of a new era for barbados. daniela relph was at the ceremony. some of this country's most well—known names were among the vip guests attending the transition ceremony. rise! generals, salute! and also here to watch it all play out, the prince of wales — invited to see his mother removed as the head of state, the first time that has happened anywhere in 30 years. for the final time on this caribbean island, he viewed a military march past and took the final salute. and then, the symbolic moment of transition. as the royal standard was lowered over barbados, it became a republic. bell tolls it's hard to imagine that this event wasn't tinged with some sadness for the prince of wales. he's focused on the enduring
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friendship between two nations, and also spoken directly about the pain of a shared history. from the darkest days of our past and the appalling atrocity of slavery, which forever stains our history, the people of this island forged their path with extraordinary fortitude. emancipation, self—government, and independence were your waypoints. freedom, justice, and self—determination have been your guides. an acknowledgement of the past as this island looked forward. that was bridgetown overnight. and this was earlier — president sandra mason swore in the new government. also present was the singer rhianna, who has been honoured as a national hero. barbadians are proud people, y'know?
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we are probably the proudest people i know. and, no matter where i go in the world, i take that pride with me. no matter where we go, the world will know that we're basian to the bone. i'll be a basian �*till the day i die. this is still the only place i've ever called home. barbados is one of the most prosperous and populated carribean islands. and its connection to britain can be traced back to 1627, when settlers first arrived. over 330 years later, in 1966, the queen travelled to bridgetown to mark barbados' independence — but the queen remained as head of state. then in 2020, barbados announced it would sever its british ties. sandra mason, who was then governor general, was unequivocal, saying, "the time has come to fully leave our colonial past behind" and that "barbadians want a barbadian head of state". and now it has one. the journalist daniel henry
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describes what this change means. i think it can be difficult for people who maybe haven't been to barbados before to appreciate how many parts of the island look and feel british — we are talking about red letterboxes, people driving on the same side of the road, on the road, we are talking about school names, hospital names. i remember there being this very, very long street where you'd look left and right, and almost every street seemed to be named after a previous royal. barbados was one of england's first slave colonies. between 1627 and 1807, approximately 387,000 enslaved africans were sent to the island. in the guardian this week, the barbadian historian prof hilary beckles describes how the island was "most ruthlessly colonised by britain's ruling elites." he goes on... "they made their fortunes from sugar produced by an enslaved, "disposable" workforce, and this great wealth
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secured britain's place as an imperial superpower and caused untold suffering." in 183a, slavery was abolished — but its legacy remains. kareem smith is a journalist with barbados today. on one level, of course, we have the historical account of colonialism — which, for us in barbados, was a time of numerous atrocities that included slavery, included an indentured period — and the history books really have not written our time, the majority of it certainly spent under the british monarchy in a very positive light. and so, i think that the move towards a republic will have encapsulated where we would like to go as a people. before barbados, the last nation to remove the queen as head of state was mauritius in 1992. and, like mauritius, barbados will remain in the commonwealth — which is a loose association of britain, its former colonies
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and some current dependencies. celestina olulode is in bridgetown. thank you very much forjoining us on this momentous day for barbados. i wonder what level of support there is in the country for this decision? well, welcome to the world's newest republic. in terms of support, lots of people say that they've back to this move. lots of barbadian tsar in full support of this. however, there is concerns about how this has happened. some barbadians said they wanted a referendum on this issue, because this is a key moment in their history and they wanted a say in how all of this happened. at the same time, some people have said we are in a pandemic, now is not the time for this to happen. but
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overall, the majority of barbadians i've spoken to have said yes, the idea of leaving the colonial past behind does really resonate with them. ~ . behind does really resonate with themr ., ., ,, , behind does really resonate with them. ~ ., ., , , , behind does really resonate with them. ~ ., ., ,, , ~ behind does really resonate with them. ~ ., ., ,, , . ., them. what happens next? we have... what else will — them. what happens next? we have... what else will follow? _ them. what happens next? we have... what else will follow? let's _ them. what happens next? we have... what else will follow? let's be - what else will follow? let's be clear, what else will follow? let's be clear. when — what else will follow? let's be clear, when barbadian - what else will follow? let's be clear, when barbadian spoke l what else will follow? let's be | clear, when barbadian spoke up what else will follow? let's be - clear, when barbadian spoke up this morning, it's not as if something big changed in their everyday life. this is all about the way this nation sees itself moving forward. i met the prime minister last week, and she said look, we've had 396 years under a british monarch system. so it's time to move on. in terms of what will change, symbols, things like a national honour system
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— you heard there about rihanna being honoured as a national hero, you'll see more of that because the british honour system is no more in this country. and then, name changes — we now have the barbados police service instead of the royal barbados police force. so these are just small changes, but they are significant to some people who say that the way this country needs to look at itself and projected onto a global stage needs to change. thank ou ve global stage needs to change. thank you very much _ global stage needs to change. thank you very much indeed. _ global stage needs to change. thank you very much indeed. usually - you very much indeed. usually symbolic moments in barbados. and practical moments, as well —— hugely symbolic. you can also get coverage on that story through the bbc news app. in the second half of outside source, we will turn back to the conflict in
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yemen. we will be hearing from jeremy bowen about the practicalities of getting into the country and reporting on what's happened. hello there. it was noticeably milder today across the board compared to what we've had the last couple of days, but it's set to change once again. as we move through tonight, a spell of wet and windy weather will spread across the uk, and that will introduce colder air again from the north or the north—west. so, it will be colder for the first few days of december. here's this area of low pressure spreading southwards. some warm air wrapped into it, or mild i should say. but that will clear away, and you'll notice the blue colours beginning to invade behind the system as it pushes its way south—eastwards. now, some pretty heavy rain on this low pressure as it spreads south—eastwards. that'll be followed by blustery showers and clear spells, these turning increasingly wintry certainly over the hills across scotland. it will be windy pretty much everywhere, but especially across some western coasts, where it will be touching gale—force, particularly in exposure.
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temperature—wise, not particularly cold in the south, but not as mild as what it was the previous night. so, for wednesday, then, the 1st of december, the last of the mild air clears away from the south east through the morning. you'll notice the blue colours invading. it is going to feel chillier throughout the day, but there will be a bit more sunshine around, which will be a bonus. but plenty of showers around, these wintry over northern hills, even down to lower levels in places. and they'll form to merge bands across parts of england and wales, so some areas could be quite wet throughout the afternoon. temperatures—wise, 3—9 celsius in the south. as we head through wednesday night, it stays showery, temperatures tumble under the clear skies here, so we could see a touch of frost, maybe some ice around. but there'll be further showers across northern and eastern coasts, and these will be of a wintry flavour. certainly it'll still be quite breezy, especially close to the coast. and those temperatures colder than what we've had the last couple of nights, 3—5 celsius, but even cooler than that in some sheltered rural locations. thursday's, then, a chilly day,
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but we do have this ridge of high pressure trying to push in. so, that will slowly kill off the showers, particularly across southern and western areas. most of the showers, i think, will be across more northern and eastern areas, and again they will be quite wintry in nature. thicker cloud develops, though, across the west as a new weather front begins to make inroads later in the day. and those temperatures, 3—8 celsius, temperatures coming up a little bit across the west. and that marks a change for friday. again it turns a bit milder for a time throughout friday, but with that comes more rain.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. officials believe the new covid—19 variant was in europe earlier than thought. test samples show cases of omicron in the netherlands 11 days ago. that's before the variant was first reported by south africa. there are 220 omicron cases in 20 countries, including the uk, which has set a two—month target to give boosters jabs to adults. it's time for another great british vaccination effort. we've done it before, and we're going to do it again. and let's not give this virus a second chance. also in the programme, we report from yemen. houthi rebels are gaining ground
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in the seven—year conflict, a conflict that's caused shocking levels of suffering and forced many into makeshift desert camps. the people here are suffering because of the fault lines that run right through the middle east. and the head of britain's secret intelligence service mi6, a man who goes by the name of "",c has given a rare interview. we'll bring you the highlights. here in the uk, the head of britain's secret intelligence service, mi6, made a rare public appearance. richard moore goes by the pseudonym "c" and spoke exclusively to the bbc before giving his first major public speech. here he is explaining why he's gone public. we have moved on a bit, and i think in a modern democracy
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it is important that i, from time to time, judiciously, come and share some thoughts on what my service does, the sort of challenges that we face and indeed how we're going to need to change to meet those challenges. you heard the mention of challenges there. three in particular were a focus — china, russia and the rate of technological change. let's start with china. it has tried to harvest data from around the world. and it's also tried to use influence through its economic policies to try and sometimes, i think, get people on the hook. you know, i talk about data traps and debt traps in this space. debt traps and data traps we heard about there. as mr moore said, debt traps are when a country may try to assert influence via the debt that's owed to you. one possible example was feaured in the the times as it reported today's interview. it reports that...
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and then here's mr moore's explaining what data traps are. if you allow another country to gain access to really critical data about your society, over time, that will erode your sovereignty. you no longer have control over that data. harvesting data is a practice which is farfrom unique to china, and some also argue china is within its rights to put its security needs first. on that, here's vladimir putin today. translation: china probably has the right to build up its security i in a way that provides safety to such a large country. so, who would say no to it? and it's natural that with the growth of economic potential, military power also grows. and mr putin's comments lead us onto the next threat richard moore identified, russia. the current difficult relationship with russia is not
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the one the uk wants, but we will do whatever it takes to keep our country safe and to deter and defend against the full syndrome of threats moscow poses. and this sentiment is shared by other countries, poland being one. the bbc�*s katya adler has spoken exclusively to its prime minister about russia. there is a threat on ukraine, - military build—up around ukraine, pressure through all- the energy—related channels, in particular gas prices and oil. and then, russia is very good at propaganda. - they are trying to put enormous pressure on the european union to disintegrate, to disunite all of us _ the prime minister spoke there about the threat to ukraine. in recent weeks, we've reported on russian troops movements. here's a recent satellite image showing russian forces around 300 kilometres from the ukrainian border.
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according to the bbc�*s sarah rainsford, that's "prompted fresh, even starker warnings from us intelligence circles that a cross—border offensive could be on the cards. moscow insists these us warnings are 'anti—russian�* hysteria." however you want to describe it, it was top of the agenda at a meeting of the defence alliance nato in latvia today. here's nato's secretary—general. today, we will address the build—up of russian forces close to ukraine's borders. we'll call on russia to be transparent, reduce tensions and de—escalate. let's now turn to the third threat identified by richard moore, the pace of technological change. in september, it was revealed that inside the m16 headquarters in london, there is a real—life q section. that's right. just as injames bond films, this areas provides britain's spies with the latest gadgets. but mr moore admitted that mastering modern technology
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is something his service can't manage on in its own. here he is again. to stay secret, we're going to have to become more open. my mission as chief is to ensure the successful transformation and modernisation of our organisation. and meeting the technological challenge head—on by opening up to an unprecedented degree to partners who can help us master the technologies we need for our operations. a "sea change" is what mr moore called this new way of working. and there are some people who are concerned that collaborations outside the security services may present problems. here's our security correspondent frank gardner. this is somebody whose name until he took over was secret, | it was classified secret. he joined mi6 back in 1987 at a time when we didn't. i have the internet or phones or, | you know, mobile phones rather,
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and in a completely different era. and what's he saying now is that there is this - incredible technological _ race going on where not only does mi6 risk getting left behind if they're not careful, - but the country's national security would be at risk if we're not - i keeping up in the vanguard of alll these technological achievements. and what he's talking - about here is things like ai, artificial intelligence, - machine learning, quantum synthetic biology, manipulated biological. _ gene manipulation, things like that. stuff which he says britain's adversaries are doing. - they're pouring billions into it, and by adversaries he means l specifically russia and china. and if we don't, we being him| and m16, he said, if they don't partner up with technological companies outside _ the intelligent space, - they're going to get left behind and it'll be impossible for them to do theirjobs. _ so, i have to say that, you know, although this is, ok, _ | i get that they have to do this| in order not to get left behind, but there is an inherent risk in this for them. i because if they start going more
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open, as he's saying they're - going to have to do, - that's a fantastic opportunity potentially for britain's _ adversaries to get in there and try and steal those secrets - through blackmail, through data leaks, through subversion one way or another. _ so, it's quite a bold move, - but one that he says they've got to do or else they're _ going to become an anachronism. let's return to yemen, where the war between houthi rebels and the government could be at a turning point. earlier, we showed you a report our middle east editorjeremy bowen sent from the city of marib, where houthi forces are closing in. marib is the last stronghold of yemen's internationally—recognised government. i spoke tojeremy about how he managed to reach the city. well, marib, where i went, is very hard to reach. it's remote, it's in the desert. i was able to get permission
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to cross the border from saudi arabia, and then it's a five—hour drive down a desert road before you get there. and actually, one of the things the houthis would like to do is to cut that road and further isolate marib. and you mentioned that you crossed the borderfrom saudi arabia. how do the saudis view the pressure that this city is now coming underfrom the rebels? well, they are bombing the houthi rebels from the air with their very powerful air force that they've got some of the latest british and american warplanes. and they have inflicted, according to the houthis themselves, 1a,700 of theirfighters have been killed fighting around the city sincejune. so, that is one heck of a death rate. and so, at the moment, it really is the heart of the war because if the internationally—recognised
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government do lose there to the houthis, if there's either an agreement or a military defeat, it will be the end of the government's final stronghold in the north of yemen. in terms of that government, jeremy, does it have its own military force, or is it entirely reliant on the saudis? no, there is an army, there's a government of the yemen army. and i spoke extensively to some of their officers and commanders, from the minister of defence, who's a general down, and they say they're fighting for their country, fighting against the houthis. i spoke to wounded men in hospital who said they were raring to get out there and fight again, including one man who'd lost his arm. and in terms of the conflict finding some form of resolution, we've often talked on outside source with you about the conflict
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in syria, which had for a long time looked to be well away from any conclusive resolution one way or the other. can the same be said for yemen at the moment? afraid so. for yemen at the moment? there is a school of thought that, if the houthis did, either by an agreement or some kind of military breakthrough, take the city of marib, then they may be more inclined to talk and there may be something to talk about. and there is a un envoy who works very hard on all of this stuff. however, you know, it is my impression from having looked at these situations many times over the years that diplomacy tends to work when either there is some very powerful force that is motivated, a big country, to bash heads or when all sides are so exhausted and debilitated and drained that they are ready to make a deal. and neither of those factors applies in yemen at the moment. and you were mentioning the saudis�* ongoing support for the government.
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:et�*s talk about the other side of the equation and iran's relationship with the houthis. do the iranian authorities still have an appetite to support the rebels? yeah, they seem to. it's an alliance, really, i think that's the best way to understand it. the saudis would say that the houthis are the tools of tehran, that they will do as they're told. i don't think so. i think if tehran issued them an order and they didn't like it, i don't think tehran is issuing them those orders, i don't think the houthis would obey. they're quite independently—minded. but it is an alliance that suits both of them to see saudi arabia caught in what, for the saudi is, is a very difficult situation. back in 2015, prince mohammed bin salman, the crown prince, mbs as he's known, went into yemen expecting a quick victory, and he hasn't got it. it's become an episode which has done the saudis great discredit. they've killed civilians
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in their air strikes, used sophisticated weaponry against defenseless civilian areas. so, i think they liked to get out if they had a way of getting out, and at the moment, they don't, they're stuck. the french far—right commentator eric zemmour has announced that he's running in next year's presidential election. we had a good idea this was coming. and it means there are now two far—right challengers to emmanuel macron, the other being marine le pen. here's mr zemmour announcing his campaign today. translation: it is no i longer the time to reform france, but to save it. this is why i have decided to run for president, so that our children and our grandchildren do not know barbarism, so that our daughters are not and our sons are not submissive, so that we can pass on to them the france we used to know and have received from oui’ ancestors.
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so, who is eric zemmour? he's a long—time conservative writer and tv host who's been nicknamed "the french trump". though there are some important differences between the two men. he's critical of both islam and immigration. he's been convicted twice for inciting hatred, and he's the son of algerianjewish parents who migrated to france. opinion polls showed support for eric zemmour surging in september and october, but this is the latest poll — emmanuel macron at 25%, marine le pen 20%, eric zemmour with 15. down on a few weeks back, but still in contention. here's one right—wing mp reacting to mr zemmour�*s candidacy. translation: the least we can say i is that there was zero suspense. l there is no plan, no self—control and no team. eric zemmour will now have to show us that he is capable of being a serious presidential candidate and not just a stooge
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for emmanuel macron by bashing marine le pen from morning to night. hugh schofield is our paris correspondent. good to see you. is he a contender? difficult to say. when he first was mooted _ difficult to say. when he first was mooted as — difficult to say. when he first was mooted as a _ difficult to say. when he first was mooted as a contender— difficult to say. when he first was mooted as a contender about - difficult to say. when he first was i mooted as a contender about three difficult to say. when he first was - mooted as a contender about three or four months— mooted as a contender about three or four months ago — mooted as a contender about three or four months ago i_ mooted as a contender about three or four months ago i said _ mooted as a contender about three or four months ago i said this— mooted as a contender about three or four months ago i said this is- four months ago i said this is ridiculous _ four months ago i said this is ridiculous. the _ four months ago i said this is ridiculous. the man- four months ago i said this is ridiculous. the man is- four months ago i said this is ridiculous. the man is an - ridiculous. the man is an intellectual— ridiculous. the man is an intellectual and - ridiculous. the man is an intellectual and had - ridiculous. the man is an intellectual and had with | ridiculous. the man is an . intellectual and had with no political _ intellectual and had with no political charisma _ intellectual and had with no i political charisma whatsoever intellectual and had with no - political charisma whatsoever and he is inconceivable _ political charisma whatsoever and he is inconceivable that _ political charisma whatsoever and he is inconceivable that he _ political charisma whatsoever and he is inconceivable that he would - political charisma whatsoever and he is inconceivable that he would end i is inconceivable that he would end ”p is inconceivable that he would end up as— is inconceivable that he would end up as president _ is inconceivable that he would end up as president. but _ is inconceivable that he would end up as president. but then - is inconceivable that he would end up as president. but then he i is inconceivable that he would end. up as president. but then he hinted for three _ up as president. but then he hinted for three months, _ up as president. but then he hinted forthree months, it— up as president. but then he hinted for three months, it was _ up as president. but then he hinted for three months, it was kind - up as president. but then he hinted for three months, it was kind of- up as president. but then he hinted for three months, it was kind of a i for three months, it was kind of a preannouncement _ for three months, it was kind of a preannouncement phase - for three months, it was kind of a preannouncement phase of- for three months, it was kind of a preannouncement phase of him i preannouncement phase of him obviously— preannouncement phase of him obviously was _ preannouncement phase of him obviously was going _ preannouncement phase of him obviously was going to - preannouncement phase of him i obviously was going to announce, preannouncement phase of him - obviously was going to announce, and during _ obviously was going to announce, and during that _ obviously was going to announce, and during that period _ obviously was going to announce, and during that period as _ obviously was going to announce, and during that period as you _ obviously was going to announce, and during that period as you say- obviously was going to announce, and during that period as you say his i during that period as you say his poll ratings _ during that period as you say his poll ratings shot _ during that period as you say his poll ratings shot up. _ during that period as you say his poll ratings shot up. now- during that period as you say his poll ratings shot up. now there i during that period as you say his i poll ratings shot up. now there are those _ poll ratings shot up. now there are those inclined _ poll ratings shot up. now there are those inclined to _ poll ratings shot up. now there are those inclined to believe _ poll ratings shot up. now there are those inclined to believe that - poll ratings shot up. now there are those inclined to believe that the i those inclined to believe that the bubble _ those inclined to believe that the bubble has— those inclined to believe that the bubble has maybe _ those inclined to believe that the bubble has maybe burst- those inclined to believe that the bubble has maybe burst and i those inclined to believe that the bubble has maybe burst and it i those inclined to believe that the i bubble has maybe burst and it was all really— bubble has maybe burst and it was all really a — bubble has maybe burst and it was all really a kind _ bubble has maybe burst and it was all really a kind of— bubble has maybe burst and it was all really a kind of the _ bubble has maybe burst and it was all really a kind of the effect - bubble has maybe burst and it was all really a kind of the effect of- all really a kind of the effect of smoke — all really a kind of the effect of smoke and _
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all really a kind of the effect of smoke and mirrors _ all really a kind of the effect of smoke and mirrors and - all really a kind of the effect of smoke and mirrors and will. all really a kind of the effect of| smoke and mirrors and will not all really a kind of the effect of. smoke and mirrors and will not be able to— smoke and mirrors and will not be able to sustain _ smoke and mirrors and will not be able to sustain itself, _ smoke and mirrors and will not be able to sustain itself, this- smoke and mirrors and will not be able to sustain itself, this free i able to sustain itself, this free campaign _ able to sustain itself, this free campaign as— able to sustain itself, this free campaign as long _ able to sustain itself, this free campaign as long as— able to sustain itself, this free campaign as long as he - able to sustain itself, this free campaign as long as he was. able to sustain itself, this free i campaign as long as he was not actually— campaign as long as he was not actually a — campaign as long as he was not actually a candidate _ campaign as long as he was not actually a candidate and - campaign as long as he was not actually a candidate and now i campaign as long as he was not actually a candidate and now iti campaign as long as he was not. actually a candidate and now it all comes— actually a candidate and now it all comes fizzling _ actually a candidate and now it all comes fizzling down. _ actually a candidate and now it all comes fizzling down. that's - actually a candidate and now it all comes fizzling down. that's quite| comes fizzling down. that's quite possible — comes fizzling down. that's quite possible he— comes fizzling down. that's quite possible. he has— comes fizzling down. that's quite possible. he has got— comes fizzling down. that's quite possible. he has got an - comes fizzling down. that's quite possible. he has got an awful- comes fizzling down. that's quite possible. he has got an awful lot| comes fizzling down. that's quite i possible. he has got an awful lot of handicaps _ possible. he has got an awful lot of handicaps still, _ possible. he has got an awful lot of handicaps still, not _ possible. he has got an awful lot of handicaps still, not least _ possible. he has got an awful lot of handicaps still, not least i - possible. he has got an awful lot of handicaps still, not least i think- handicaps still, not least i think he is _ handicaps still, not least i think he is the — handicaps still, not least i think he is the most _ handicaps still, not least i think he is the most un—charismaticl he is the most un—charismatic personality~ _ he is the most un—charismatic personality. but _ he is the most un—charismatic personality. but we _ he is the most un—charismatic personality. but we live - he is the most un—charismatic personality. but we live in- he is the most un—charismaticl personality. but we live in very strange — personality. but we live in very strange times, _ personality. but we live in very strange times, and _ personality. but we live in very strange times, and what- personality. but we live in very strange times, and what he i personality. but we live in very strange times, and what he isl personality. but we live in very i strange times, and what he is very good _ strange times, and what he is very good at _ strange times, and what he is very good at is — strange times, and what he is very good at is being _ strange times, and what he is very good at is being consistent, - strange times, and what he is very good at is being consistent, beingi good at is being consistent, being authentic. — good at is being consistent, being authentic, being _ good at is being consistent, being authentic, being true _ good at is being consistent, being authentic, being true to— good at is being consistent, being authentic, being true to his - good at is being consistent, beingl authentic, being true to his vision. as a _ authentic, being true to his vision. as a debater, _ authentic, being true to his vision. as a debater, he _ authentic, being true to his vision. as a debater, he is _ authentic, being true to his vision. as a debater, he is really- authentic, being true to his vision. as a debater, he is really quite i as a debater, he is really quite formidable _ as a debater, he is really quite formidable. and _ as a debater, he is really quite formidable. and he _ as a debater, he is really quite formidable. and he has - as a debater, he is really quite formidable. and he has got i as a debater, he is really quite| formidable. and he has got the as a debater, he is really quite i formidable. and he has got the kind of interior— formidable. and he has got the kind of interior mindset, _ formidable. and he has got the kind of interior mindset, his— formidable. and he has got the kind of interior mindset, his view- formidable. and he has got the kind of interior mindset, his view of- formidable. and he has got the kind of interior mindset, his view of the. of interior mindset, his view of the world _ of interior mindset, his view of the world is— of interior mindset, his view of the world is entirely _ of interior mindset, his view of the world is entirely consistent. - world is entirely consistent. whenever— world is entirely consistent. whenever anyone _ world is entirely consistent. whenever anyone throws i world is entirely consistent. whenever anyone throws at j world is entirely consistent. i whenever anyone throws at him, world is entirely consistent. - whenever anyone throws at him, he has got _ whenever anyone throws at him, he has got an— whenever anyone throws at him, he has got an answer— whenever anyone throws at him, he has got an answer and _ whenever anyone throws at him, he has got an answer and that - whenever anyone throws at him, he has got an answer and that makes i whenever anyone throws at him, he i has got an answer and that makes him quite an— has got an answer and that makes him quite an interesting _ has got an answer and that makes him quite an interesting personality- has got an answer and that makes him quite an interesting personality for- quite an interesting personality for a lot people — quite an interesting personality for a lot people on _ quite an interesting personality for a lot people on the _ quite an interesting personality for a lot people on the right— quite an interesting personality for a lot people on the right and - quite an interesting personality for a lot people on the right and allow| a lot people on the right and allow people _ a lot people on the right and allow people on— a lot people on the right and allow people on the _ a lot people on the right and allow people on the right _ a lot people on the right and allow people on the right are _ a lot people on the right and allow people on the right are plainly- people on the right are plainly entrusted _ people on the right are plainly entrusted to— people on the right are plainly entrusted to him _ people on the right are plainly entrusted to him over- people on the right are plainly entrusted to him over the i people on the right are plainly entrusted to him over the lastj people on the right are plainly- entrusted to him over the last few weeks _ entrusted to him over the last few weeks and — entrusted to him over the last few weeks and the _ entrusted to him over the last few weeks and the couple _ entrusted to him over the last few weeks and the couple of _ entrusted to him over the last few weeks and the couple of months. i weeks and the couple of months. that's_ weeks and the couple of months. that's why— weeks and the couple of months. that's why he _ weeks and the couple of months. that's why he went _ weeks and the couple of months. that's why he went so _ weeks and the couple of months. that's why he went so high. i weeks and the couple of months. that's why he went so high. but. weeks and the couple of months. that's why he went so high. but i suspect— that's why he went so high. but i suspect that _ that's why he went so high. but i suspect that the _ that's why he went so high. but i suspect that the pressure - that's why he went so high. but i suspect that the pressure being i that's why he went so high. but i i suspect that the pressure being the real campaign— suspect that the pressure being the real campaign will— suspect that the pressure being the real campaign will tell— suspect that the pressure being the real campaign will tell that - suspect that the pressure being the real campaign will tell that what i suspect that the pressure being the real campaign will tell that what we have seen— real campaign will tell that what we have seen in— real campaign will tell that what we have seen in the _ real campaign will tell that what we have seen in the last _ real campaign will tell that what we have seen in the last couple - real campaign will tell that what we have seen in the last couple of- have seen in the last couple of weeks — have seen in the last couple of weeks which _ have seen in the last couple of weeks which is _ have seen in the last couple of
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weeks which is him _ have seen in the last couple of weeks which is him telling i have seen in the last couple of weeks which is him telling offi have seen in the last couple of. weeks which is him telling off will continue — weeks which is him telling off will continue and _ weeks which is him telling off will continue and that _ weeks which is him telling off will continue and that he _ weeks which is him telling off will continue and that he won't - weeks which is him telling off will continue and that he won't make i weeks which is him telling off will. continue and that he won't make the grade _ continue and that he won't make the urade. ., ., , , ., . ., grade. you mention his vision. what is it? well, — grade. you mention his vision. what is it? well, his _ grade. you mention his vision. what is it? well, his vision _ grade. you mention his vision. what is it? well, his vision is _ grade. you mention his vision. what is it? well, his vision is one - grade. you mention his vision. what is it? well, his vision is one of- grade. you mention his vision. what is it? well, his vision is one of of. is it? well, his vision is one of of a historian. _ is it? well, his vision is one of of a historian, intellectual, - is it? well, his vision is one of of a historian, intellectual, bookish| a historian, intellectual, bookish figure— a historian, intellectual, bookish figure who— a historian, intellectual, bookish figure who glories _ a historian, intellectual, bookish figure who glories in— a historian, intellectual, bookish figure who glories in france's- a historian, intellectual, bookish. figure who glories in france's past. he has— figure who glories in france's past. he has an — figure who glories in france's past. he has an immense _ figure who glories in france's past. he has an immense knowledge i figure who glories in france's past. he has an immense knowledge of. he has an immense knowledge of french— he has an immense knowledge of french history— he has an immense knowledge of french history and _ he has an immense knowledge of french history and has _ he has an immense knowledge of french history and has an - he has an immense knowledge of. french history and has an immense intellect _ french history and has an immense intellect that — french history and has an immense intellect that is _ french history and has an immense intellect that is very _ french history and has an immense intellect that is very widely- french history and has an immense intellect that is very widely read. i intellect that is very widely read. you will— intellect that is very widely read. you will be — intellect that is very widely read. you will be very— intellect that is very widely read. you will be very hard _ intellect that is very widely read. you will be very hard put - intellect that is very widely read. you will be very hard put to i intellect that is very widely read. you will be very hard put to best| you will be very hard put to best him in _ you will be very hard put to best him in a — you will be very hard put to best him in a debate, _ you will be very hard put to best him in a debate, but _ you will be very hard put to best him in a debate, but the - you will be very hard put to best him in a debate, but the bindingj him in a debate, but the binding criticism — him in a debate, but the binding criticism of— him in a debate, but the binding criticism of him _ him in a debate, but the binding criticism of him is _ him in a debate, but the binding criticism of him is that _ him in a debate, but the binding criticism of him is that he - him in a debate, but the binding criticism of him is that he is- him in a debate, but the binding criticism of him is that he is all. criticism of him is that he is all backward — criticism of him is that he is all backward looking. _ criticism of him is that he is all backward looking. it— criticism of him is that he is all backward looking. it really- criticism of him is that he is all backward looking. it really is. i criticism of him is that he is all. backward looking. it really is. he knows _ backward looking. it really is. he knows he — backward looking. it really is. he knows he napoleon _ backward looking. it really is. he knows he napoleon from - backward looking. it really is. he knows he napoleon from his- backward looking. it really is. he knows he napoleon from his all. backward looking. it really is. he i knows he napoleon from his all the rest of— knows he napoleon from his all the rest of it _ knows he napoleon from his all the rest of it he — knows he napoleon from his all the rest of it. he is— knows he napoleon from his all the rest of it. he is versed _ knows he napoleon from his all the rest of it. he is versed in _ knows he napoleon from his all the rest of it. he is versed in french. rest of it. he is versed in french history— rest of it. he is versed in french history and _ rest of it. he is versed in french history and adores _ rest of it. he is versed in french history and adores it _ rest of it. he is versed in french history and adores it and - rest of it. he is versed in french history and adores it and has i rest of it. he is versed in frenchl history and adores it and has the sort of— history and adores it and has the sort of love — history and adores it and has the sort of love of— history and adores it and has the sort of love of france _ history and adores it and has the sort of love of france that - history and adores it and has the j sort of love of france that comes from _ sort of love of france that comes from perhaps— sort of love of france that comes from perhaps his _ sort of love of france that comes from perhaps his background i sort of love of france that comes from perhaps his background asi sort of love of france that comes l from perhaps his background as an absolutely — from perhaps his background as an absolutely committed _ from perhaps his background as an absolutely committed kind - from perhaps his background as an absolutely committed kind of- from perhaps his background as an absolutely committed kind of a - absolutely committed kind of a simulated _ absolutely committed kind of a simulated jewish _ absolutely committed kind of a simulated jewish arrival - absolutely committed kind of a simulated jewish arrival here. i absolutely committed kind of a i simulated jewish arrival here. but what _ simulated jewish arrival here. but
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what he _ simulated jewish arrival here. but what he has — simulated jewish arrival here. but what he has got _ simulated jewish arrival here. but what he has got for— simulated jewish arrival here. but what he has got for the _ simulated jewish arrival here. but what he has got for the future, i simulated jewish arrival here. but i what he has got for the future, that is what _ what he has got for the future, that is what everybody _ what he has got for the future, that is what everybody is _ what he has got for the future, that is what everybody is saying, - what he has got for the future, that is what everybody is saying, wherei is what everybody is saying, where if the _ is what everybody is saying, where if the programme _ is what everybody is saying, where if the programme was _ is what everybody is saying, where if the programme was meant - is what everybody is saying, where if the programme was meant the l if the programme was meant the programme _ if the programme was meant the programme has _ if the programme was meant the programme has not _ if the programme was meant the programme has not been - if the programme was meant the i programme has not been spelled if the programme was meant the - programme has not been spelled out, certainly— programme has not been spelled out, certainly economically. _ programme has not been spelled out, certainly economically. we _ programme has not been spelled out, certainly economically. we knew - programme has not been spelled out, certainly economically. we knew in i certainly economically. we knew in immigration — certainly economically. we knew in immigration he _ certainly economically. we knew in immigration he is _ certainly economically. we knew in immigration he is very— certainly economically. we knew in immigration he is very tough - certainly economically. we knew in immigration he is very tough and l immigration he is very tough and talks— immigration he is very tough and talks about — immigration he is very tough and talks about expelling _ immigration he is very tough and talks about expelling illegal- talks about expelling illegal migrants _ talks about expelling illegal migrants. there's _ talks about expelling illegal migrants. there's a - talks about expelling illegal migrants. there's a talk - talks about expelling illegal migrants. there's a talk ofi talks about expelling illegal. migrants. there's a talk of him excelling — migrants. there's a talk of him excelling people _ migrants. there's a talk of him excelling people who _ migrants. there's a talk of him excelling people who have - migrants. there's a talk of him excelling people who have a i migrants. there's a talk of him - excelling people who have a french passport _ excelling people who have a french passport but — excelling people who have a french passport but certainly— excelling people who have a french passport but certainly people - excelling people who have a french passport but certainly people who i passport but certainly people who can be _ passport but certainly people who can be removed. _ passport but certainly people who can be removed. an— passport but certainly people who can be removed. an immigrationi passport but certainly people who. can be removed. an immigration is his trig _ can be removed. an immigration is his trig thihg — can be removed. an immigration is his trig thing but _ can be removed. an immigration is his big thing but will— can be removed. an immigration is his big thing but will he _ can be removed. an immigration is his big thing but will he actually . his big thing but will he actually plans— his big thing but will he actually plans to — his big thing but will he actually plans to do _ his big thing but will he actually plans to do if— his big thing but will he actually plans to do if you _ his big thing but will he actually plans to do if you become - his big thing but will he actually plans to do if you become a - his big thing but will he actually i plans to do if you become a leader is hot _ plans to do if you become a leader is not clear— plans to do if you become a leader is not clear at— plans to do if you become a leader is not clear at all. _ plans to do if you become a leader is not clear at all. is _ plans to do if you become a leader is not clear at all.— is not clear at all. as and when it becomes clear, _ is not clear at all. as and when it becomes clear, you _ is not clear at all. as and when it becomes clear, you will- is not clear at all. as and when it becomes clear, you will no - is not clear at all. as and when iti becomes clear, you will no doubt help us through it. thank you very much, hugh schofield life in paris. stay with us on outside source. still to come, we'll turn to antarctica, where scientists are about to begin drilling into ice over 1.5 million years old. we'll speak to a researcher involved. christmas is an important time of year for the hospitality businesses in the uk.
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figures in the industry have told the government that advice from some health officials for people to limit socialising in response to the omicron variant of coronavirus will harm businesses. emma simpson reports. they're all ready for the christmas season at this small wine bar and restaurant, but on monday, the phones started ringing. we've lost, in the last 2a hours, about £8500 worth of business. we've had a group booking for today cancelled, a group booking for an event out of house at their offices cancelled tonight, and a further three groups later in the week. on paper, nothing's changed for hospitality today. it should be business as usual. but there's a bit of a chill wind starting to blow through this sector, with some customers getting cold feet. but there are also plenty who have no intention of cancelling any big christmas nights out.
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we are going to one a week on saturday, and we're not pulling out. absolutely not. you need to do it sensibly, but as long as you do it sensibly, it's nice to have fun again. paul runs three pubs in yorkshire and is worried. he has had lots of cancellations too at what should be the busiest time of year. so important to have christmas to boost them coffers and get you through march. the industry says it has already pulled out the stops to follow the rules. ventilation, hygiene, sanitation, that's what the scientific - advisory committee to - the government recommends. i that's what the hospitality sectori has invested in, and that should be sufficient to keep us ppen and keep customers and teens safe. - there is a huge amount of uncertainty about this new variant, but that is the last thing at this hard—hit sector needs as it tries to get back on its feet.
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emma simpson, bbc news. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is — officials believe the new covid—19 variant was in europe earlier than thought. test samples show omicron cases in the netherlands 11 days ago. now to antarctica, and efforts are about to get under way to drill a narrow hole down into the ice, removing a core three kilometres long to enable scientists to learn about the earth's distant past. the samples will allow scientists to learn more about the frequency of previous ice ages as long as 1.5 million years ago. a european team is about to set up its equipment near a joint italian—french base station on the east antartctic plateau. this video shows
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supplies being moved in. the drilling site is not an easy place to work. as well as being —35 degrees, that's in summer, it's also more than 3000 meters above sea level. this is what they're after. this ice sample was from an earlier drilling mission back in 2008. that recovered material from as far back as 800,000 years ago. the new mission plans to beat that. amy king is from the british antarctic survey, who are part of the project. great to have you on the programme. thanks very much for your time. when you make your list of goals for what you make your list of goals for what you were hoping to learn, what is right at the top was my to put some of this in context if we think about how ice is formed on the ice sheet... how ice is formed on the ice sheet- - -_ how ice is formed on the ice sheet... . , . sheet... year upon year layer upon la er of sheet... year upon year layer upon layer of the — sheet... year upon year layer upon layer of the fall _ sheet... year upon year layer upon layer of the fall line _ sheet... year upon year layer upon layer of the fall line one _ sheet... year upon year layer upon layer of the fall line one a - sheet. .. year upon year layer upon layer of the fall line one a layer- layer of the fall line one a layer on top of the other so older at the top and younger. when snow falls in capital air bubbles from the time the snow fell. this is a unique record. it is a direct sample of the atmosphere from the time that that snow fell. and we are aiming to
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measure a number of components from those gas bubbles but most important greenhouse gases, which we know are very important in predicting our future climate change. so as you mentioned before, the oldest ice bubble we have remeasured was 800,000 years old. but now we are aiming to extend this to 1.5 million years. it was interesting about this time period was when me and years ago we had a phenomenal change in the earth possible natural cycles. so what happened was that our glacial and interglacial cycles as you already mentioned earlier for the last 1 you already mentioned earlier for the last1 million years have gone through 100,000 euros cycles, but before1 million years through 100,000 euros cycles, but before 1 million years ago, they were operating on 41,000 year cycles. we don't know what caused this change really and we also don't know what happened in our atmosphere at the time. so you're aiming for this court to help answer two of those questions. find this court to help answer two of those questions.— this court to help answer two of those questions. and to find out all the information, _ those questions. and to find out all the information, you _ those questions. and to find out all the information, you first _ those questions. and to find out all the information, you first need - those questions. and to find out all the information, you first need to l the information, you first need to get the ice. help us understand
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practicalities of removing this ice and provably stopping it from melting as well. it is and provably stopping it from melting as well.— melting as well. it is a huge operation — melting as well. it is a huge operation logistically - melting as well. it is a huge operation logistically and i melting as well. it is a huge operation logistically and in | melting as well. it is a huge - operation logistically and in terms of people involved in it which is why we need these big collaborative projects to help us achieve it. so in terms of drilling the actual core, we have spent the last two years firstly trying to figure out the exact right spot to drill. we want to make sure we are getting the ice as old as we hope it is. the drilling will now take three or four years to get to the base of the ic because we have to drill the ice in one or two major sections at a time. so it involves keeping going back down to bringing the isolation up to the surface and going down again and honestly that whole process takes a long time when you are three km deep. we are also limited to just summer operation so an article in the winter is so dark and stormy and inhospitable that we cannot be there. so it takes many years to do this. and then in terms of bringing theice this. and then in terms of bringing the ice back, first of what we do is cut the cord and half and leave half
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of the court at least in antarctica as a fail—safe so it cannot help — melt there we hope. we try to get the core back to the laboratories in europe so this will be shipped in a specialist freezer containers keeping it down at below —20 as a maximum. hope it's a safejourney back and it will come back in different portions but we won't see the older here in europe are probably a few years to come. mr; probably a few years to come. my goodness and what undertaking. only 30 seconds but i have to ask you if you're going to get together. i will you're going to get together. i will not no but you're going to get together. i will not go but i _ you're going to get together. i will not go but i very — you're going to get together. i will not go but i very much _ you're going to get together. luv ll not go but i very much look forward to receive the ice here and running it through my lab here. i bet to receive the ice here and running it through my lab here.— it through my lab here. i bet you are also great — it through my lab here. i bet you are also great to _ it through my lab here. i bet you are also great to speak- it through my lab here. i bet you are also great to speak to - it through my lab here. i bet you are also great to speak to you i it through my lab here. i bet you. are also great to speak to you and thank you very much indeed. amy king from the british and arctic survey so a major undertaking which we will need to keep an eye on over the coming years was if you want site stories from my colleagues here at bbc news on an article or lots of other things as well, go to the front page of the website and click on the sites tab, you will find all the latest coverage and asset bc
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dot—coms flash news. that is it for this edition of the programme, the giver watching and i will see you tomorrow. hello there. it was noticeably milder today across the board compared to what we've had the last couple of days, but it's set to change once again. as we move through tonight, a spell of wet and windy weather will spread across the uk, and that will introduce colder air again from the north or the north—west. so, it will be colder for the first few days of december. here's this area of low pressure spreading southwards. some warm air wrapped into it, or mild i should say. but that will clear away, and you'll notice the blue colours beginning to invade behind the system as it pushes its way south—eastwards. now, some pretty heavy rain on this low pressure as it spreads south—eastwards. that'll be followed by blustery showers and clear spells, these turning increasingly wintry certainly over the hills across scotland. it will be windy pretty much everywhere, but especially across some western coasts, where it will be
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touching gale—force, particularly in exposure. temperature—wise, not particularly cold in the south, but not as mild as what it was the previous night. so, for wednesday, then, the 1st of december, the last of the mild air clears away from the south east through the morning. you'll notice the blue colours invading. it is going to feel chillier throughout the day, but there will be a bit more sunshine around, which will be a bonus. but plenty of showers around, these wintry over northern hills, even down to lower levels in places. and they'll form to merge bands across parts of england and wales, so some areas could be quite wet throughout the afternoon. temperatures—wise, 3—9 degrees in the south. as we head through wednesday night, it stays showery, temperatures tumble under the clear skies here, so we could see a touch of frost, maybe some ice around. but there'll be further showers across northern and eastern coasts, and these will be of a wintry flavour. certainly it'll still be quite breezy, especially close to the coast. and those temperatures colder than what we've had the last couple of nights, 3—5 degrees, but even cooler than that in some
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sheltered rural locations. thursday's, then, a chilly day, but we do have this ridge of high pressure trying to push in. so, that will slowly kill off the showers, particularly across southern and western areas. most of the showers, i think, will be across more northern and eastern areas, and again they will be quite wintry in nature. thicker cloud develops, though, across the west as a new weather front begins to make inroads later in the day. and those temperatures, 3—8 degrees, temperatures coming up a little bit across the west. and that marks a change for friday. again it turns a bit milder for a time throughout friday, but with that comes more rain.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. all adults over 18 in england will be offered a coronavirus boosterjab by the end of january. boris johnson says it's the best defence, against the omicron variant. it's the best defence, it's time for another great british vaccination effort. we've done it before and we're going to do it again. and let's not give this virus a second chance. mps vote to approve new rules which make masks compulsory in shops and on public transport in england, unless you are exempt. and anyone arriving in the uk must take a pcr test within two days, and isolate until they receive a negative result. five days after storm arwen, tens of thousands are

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