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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 30, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. face mask rules return in england — in efforts to combat the spread of the omicron variant later today — borisjohnson will set out plans to accelerate the boosterjab programme — with all adults in the uk to be offered a third vaccine. what that will do is basically increase your general levels of immunity which we hope will, to some extent, counter the potential drop in vaccine effectiveness we might find with this variant. travel rules also change from today— anyone coming into the uk now needs to take a pcr test and self—isolate until they get a negative result
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with new restrictions coming in to slow down the spread of the new variant of covid how do you feel about the reintroduction of mandatory mask wearing in england? what other questions do you have about this new variant and what it means for you? get in touch with me on twitter @annitabbc and use the #bbcyourquestions barbados has removed the queen as head of state after almost 400 years and transitioned to a republic— swearing in its first ever barbadian president. ghislaine maxwell's criminal trial is underway in new york— with the disgraced heiress accused of providing young girls for convicted sex offender jeffrey epstein to abuse hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world.
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new rules aimed at limiting the spread of the omicron variant of coronavirus have come into force today as more cases have been recorded in the uk. face coverings must now be worn in shops and on public transport in england. later today the uk prime minister is due to speak at a downing street news conference where he'll set out plans to accelerate the boosterjabs programme with all adults in the uk to be offered a third vaccine. the plans come as the chief executive of moderna says he forsees a drop in the effectiveness of current jabs. he told the financial times it will take months to develop a new shot that works but that they're already working on it. german leaders will also meet later to discuss the possible introduction of new measures to combat an aggressive fourth wave of infections. also from today, if you're arriving into the uk, you'll need to complete a pcr test and self—isolate until you receive the result. it comes as the european commission
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urges eu health ministers to step up testing and sequencing as the omicron variant is detected across the continent. with all the details on those new rules in the uk, here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. from this morning, face coverings are now compulsory in shops and on public transport in england. face coverings are already needed for most public places and transport in wales. masks are also required in pubs and restaurants in scotland and northern ireland. but there is some concern over how shoppers in england will cope with the return of face coverings. the vast majority of the public, when it was required to wear face coverings, were very good about it, and still are in scotland and wales, where the regulations were never removed. but there is definitely a minority of people who seem to think that the rules shouldn't apply to them and they are causing problems at stores. we've seen the levels of violence that shop workers faced more than doubled during the pandemic. there are changes in schools, too, where staff and pupils in year 7 and above are also being advised to wear masks in communal areas. in scotland, that rule
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applies in class, as well. and international travellers coming to the uk now also need to take a pcr test within two days of their arrival and self—isolate until they get a negative result. but perhaps the biggest changes are the modifications to the booster programme — slashing the gap between second jab and booster from six months to three and opening up boosters to all those over 18. vaccines and boosters remain the prime defence against the virus. this is a programme which is all about speed, so you are right, the two challenges are going to be the logistics of actually delivering so much vaccine in a very short time, and, of course, it is important that people come forward and receive those jabs in good time, so they can build up that extra immunity that they need to be sure that we are protected against this new variant. so a challenging month ahead for the nhs and, obviously, people need to respond as soon as they get contacted and come forward.
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it's clear uk cases linked to the omicron variant are on the rise. the big unanswered questions remain — what impact the variant will have on illness, vaccines and transmission. dominic hughes, bbc news. jenny harries is the chief executive of the uk health security agency. she says we're in a period of great uncertainty. almost all the public health professionals are very concerned about the variant, it has far more mutations than anything we have seen before and some of the characteristics of these mutations give us concern that it might start to evade either natural immunity where we have been infected before or the great efforts we have made with vaccination. but all of this is a period of great uncertainty and that is the key point. we are taking precautionary measures in order that we buy ourselves some time, so we can carry through the scientific tests we normally do to understand the variant better. the airline, easyjet,
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has made a loss of more than a billion pounds for the second year in a row. its results were slightly better than in the previous twelve months, and the firm said it had good levels of bookings — but it was too early to know what impact the omicron variant would have on the business. the chief executive of easyjet, johan lundgren, said that despite the introduction of new travel restrictions in the uk, he was confident the government would remove them as soon as was possible. clearly, they want to have the ability as soon as it is safe to do so to remove all the restrictions so we take a lot of comfort in that, that is the right way of looking at that so we are not writing off the winter but having said that, we thought always that this winter was going to be a year of two halves, when the winter would be something that had a lot of uncertainty and that assumption seems to be the right one. our reporter charlotte gallagher is at gatwick airport and joins me now.
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give as a sense of what difference the new rules are making. gatwick airort is the new rules are making. gatwick airport is still— the new rules are making. gatwick airport is still out _ the new rules are making. gatwick airport is still out lot _ the new rules are making. gatwick airport is still out lot more - the new rules are making. gatwick airport is still out lot more quiet . airport is still out lot more quiet thanit airport is still out lot more quiet than it was before the pandemic. thousands of people arriving here today will be affected by these new rules. anyone arriving into the uk apart from coming from the common travel area, the channel islands and ireland, will have to take a pcr test at the end of the second day after their arrival and then they'll have to isolate until they get a negative result. that means you will have to pay for the pcr test, it is not an nhs scheme, but from a private company. not everyone is happy with these new rules, including the first ministers of wales and scotland, they'd like to see people isolating for eight days, taking a pcr test on the eighth day, a second one, and then isolating until they get a negative result. what they have at the moment is not
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enough, they have called for an urgent meeting about these plans, but the government has rejected this idea saying what we are doing now is proportionate and anything else would damage the travel industry too severely. travel leaders are saying what we should be doing as well, these pcr tests are quite expensive, is giving them for free from the nhs, essentially, these plans were sprung on people at the weekend when they came back to the uk, they would have to take a pcr test. i have spoken to a few people on the train this morning and the general sense was relief that they were finally getting to go on holiday and they would worry about the pcr test when they got back. would worry about the pcr test when they got back-— they got back. obviously the travel indust at they got back. obviously the travel industry at this _ they got back. obviously the travel industry at this time _ they got back. obviously the travel industry at this time of _ they got back. obviously the travel industry at this time of year - they got back. obviously the travel industry at this time of year is - industry at this time of year is thinking about encouraging people through adverts to look towards next summer. so in the slightly longer term, i wonder what the industry are saying about its prospects after a really difficult couple of years.
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it's been so unnerving for travel companies, hasn't it? everyone felt things were getting back to normal and all of a sudden, a new variant, people are now reluctant to book holidays in case they have to cancel them at the last minute and south africa, a popular destination is now on the red list and people had to hotel quarantine when they arrived backin hotel quarantine when they arrived back in the uk, and it is things like having a pcr test on the nhs which travel bosses say would encourage people to book holidays if there was less cost for them. when you walk through gatwick airport, it is so much quieter than it was before the pandemic. only one terminal is open, the north terminal, the south terminal is closed, lots of shops are closed because there is no point, there is not enough passengers to support these businesses.— these businesses. thank you very much. before _
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these businesses. thank you very much. before i _ these businesses. thank you very much. before i go _ these businesses. thank you very much. before i go to _ these businesses. thank you very much. before i go to my - these businesses. thank you very much. before i go to my next - these businesses. thank you very i much. before i go to my next guest, the european medicines agency, it could bring forward a recommendation on mix and match boosters by the end of the week. speaking in front of an ep is the executive director of the medicines agency said there are many studies that suggest such an approach could restore protection as effective of a booster with the same vaccine. the mix and match is being done here in the uk. he knew detail on that statement, she told meps and ireland were 93% of the adult population is vaccinated, the number of deaths peri million population over the last ia days was 15 but in two other european countries where vaccination rates are less than 50%, the equivalent death rate was more than 250 people. detail coming in from our brussels correspondent. let's talk to professor sian griffiths, epidemiologist and
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global health expert. good to have you with us. let's talk about the reintroduction of the mask mandate in shops and public transport in england, other parts of the uk have been telling people to wear masks for some time now and in other parts of the world, mask wearing has been very prevalent throughout the pandemic. do you think people who were not wearing masks because it was not monday's mandatory will now put them on again? mandatory will now put them on main? , ., ., mandatory will now put them on main? ., mandatory will now put them on aiain? ., mandatory will now put them on aain? ., , again? good morning, i hope they well because _ again? good morning, i hope they well because it _ again? good morning, i hope they well because it is _ again? good morning, i hope they well because it is now _ again? good morning, i hope they well because it is now mandated. | again? good morning, i hope they. well because it is now mandated. the mask wearing had worn off on where it was recommended so hopefully this will remind people that they do need to wear masks, other parts of the uk and many other countries across the world have been enforcing mask wearing and all the research shows that it makes a difference pump it
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does not stop you getting covid—i9, but it makes a difference and that is an important part of getting vaccinated, wearing masks, being in well ventilated spaces, washing hands, that all makes a difference to the spread of the new variant. how important is the type of mass? it is important that your mask is three layer and fits as recommended by the who, so i think it is better to be wearing a mask than to find, really search hard and try to get masks which might be needed in the health care sector. wearing a mask is the first step and wearing a proper though, is the first step and wearing a properthough, it is the first step and wearing a proper though, it fits across your nose, where it over your nose, don't know how many times we have seen people with their mask under their nose, tight under the chain, fits closely on your cheeks, that will make the difference because this is
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all about decreasing the spread, the aerosol spray tan the droplet spread from the virus can be decreased if people were masks.— from the virus can be decreased if people were masks. what can you say about the different _ people were masks. what can you say about the different in _ people were masks. what can you say about the different in sight _ people were masks. what can you say about the different in sight the - about the different in sight the national psyche in some countries where people very readily respond to messages on mask wearing compared to others where there is not the same uptake? it others where there is not the same u take? , , . ., uptake? it is interesting. i chaired the horn uptake? it is interesting. i chaired the hong kong — uptake? it is interesting. i chaired the hong kong government - uptake? it is interesting. i chairedl the hong kong government enquiry into thousand three and as soon as the first case was announced in china in 2020, everyone in hong kong started to wear masks and one of my friend sent me some because i think mask wearing one scene, they had learnt from the sars epidemic that masks are protective. if you look at the uk, ambivalent about masks, but the uk, ambivalent about masks, but the science has been built in, the
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evidence shows increasingly that masks are effective, and some of the initial ideas, people were masks and think they are protected, i think the public are more clever than that and they understand that it is part of what you do but not the totality. it is a good thing to do to wear a mask. there is a change in the psyche, i hope people will start to wear masks in the places that are recommended, in the retail sector, on transport, in the hairdresser, in the takeaway. that is where we hope to see masks worn across england. ? do you think the message has to come from government? fir do you think the message has to come from government?— from government? or is it more about the individual — from government? or is it more about the individual to _ from government? or is it more about the individual to take _ from government? or is it more about the individual to take that _ from government? or is it more about the individual to take that message i the individual to take that message on board and exercise the right choice? ., ., , on board and exercise the right choice? ., .,, ., , , choice? mask wearing has to be, 'ust because we — choice? mask wearing has to be, 'ust because you're told i choice? mask wearing has to be, 'ust because you're told to i choice? mask wearing has to be, 'ust because you're told to shouldn't h choice? mask wearing has to be, just because you're told to shouldn't be l because you're told to shouldn't be that you do, individuals have a big
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part to play endless. individual behaviour. it is about thinking about other people as much as yourself when you are wearing a mask, it is no good saying that you are fully vaccinated and you do not need one, it is protecting other people should you be infected. there is a sense of social and personal responsibility that goes along with any government mandate, we to get that rebalanced. i am pleased that the advice to were masks in schools has been reemphasised because young people, if young people are wearing masks it stimulates households to wear masks and it is about messaging in communities, messaging by the public health community explaining why it is a good thing to do is important as well asjust why it is a good thing to do is important as well as just been told to do so by the government. important as well asjust been told to do so by the government. finally, do ou to do so by the government. finally, do you think — to do so by the government. finally, do you think at _ to do so by the government. finally, do you think at this _ to do so by the government. finally, do you think at this stage _ to do so by the government. finally, do you think at this stage in - to do so by the government. finally, do you think at this stage in the - do you think at this stage in the pandemic we are in a position to
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have more nuanced course corrections as information comes an to adapt the rules? is that not helpful when you're trying to get a message out across a country? lots of my viewers are getting in touch today saying that the rule of mask wearing should not have been removed in the first place because it was too confusing. i agree that we should never have removed it. iwish i agree that we should never have removed it. i wish we could have seen the politicians taking a lead, the images of parliament, one side wearing a mask, then it was mandated, and then some people said they were not going to wear it, but there was scientific reasons, there was covid—i9 in westminster at rates which were going to infect people. mask wearing is about protecting the community as much as yourself. we need to see leadership, people wearing masks correctly, on the
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media, and that plays a big part. i agree that i would personally have preferred as not to drop the mask wearing rule, i have been wearing mine on the train and staring at people who have not been wearing it, hang on, why are you not wearing a mask? it is about sensible behaviour, it is something we should continue to do. at the same time, we do not actually know very much about the virus at the moment. we know we have to wait a couple of weeks for the science, we have heard the deputy chief medical officer talking about adjusting the dial, we had to take an informed approach to adjusting the dial as the science and information becomes available. when we know more about the omicron variant we will be able to adjust accordingly. precautionary steps that have been taken by the government over the last few days are very necessary and should be in
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place until we have the scientific information.— place until we have the scientific information. ., ~ , ., , . china has warned that the fast—spreading omicron variant will pose challenges at the winter olympics in beijing in february. china has largely quashed covid—i9 within its borders through travel restrictions and snap lockdowns. but outbreaks linked to the delta variant have persisted. foreign ministry spokesman zhao lijian says he's confident the winter olympics will be conducted smoothly but he says the new variant will lead to challenges linked to prevention and control. we have just had a statement from the national police chief council saying that police in england will work in partnership with relevant business owners and their staff to make sure people comply with the new regulations about wearing face coverings. the new rules say that in shops and public transport from the age of ii upwards who does not have age of ii upwards who does not have a reasonable excuse should wear a
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face covering. police officers can direct someone to wear a face covering or tell them to leave or find them £200 as well. the statement from the national police chief counsel. a couple of your tweets that you have been sending me on the subject about masks. what we are facing with the new variant of covid—i9, omicron. one person has just been shopping and has seen people not wearing masks and no signs encouraging people to do that. who is policing this? we have heard from the police, some people need to put up their signage and shops, we have seen it previously, this message says why do we not have to wear masks in restaurants? the idea is because you are sitting down and eating and drinking and is not practical to wear a mask and take it
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off and put it on again. the ideal would be to wear the mask while you're moving around and not sitting eating or drinking. keep sending those tweets to me, just scanning through to see if there are any more to bring it right now, this message says the government needs to make it clear of the potential health consequences of not wearing a mask needs to be specific. another message says mask wearing should never have gone away. i would welcome to wear a mask in hospitality and i still do until i sit down with food and drink to protect everyone. you can send your tweets to me. the caribbean island nation, barbados, has become the world's newest republic, severing its colonial bonds with britain nearly a00 years after its first boats arrived there. at the stroke of midnight president dame sandra mason replaced queen elizabeth as head of state. bells rang out in the capital bridgetown, signalling the transition.
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our correspondent, daniela relph was there. the world's newest republic and a show of national pride. this constitutional shift in barbados is about asserting self—confidence and shedding the links to its colonial past. some of this country's most well—known names were among the vip guests attending the transition ceremony. and also here to watch it all play out, the prince of wales, invited to see his mother removed as a head of state — the first time that has happened anywhere in 30 years. for the final time on this caribbean island, he viewed a military march past and took the final salute. and then, the symbolic moment of transition. as the royal standard was lowered over barbados, it became a republic.
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it is hard to imagine that this event was not tinged with some sadness for the prince of wales. he has focused on the enduring friendship between two nations and also spoken directly about the pain of a shared history. from the darkest days of our past, and the appalling atrocity of slavery, which for ever stains our history, the people of this island forged their path with extraordinary fortitude. emancipation, self—government, and independence were your waypoints. freedom, justice and self—determination have been your guides. an acknowledgement of the past as this island looked forward and swore
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in its first ever president. i, sandra prunella mason, do swear that i will be faithful and bear true allegiance to barbados according to law, so help me god. casting aside the official link to the british monarchy, barbados is increasingly looking east to china for financial support. there are republican rumblings, too, in other caribbean nations. they will be watching this newest republic closely. and our correspondent celestina olulude, who's in barbados, gave us this update. welcome to the world's newest republic. this is all important to this nation— republic. this is all important to this nation because for the first time _ this nation because for the first time ever— this nation because for the first time ever it has a barbadian head of
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statei _ time ever it has a barbadian head of state, dame sandra mason who is the president— state, dame sandra mason who is the president of— state, dame sandra mason who is the president of this country. last week i president of this country. last week i met_ president of this country. last week i met the _ president of this country. last week i met the prime minister who said that this _ i met the prime minister who said that this is — i met the prime minister who said that this is all important because it is about — that this is all important because it is about installing national pride — it is about installing national pride into the lives of the people of barbados, especially the young people _ of barbados, especially the young people. the ceremony took place at the early— people. the ceremony took place at the early hours of this morning, it was attended by prince charles, it was attended by prince charles, it was attended by rhianna, and the president— was attended by rhianna, and the president was sworn in. earlier on, i president was sworn in. earlier on, i spoke _ president was sworn in. earlier on, i spoke to— president was sworn in. earlier on, i spoke to a — president was sworn in. earlier on, i spoke to a number of people, i have _ ispoke to a number of people, i have been— i spoke to a number of people, i have been doing it all week, and they have — have been doing it all week, and they have been telling me their mixed — they have been telling me their mixed opinions on all of this. some people. _ mixed opinions on all of this. some people. the — mixed opinions on all of this. some people, the majority of people say it is a _ people, the majority of people say it is a great move because it helps us move _ it is a great move because it helps us move on— it is a great move because it helps us move on from our colonial past. some _ us move on from our colonial past. some people have told me that whilst they think— some people have told me that whilst they think it is a step in the right direction, — they think it is a step in the right direction, they would have liked a referendum because they say that there _ referendum because they say that there is—
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referendum because they say that there is a — referendum because they say that there is a big moment for the history— there is a big moment for the history of— there is a big moment for the history of the country and they would — history of the country and they would have liked to help shape how the new _ would have liked to help shape how the new republic is created. for now _ the new republic is created. for now. at— the new republic is created. for now, at least, at the the celebrations will continue in barbados because tomorrow rhianna will be _ barbados because tomorrow rhianna will be named as a national hero of this country — the trial of ghislaine maxwell has begun in new york with the prosecution saying the former girlfriend of convicted sex offenderjeffrey epstein "preyed on vulnerable young girls, manipulated them, and served them up to be sexually abused." maxwell, who's 59, faces 8 charges of sex trafficking and other offences. she has pleaded not guilty and her defence says she's being made a scapegoat for epstein's crimes. he took his own life while injail in 2019. from new york, nada tawfik reports. over the next few weeks, what plays out in this new york
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court house will be a crucial chapter in the twisted saga ofjeffrey epstein's sex—trafficking ring, and ghislaine maxwell's alleged role in it. as her highly—awaited trial begins, the world's eyes were trained on what the evidence presented here were would reveal. and so, too, were epstein's accusers, some arrived to show solidarity the alleged victims. in opening statements, the government said ghislaine maxwell was a dangerous predator who provided a cover of respectability for epstein. prosecutors said she lured victims with the promise of a bright future, only to sexually abuse them. her defence attorney told the jury she was a convenient stand—in for epstein and the government would not be able to prove their case. he said the accusers' memories were corrupted and influenced by a desire for a big jackpot of money. there have been numerous investigations, documentaries exploring ghislaine maxwell's alleged crimes. but the allegations had never been aired in a criminal trial. the jury will be presented with a range of evidence from flight logs to testimonies from epstein's former staff.
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the four underage girls in the indictment, now grown women, are expected to take the stand. and other accusers from around the country can testify too, those with stories similar to teresa helm. according to her, she thought she had landed a job as a professional masseuse, but instead, walked right into a nightmare. i thought that her and i were making these connections and she did her role, played her role, beautifully. she was masterful at it. i walked myself into a predator's home. ghislaine maxwell's brother ian says at least one sibling will be present every day of the trial to support her. it is impossible for me to think that she would have been engaged in these really horrendous charges. if convicted, she faces up to 80 years in prison. labour leader sir keir starmer has reshuffled his shadow cabinet.
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there was a big promotion for yvette cooper, to shadow home secretary, david lammy has been promoted to shadow foreign secretary, replacing lisa nandy and wes streeting becomes shadow health secretary. some labour mps believe there are growing divisions between sir keir starmer and deputy leader angela rayner. you know, i've been through a lot of reshuffles in the last 11 years. the leader makes the decisions. the gaffer picks the team. that is how it goes and that is how it has always gone. frankly, i couldn't really care less about the circus around who's in, who's out, who's up, who's down, who knew, who didn't. i care about the fact that there are people across this country who deserve a better settlement — they've deserved it for a long time. france is preparing to honour the singer and activist, josephine baker with a place in the pantheon later today. she's the first black woman to be remembered in the resting place of france's national heroes, through her work on civil rights and for the resistance during the second world war.
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our paris correspondent, lucy williamson has been looking back at her life. almost a century ago, paris metjosephine baker. a young woman from across the atlantic who became a new kind of celebrity in a city that was hungry for american idols. josephine baker was a girl who left saint louis to come to europe to find freedom. baker had fled segregation in missouri and was enchanted with the freedom and acceptance she found in france. but there was racism here, too. both in her roles on stage and in her daily life. madame josephine. speaking to the bbc years later, she explained how she fought against it, adopting 12 children from around the world that she nicknamed her rainbow tribe. these children represent an example of real brotherhood.
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they show to people that it is possible to live together if we so wish to. one of her children says he never thought his mother was cool until he learned mickjagger was a fan. she was very protective, very close to us when she was there because sometimes she was away. and she wanted for us a good education, so sometimes she could be a little bit strict when we are doing bad things. baker used her celebrity to campaign against racism and intolerance and also to pass information for the french resistance during the second world war. this is one of the greatest honours in france can bestow — a seat in the resting place of its national heroes. josephine baker is the first black woman to be honoured here, a member of france's wartime resistance movement and a lifelong campaigner against racism.
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tonight, almost a century after she performed there, josephine baker will be honoured in a nightclub in paris with a tribute show. i'm not trying to bejosephine, i can't bejosephine, she is too... it's enormous, she is too big for me. idealist and idol, singer and spy, her trademark song j'ai deux a lovesong to paris. the city that claimed her and has never let her go. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. the headlines on bbc news... face mask rules return in england — in efforts to combat the spread of the omicron variant later today — borisjohnson will set out plans to accelerate the boosterjab programme — with all adults in the uk to be offered a third vaccine.
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what that will do is basically increase your general levels of immunity which we hope will to some extent counter at the potential drop in vaccine effectiveness we might find with this variant. travel rules also change from today — anyone coming into the uk now needs to take a pcr test and self—isolate until they get a negative result barbados has removed the queen as head of state after almost a00 years and transitioned to a republic — swearing in its first ever barbadian president. ghislaine maxwell's criminal trial is underway in new york with the disgraced heiress accused of providing young girls for convicted sex offender jeffrey epstein to abuse the war in yemen could be at a turning point. houthi forces have been pushing at the city of marib for two years, but since september, they've gone on the offensive and gained ground at the expense of the army of the internationally recognised government. at least 800,000 displaced
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people are in marib, plus a5,000 more who have arrived in the last three months. our middle east editor jeremy bowen has been there and to the front line. we are heading up towards the front line. we are with soldiers from the army, the government of yemen. the houthis, the other side, started to push at the beginning of the year around here. it has really intensified since about september. which has resulted in that big influx of displaced people fleeing from the fighting.
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for the people in this camp, it is not the first time they have had to move, they have had to move repeatedly as the front lines have moved. there are camps, plenty of camps, which have been closed because of military action. they move because they have to to get away from the front line thatis coming towards them. so she was wounded? these are pictures of dead people.
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what lies beneath all of this is the war. war kills people, war makes people move. war creates a crisis and the way this war ends is not in the hands of yemenis, because big, regional powers have intervened. one side, the friends of iran, on the other side, the friends of saudi arabia, the us and israel. the people here are suffering because of the fault lines that run right through the middle east. joining me now is christa rottensteiner the chief of mission for yemen, international organization for yemen. thank you forjoining us today. tell
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us a bit more, obviously we have seen the pictures from that report, tell us about how this conflict has already had an impact on people's lives. . ., . already had an impact on people's lives. _, . ., , ., already had an impact on people's lives. . ., ., lives. the conflict has had a huge im act lives. the conflict has had a huge impact on — lives. the conflict has had a huge impact on people's _ lives. the conflict has had a huge impact on people's lives. - lives. the conflict has had a huge| impact on people's lives. overall, in yemen, we have two thirds of the population reliant on assistance so it's a very difficult situation, particularly very close to the front line. we are the largest organisation there, we have been there for over two years and i've just come back from there and i have to say, i have never seen the situation is desperate as it is now and that's because of the hostilities that have increased. we are seeing waves of displaced people coming into a city for the services have already been stretched by so many years of war and over a million people who have settled there to seek some safety. we are doing our best to help, we have helped over 200,000 people already this year but much more is needed because there is
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such a huge need. to much more is needed because there is such a huge need.— such a huge need. to what extent are ou such a huge need. to what extent are you working — such a huge need. to what extent are you working with _ such a huge need. to what extent are you working with the _ such a huge need. to what extent are you working with the president - such a huge need. to what extent are you working with the president 's - you working with the president �*s government in yemen and has there been any cooperation with the houthis. brute been any cooperation with the houthis. ~ ., ~' been any cooperation with the houthis. ~ ., ~ ., , , houthis. we work with all the sides and all across _ houthis. we work with all the sides and all across the _ houthis. we work with all the sides and all across the country - houthis. we work with all the sides and all across the country and - houthis. we work with all the sides and all across the country and for. and all across the country and for their needs are the largest. we have been able to help hundreds of thousands of people with food, water, health care in marib and that is really needed because the services are so overstressed. since september we have seen a tenfold increase in the numbers who have arrived in the displaced camps. as the migration agency, we also support migrants and we must not forget, migrants keep arriving in yemen on their way north and they are particularly vulnerable and they often get stuck between the front lines and are vulnerable to exploitation by smugglers. i know
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ou have exploitation by smugglers. i know you have seen _ exploitation by smugglers. i know you have seen families _ exploitation by smugglers. i know you have seen families who - exploitation by smugglers. i know you have seen families who havel exploitation by smugglers. i know- you have seen families who have been forced to uproot themselves multiple times and of course it makes them very difficult to help, i guess, as people are constantly on the move. what is the international response like so far? what more do you need? you are absolutely right. i have witnessed in marib, speaking to families who have been displaced five times and every time it becomes more difficult. particularly for women, in marib we see many women who have families and it is very hard for them to move around and help theirfamily so hard for them to move around and help their family so the response has been increased. we have really upscaled our assistance but it is very difficult because the needs are large and ourfunding very difficult because the needs are large and our funding for this year has only arrived at 50% so overall, we need more money to be able to help those who are most in need with the most basic to survive. you
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help those who are most in need with the most basic to survive.— the most basic to survive. you are talkini as the most basic to survive. you are talking as a _ the most basic to survive. you are talking as a priority _ the most basic to survive. you are talking as a priority the _ the most basic to survive. you are talking as a priority the basics - the most basic to survive. you are talking as a priority the basics of. talking as a priority the basics of life? ~ , ,., y talking as a priority the basics of life? ~ , , ., life? absolutely, food, water, shelter, health _ life? absolutely, food, water, shelter, health care, - life? absolutely, food, water, shelter, health care, that - life? absolutely, food, water, shelter, health care, that is i life? absolutely, food, water, l shelter, health care, that is not even looking at longer term problems so in to my example, we need infrastructure so we have a longer term solution so more children are in school, we can rehabilitate hospitals because half of the health facilities in yemen are not working but that is difficult to do close to the front because as we heard, there is multiple displacement and sometimes we build up infrastructure in a camp that then is too close to the fighting and we need to abandon that so it is a constant struggle to make sure we provide the basics for people who need it desperately. good luck to ou people who need it desperately. good luck to you and _ people who need it desperately. good luck to you and all— people who need it desperately. good luck to you and all the _ people who need it desperately. good luck to you and all the team working in yemen. from the early hours of this morning, a whole new raft of changes have come into force in an effort
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to tackle the spread of the coronavirus omicron variant. masks are now compulsory in shops and on public transport in england bringing it into line with the rest of the uk. all travellers entering britain will now have to take a pcr test within two days, and must self isolate, until they test negative. plus the booster programme is being rolled out to include all uk adults — although there's still no firm timeline in place for when people will have theirjabs. luke chester is organising director of the transport salaried staffs' association, which is a trade union for those who work in the transport and travel industries. thank you forjoining us. first of all, do you support the return of this mask mandate in england? face coverinis this mask mandate in england? face coverings should _ this mask mandate in england? face: coverings should never have this mask mandate in england? faco: coverings should never have been stopped on public transport, they are a really cheap, effective and easy way to reduce transmission of the virus and protect staff, passengers and the wider community. unfortunately, the mixed messages
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from the government have impacted compliance, making it more difficult to get people to wear masks again. if there has been confusion because of that, as you suggest, how difficult will it now be to enforce? enforcement is the key thing. members and other transport workers worked right throughout the pandemic and put themselves in harm's way, losing colleagues and friends, many of our members have been very severely unwell as the result of the virus. just doing theirjob, they do not get a choice where they work so enforcement needs to be done by the correct agencies, british transport police, security, other police services, not by front line transport staff who are already suffering verbal and sometimes physical abuse. suffering verbal and sometimes physicalabuse. i suffering verbal and sometimes physical abuse.— physical abuse. i wanted to ask about that _ physical abuse. i wanted to ask about that in _ physical abuse. i wanted to ask about that in a _ physical abuse. i wanted to ask about that in a moment - physical abuse. i wanted to ask about that in a moment but - physical abuse. i wanted to askj about that in a moment but are physical abuse. i wanted to ask - about that in a moment but are you therefore advising them, saying to them, do not confront people if they
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are not wearing a mask? tote them, do not confront people if they are not wearing a mask?— are not wearing a mask? we work closely with _ are not wearing a mask? we work closely with the _ are not wearing a mask? we work closely with the employers - are not wearing a mask? we work closely with the employers in - are not wearing a mask? we work closely with the employers in the | closely with the employers in the transport sector to ensure that we have the right policies and procedures in place. but certainly, it is not the job of transport workers to be confronting members of the public, some of whom we now have got very strong personal opinions about wearing masks. it is not their job to put themselves in harm's way. the government needs to step up and correctly resource the appropriate authorities to ensure that everyone is kept safe by making the mask mandate operate effectively. presumably some of them are asking passengers to wear masks because abuse is being directed at them when they do so give us a sense, i don't know if you can put a figure on it in terms of percentages, how many of the members of your union have suffered abuse as a result of asking
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people to follow a mask mandate in the past? people to follow a mask mandate in the iast? :, :, _, , people to follow a mask mandate in the iast? :, :, , ., the past? your outcome is hard to iut a the past? your outcome is hard to put a percentage _ the past? your outcome is hard to put a percentage on _ the past? your outcome is hard to put a percentage on it _ the past? your outcome is hard to put a percentage on it because - the past? your outcome is hard to put a percentage on it because so | put a percentage on it because so much of the abuse goes unreported, it is such a common thing for our members to experience abuse. but we know that large numbers of our members are reporting an increase in level of abuse as a result of the failure of this government to ensure that there was enforcement of the mask mandate previously and the mixed messages in saying they expected and wanted people to work masks but then also saying you did not have to if you did not want to. borisjohnson �*s here is winston churchill, imagine if churchill during the blitz had said you have to close your curtains and maintain blackout but not if you do not want to. this is not a sensible approach from the government. to put our members at risk, we are pleased the mask mandate is back in place but the government needs to step up and
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resource the british transport police and security and other police forces to ensure that the safe use of public transport is promoted and that we protect staff and the wider community. that we protect staff and the wider community-— let's discuss those new measures for travellers arriving in the uk. the travel editor of the independent, simon calder, joins me now from florida. simon, hello to you. let's go back to basics. just make sure that everyone is clear what the new rules are. �* . . everyone is clear what the new rules are. �*, ., , everyone is clear what the new rules are. , .., everyone is clear what the new rules are. i, ., , . ., ., are. it's a complete change from work we were — are. it's a complete change from work we were when _ are. it's a complete change from work we were when i _ are. it's a complete change from work we were when i actually - are. it's a complete change from j work we were when i actually set are. it's a complete change from - work we were when i actually set off from the uk on friday. what you now need to do is on the second day or crucially one of the two preceding
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days, effectively as soon as you arrive in my case, i am going to be getting a test at the airport, it has to be a pcr test and crucially, you have to self isolate until you get a negative result. if you get a positive result, of course, you need to self isolate for ten days. there's thousands of british people here in orlando, i've been talking to a number of them, they are mostly cheesed off because they pre— booked their lateral flow test, some providers have been very good and offered refunds or allowing people to upgrade to the more expensive slower test and there also a lot of confusion, not many children here, of course, because it is term time but for instance, in england, it is everyone over the age of five who must take a pcr test and this is assuming they are either fully vaccinated or children travelling with fully vaccinated people, whereas in scotland is this everyone over the age of ii. whereas in scotland is this everyone over the age of 11. if you are looking at it from a global perspective, the uk cannot agree on
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what the ideal rules are, it shows the kind of confusion that are spreading around the world with the concerns about omicron and right around the world, from australia to switzerland, the governments are reacting and not in a good way, for travellers or the travel industry. just clarify for us, it is worth repeating because lots of people have asked about this, when do you have asked about this, when do you have to book that pcr test, when you're to return? to have to book that pcr test, when you're to return?— you're to return? to give you an example. — you're to return? to give you an example. my — you're to return? to give you an example, my flight _ you're to return? to give you an example, my flight is _ you're to return? to give you an example, my flight is at - you're to return? to give you an example, my flight is at seven l example, my flight is at seven o'clock on friday, friday afternoon i shall settle down with a cup of coffee, i shall book my test then, there is no benefit that i can see booking at any earlier in case the rules change again stop i will then go through the spiral of despair which involves filling in the uk passenger locator form, which involves filling in the uk passenger locatorform, no point doing it any earlier but crucially, i am taking that test the moment i
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stepped off the aircraft, that is good for me because it means particularly if i am prepared to pay possibly getting on for £100 for an express test, $1a0, that means i will be able to leave self isolation as soon as possible. but also, i think, from a public health point of view, finding out whether or not i have contracted omicron is pretty crucial, sooner rather than later but, yes, really important to emphasise, it is called a day two test, goodness knows why because i call it a do it as soon as you get off the plane test.— call it a do it as soon as you get off the plane test. ok, i guess that is as iood off the plane test. ok, i guess that is as good a — off the plane test. ok, i guess that is as good a time _ off the plane test. ok, i guess that is as good a time as _ off the plane test. ok, i guess that is as good a time as any _ off the plane test. ok, i guess that is as good a time as any to - off the plane test. ok, i guess that is as good a time as any to do - off the plane test. ok, i guess that is as good a time as any to do it. i is as good a time as any to do it. do you think at this stage in the pandemic the whole system, government, the travel industry, can be more nimble to respond any changes as and when more data about omicron becomes available? look. changes as and when more data about omicron becomes available?— omicron becomes available? look, i have been talking _ omicron becomes available? look, i have been talking to _ omicron becomes available? look, i have been talking to lots _ omicron becomes available? look, i have been talking to lots of - omicron becomes available? look, i have been talking to lots of people | have been talking to lots of people in the travel industry, they are
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having a miserable time, qe have been reporting this morning easyjet losses, i calculate £2000 every minute over the past year. slightly less than they lost last year, but it's still not great. this is the biggest budget airline in britain, of course. it's so difficult. i mean, there we were on saturday afternoon and suddenly, the rules changed. it took really quite some time for the government to actually say when they were going to change and there is this kind of incoherence and misunderstanding and all kinds of misinformation circulating on social media so it's a really tough time. and of course, travel, whether you are a traveller looking forward to a christmas tableau demo quality, a travel agent looking forward to people coming in and buying a holiday from you, it is based on confidence, based on people looking forward to greater trips. and as soon as you start to erode that confidence because of sudden
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changes, because of course, the spread of a scary new variant, it erodes that confidence and makes things very, very difficult, i'm afraid. this is supposed to be the industry of human happiness, it's looking a bit bleak and we don't in the uk, find out more until the saturday before christmas. that's the first review of these new rules. well our viewers will see we now have a split screen and popping up beside you is harry stewart. from suffolk, living injohannesburg. harry, you have a question suffolk. living injohannesburg. harry. you have a question for simon, harry, you have a question for simon, please harry. you have a question for simon, please ask it. harry, you have a question for simon, please ask it.- harry, you have a question for simon, please ask it. thank you for havini me simon, please ask it. thank you for having me on- _ simon, please ask it. thank you for having me on. simon, _ simon, please ask it. thank you for having me on. simon, how- simon, please ask it. thank you for having me on. simon, how do - simon, please ask it. thank you for having me on. simon, how do i - simon, please ask it. thank you for having me on. simon, how do i get| having me on. simon, how do i get back— having me on. simon, how do i get back if— having me on. simon, how do i get back if i_ having me on. simon, how do i get back if i am — having me on. simon, how do i get back if i am in— having me on. simon, how do i get back if i am in south africa, in a red list — back if i am in south africa, in a red list country? of back if i am in south africa, in a red list country?— back if i am in south africa, in a red list country? of course, harry, as ou red list country? of course, harry, as you know. _ red list country? of course, harry, as you know, these _ red list country? of course, harry, as you know, these rules - red list country? of course, harry, as you know, these rules came - red list country? of course, harry, as you know, these rules came in l red list country? of course, harry, l as you know, these rules came in on thursday night, overnight, very suddenly, we had a flight ban, i have spoken, there are thousands of people in your position, i have spoken to a good few of them and it's absolutely awful news for people hoping to get back. of
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course, there are now flights running again, british airways, virgin atlantic, from south africa to the uk. anybody boarding one of those flights when they arrive, they have to go into self isolation, into hotel quarantine, forgive me, managed isolation, in one of the hotels on isolation row at heathrow airport, and that will cost you £2285 if you are a solo traveller. lots of people understandably do not want to do that and they are looking at going legally and responsibly through third countries. the idea being that if you spent ten full days out of south africa or one of the nine other southern african countries that are affected by this red list ruling, then you are deemed no longer to present a threat and you can travel back normally to the uk which means if you have been fully vaccinated then all you need
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to do is pre— booked this pcr test from when you arrive in one of the two following days and on top of that, be prepared to self isolate, you can do that at home, not in a hotel. typically, one of the destinations people are telling me about is egypt, because you can flight to cairo and maybe go to one of the resorts orjust head up the nile and again, stress, this has to be done legally and responsibly. simon, thank you so much. i will continue chatting with harry. i don't know, does that help you, that answer? what you didn't mention if you are supposed to be a best man at a wedding, aren't you? in december the 17th? yes, making the speech. what is the situation? at the moment. _ what is the situation? at the moment, i don't know, i called coronavirus _ moment, i don't know, i called coronavirus last saturday, i was watching — coronavirus last saturday, i was watching the rugby in a bar with some _ watching the rugby in a bar with some friends, the england south africa _ some friends, the england south africa match, on sunday i felt fine,
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'ust africa match, on sunday i felt fine, just a _ africa match, on sunday i felt fine, just a little — africa match, on sunday i felt fine, just a little bit tired but on monday— just a little bit tired but on monday i felt quite tired but i thought— monday i felt quite tired but i thought that was monday. and on tuesday— thought that was monday. and on tuesday i— thought that was monday. and on tuesday i started to feel ill but i wasn't _ tuesday i started to feel ill but i wasn't showing the normal coronavirus symptoms, i was quite feverish. _ coronavirus symptoms, i was quite feverish. my— coronavirus symptoms, i was quite feverish, myjoints were aching and i feverish, myjoints were aching and i had _ feverish, myjoints were aching and i had not _ feverish, myjoints were aching and i had not lost my taste or smell so i had not lost my taste or smell so iwent— i had not lost my taste or smell so i went to _ i had not lost my taste or smell so i went to my— i had not lost my taste or smell so i went to my doctor and asked what i should _ i went to my doctor and asked what i should do. _ i went to my doctor and asked what i should do, she recommended a coronavirus test so i took that and went— coronavirus test so i took that and went home — coronavirus test so i took that and went home and the next day i confirmed positive. the next day, i was also _ confirmed positive. the next day, i was also feeling much, much better so my— was also feeling much, much better so my symptoms on tuesday were quite mild but. _ so my symptoms on tuesday were quite mild but, yes, iwas ill, wednesday i mild but, yes, iwas ill, wednesday i was _ mild but, yes, iwas ill, wednesday i was already kind of fine, just with— i was already kind of fine, just with a — i was already kind of fine, just with a dry— i was already kind of fine, just with a dry cough and a little bit of a fever~ _ with a dry cough and a little bit of a fever~ |— with a dry cough and a little bit of a fever. ~ :, , :, ., with a dry cough and a little bit of a fever. ~ :, i. ., , a fever. i know you have been vaccinated. — a fever. i know you have been vaccinated, do _ a fever. i know you have been vaccinated, do you _ a fever. i know you have been vaccinated, do you think- a fever. i know you have been vaccinated, do you think this | a fever. i know you have been i vaccinated, do you think this was the omicron variant but briefly, we are almost out of time, if you were to make it to the uk is it conceivable any pcr test that you would do might still show you is positive? i would do might still show you is iositive? . would do might still show you is iositive? :, :, , ., ., positive? i am not sure, i am going to take a pcr _ positive? i am not sure, i am going to take a pcr test _ positive? i am not sure, i am going to take a pcr test tomorrow - positive? i am not sure, i am going to take a pcr test tomorrow and i to take a pcr test tomorrow and hopefully — to take a pcr test tomorrow and hopefully it comes up negative, i am
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feeling _ hopefully it comes up negative, i am feeling 100% tomorrow but i believe sometimes they kick up a positive result— sometimes they kick up a positive result even after you have got coronavirus.— result even after you have got coronavirus. :, , :, ., ,, coronavirus. good luck to you, thank ou for coronavirus. good luck to you, thank you for talking _ coronavirus. good luck to you, thank you for talking to _ coronavirus. good luck to you, thank you for talking to us. _ coronavirus. good luck to you, thank you for talking to us. just _ coronavirus. good luck to you, thank you for talking to us. just one - you for talking to us. just one example of one person in the situation they face based on the new rules, the new travel rules. human rights watch says taliban forces in afghanistan have either killed orforcibly disappeared more than a hundred former police and intelligence officers since the august takeover. the new taliban rulers had announced a general amnesty for all those linked to the previous government, and they reject the findings of this report. secunder kermani reports from kabul. researchers working on this report have gone into great detail tracing dozens of examples of the killings or extra—judicial detentions of former members of the afghan security forces. these are details that are increasingly difficult to ascertain with, for example, many local journalists having fled the country, those that remain understandably afraid of reporting that is critical of the taliban. when the group came to power
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in august, thy did declare a general amnesty for all those linked to the previous government. and it is certainly not the case that every single former policeman, former soldier, has been targeted in this way or even that the vast majority of them have been targeted in this way. but this report looked atjust four of afghanistan's 3a provinces and found there were credible allegations of more than 100 killings. now, former members of the security forces were meant to obtain letters of forgiveness from the taliban whilst handing in their weapons, but according to human rights watch, the taliban used that as an opportunity to detain and then kill some of them. at other times, human rights watch said that the taliban were able to access employment records and use that information to target former members of the security forces in raids on their homes and on theirfamily�*s homes. at least some of these incidents appear to be motivated by examples of local or personal rivalries where, for example, an individual was accused of mistreating taliban fighters in the past. but in other instances, the reasoning seems much less
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clear and in any case, there is no evidence that any of the victims received any kind of trial. the taliban have unsurprisingly rejected the findings of this report. they have created a commission, they say, to root out abuses committed by their fighters, but so far, they admit that no—one has been punished for any kind of killing of this kind. the snp will table a motion of censure today over the leadership of prime minister boris johnson at westminster. the party's westminster leader ian blackford said mrjohnson should be held to account for his "disastrous actions". he said his party would act as the "real opposition" by tabling a motion rebuking the prime minister. mrjohnson has insisted that his uk government is "delivering for the people of this country".
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you're watching bbc news. joanna is with you next to take you through until one o'clock. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. today, temperatures are going to be above average for the time of year, but tomorrow they will be below average for the time of year. today also we are looking at a cloudy and damp day. that is a lot of cloud around and it is being dragged in on a westerly wind from the atlantic, producing some rain and drizzle with it currently. but later, as this front comes in, we will see a return to some heavier rain, initially across northern ireland and scotland, and the wind will start to strengthen as well. you can see from the colours in this chart, it's going to be mild throughout the course of the day everywhere except the far north—east of scotland. so a lot of cloud around, some patchy, light rain and drizzle. some breaks developing
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across parts of england and wales. and as our weather front approaches, we will start to see some rain come in initially to northern ireland and then western scotland with increasing winds. temperatures today for only a celsius in lerwick, it's feeling cold for you, but is generally about 8 to 12 celsius. the average at this time of year, very roughly, is five to eight, north to south. through this evening and overnight, low pressure bringing the rain deepens as it moves across, taking some heavy bursts of rain with it and followed by a rush of showers coming in on the wind. it will be a windy night, not as windy as it was on the weekend, but along the exposed coasts and hills, we could see gusts up to gale force. temperature—wise, cold enough for a touch of frost in the northern isles, and a colder night than the one just gone, but we are looking at around 5 to 11 celsius north to south. mild start in the south, but through the day, as we pull in more of a northerly wind, you can see help most of us see the blue colours return.
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it will turn colder through the day tomorrow. tomorrow, it's a mixture of some sunny skies, wintry showers throughout the day across northern scotland, and those showers pushing south through the course of the day. feeling cold in that northerly wind. temperatures 2 in the north to about 8 or 9 as we push further south. as we head on into thursday, we will start off with some wintry showers along the north sea coastline. the wind won't be quite as strong. there will be a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine, and you can see the clouds thickening out towards the west, heralding the arrival of another weather front. and look at those temperatures, a to 8 celsius. temperatures are on the low side for this time of year. so, after the cold thursday, on friday, things start to improve a little bit in terms of temperatures as once again the rise.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11. later today, borisjohnson will set out plans to accelerate the booster jab programme with all adults in the uk to be offered a third vaccine. what that will do is basically increase your general levels of immunity which we hope will, to some extent, counter the potential drop in vaccine effectiveness we might find with this variant. face mask rules return in england in efforts to combat the spread of the omicron variant. travel rules also change from today. anyone coming into the uk must now take a pcr test and self—isolate until they get a negative result.
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barbados has removed the queen as head of state after almost a00 years and transitioned to a republic— swearing in its first ever barbadian president. thousands of families across the uk are still without power because of storm arwen. good morning and welcome to bbc news. new rules aimed at limiting the spread of the omicron variant of coronavirus have come into force today as more cases have been recorded in the uk. the prime minister is due to speak at a downing street news conference — where he'll set out plans to accelerate the booster jab programme — with all adults in the uk to be offered a third vaccine. face coverings must now be worn in shops and on public transport in england.
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and if you leave the country, you'll need to complete a pcr test on your arrival back into the uk and self—isolate until you receive the result. with all the details, here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. from this morning, face coverings are now compulsory in shops and on public transport in england. face coverings are already needed for most public places and transport in wales. masks are also required in pubs and restaurants in scotland and northern ireland. but there is some concern over how shoppers in england will cope with the return of face coverings. the vast majority of the public, when it was required to wear face coverings, were very good about it, and still are in scotland and wales, where the regulations were never removed. but there is definitely a minority of people who seem to think that the rules shouldn't apply to them and they are causing problems at stores. we've seen the levels of violence that shopworkers faced more than doubled during the pandemic. there are changes in schools, too, where staff and pupils in year 7 and above are also being advised to wear masks in communal areas. in scotland, that rule applies in class, as well.
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and international travellers coming to the uk now also need to take a pcr test within two days of their arrival and self—isolate until they get a negative result. but perhaps the biggest changes are the modifications to the booster programme — slashing the gap between second jab and booster from six months to three and opening up boosters to all those over 18. vaccines and boosters remain the prime defence against the virus. this is a programme which is all about speed, so you are right, the two challenges are going to be the logistics of actually delivering so much vaccine in a very short time, and, of course, it is important that people come forward and receive those jabs in good time, so they can build up that extra immunity that we need to be sure that we are protected against this new variant. so a challenging month ahead for the nhs and, obviously, people need to respond as soon as they get contacted and come forward. it's clear uk cases linked to the omicron
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variant are on the rise. the big unanswered questions remain — what impact the variant will have on illness, vaccines and transmission. dominic hughes, bbc news. jenny harries is the chief executive of the uk health security agency. she says we're in a period of great uncertainty. almost all the public health professionals are very concerned about the variant, it has far more mutations than anything we have seen before and some of the characteristics of these mutations give us concern that it might start to evade either natural immunity where we have been infected before or the great efforts we have made with vaccination. but all of this is a period of great uncertainty and that is the key point. we are taking precautionary measures in order that we buy ourselves some time, so we can carry through the scientific tests we normally do to understand the variant better. the boss of iceland has said
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that his staff will not be forcing shoppers to wear masks despite the introduction of new covid—19 rules in england — as we've been hearing they're now mandatory in shops and on public transport. managing director, richard walker, told us why he made this decision. we have around a,000 reported incidences of verbal abuse each year. that increased significantly during the first lockdown, and our staff received over 50 instances of abuse every week. since we stopped asking staff to challenge customers, that dropped down to only five per week. that is replicated across the whole industry. recent research by unite found that over 90% of retail workers have either been assaulted, threatened or abused in the last 12 months. so this is a big problem. our staff have been heroic, keeping food on the table and the shelves stacked throughout the pandemic and i won't be putting them in any harm's way.
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police in england have said they will work "in partnership with relevant business owners and their staff" to make sure people comply with the new regulations about wearing face coverings. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford is here richard walker makes a good point about the people on the front line, shop workers, what do they do if they are faced with someone who refuses to wear a mask? thea;r they are faced with someone who refuses to wear a mask? they are beini refuses to wear a mask? they are being asked _ refuses to wear a mask? they are being asked to — refuses to wear a mask? they are being asked to encourage - refuses to wear a mask? they are being asked to encourage people | refuses to wear a mask? they are i being asked to encourage people to wear masks which is after all the law. they cannot direct someone to wear a mask, that is something where you have to be a designated person in order to do that, but i should say that those businesses who are trying to discourage people from wearing masks and we know there aren't many but there are some who say don't wear a mask, they are actually breaking the law and you can receive a fine of £5,000 if you actively discourage people from wearing masks and a place whereby
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law they should and it's a £1000 fine if you are discouraging people from wearing masks in your shop under £200 fine if you are not wearing a mask when you are supposed to innate shop or public transport, banks, building societies, post offices. it is slightly groundhog day. this will be familiar going back to the start of the pandemic. the police have said they will use the four e tactics, engage, explain the four e tactics, engage, explain the rules, encourage them to encourage — abide by the rules but then enforce the rules by telling people to leave the shop or public transport and telling them to wear a face covering and if that does not happen they will use the fixed penalty notice finds. figs happen they will use the fixed penalty notice finds.— happen they will use the fixed penalty notice finds. as you say, we've been _ penalty notice finds. as you say, we've been around _ penalty notice finds. as you say, we've been around the _ penalty notice finds. as you say, we've been around the circle - penalty notice finds. as you say, we've been around the circle a l penalty notice finds. as you say, l we've been around the circle a few times now. is it possible to ascertain how many people followed the rules and what sort of proportional people do not followed the rules when they are there as an obligation? and how many fines get
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issued? it’s obligation? and how many fines get issued? �* . ' : obligation? and how many fines get issued? �* , , . :, obligation? and how many fines get issued? �*, , . :, issued? it's difficult to say. the fines completely _ issued? it's difficult to say. the fines completely stopped - issued? it's difficult to say. the fines completely stopped in - issued? it's difficult to say. the - fines completely stopped in england once the face covering rules stopped and they were imposed quite a lot in their thousands in fact last year and people have got used to not wearing face coverings and nobody knows quite what will happen next and anecdotally more people are wearing them today, so many people are aware that the regulations have come into force and they have wanted to comply by them. the issue is to what extent do people have fear at the moment. at the pandemic start a lot of people had a lot of fear and they felt not only obliged by law to comply but they also felt a moral obligation and for their own safety that they would wear face coverings. i don't think anybody yet knows at the moment how much fear there is out there about the new variant and how much people are going to actively want to comply beyond the fact that they are breaking the law. clearly the government is hoping that people will realise what this
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is an unknown variant with potentially high risks and people will want to apply by the new regulations but the police have been clear over night that they are going to start to enforce them again, so people should not be surprised if they are travelling on public transport if a police officer approaches them and ask them to put on a mask. if they own a shop and a police officer happens to be there all the shop owner calls the police, they might be encouraged to wear a face covering. by the way, i should say one other thing. in the government guidance they are encouraging people to wake face coverings, not the visors, not the transparent visors. who; coverings, not the visors, not the transparent visors.— transparent visors. why is that? they believe _ transparent visors. why is that? they believe the _ transparent visors. why is that? they believe the visors - transparent visors. why is that? they believe the visors are - transparent visors. why is that? they believe the visors are not i transparent visors. why is that? l they believe the visors are not as good at preventing the spread of the visors because when you breathe out you are still breathing out a lot of potentially infectious area, so a lot of people have got into the habit of thinking i could wear a visor and that is as good but the government guidance says they don't
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believe that face visors are as good as face coverings.— as face coverings. thank you, daniel. as face coverings. thank you, daniel- let — as face coverings. thank you, daniel. let me _ as face coverings. thank you, daniel. let me know- as face coverings. thank you, daniel. let me know your - as face coverings. thank you, - daniel. let me know your thoughts and experiences on this. you can get in touch with me directly on twitter. there are tougher restrictions on entering the uk for travellers. our reporter charlotte gallagher is at gatwick airport and joins me now. remind us what the situation is from today. remind us what the situation is from toda . :, , :, remind us what the situation is from toda . :, , ., ., remind us what the situation is from toda . ., ., today. people arriving at gatwick airiort today. people arriving at gatwick airport this _ today. people arriving at gatwick airport this morning _ today. people arriving at gatwick airport this morning on _ today. people arriving at gatwick airport this morning on the - today. people arriving at gatwick airport this morning on the first | today. people arriving at gatwick. airport this morning on the first to be affected by new restrictions and we have been speaking to people who arrive from jamaica and antigua, and some of them had no idea until they got to the airport that the situation had changed, so essentially people arriving into the uk, unless they are coming from the common travel area, which is the channel islands and ireland, will have to take a pcr test by the end of the second day after their arrival, and they will have to isolate until they get a negative
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result and this came in at four o'clock this morning, so thousands of people across the uk already affected by the new restrictions, and unfortunately for them as well, they will have to pay for the pcr test, lateralflow they will have to pay for the pcr test, lateral flow test are free, we have to pay for pcr from a private company and looking at my emails i've had emails from the companies offering test for £99, so it isn't cheap, and some people in the travel industry have called on the government to make these tests available for people on the nhs as it was such a last—minute decision and had been sprung on people and it is too much expense, they say and could have further imprecations for the travel industry. not everyone is happy with these new restrictions, in fact the first ministers of scotland and wales think they should go much further. what they want to see is people isolating for eight days and taking a second pcr test on the eighth day and then only being allowed to come out when they
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receive a negative result. however so far downing street have said what they are doing is proportionate and any further restrictions would damage the travel industry even further. . ~ damage the travel industry even further. :, ,, , :, damage the travel industry even further. . ~ , :, ., :, a drive to accelerate the booster programme is expected. is the nhs ready for this? the government is talking about half a millionjobs per day. let's speak to matthew taylor who is the chief executive of the nhs confederation — a membership body for organisations that commission and provide national health service services. thank you forjoining us. how quickly can that be stepped up? well, the nhs will do everything it possibly can to accelerate the booster programme and as long as the vaccine is available, nhs staff and the many volunteers also helping in the many volunteers also helping in the programme and other organisations are able to administer the vaccine, we can make progress,
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but it's important to recognise that this is a new additional pressure for the health service as we are going into the winter, so yes, we can accelerate the appointment and the supply of the vaccine is there, but it is going to add to those existing pleasures.— but it is going to add to those existing pleasures. when he states an additional— existing pleasures. when he states an additional pressure, _ existing pleasures. when he states an additional pressure, are - existing pleasures. when he states an additional pressure, are you - an additional pressure, are you saying that something that can be accommodated on top of what is currently being done or is it inevitably going to take away from the services that are currently available?— the services that are currently available? ., :, ., ., available? the national health service is a _ available? the national health service is a public— available? the national health service is a public service - available? the national health service is a public service and l available? the national health| service is a public service and if the government says the number one priority now is to accelerate the booster programme then that is what the nhs and those groups in primary care, at the front line of that, thatis care, at the front line of that, that is what they will prioritise because that is what the government is saying and they are saying, yes, we will do that they can exhilarate the booster process at a time
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everybody knows the primary care system is a long wait and there are long waits to see the gp and are sleep there are rates to see the gp that there is unprecedented demand on ambulance services, so in the nhs will do what it always does to respond to the demand, but we as a public, the government have to be realistic about the fact that that is going to add to the other pressures we face. can is going to add to the other pressures we face.- is going to add to the other pressures we face. can you give us examiles pressures we face. can you give us examples of _ pressures we face. can you give us examples of what _ pressures we face. can you give us examples of what it _ pressures we face. can you give us examples of what it will _ pressures we face. can you give us examples of what it will mean - pressures we face. can you give us examples of what it will mean if i examples of what it will mean if somebody wants to see their gp? will it be harderfor them by stomach somebody wants to see their gp? will it be harder for them by stomach are any services that will be cancelled that people might be thinking they are currently going to go and how? the consequences of accelerating the booster programme will vary from place to place, but overall if you ask a hard—pressed primary care system to do even more in relation to the vaccine, that will take up
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the time of people, everyone from receptionists to nurses, to everyone in the primary care team, more of their time will be taken up with this and that means it will have a knock—on effect, and yes, it will mean you have to wait longer to see your gp. what i would say is this. many gp practices and i was using on the other day offer you the opportunity of using their website to share with the doctor what your symptoms are and to have a telephone consultation, a digital consultation and if the offer is made available, take it, and if the doctor thinks you need a face—to—face appointment, the doctor will arrange it. but, yes it will increase the pressure is and we will have to wait longer to see the gp in some places and it does have a knock—on effect because if you're waiting to see the gp and you have a problem and it gets worse, you might end up going to emergency departments or calling an ambulance and as the statistics tell us, week
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in, week out, when its ambulance response times, emergency department response times, emergency department response times, emergency department response times, whether it is the big issue of the number of people on waiting lists and we will do more about government plans on this, any extra pressure you put on the health service has consequences throughout the system. x�*t�*ou service has consequences throughout the s stem. :, :, service has consequences throughout thes stem. :, ., , ., the system. you are explaining the situation in — the system. you are explaining the situation in a _ the system. you are explaining the situation in a very _ the system. you are explaining the situation in a very measured - the system. you are explaining the situation in a very measured way . the system. you are explaining thej situation in a very measured way in terms of this having consequences further down the line. how do you feel about what that will mean. i saw a quote from you previously when you set the nhs is now facing unsustainable pressures and running so hot it has reached a tipping point. how worried are you? i’m so hot it has reached a tipping point. how worried are you? i'm very concerned and _ point. how worried are you? i'm very concerned and we _ point. how worried are you? i'm very concerned and we should _ point. how worried are you? i'm very concerned and we should all- point. how worried are you? i'm very concerned and we should all be - concerned and we should all be concerned. the health service simply is not able to perform at the level that it wants to perform at and we cannot hide the fact that when we are under the kind of pressure we are under the kind of pressure we are under the kind of pressure we are under now it's the consequence of many different things. a0 the number of people in hospitals with
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covid has declined and lets hope it continues but ordinary winter pressures, that enormous backlog, when you bring those factors together, it does create incredible pressure and what we cannot hide is that has an impact on the quality of care we can provide and has an impact even on patient safety and nhs staff, care staff have been working flat out for two years and they continue to work flat out and they continue to work flat out and the thing that most impact on morale is when they're not able to provide the kind of service they want to provide an unfortunately for many people in the health service, that is currently the case.— people in the health service, that is currently the case. thank you for “oinini is currently the case. thank you for joining us. — is currently the case. thank you for joining us, matthew— is currently the case. thank you for joining us, matthew taylor. - the chief executive of the pharmaceuticalfirm, moderna, has warned that covid vaccines are unlikely to be as effective against the omicron variant of the virus as they have been against the delta type. stephane bancel told the financial times it was unclear to what extent the effectiveness would drop, but he said all the scientists he'd talked to had suggested it was,
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in his words, "not going to be good". many scientists belive the existing vaccines are likely to work but their effect may be weakened by the mutations to the omicron variant. moderna has already said it is working on an omicron—specific vaccine, as is us drugmaker pfizer. let's talk to dr deepti gurdasani, clinical epidemiologist at queen mary university of london. thank you so much forjoining us. at what point does a book on there are so many variations and mutations in a virus that it actually becomes something else? something the vaccines don't deal with it because we know with omicron there are 50 mutations. i we know with omicron there are 50 mutations. ~ . . we know with omicron there are 50 mutations. ~ :, , , mutations. i think the answer is that we really _ mutations. i think the answer is that we really don't _ mutations. i think the answer is that we really don't know. - mutations. i think the answer is i that we really don't know. omicron definitely has many more mutations than the previous variance and they change specific parts of the virus
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targeted by the antibody response and by our response to vaccines, so that's very, very important because it looks like it has the potential to massively or at least partially lead to a reduction in vaccine effectiveness. to some extent that can be overridden by very high antibody levels, the sort of antibody levels, the sort of antibody levels, the sort of antibody levels you see with boosting, which i think is the reason booster shots have been brought forward to allow more people to have a more robust response to overrun the extent to which we don't know yet. overrun the extent to which we don't know et. :, . ., ., , ,:, know yet. how much data is there so far to io know yet. how much data is there so far to go on — know yet. how much data is there so far to go on in _ know yet. how much data is there so far to go on in terms _ know yet. how much data is there so far to go on in terms of _ know yet. how much data is there so far to go on in terms of the - know yet. how much data is there so far to go on in terms of the impact i far to go on in terms of the impact of omicron? because south africa raised the alert, i think, on the 2ath of november but for instance here, on the 19th of november they are looking at contacts in a kfc in essex where one of the first two cases was identified, so clearly it's been out there sooner than it was properly identified in south
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africa. . . was properly identified in south africa. :, , ., , was properly identified in south africa. :, , :, africa. that is always the case with variance. when _ africa. that is always the case with variance. when the _ africa. that is always the case with variance. when the alpha - africa. that is always the case with variance. when the alpha variant i africa. that is always the case with i variance. when the alpha variant was identified it had been circulating for six weeks and it was similar with delta. here the identification might have been potentially earlier because of experience with other variance but was circulating before then and it's almost definitely have community transmission, extensively in many parts of the world, including the uk, so that sadly goes with identifying the variant and that means it is essential notjust to slow the further import of the variant, which is an important step, but to reduce transmission in the community because we have to be thinking about how we are going to limit spread while more people get their boosters and normal measures like mass, ventilation, mitigations like mass, ventilation, mitigations like working remotely come together to help people limit the spread and protect the nhs. fine to help people limit the spread and protect the nhs.— protect the nhs. one german scientist has _ protect the nhs. one german scientist has said _ protect the nhs. one german scientist has said that - protect the nhs. one german
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scientist has said that this i protect the nhs. one german i scientist has said that this could be a positive moment in that if it is a variant that was spread more rapidly and be milder, it could wipe out the previous more dangerous variance and hasten the demise of covid 19 and i can see you shaking your head. covid 19 and i can see you shaking our head. covid 19 and i can see you shaking your head-— covid 19 and i can see you shaking our head. , :, . ., your head. there is no evidence that and i think your head. there is no evidence that and i think we _ your head. there is no evidence that and i think we have _ your head. there is no evidence that and i think we have to _ your head. there is no evidence that and i think we have to look - your head. there is no evidence that and i think we have to look at - your head. there is no evidence that and i think we have to look at ? i and i think we have to look at? it's notjust about and i think we have to look at? it's not just about severity it's about transmissibility. if the variant is more transmissible, even if less severe it could cause many more deaths and so far the date we see from south africa tells us that hospitalisations have doubled in a single week, particularly in the pretoria area and although those cases are not severe and we are not seeing an increase in debt it's too early to tell and we are hearing about potentially how the number of young people, particular toddlers are getting ill and all of these are concerning. we don't know yet but to assume it is mild and it's good news is frankly completely reckless at
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this point in time. in is frankly completely reckless at this point in time.— is frankly completely reckless at this point in time. in terms of the measures that _ this point in time. in terms of the measures that are _ this point in time. in terms of the measures that are currently i this point in time. in terms of the| measures that are currently being taken, obviously precautions coming on quite quickly and things get learned each time there is a new development and something else happens in the future and lessons have been learned from how it was responded to previously, do you think that the measures currently, we are in the right place, as the assessments are made as to how serious omicron will be?- assessments are made as to how i serious omicron will be?- oh, serious omicron will be? hello? oh, can ou serious omicron will be? hello? oh, can you hear — serious omicron will be? hello? oh, can you hear me? — serious omicron will be? hello? oh, can you hear me? it's _ serious omicron will be? hello? oh, can you hear me? it's joanna, i serious omicron will be? hello? oh, can you hear me? it's joanna, can i can you hear me? it'sjoanna, can you hear me? i think sadly she can't hear me. i think we have some technical issues, so we will have to leave it. it isjoanna, can you hear me? we have got your back. brilliant? don't know what happened. just worrying about your view on the measures currently being undertaken
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to protect against where this potentially goes, because we are a bit in the dark in terms of understanding it as we've been discussing. i understanding it as we've been discussing-— discussing. i think it is three thinis, discussing. i think it is three things. first _ discussing. i think it is three things, first of _ discussing. i think it is three things, first of it _ discussing. i think it is three things, first of it is - discussing. i think it is three things, first of it is in - discussing. i think it is three l things, first of it is in present here, slow the spread and we learned that from long expense with other variance and that does not mean travel bans from south africa because those are unlikely to be effective because this is widespread. we need comprehensive quarantines and pre—flight quara ntines and pre—flight screening, quarantines and pre—flight screening, not screening afterwards and then you need to slow the spread within the country because it's clearly present and that means mitigations in schools where a lot of the spread of variance initially occurred, as well as mask mandates but notjust in specific regions, in all indoor public areas and hybrid bars, that message has to come through with well fitting masks and ventilation in indoor spaces, limit gatherings, if you can and work from home if possible. plus, the boosting
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we are having and extending vaccinations faster to younger people and children who haven't got it yet, all of those things will help but we need to buy time with limiting transmission with other measures as well which i don't think is happening as much as it could given that our nhs is under severe pressure and has been for about 18 or19 pressure and has been for about 18 or 19 weeks already.— or 19 weeks already. thank you so much forjoining _ or 19 weeks already. thank you so much forjoining us. _ and later the prime minister borisjohnson will lead a downing street briefing at apm. he will give an update on the acceleration of the booster programme — and you can watch that here on bbc news the greek prime minister has said that any citizens over 60 years old who don't get vaccinated against coronavirus will face monthly fines. the $113 fines will start being imposed from mid—january. the prime minister described them as not a form of punishment but the price of health, and an act ofjustice.
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thousands of people have spent a fourth night without power in the wake of storm arwen. the north—east of scotland remains the worst hit, with police declaring a major incident in the area due the widespread disruption. about 17,000 homes in the north east of england, yorkshire and lincolnshire are also still without power, and about 3,000 in the electricity north west area. mark mcalindon reports from cumbria. it might look like a winter wonderland up here but for the people of nenthead, it really is as if hell has frozen over. the power went off last week and still the village waits to be reconnected. has anyone told you when you might be able to expect to get power back on? i heard a rumour in the local shop, could be friday. how does that make you feel? it is a long time to go, isn't it? we've got the whole week. there's no lights, heating, no access to the internet. they are cut off, and for some, there is only one way to feed yourself. it's been absolutely freezing,
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trying to walk around the house, keep your body heat up. going out for walks, trying to cook outside. clay cooker. it's really a struggle. because i've only got wood and bits of fire. and i've had to chop a cabinet up this morning. they don't know when they will be back online, it's tough to play in the snow because there is no way for many to get warm afterwards. in alston too, some people at this reception centre are still without power, happy to be eating something warm. it's been really awful, being all alone in the cold. it's been difficult. it's been cold, dark, there's not been any hot food, any hot water. the community here is doing its best to make sure no one goes without. inviting people down to either come down with a flask to take away some soup or to sit down and get warmed up, charge their mobile phones, laptops, whatever they need to do, just to keep them going. but here too we meet others who are angry, wondering when help will arrive. i have six children under
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the age of eight—year—old. one of them is actually a seven—month—old and deaf, she is classed as a disabled child, and not one person has even tried to get up to see if we are ok. i'm actually now trying to get out of the village to send my four—year—old child to newcastle, to live with my nana. because i don't know when it's going to come back on. back in nenthead, a free hot food van was provided but the news that will really warm the blood here is when power returns. and you can keep up to date with the latest on how storm arwen is affecting where you live on your local bbc radio station. you can listen on fm, digital radio or via bbc sounds. some breaking news to bring you and we are hearing comments from oxford university on the efficacy of the vaccine against the new omicron variant of covid 19 and oxford
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university saying we have the necessary tools and processes in place for rapid development of an updated covid 19 vaccine if necessary. they say there is no evidence so far that vaccines will not provide high levels of protection against severe disease from omicron. thatjust three from oxford university which developed the astrazeneca vaccine. — just through. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. the temperatures are going to be up and down as we go through the course of this week. they are above average today, it has been a much milder start to the day. there is a lot of gloat around, some patchy light rain and drizzle, but we will see some breaks develop, particularly so across parts of england and wales. these are our temperatures, eight to 12 degrees, but still cold in the northern isles. in the latter part of the afternoon, heavier rain will push in across northern ireland and western scotland, accompanied by strengthening winds, and that is going to move across us as we go through the course of the night. it will be windy with
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the chance we could see some gales across some of the exposed coasts and hills, and it is colder night than last night for most with a touch of frost are quite likely across the northern isles. now, as we head on into tomorrow we start off with some rain and some wintry showers across northern scotland into lower levels and then this northerly follows in behind a weather front fishing south taking as rain. so it's going to turn colder from the north as we go through the day.
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hello, this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines: face mask rules return in england — in efforts to combat the spread of the omicron variant. later today, borisjohnson will set out plans to accelerate the boosterjab programme — with all adults in the uk to be offered a third vaccine. travel rules also change from today— anyone coming into the uk now needs to take a pcr test and self—isolate until they get a negative result. with new restrictions coming in to slow down the spread of the new variant of covid, how do you feel about the reintroduction of mandatory mask wearing in england? what other questions do you have about this new variant and what it means for you?
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get in touch with me on twitter @bbcjoannag and use the #bbcyourquestions. thousands of families across the uk are still without power because of storm arwen. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane. tributes have been paid to the former chelsea player and coventry managerjohn sillett who's died at the age of 85. he made his name with the london club winning the league title in 1955. but it was the fa cup win with coventry which was the crowning moment of his managerial career, lifting the trophy at wembley in 1987, having beaten tottenham after extra time, in what's been called one of the most entertaining finals in history.
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a statement on the clubs website said all were devastated and that he would be forever loved and remembered by sky blues fans. john sillett, who's died at the age of 85. cristiano ronaldo has hit back at the organiser of the ballon d'or, who claimed the player's only ambition was to win the award more times than lionel messi. d'or, who claimed the player's only ambition was to win the award more times than lionel messi. ronaldo accused pascal ferreh of "absolute disprespect" and said he only won for himself and the clubs he represents, not against anyone else. ronaldo has taken the honour five times, but last night, messi lifted the prize for the seventh time, having helped argentina win the copa america earlier this year, his first international honour. his three sons watching on in their matching suits. he was also top scorer in la liga last season before joining paris saint germain in the summer. the women's award went to barcelona captain alexia putellas. cricket australia's hopes of staging the fifth ashes test in perth could be injeopardy, with the local government insisting that players, staff and family members quarantine after entering the state. the first test gets underway on the 8th of december at the gabba in brisbane, but — with the emergence of the new varient — there's every chance the schedule could be heavily affected.
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jos buttler says it's the reality they've faced this year. it's sort of been a disjointed year, the one just gone. some good form, some bad form, the same the year before, but i certainly have nothing to lose. i have come here, the first time i have experienced an ashes series, and fully determined to enjoy all the challenges that that throws up and i'm excited to experience it, the good, the bad, the highs and lows along the way. tiger woods has said he was lucky not to lose his leg in the horrific car crash he was involved in earlier this year and that he doesn't expect to return to the tour full—time. woods was speaking for the first time since the accident. in an interview with golf digest he said it had been very difficult returning after his back surgeries, so following the dreadful injuries he suffered in the collision
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in february earlier this year — he felt it would be impossible to go back to being a professional golfer. i don't have to compete and play against the best players of the world to have a great life. i know that after my back fusion, for me, i had to prove to myself, i had to climb mount everest one more time. i had to do it. and i did. this time around, i don't think i'll have the body to climb mount everest and that's ok. but i can't participate in the game at all. i can still maybe, if my leg gets good enough, maybe kick off a tournament here or there. more on that interview on the bbc sport website. from the early hours of this morning, a whole new raft of changes have come into force — in an effort to tackle the spread of the coronavirus omicron variant.
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masks are now compulsory in shops and on public transport in england — measures that are already in force in the rest of the uk. all travellers entering britain will now have to take a pcr test within two days, and must self isolate, until they test negative. plus the booster programme is being rolled out to include all uk adults — although there's still no firm timeline in place for when people will have theirjabs. how have the new rules on masks been enforced? nina warhurst reports from liverpool lime street station. you will be forgiven in england if you have got out of the habit of grabbing one of these masks on your way out the door but as of today, they become mandatory once again. if you are going into a place of retail, but if you're getting your nails done, going to the post office, booking a holiday with a travel agent, you will be asked to wear a mask and you could be fined if you refuse to do so. in scotland, wales and northern ireland masks are already being worn as part
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of government policy and on top of that, vaccine passports are being asked for nightclubs and people are being asked to work from home where possible but certainly here in england, this is undoing a freedom given in the summer and there are questions around appliance, the extent to which people will agree to wear a mask because it will be reliant by and large on the individual. let's speak to bill. good to see you. what was the reaction from the many businesses you work with? the response was, no, not again — more restrictions on business that is already struggling to recover. big concern. the main concern with that is enforcement, how do they enforce people coming into their shops from wearing masks? big concerns for business. by and large, i would say it's 60— a0 this morning here in liverpool, some people putting on their masks as they board the train, it's not the way it was when masks were first introduced, do you think it's people getting used to it or do you think long term there will be a refusal?
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i think there is a start of people getting used to it, numbers of people had been continuing to wear masks even when they were not mandatory because they felt more comfortable, felt more reassured doing that and you are going to get that mix of people again, as they come into businesses. in fact, listening to the list of businesses that are affected by it, it's only retail, as we know, or if you are going into the hairdressers and people are going to be confused about it so there is a lack of clarity in the messaging. thank you. bill was telling me earlier at some businesses said this time round we are not going to pay the extra to get private security to help with mask enforcement and iceland today became one retailer saying they will not ask their staff to ask customers to put masks on. they already have enough on their plate in the run—up to christmas so enforcement
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will be a big issue, the home secretary says the rules will be reviewed in the coming weeks to see whether those rules have to be enhanced or cancelled before christmas. the mayor of london sadiq khan has urged people visiting the city to �*err on the side of caution' and wear a mask to protect others. i have been calling for this for some time, because the evidence is, before july the 19th when it was compulsory to wear a face mask on public transport backed up by enforcement with the power to issue fines and use british transport police, we saw compliance at around 85%. although since july the 19th, there has still been a condition of carriage, you are required to wear a face mask if you use public transport in london, we have not been able to issue fines, we have not been able to use british transport police or the police to enforce this, and i'm afraid compliance has gone down. so i welcome the announcement from the government and i would say to all your viewers, not only in public transport or in shops where you have
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to wear a face mask, if you can't keep a social distance and you're in a confined space, err on the side of caution, better safe than sorry, because we do know that one in three who has the virus will not show symptoms, and one of the most unselfish things you can do is to wear a face mask because it reduces the chances of passing this on. is to wear a face mask because it reduces the chances of passing this on. and i'm expecting to see a big increase in uptake on this on public transport in london. emma jones is the founder of enterprise nation, a small business support platform for the uk. thank you forjoining us. how do you feel about small business owners having to effectively police the wearing of masks? what is your response?— wearing of masks? what is your res-onse? :, :, ., response? good morning and thanks for havini response? good morning and thanks for having me _ response? good morning and thanks for having me on _ response? good morning and thanks for having me on the _ response? good morning and thanks for having me on the show. - response? good morning and thanks for having me on the show. we i response? good morning and thanks for having me on the show. we went out and spoke to our businesses as soon as this was announced it was coming today and i think small businesses are being really pragmatic in their response. bear in mind they have been through this experience before and retailers are saying to us anything that keeps people coming into shops is good, anything that hopefully prevents further national lockdown is good, and of course anything that makes
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their teams operating in shops feel safe is also good. naturally it will ensure some consumers feel a little more nervous about hitting the high street, but bearing in mind small businesses have done an incredible job over the past 18 months of diversifying their business so we have seen many shop openers and hospitality business owners build their online presence and what they are saying is we have been through this before, we are pretty resilient so will be pragmatic in response and policing it and making sure everyone feel safe to continue shopping. the boss of ice land has said he not force his staff to tell customers to put on mastiff they are not wearing them because they have had some negative experiences previously. dash—mac to put on masks. it is negative experiences previously. dash-mac to put on masks. it is very de iendent dash-mac to put on masks. it is very dependent on _ dash-mac to put on masks. it is very dependent on shopkeepers. - dash-mac to put on masks. it is very dependent on shopkeepers. small. dependent on shopkeepers. small businesses we support end up quite a
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small footprint in their shops so one of the things we saw 12 months ago when the shops are reopening, is essentially a queueing system. it helps the business owner or whoever is in the store engage with customers so it is a conversation starter when a customer comes in, do you feel safe in the store? how can we help you make a purchase? and also having the best of coming into the physical store whilst also directing people to say you can also buy online. so small business owners have been through this experience and are filling in a much stronger and are filling in a much stronger and fitter place to respond to it again and they are each enforcing their own particular practices within their store and using technology to have tuning systems but also making sure once customers are even in small spaces they are filling say. it are even in small spaces they are filling say-— filling say. it sounds like there will have to — filling say. it sounds like there will have to be _ filling say. it sounds like there will have to be extra _ filling say. it sounds like there will have to be extra time i filling say. it sounds like there i will have to be extra time built-in will have to be extra time built—in
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to the christmas shopping potential of this year because online is brilliant but there are deadlines to make sure you will get the stuff before christmas and if you are going out wanting a quick —— in and out of shops you might find it is not possible. bud out of shops you might find it is not possible-— not possible. and of course buy oane not possible. and of course buy online and _ not possible. and of course buy online and off-line _ not possible. and of course buy online and off-line from - not possible. and of course buy online and off-line from small. online and off—line from small businesses. the number one item that small businesses want to know at the moment is how they make sales. many small businesses did struggle over the past 18 months but some of them really connected with our customers and increase the sale volumes and thatis and increase the sale volumes and that is what businesses want to know, how do i keep my customers happy and make sure they get their products in time for christmas? please try and buy small this christmas whether that be going to your local high street shops are finding their online site and buying from them that way.— finding their online site and buying from them that way. obviously a lot of small businesses _ from them that way. obviously a lot of small businesses are _ from them that way. obviously a lot of small businesses are more i of small businesses are more resilient now, they have had to learn through the experience of the last almost two years. would you say
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thatis last almost two years. would you say that is universal? how many businesses have really struggled? it has been amazing. the businesses that have survived, fortunately we support communities about 500,000 founders. most of them have come through the last 18 months and see the feel financially fitter and they are digitally fitter because many of them said if no one is coming into my shop i have got to build an online presence and trade in marketplaces but most importantly they feel mentally stronger. so many business owners are said to me if i have managed to get through the past 18 months i can literally get anything and this is what we're seeing in the mandatory requirement today. the prime minister has enforced that, the country is responding and small businesses what they do best, saying we have been through this before, we are ready and able to respond but please do
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not cut off our sales ahead of christmas and our resilience is there to see.— christmas and our resilience is there to see. :, ,, i. , . there to see. thank you very much for “oinini there to see. thank you very much forjoining us. _ there to see. thank you very much forjoining us, emma _ there to see. thank you very much forjoining us, emma jones. - ministers have announced plans for tougher sentences for child abusers in england and wales. the maximum jail sentence for those who cause a child's death will increase from 1a years to life imprisonment. sentences are also set to go up from ten to 1a years for people who cause serious harm to children. the legislation is being dubbed "tony's law" following a campaign by the family of seven—year—old tony hudgell who had to have both legs amputated following abuse by his biological parents. zoe conwayjoined tony and his family as they were told the news legs amputated following abuse by his biological parents. zoe conwayjoined tony and his family as they were told the news byjustice secretary dominic raab. why is there a wig? judges wear wigs so that the
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criminals, when they are in court, can't tell the difference between them and ordinary people. i think it's made of horse wool. what do you think of that? tony hudgell might be in the presence of the deputy prime minister, justice secretary dominic raab, but he's certainly not daunted. and you don't know how to work that. but then seven—year—old tony hudgell isn't daunted by anything. what does this do? it's his fearlessness and energy that has so inspired his parents. paula and mark hudgell have been campaigning for tony's law — tougher sentences for people convicted of child cruelty. and, at this meeting, they are finding out that the government is going to act. we just think that what tony has done is inspiring. and the need to protect little ones like him is overwhelming. so we will be announcing that change very shortly and i wanted you to know before the general public. that is wonderful. thank you. you are a bit of a role model for all of us. what do you think about that? i don't know what that means. aw. tony was just a few weeks old when
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he suffered horrific injuries. his doctors feared he would not survive. he had been abused by his biological parents. he had suffered multiple organ failure, septicaemia and fractures to both thighs, lower legs, ankles, toes and thumbs. his legs had to be amputated. paula and mark hudgell began looking after him when he was four months old. presented in front of me was this tiny, broken, shut—down, underweight, legs in plaster, four—month—old baby. i broke down in tears. absolutely sobbed. and thought, i can't do this. but within two hours of being with him, there was no way i was going to leave him. this is tony with his biological parents tony smith and jodie simpson. in 2018, they were convicted of causing serious physical harm to a child and cruelty to a person under 16. they were each sentenced to ten years in prison.
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under the government's new law, they would get longer. we are announcing the increase in sentencing for causing death by cruelty to children from ia years to life in prison, and for causing serious injury by cruelty from ten years to ia years. and the reason is because children, and young children in particular, are the most vulnerable in our society. they have got to be given the strongest protection of the law. you have just met tony. i saw the two of you staring out the window and looking at where the queen lives. what do you make of him? he is an incredible young boy. he is full of energy. you would not really have a full understanding of what he has been through, but he is full of life, full of energy and deserves every chance to make the best of his potential. he is swimming, he is horse riding. and i think we need to make sure we are protecting young boys, young children like tony.
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every day for a month last year, tony walked around his local park to raise money for the hospital that saved his life. inspired by captain tom, who raised millions by walking 100 times around his garden, tony set out to raise £500 by walking ten kilometres. sometimes, it hurt, and sometimes he fell over. but he kept going. he completed ten kilometres and he raised more than £1.5 million. he is an inspiration every day. he never complains. he carries on, no matter what is thrown at him. all the challenges, he just gets himself back up and carries on. ten years for tony's parents that received the maximum sentence just doesn't seem enough for his lifelong injuries. so now, increasing that to 1a years, which, now, with the new sentencing that they have to serve two thirds, that is going to be almost ten
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years that they would have to spend inside — so that is double what they would have to now. tony, what has today been like? just amazing. amazing, indeed. for how many seven—year—olds get to work on the deputy prime minister's speech? so where have you got up to? not very far. — i have a team that draft the speech. as the justice secretary is discovering, tony hudgell never gives up. zoe conway, bbc news. the trial of ghislaine maxwell has started in new york with the prosecution saying the former girlfriend of the convicted sex offender jeffrey epstein "preyed on vulnerable young girls,
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manipulated them, and served them up to be sexually abused". maxwell, who is 59, faces eight charges of sex trafficking and other offences. she has pleaded not guilty and her defence says' she's being made a scapegoat for epstein's crimes. the disgraced financier took his own life while in jail in 2019. from new york nada tawfik reports. over the next few weeks, what plays out in this new york court house will be a crucial chapter in the twisted saga ofjeffrey epstein's sex—trafficking ring, and ghislaine maxwell's alleged role in it. as her highly awaited trial began, the world's eyes were trained on what the evidence presented here were would reveal. and so, too, were epstein's accusers, some arrived to show solidarity with the alleged victims. in opening statements, the government said ghislaine maxwell was a dangerous predator who provided a cover of respectability for epstein. prosecutors said she lured victims
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with a promise of a bright future, only to sexually abuse them. her defence attorney told the jury she was a convenient stand—in for epstein and the government would not be able to prove their case. he said the accusers' memories were corrupted and influenced by a desire for a big jackpot of money. there have been numerous investigations, documentaries exploring ghislaine maxwell's alleged crimes. but the allegations have never been aired in a criminal trial. the jury will be presented with a range of evidence from flight logs to testimonies from epstein's former staff. the four underage girls in the indictment, now grown women, are expected to take the stand. and other accusers from around the country can testify too, those with stories similar to teresa helm. according to her, she thought she had landed a job as a professional masseuse, but instead, walked right into a nightmare. i thought that her and i were making these connections and she did her role, played her role, beautifully. she was masterful at it.
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i walked myself to a predator's home. ghislaine maxwell's brother ian says at least one sibling will be present every day of the trial to support her. it is impossible for me to think that she would have been engaged in these really horrendous charges. if convicted, she faces up to 80 years in prison. the labour leader sir keir starmer has reshuffled his shadow cabinet. there was a big promotion for yvette cooper, to shadow home secretary, david lammy has been promoted to shadow foreign secretary, replacing lisa nandy and wes streeting becomes shadow health secretary. some labour mps believe there are growing divisions between sir starmer and deputy leader angela rayner. you know, i've been through a lot
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of reshuffles in the last 11 years. the leader makes the decisions. the gaffer picks the team. that is how it goes and that is how it has always gone. frankly, i couldn't really care less about the circus around who's in, who's out, who's up, who's down, who knew, who didn't. i care about the fact that there are people across this country who deserve a better settlement — they've deserved it for a long time. barbados has become the world's newest republic and in doing so has removed the queen as its head of state. prince charles attended the ceremony which saw sandra mason sworn in as the country's first president just after midnight local time. daniela relph reports from the barbadian capital bridgetown. the world's newest republic and a show of national pride. this constitutional shift in barbados is about asserting self—confidence and shedding the links to its colonial past. some of this country's most well—known names were among the vip guests attending the transition ceremony. and also here to watch it all play out, the prince of wales,
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invited to see his mother removed as a head of state — the first time that has happened anywhere in 30 years. for the final time on this caribbean island, he viewed a military march past and took the final salute. and then, the symbolic moment of transition. as the royal standard was lowered over barbados, it became a republic. it is hard to imagine that this event was not tinged with some sadness for the prince of wales. he has focused on the enduring friendship between two nations and also spoken directly about the pain of a shared history. from the darkest days of our past, and the appalling atrocity of slavery, which for ever stains our history, the people of this island forged their path
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with extraordinary fortitude. emancipation, self—government, and independence were your waypoints. freedom, justice and self—determination have been your guides. an acknowledgement of the past as this island look forward and swore in its first—ever president. i, sandra prunella mason, do swear that i will be faithful and bear true allegiance to barbados according to law, so help me god. casting aside the official link to the british monarchy, barbados is increasingly looking east to china for financial support. there are republican rumblings, too, in other caribbean nations. they will be watching this newest republic closely. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol.
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hello again. today, temperatures are going to be above average for the time of year, but tomorrow they will be below average for the time of year. today also we are looking at a cloudy and damp day. that is at lot of cloud around and it is being dragged in on a westerly wind from the atlantics, producing some rain and drizzle currently. but later, as this front comes in, we will see it return to some heavier rain, initially across northern ireland and scotland, and the wind will start to strengthen as well. you can see from the colours in this chart, it's going to be mild throughout the course of the day everywhere except the far north—east of scotland. so a lot of cloud around, some patchy, light rain and drizzle. some breaks developing across parts of england and wales. and as our weather front approaches, we will start to see some rain come in initially to northern ireland and then western temperatures today only four celsius
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in lerwick, it's feeling cold for you, but is generally about eight to 12 celsius. the average at this time of year, very roughly, is five to eight, north to south. through this evening and overnight, low pressure bringing the rain deepens as it moves across us, taking some heavy bursts of rain with it and followed by a rash of showers coming in on the wind. it will be a windy night, not as windy as it was on the weekend, but along the exposed coasts and hills, we could see gusts up to gale force. temperature wise, cold enough for a touch of frost in the northern isles, and a colder night than the one just gone, but we are looking for around five to 11 celsius north to south. a mild start in the south, but through the day, as we pull in more of a northerly wind, you can see help most of us see the blue colours return. it will turn colder through the day tomorrow. tomorrow, it's a mixture of some sunny skies, wintry showers throughout the day across northern scotland, and those showers pushing south through the course of the day. feeling cold in that northerly wind.
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temperatures two in the north to about eight or nine is to push further south. as we head on into thursday, we will start off with some wintry showers along the north sea coastline. the wind won't be quite as strong. there will be a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine, and you can see the clouds thickening out towards the west, heralding the arrival of another weather front. and look at those temperatures, four to eight celsius. temperatures are on the low side for this time of year. so, after the cold thursday, on friday, things start to improve a little bit in terms of temperatures as once again they rise.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... borisjohnson will set out plans to accelerate the boosterjab programme with all adults in the uk to be offered a third vaccine. what that will do is basically increase your general levels of immunity, which we hope will, to some extent, counter the potential drop in vaccine effectiveness that we might find with this variant. face mask rules return in england in efforts to combat the spread of the omicron variant. travel rules also change from today, anyone coming into the uk must now take a pcr test and self—isolate until they get a negative result. thousands of families across the uk are still without power because of storm arwen. barbados has removed the queen as head of state after almost a00
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years and transitioned to a republic, swearing in its first ever barbadian president. good morning and welcome to bbc news. new rules aimed at limiting the spread of the omicron variant of coronavirus have come into force today as more cases have been recorded in the uk. the prime minister is due to speak at a downing street news conference, where he'll set out plans to accelerate the boosterjab programme with all adults in the uk to be offered a third vaccine. face coverings must now be worn in shops and on public transport in england. and if you leave the country, you'll need to complete a pcr test on your arrival back into the uk and self—isolate until
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you receive the result. also, in the last hour, oxford university says there is no evidence that vaccines will not protect against severe disease from the omicron variant. with the latest on the current guidance, here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. from this morning, face coverings are now compulsory in shops and on public transport in england. face coverings are already needed for most public places and transport in wales. masks are also required in pubs and restaurants in scotland and northern ireland. but there is some concern over how shoppers in england will cope with the return of face coverings. the vast majority of the public, when it was required to wear face coverings, were very good about it, and still are in scotland and wales, where the regulations were never removed. but there is definitely a minority of people who seem to think that the rules shouldn't apply to them and they are causing problems at stores. we've seen the levels of violence that shopworkers faced more than doubled during the pandemic. there are changes in schools, too, where staff and pupils in year 7 and above are also being advised
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to wear masks in communal areas. in scotland, that rule applies in class, as well. and international travellers coming to the uk now also need to take a pcr test within two days of their arrival and self—isolate until they get a negative result. but perhaps the biggest changes are the modifications to the booster programme — slashing the gap between second jab and booster from six months to three and opening up boosters to all those over 18. vaccines and boosters remain the prime defence against the virus. this is a programme which is all about speed, so you are right, the two challenges are going to be the logistics of actually delivering so much vaccine in a very short time, and, of course, it is important that people come forward and receive those jabs in good time, so they can build up that extra immunity that we need to be sure that we are protected against this new variant. so a challenging month ahead for the nhs and, obviously, people need to respond as soon as they get contacted
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and come forward. it's clear uk cases linked to the omicron variant are on the rise. the big unanswered questions remain — what impact the variant will have on illness, vaccines and transmission? dominic hughes, bbc news. i'm joined now by our political correspondent, chris mason. chris, the prime minister giving a news conference later. do we already know basically what he's going to say? is there likely to be anything extra? �* . . say? is there likely to be anything extra? �*, ., , ., say? is there likely to be anything extra? �*, ., , :, ., �* extra? it's a good question. i don't honestly know _ extra? it's a good question. i don't honestly know the _ extra? it's a good question. i don't honestly know the answer - extra? it's a good question. i don't honestly know the answer in i extra? it's a good question. i don't honestly know the answer in that l extra? it's a good question. i don't i honestly know the answer in that we are not being steered towards any particular fresh announcements but i think the essence of what i think will be about it is detail, as mentioned in the commons debates around the practicalities that dominic was talking about bobby how —— about how the scaling up in the
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booster will be done. secondly, i do think this is interesting. this isn't something that can be pre—briefed. it's all in tone and emphasis. it's exactly what tone the prime minister strikes. the other thing that we know very strikingly at the moment around this new variant is how much we don't know. the government has clearly decided that it wants to be cautious, that it wants to act quicklyjust in case the evidence over the coming weeks is bleak or isn't great but at the same time, the consistent message from ministers this morning out and about was to say that we as individuals should not be radically changing our plans. yes, we should abide in england with the new regulations as far as mask wearing is concerned but we shouldn't necessarily be radically altering our day—to—day experience in terms of what we are going to do and the people that we meet. ijust of what we are going to do and the people that we meet. i just wonder just what tone the prime minister
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will strike about how we should conduct our day—to—day life, because on the one hand, the government doesn't want to give us a sense of panic, but on the other hand, does want to be seen as pragmatic and cautious in terms of the threat, the specifics of which, we don't know much about. listen out for the tone, i would say. in much about. listen out for the tone, i would say-— i would say. in terms of the political _ i would say. in terms of the political consensus - i would say. in terms of the political consensus around | i would say. in terms of the i political consensus around what i would say. in terms of the - political consensus around what has been said so far in the government's approach? been said so far in the government's ai iroach? , ., :, :, been said so far in the government's aiiroach? ,., :, :, , approach? there is a lot of support. what we heard _ approach? there is a lot of support. what we heard from _ approach? there is a lot of support. what we heard from labour- approach? there is a lot of support. what we heard from labour in i approach? there is a lot of support. what we heard from labour in the i what we heard from labour in the last couple of days, they have welcomed the fact that the government has acted cautiously and relatively quickly, despite the fact that there are some voices including voices in health are that think that the uk and broader european countries have overreacted. there has been some concerns from some conservative backbenchers around this reimposition of restrictions of
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liberties. those are relatively small and given labour pus outlook, there is nothing there numerically to cause concern. this happens at apm this morning and they are only going to discuss it after the measure has kicked in. we need to keep an eye on further down the track because when we get to that week before christmas, when certainly the mask regulation in england is due to expire, parliament will have already risen for its christmas holiday, so you wonder how that whole debate might play outcome that whole debate might play outcome that date to rant about the 21st of december. depending on how the data looks then, there might either be an extension orfor the looks then, there might either be an extension or for the opposite, for the liberation of the whole business of having to wear masks quite as frequently in england as we are now having to do. there will be democracy if you like around
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parliament for that to happen. thank ou. and later, the prime minister borisjohnson will lead a downing street briefing at apm. he will give an update on the acceleration of the booster programme and you can watch that here on bbc news. i'm joined now by chris hopson, who is chief executive of nhs providers, which represents hospital trusts in england. it's the membership organisation for all of those services. welcome, thank you forjoining us. there is going to be this big booster programme roll—out. will the nhs be able to cope? programme roll-out. will the nhs be able to cope?— able to cope? well, it's clearly ioiin to able to cope? well, it's clearly going to be — able to cope? well, it's clearly going to be a _ able to cope? well, it's clearly going to be a very _ able to cope? well, it's clearly going to be a very difficult i going to be a very difficult challenge. we know that if we are going to try and vaccinate that a number of extra people compared to what is already a pretty complex programme in terms of boosters and younger people and in terms of
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people who haven't even had their first and second jobs. we know that adding these people may be an extra challenge but my argument is if you look at what we have achieved, i think we have done a really good job of it, so i think it will be a big challenge, because it's coming at a point when the services under huge amounts of pressure, but as i've said, we have demonstrated time and time again enter the last 18 months that the nhs is very good at meeting whatever is thrown at us.— whatever is thrown at us. obviously, we've seen — whatever is thrown at us. obviously, we've seen as _ whatever is thrown at us. obviously, we've seen as you _ whatever is thrown at us. obviously, we've seen as you say _ whatever is thrown at us. obviously, we've seen as you say there, - whatever is thrown at us. obviously, we've seen as you say there, the i we've seen as you say there, the impact of meeting the new challenges every time has been the backlog of cases that aren't being dealt with. where are things currently in terms of the backlog? how much has been dealt with while there has been, i suppose, a period where the nhs has been able to get back relatively to normal and deal with that and how is that likely to be impacted with what
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is coming? them enough we've got three things going on at once. firstly, we are very busy at this time of year. many chief executives are saying to us and precedent me —— unprecedentedly... the second thing to say is that nhs staff have absolutely been flat out, trying to do this combination of dealing with those 6000 covid patients and make sure that we deal with these very high levels of demand in emergency care, particularly ambulances and emergency departments, but also getting through that backlog as quickly as possible. the getting through that backlog as quickly as possible.— getting through that backlog as quickly as possible. the third thing that is going _ quickly as possible. the third thing that is going on — quickly as possible. the third thing that is going on is _ quickly as possible. the third thing that is going on is the _ quickly as possible. the third thing that is going on is the reality i quickly as possible. the third thing that is going on is the reality is i that is going on is the reality is that is going on is the reality is that we are, even though we are going full pelt, we are finding it difficult to keep up with the amount of demands that we have got coming in. the answer is that the waiting list is growing, it is currently just under 6 million. that is 6
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million to many people. our executives absolutely realise that there is a moral imperative to get through that backlog are quickly as possible. but we can't do absolutely everything, and clearly, the bit that we are all waiting to see, which you have been talking about, is what this impact of the omicron variant will have. clearly, what we talked about, expanding the booster, which talks about emergency care pathways, we've talked about a very busy amount of backlog, clearly if that 6000 patients goes up, and don't forget we have 3a,000 covid patients injanuary, and if that number goes over the 6000, it's clearly because of the omicron variant and it will bring more pressure. the final point of this little bit is that we are doing the very best we can because that's what we here for. very best we can because that's what we here for-— we here for. what is morale like in the nhs? i—
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we here for. what is morale like in the nhs? ithink— we here for. what is morale like in the nhs? | think it's _ we here for. what is morale like in the nhs? | think it's hard. - we here for. what is morale like in the nhs? | think it's hard. our- the nhs? i think it's hard. our staff were _ the nhs? i think it's hard. our staff were saying _ the nhs? i think it's hard. our staff were saying before i the nhs? i think it's hard. our staff were saying before we i the nhs? | think it's hard. 0ur| staff were saying before we had the nhs? | think it's hard. our- staff were saying before we had even got into covid—19 that we were working incredibly hard. the difficult bits, if i'm honest, for the service is that we have gone through this decade of the longest and deepest financial squeeze in nhs history, where we were not increasing the amount of funding for the nhs over the last decade to keep up the nhs over the last decade to keep up with the demands, so we haven't been able to build the extra capacity. we've been trying to close that gap by asking our staff to work harder and harder and they were telling us before we even got into covid—19 that it was unsustainable but we are asking them now to make a special effort in terms of when covid first arrived. in the northern half of the country, we were telling people to deal with the second wave in the north. we were then saying we are seeing this 3a,000 hospitalised covid—19 patients, please help them. we are now saying to them again,
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please, work harder in terms of dealing with all of these pressures that we have just been talking about. what we can't do is keep asking our staff time after time after time to keep going yet again, so that is why lots of us in the nhs have been saying, we have to get to a place, where we have got the right number of people, we have to do the long term workforce planning properly and we need to make sure that on a sustainable basis, our staff are given the workloads that they can deal with. when i go out and talk on the front line and i visit lots of places as part of my job, what people want to know is they get the point that they are being asked to go again but what they're saying to me is, chris, can you really guarantee that you are not going to be asking us yet again in six months' time, in 12 months' time, in 18 months' time? we have to get into a position where we can reassure our staff that we are not going to keep asking them time after time to keep going again. idiatomic!
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going to keep asking them time after time to keep going again.— time to keep going again. would you mind staying — time to keep going again. would you mind staying with _ time to keep going again. would you mind staying with us _ time to keep going again. would you mind staying with us for— time to keep going again. would you mind staying with us for a _ time to keep going again. would you mind staying with us for a moment? | mind staying with us for a moment? it'sjust time to mind staying with us for a moment? it's just time to say goodbye to anyone watching us on bbc two. thank you for your company this morning and i hope you have a good afternoon. goodbye. so, just to pick up afternoon. goodbye. so, just to pick up on what you are talking about there in terms of building... i mean, you are talking about the future, obviously, and how nhs is built, where there is sufficient workforce to deal with extra pressures, when they come along, but then also to take along in normal times. how is that achieved? obviously, it makes no sense to gauff effectively, you need workers to come and go to deal with that. how do you see that working? i like our how do you see that working? i like your concept _ how do you see that working? i like your concept of _ how do you see that working? i like your concept of what _ how do you see that working? i like your concept of what we _ how do you see that working? i i. «go your concept of what we need the nhs to be out is a level where we have got the right level of capacity to
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deal with the demand. we are asking our staff to take a reasonable workloads. they might be times where we ask them to undertake more. what is the answer, there are really two or three things. the first is we have to be honest about the amount of funding that the nhs needs in order to reach that steady, sustainable state and whilst the extra money has come forward and starts flowing next year is helpful, all it does is it takes us back to the long—term average increases that the long—term average increases that the nhs has received. the reality is, the health foundation were saying this two months ago, we are going to need 1 million more staff over the next decade to match the level of demand. when issue is the many, but the second is what i have been saying, which is the workforce, which is what we need is we need to
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expand our workforce to have the right level of skills with the right numbers of people and we need to give them a reasonable workloads. we need for example to ensure that those who want to work flexibly, which many more people want to do these days, that they can do so. again, we haven't got the long—term workflows planning that we need. —— workforce planning. the government had the chance to put that system in place but they rejected an amendment from jeremy hunt, therefore the health secretary was putting forward that commitment when the bill went through the house of commons. we need to get our act together on the funding and the workforce. just need to get our act together on the funding and the workforce.- funding and the workforce. just to brini funding and the workforce. just to bring things _ funding and the workforce. just to bring things back _ funding and the workforce. just to bring things back to _ funding and the workforce. just to bring things back to where - funding and the workforce. just to bring things back to where we i funding and the workforce. just to bring things back to where we are | bring things back to where we are now as we head into winter and we obviously have the omicron variant with us, what are your thoughts with regards to how things are going to be in the weeks ahead? weill. regards to how things are going to be in the weeks ahead?— regards to how things are going to be in the weeks ahead? well, we know
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that we are this _ be in the weeks ahead? well, we know that we are this busy, _ be in the weeks ahead? well, we know that we are this busy, we _ be in the weeks ahead? well, we know that we are this busy, we really - that we are this busy, we really are. the phrase we have used is beyond full stretch and that is before we hit the peak that we normally hit injanuary, so i think people are already worried about the degree of pressure that we are likely to be under injanuary. clearly, if omicron turns out to be able to evade the vaccine to a significant extent and the symptoms turn out to be like they currently have shown under the delta variant, then we could have even more cases that could cause even more worry. this is what the nhs is here for. we are here to deal with these kind of pressures and every single member of nhs staff, they will be doing everything they can to provide the best possible care to everybody who needsit best possible care to everybody who needs it as quickly as we possible can because that's what we're here for. . .. can because that's what we're here for. . ~' , :, , can because that's what we're here for. :, ,, i. , . can because that's what we're here for. . ,. ,, , : :, for. thank you very much indeed for “oinini for. thank you very much indeed for joining us- — for. thank you very much indeed for joining us. chris— for. thank you very much indeed for joining us. chris from _ for. thank you very much indeed for joining us. chris from nhs- joining us. chris from nhs
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providers. now we are going to a news conference from the welsh government to their response to the omicron variant. let's listen in. the actions we _ variant. let's listen in. the actions we are _ variant. let's listen in. the actions we are taking i variant. let's listen in. the actions we are taking in i variant. let's listen in. tio actions we are taking in wales variant. let's listen in. tie: actions we are taking in wales to protect you. jill will set out how we are expanding the vaccination programme in line with the latest advice from the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation. now, the world health organization designated this new variant of coronavirus now called omicron, a variant of concern on friday. this is based on evidence of several mutations which have an impact on how it behaves, for example, on how easily it spreads or the severity of the illness it causes. over the weekend, cases of the omicron variant have been identified around the world from australia to israel,
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throughout europe and in canada. there have been 14 confirmed cases in the united kingdom but more are under investigation. there are currently no reported cases in wales. but we should be so paired —— prepared to see it being identified. speaks welsh. this is another serious development in the pandemic and one that we are taking very seriously. however, there is a lot that we don't know about this variant and we will not know the answers until more research has been done. the european centre for diseases prevention and control has warned that this is the most divergent variant so far. to help keep wales safe and the people in wales safe and to slow the spread of
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the new variant, we have put in place a series of measures over the last few days. the main focus of these have been international travel. in line with the action taken in the rest of the united kingdom, we have placed ten southern african countries on the red list for international travel and this means that anyone travelling back to wales from these countries will have to complete ten days of quarantine in a managed quarantine hotel and there can be no exceptions to this rule. in addition, vaccinated travellers coming back to the united kingdom from and non—registered country will have to self isolate and take a pcr test after two days. they can stop self isolating if they have a negative result. if the test is positive, they will have to self isolate for ten days and the people they live with you also need to
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isolate until they have a negative test. the rules on an vaccinated travellers are not changing. they must self isolate for ten days and take a pcr test on day two and day eight. these new rules replace the requirements for vaccinated travellers to have a lateral flow test when travelling from overseas and is another step to more rapid sequencing to help prevent the variance from spreading in our communities. as you may be aware, the first minister and the first minister of scotland have jointly called the uk government to go further and to reinstate the need for a day eight pcr test for vaccinated travellers as an added safeguard. the education minister last night strengthened the use of masks in secondary schools, colleges until the rest of the term. all staff and pupils need to wear masks
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indoors. self isolation rules — everywhere identified it as a close contact in wales will need to self isolate for ten days regardless of their vaccination status or age. we hope that these actions, when taken together, with all the other protections we have in wales will slow the spread of this variant. jill will now explain how we will be prioritising vaccination as we expand the booster programme to keep people in wales say. thank expand the booster programme to keep people in wales say.— people in wales say. thank you, minister. as _ people in wales say. thank you, minister. as the _ people in wales say. thank you, minister. as the minister - people in wales say. thank you, minister. as the minister has - minister. as the minister has explained, we are urgently expanding the vaccination programme in wales in line with the latestjcvi advice. the chair of the jcvi has in line with the latestjcvi advice. the chair of thejcvi has indicated that we get the greatest benefit from the vaccines if they are deployed before any future omicron
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waves start. we will therefore be making booster is available to all adults in wales, which means expanding the programme to include all 18 to 39—year—olds, who have had the first two doses of the vaccine. we will vaccinate older people and those in risk groups first and have been making excellent progress with more than 840,000 booster vaccines given to date. the majority of people aged 65 and over, people living and working in care homes and front line nhs workers have already had the booster vaccine. thejcvi is now recommending that we speed up the roll—out by reducing the minimum into role between the second dose of the vaccine and the booster to three months. we will follow this advice and reduce the interval as quickly as possible. we will also offer the
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booster to all people who are severely immuno compromised, who have completed their primary course of three doses of the vaccine. the jcvi has recommended that all 12 to 15—year—olds are offered a second dose of the pfizer vaccine at least 12 weeks after the first dose. we will also follow this advice. expanding the vaccine programme will be challenging, it will mean increasing the speed of the roll—out and increasing the workforce to ensure we can offer boosters and second vaccines to everyone who is eligible. we have the supply of the vaccine and we are working with the nhs at speed to put plans in place this week. we are looking at creating more capacity in clinics, using drive—through models, working with primary care colleagues wherever we can and with other public service staff, who are trained vaccinators, to ensure that
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we can protect as many people as possible. as the minister said, there is a lot that we do not yet know about this variant but increasing the protection that vaccination gives us both individually and collectively as we face the prospect of a new and serious variant and a possible further spread of the disease will help. it is not too late to be vaccinated. i would urge everyone to come forward for the vaccine that has not yet had one or two doses. it does not matter if you have already had covid—19 infection is the vaccine will give you longer lasting protection against the virus and especially as it looks like there is a higher risk of reinfection with the new omicron variant. minister, i will now head back to you. speaks welsh. we believe that a briefing
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from the welsh government and bring in our correspondence, who is in cardiff. your summary of what we have heard?— cardiff. your summary of what we have heard? ~ . , ., . ~ have heard? well, what you can take from that is — have heard? well, what you can take from that is the _ have heard? well, what you can take from that is the welsh _ have heard? well, what you can take from that is the welsh government l from that is the welsh government have put in a few measures responding to this new variant, the international travel measures as you heard outlined thereby eluned morgan and also some changes in schools for older students, so wearing masks in classrooms in secondary schools and colleges and also in universities. but will they, should they go further? there is no full review of the covid—19 measures here in wales until later next week and we already have the mandatory use of face masks inside shops, supermarkets and on public transport. the advice to work from home has always stayed in place here in wales, so do they need to act further? i suppose that extra week gives ministers a bit more time to contemplate what they expect to see from this variant but probably
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not enough time to know whether it will cause greater hospitalisations. that is one of the key indicators really to work out whether or not we need to bring back potentially a lockdown. nobody hopes for that is whether stronger measures, extending covid—19 passes, closing night clubs, potentially whether those measures might be necessary. thank ou ve measures might be necessary. thank you very much- _ measures might be necessary. thank you very much. now _ measures might be necessary. thank you very much. now time _ measures might be necessary. thank you very much. now time for - measures might be necessary. thank you very much. now time for a - you very much. now time for a weather update. hello again. the temperatures are going to be up and down as we go through the course of this week. they are above average today, it has been a much milder start to the day. there is a lot of gloat around, some patchy light rain and drizzle, but we will see some breaks develop, particularly so across parts of england and wales. these are our temperatures, eight to 12 degrees, but still cold in the northern isles. in the latter part of the afternoon, heavier rain will push in across northern ireland and western scotland, accompanied by strengthening winds, and that is going to move across us as we go through the
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course of the night. it will be windy with the chance we could see some gales across some of the exposed coasts and hills, and it colder night than last night for most with a touch of frost are quite likely across the northern isles. now, as we head on into tomorrow, we'll start off with some rain and some wintry showers across northern scotland into lower levels and then this northerly follows in behind a weather front fishing south taking as rain.
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hello, this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: borisjohnson will set out plans to accelerate the boosterjab programme — with all adults in the uk to be offered a third vaccine. what that will do is basically increase your general levels of immunity which we hope will, to some extent, counter the potential drop in vaccine effectiveness we might find with this variant. face mask rules return in england
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in an effort to combat the spread of the omicron variant. travel rules also change from today — anyone coming into the uk must now take a pcr test and self—isolate until they get a negative result. thousands of families across the uk are still without power because of storm arwen. barbados has removed the queen as head of state after almost 400 years and transitioned to a republic, swearing in its first ever president. a new proposal where homeowners will be able to band together with their neighbours to hold a referendum on adding extensions to their properties, has been supported by the housing secretary mr gove. under the plans, 20% of residents or ten homeowners, whicheverfigure is higher, could apply to their local council to hold a referendum on a design code for their street. joining me now is ben southwood who is a senior fellow at policy exchange, a think tank who orignally proposed the idea
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to give homeowners more say over the buildings in their area. can you explain how it would work? you give the 110w now in the planning system it can be hard for groups of people to get together and if they try to do more they would find themselves getting nowhere and people might object near them and this proposal would allow them and this proposal would allow them to make a proposal and vote on that proposal. if the proposal went through they would then get permission. i through they would then get permission-— through they would then get ermission. . , , ., through they would then get ermission. . , , . , ., permission. i assume the idea is to sto permission. i assume the idea is to step conflict _ permission. i assume the idea is to stop conflict between _ permission. i assume the idea is to stop conflict between neighbours i stop conflict between neighbours where one resident in a street wants to do something and other neighbours disagree, is that it? this to do something and other neighbours disagree, is that it?— disagree, is that it? this would allow them _ disagree, is that it? this would allow them all _ disagree, is that it? this would allow them all to _ disagree, is that it? this would allow them all to get _ disagree, is that it? this would allow them all to get the - disagree, is that it? this would allow them all to get the same| allow them all to get the same permission. most recent the country, i imagine, 95% or more if they had a vote would vote to keep things the same but there are a small
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percentage of streets were more can be done, they might be run down streets are in areas where people would like more bedrooms because property is very expensive in the area and there is scarcity and those areas want to get together and decide they want to do more or improve the look of the houses or take it into their own hands like neighbourhood planning does but at a smaller level for individual streets. ., , ., smaller level for individual streets. ., , streets. can you explain why you think it is a _ streets. can you explain why you think it is a better— streets. can you explain why you think it is a better system - streets. can you explain why you think it is a better system than l streets. can you explain why you l think it is a better system than the current one with a home owner does not have to deal with neighbours at all and go to the council to apply? it's not true that people don't have to deal with the neighbours. in our current system, if you lodge a planning application to do a lot more with your property i'm sure you never would have a lot to say about that and you would have to deal with them. the current planning system deals well with large, bespoke situations, but in small situations where the impact is really limited to an individual street it is best
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to an individual street it is best to let people have the decision themselves rather than put the blame on individual council officers. the community can decide what it wants to do with its own street.— to do with its own street. explained that about the _ to do with its own street. explained that about the blame _ to do with its own street. explained that about the blame on _ to do with its own street. explained that about the blame on planning i that about the blame on planning officers. is that the issue you are looking to address primarily? {line officers. is that the issue you are looking to address primarily? one of the key issues _ looking to address primarily? one of the key issues is _ looking to address primarily? one of the key issues is there _ looking to address primarily? one of the key issues is there is _ looking to address primarily? one of the key issues is there is blame - the key issues is there is blame avoidance by officers, they understand that as a risk that if anything goes wrong the impact would be on them personally. this will get around that by taking the decision to those affected and they can decide whether they want the street of rundown 1913 semi detached buildings into a georgian terraced and that might bring more value to the property are granny to moving but that does not need to be something to overstretched council
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officers deciding on big strategic decisions for a large area, they would not have to go into the minutiae of smaller changes to streets. 50 minutiae of smaller changes to streets. ,, ., ., . streets. so it would require quite a stron: streets. so it would require quite a strong level— streets. so it would require quite a strong level of _ streets. so it would require quite a strong level of community - strong level of community engagement. do you sense an appetite for that? you mentioned a statistic which said you anticipate the majority of people would not necessarily get involved with this? what we have seen from neighbourhood planning is where there is a lot of expertise in the community already in the members in the area they can get a neighbourhood plan going. in this case, because it is for a small area and because the requirements area and because the requirements are lower, you just have to decide what the basic rules are, we set out the categories of rules you can put the categories of rules you can put the men in the pot the design should look like, the demands are lower but i still think 97%, i've done a big model and i reckon at least 97% of people eligible will not use this right but 3% is actually very
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significant, still tens of thousands of streets which could do more with what they have.— of streets which could do more with what they have. thank you very much for joining us. from the early hours of this morning, a whole new raft of changes have come into force in an effort to tackle the spread of the coronavirus omicron variant. masks are now compulsory in shops and on public transport in england — measures that are already in force in the rest of the uk. all travellers entering britain will now have to take a pcr test within two days, and must self—isolate until they test negative. plus the booster programme is being rolled out to include all uk adults — although there's still no firm timeline in place for when people will have theirjabs. how have the new rules on masks been enforced? nina warhurst reports from liverpool lime street station. you'd be forgiven in england if you have got out of the habit
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of grabbing one of these masks on your way out the door but as of today, they become mandatory once again. if you are going into a place of retail, but if you're getting your nails done, going to the post office, booking a holiday with a travel agent, you will be asked to wear a mask and you could be fined if you refuse to do so. in scotland, wales and northern ireland masks are already being worn as part of government policy and on top of that, vaccine passports are being asked for nightclubs and people are being asked to work from home where possible but certainly here in england, this is undoing a freedom given in the summer and there are questions around compliance, the extent to which people will agree to wear a mask because it will be reliant by and large on the individual. let's speak to bill. good to see you. what was the reaction from the many businesses you work with? the response was, oh, no, not again — more restrictions on business that is already struggling to recover.
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big concern. the main concern with that is enforcement, how do they enforce people coming into their shops from wearing masks? big concerns for business. by and large, i would say it's 60—40 this morning here in liverpool, some people putting on their masks as they board the train, it's not the way it was when masks were first introduced, do you think it's people getting used to it or do you think longer term there will be a refusal? i think there is a start of people getting used to it, numbers of people had been continuing to wear masks even when they were not mandatory because they felt more comfortable, felt more reassured doing that and you are going to get that mix of people again, as they come into businesses. in fact, listening to the list of businesses that are affected by it, it's only retail, as we know, or if you are going into the hairdressers and people are going to be confused about it so there is a lack of clarity in the messaging. thank you. bill was telling me earlier at some
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businesses said this time round we are not going to pay the extra to get private security to help with mask enforcement and iceland today became one retailer saying they will not ask their staff to ask customers to put masks on. they already have enough on their plate in the run—up to christmas so enforcement will be a big issue, the home secretary says the rules will be reviewed in the coming weeks to see whether those rules have to be enhanced or cancelled before christmas. the mass expansion of the booster programme means that many more people will be hoping to get a vaccine in the coming weeks. how easy will it be to ramp up vaccinations? john maguire is at a vaccine centre in bristol. i'm at the university of the west of england, just on the outskirts of bristol, this was initially converted into a nightingale hospital, but didn't have to be used thankfully. since the summer, it has been a mass vaccination
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centre, as you say they will, but they've been busy. there will be busy in the foreseeable future. they see about 1800 people a day, small queue now, people have been moving through for the last half hour or so, but very busy doing both moderna and the pfizer booster this morning and throughout, and also some astrazeneca as well. even see schoolchildren here, some of those, some of the 12 to 15—year—olds who weren't seen at school. as you can see, people sitting at the end there who've had theirjab this morning. as you're well aware, i'm sure, almost everybody watching this morning will have had a vaccination. so many millions of us have. you sit for 15 minutes, don't you, at the end, just to make sure everything's all right. let's come and chat to one of the vaccinators working hard here this morning, alex, morning. alex, good to see you. you've got an interesting story, haven't you? we spoke earlier to some nurses who converted across, but you're not traditionally a nurse or a health care worker. tell us your story. no. so i used to work in the charity sector. i did sort of campaigning and volunteer management and started out with the st john's ambulance as a volunteer when we worked at ashton gate. and then one of the nurses i worked there, worked with there,
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encouraged me to sort of apply for this job as a vaccinator. and i got that. and i've been doing this since june. have you found it? absolutely loved it. like, it's a really nice team, really positive environment. pay's not bad. and it's obviously great to be helping people and doing something that's really important for the country. and so much so that you decided to go for a total career change. yes. so i actually start on monday up at southmead hospital. i'm going to be a healthcare assistant which is like the real entry level role, sort of supporting people with like health and personal care. and i'm really excited. yeah. and it gets busy here. we know, we were saying up to about 1800 people. i'm always fascinated by the tricks of the trade you use to persuade people who might be a little bit unsure, a little bit nervous, what sort of tips do you use. so obviously, the important thing is to like, try and empathise. there's lots of reasons why people might be nervous even once they're sat in the chair. it'sjust like listening to what their actual concerns are, really hearing them and sort
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of using the knowledge that we have. so understanding how the vaccines work, a little bit of understanding of side effects and like, general health and sort of supporting them with their recovery. good stuff. alex, thanks very much. all the best with the newjob, the new career start on monday. so, yeah, very busy already here this morning. meanwhile, greece is saying that any citizens over 60 years old, who don't get vaccinated against coronavirus will face monthly fines. the $113 fines will start being imposed from mid—january. the prime minister described them as not a form of punishment but the price of health, and an act ofjustice. ministers have announced plans for tougher sentences for child abusers in england and wales. the maximum jail sentence for those who cause a child's death will increase from 14 years to life imprisonment. sentences are also set to go up from ten to 14 years for people who cause serious harm to children. the legislation is being dubbed "tony's law" following a campaign by the family of seven—year—old tony hudgell who had to have both legs amputated following abuse by his biological parents. zoe conwayjoined tony and his
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family as they were told the news byjustice secretary dominic raab — just a warning you may find parts of her report disressing. why is there a wig? judges wear wigs so that the criminals, when they are in court, can't tell the difference between them and ordinary people. i think it's made of horse wool. what do you think of that? tony hudgell might be in the presence of the deputy prime minister, justice secretary dominic raab, but he's certainly not daunted. and you don't know how to work that. but then seven—year—old tony hudgell isn't daunted by anything. what does this do? it's his fearlessness and energy that has so inspired his parents. paula and mark hudgell have been campaigning for tony's law — tougher sentences for people convicted of child cruelty. and, at this meeting, they are finding out
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that the government is going to act. we just think that what tony has done is inspiring. and the need to protect little ones like him is overwhelming. so we will be announcing that change very shortly and i wanted you to know before the general public. that's wonderful. thank you. you are a bit of a role model for all of us. what do you think about that? i don't know what that means. aw. tony was just a few weeks old when he suffered horrific injuries. his doctors feared he would not survive. he had been abused by his biological parents. he had suffered multiple organ failure, septicaemia and fractures to both thighs, lower legs, ankles, toes and thumbs. his legs had to be amputated. paula and mark hudgell began looking after him when he was four months old. presented in front of me was this tiny, broken, shut—down, underweight, legs in plaster, four—month—old baby. i broke down in tears.
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absolutely sobbed. and thought, i can't do this. but within two hours of being with him, there was no way i was going to leave him. this is tony with his biological parents tony smith and jodie simpson. in 2018, they were convicted of causing serious physical harm to a child and cruelty to a person under 16. they were each sentenced to ten years in prison. under the government's new law, they would get longer. we are announcing the increase in sentencing for causing death by cruelty to children from 14 years to life in prison, and for causing serious injury by cruelty from ten years to 14 years. and the reason is because children, and young children in particular, are the most vulnerable in our society. they have got to be given the strongest protection of the law. you have just met tony. i saw the two of you staring out the window and looking at where the queen lives. what do you make of him? he is an incredible young boy. he is full of energy.
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you would not really have a full understanding of what he has been through, but he is full of life, full of energy and deserves every chance to make the best of his potential. he is swimming, he is horse riding. and i think we need to make sure we are protecting young boys, young children like tony. every day for a month last year, tony walked around his local park to raise money for the hospital that saved his life. inspired by captain tom, who raised millions by walking 100 times around his garden, tony set out to raise £500 by walking ten kilometres. sometimes, it hurt, and sometimes he fell over. but he kept going. he completed ten kilometres and he raised more than £1.5 million. he is an inspiration every day. he never complains. he carries on, no matter
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what is thrown at him. all the challenges, he just gets himself back up and carries on. ten years for tony's parents that received the maximum sentence just doesn't seem enough for his lifelong injuries. so now, increasing that to 14 years, which, now, with the new sentencing that they have to serve two thirds, that is going to be almost ten years that they would have to spend inside — so that is double what they would have to now. tony, what has today been like? just amazing. amazing, indeed. for how many seven—year—olds get to work on the deputy prime minister's speech? so where have you got up to? not very far. — i have a team that draft the speech. as the justice secretary is discovering, tony hudgell never gives up. zoe conway, bbc news.
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borisjohnson has been speaking in the past few minutes — let's have a listen. here we are at a vaccination centre. you are boosting the number of vaccines going into people's arms. quite a lot of the infrastructure in the vaccine roll—out has been disbanded and there are particular problems in scotland. are you sure the united kingdom can deliver on the united kingdom can deliver on the promises you are making this week? i the promises you are making this week? , ., . . ., . ~ week? i first of all want to thank the nhs and _ week? i first of all want to thank the nhs and the _ week? i first of all want to thank the nhs and the gps _ week? i first of all want to thank the nhs and the gps and - week? i first of all want to thank the nhs and the gps and every i week? i first of all want to thank- the nhs and the gps and every member of staff and volunteers at centres like this up and down the country. they have been working so hard, if you think about what they have done over the last year or so, hundreds of millions of vaccines have been distributed, over 100 million vaccines have been distributed, and the effort has been incredible. and i know that people will be thinking how we got to make another great
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surge like we did earlier this year? and i am afraid the answer to that is yes and i want to see we will throw everything at it and hope we can do the same thing again. everybody can see the situation. we made a huge amount of progress against the delta version of coronavirus and no have this question about the omicron variant that has been located in some parts of the world and now the uk as well. while there is doubt about what exactly that variant can do, we do know that the boosters can give you a lot of protection against all types of the virus and we think that is overwhelmingly likely at any rate. the crucial thing is for everybody now to come out and get your boosters and that is what the
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jcvi and i are saying and we have no doubt at all that the nhs, all the volunteers, the army, everybody can rise to the challenge. is it going to be hard work? yes, it is but i know that people can do it. people are understandably _ know that people can do it. people are understandably worried - know that people can do it. people l are understandably worried whether or not they should modify their behaviour. i wanted to talk a little bit about what people should and shouldn't do in the next few weeks. should parents not expect to see nativity plays face—to—face? could schools close early? should people pause booking the christmas holiday? we are not changing the guidance on how you should basically live your life except in a couple of ways. that is to do with putting a mask on and some context such as retail and public transport to stop transmission, and also making sure we check people when they arrive in
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the country because what we're trying to deal with here the potential threat from omicron. what we need to do is delay the seeding of omicron in this country. that is why tough checks at the borders is so important. we do not see any need at present certainly to change the overall guidance about how people should live their lives and while people continue to be cautious and sensible we think that is the right approach. if you look at what is happening with the overall state of the pandemic, our strategy for fighting the delta version, the one that has been most dominant for a while now, has basically been working and there is no doubt at all that while cases are high and the numbers of people being admitted to hospital and i see you and sadly the number of people dying, those numbers have
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been coming down. it continues to go in the right direction. what we need to do is take special measures to protect against the arrival of omicron two delay until we have established exactly what we're dealing with. we need the scientists at portadown and in the vaccine companies to work out exactly to what extent this new variant, omicron, may escape the vaccines. and there are ways in which it can sit, either be more transmissible or cause more serious illness and death. i wa nt to stress whatever the risks the answer is to get the booster because we think it is overwhelmingly likely that the booster, getting vaccinated will give you more protection. if booster, getting vaccinated will give you more protection. if that is the case and _
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give you more protection. if that is the case and only _ give you more protection. if that is the case and only small _ give you more protection. if that is the case and only small changes i give you more protection. if that is. the case and only small changes are necessary,, why do you disagree with your adviserjenny harries? only small changes are necessary? we have been living with the pandemic for a long time and i think people need to make sure they have lots of fresh air and wash their hands and take precautions but we are not going to change and we will take not see we would need to go to plan b but what we do need to do is take particular until we have worked out
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what kind of threat may present but whatever threat, what kind of threat may present but whateverthreat, it what kind of threat may present but whatever threat, it is crucial to go out and get vaccinated and it is going to be a big effort but i have no doubt the nhs and volunteers and everyone else can do it. the no doubt the nhs and volunteers and everyone else can do it.— everyone else can do it. the boss of madonna said _ everyone else can do it. the boss of madonna said today _ everyone else can do it. the boss of madonna said today his _ everyone else can do it. the boss of madonna said today his new- everyone else can do it. the boss of madonna said today his new vaccinej madonna said today his new vaccine would be less of effective and it would be less of effective and it would be less of effective and it would be monster we get anyone —— moderna. i would be monster we get anyone -- moderna. ~ . , , ., , , moderna. i think that is probably riuht. he moderna. i think that is probably right- he is _ moderna. i think that is probably right. he is not _ moderna. i think that is probably right. he is not necessarily - moderna. i think that is probably| right. he is not necessarily saying this means the vaccines would be less effective against serious illness or death. they may be less effective in preventing transmission and we see some evidence from south africa that omicron is transmitted between people who are vaccinated but it is not clear to what extent
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that this means you will pick up a severe case of omicron r will have a problem with severe illness and death. ., . . ., ., death. you are telling the nation to net its death. you are telling the nation to get its boosters. _ death. you are telling the nation to get its boosters. as _ death. you are telling the nation to get its boosters. as far _ death. you are telling the nation to get its boosters. as far as - death. you are telling the nation to get its boosters. as far as i - death. you are telling the nation to get its boosters. as far as i can - get its boosters. as far as i can tell, you are eligible, why have you not had it? i tell, you are eligible, why have you not had it? . . tell, you are eligible, why have you not had it?— not had it? i am and have been waitin: not had it? i am and have been waiting and _ not had it? i am and have been waiting and waiting _ not had it? i am and have been waiting and waiting but - not had it? i am and have been waiting and waiting but am - not had it? i am and have been l waiting and waiting but am proud not had it? i am and have been - waiting and waiting but am proud to say i will be going along to this week and i am sure it will be duly recorded. i have been waiting faithfully for my time to come due butjcvi have accelerated the timetable for everybody and accelerated the delay until your booster which is great. that was the prime minister borisjohnson. he will give up briefing at four
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o'clock on covid. he he will give up briefing at four o'clock on covid.— he will give up briefing at four o'clock on covid. he said while there is doubt _ o'clock on covid. he said while there is doubt about _ o'clock on covid. he said while there is doubt about what - o'clock on covid. he said while there is doubt about what the | there is doubt about what the variant can do and the strategies are buying time for scientist to work out exactly what the threat is from omicron, but he said boosters will make a difference and whatever arrest the answer is to get vaccinated because boosters will give you a lot of protection. dash—mac whatever the rest. he said the government is not changing guidance on how people should behave in the run—up to christmas and said you should be cautious and sensible but the government is not changing the guidance on how people should live their lives and pointed the fact there is compulsory mask wearing in place in many environments and those new travel restrictions of common today. anybody returning today dash—mac
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have common today. anybody arriving returning to this country will have to itself isolate until the test proves negative. oxford university said today about the efficacy of the vaccines, oxford university said currently there is no indication that the vaccine will not prevent against serious illness with omicron but said we have the necessary tools and process for rapid development of and process for rapid development of an updated covid vaccine should it be necessary. mps will debate the restrictions a little later and we will have coverage on the bbc news channel and
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at four o'clock the primers that will speak with the same text dash—mac the prime ministers will speak with his scientific advisers. hello there. temperatures will be a bit up and down through this week. it started very cold. it is very mild today — temperatures in double figures. and then it turns cold again towards the week, before turning a bit milder once again on friday. so, we've got a lot of cloud around with this mild air today, courtesy of this area of low pressure. this is actually a deepening feature, pushing in across the uk through the day and bringing an increasing amounts of rain and strong winds too. an increasing amounts of rain but you will notice wrapped in it certainly ahead of this area of low pressure, is the milder air, you can see the orange and yellow. there is a lot of cloud though with its moisture and spots
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of drizzle pretty much everywhere. most of the rain will be further north and strengthening winds across the north west later in the day. you will be lucky if you catch some sunshine. i think most places will stay rather cloudy. despite that, temperatures in double figures for most. certainly, on the main line but still quite cold for shetland. as we move through this evening and overnight, this area of low pressure deepens as it pushes itself. more isobars developing on the charts, so it's going to turn windier across many areas with gale developing across the irish sea coast. some rain developing as well, pushing its way southwards, followed by blustery showers. these turning increasingly wintry over the higher ground and central northern scotland as we start to engage with colder air again. tonight it will be a chillier night than what we have had previous nights. we hold the mild air across the south—east on
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wednesday but it won't be long until those blue colours take over. it is going to be a chilly day for wednesday with winds coming down from the north and north—west. sunshine and showers sums it up quite nicely, although it will be wintry on the hills in the north. longer spells of rain pushing down parts of england and wales. no double figures there, as you can see. it will range from around four to seven or eight degrees in the south. thursday is a cold day with northerly winds. sunshine and showers again. most of the showers will be across the eastern side of the country and we will start to see a ridge of high pressure building we will see increasing cloud here later in the day. a chilly day — temperatures and low single figures. it will turn briefly milder again as we move into friday, certainly for england and wales but with that, some stronger winds and outbreaks of rain.
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today at one: boris johnson describes new coronavirus restrictions in england as "the right approach." but some in business and the travel industry are concerned. from today, face coverings must be worn in shops and on public transport in england unless you're exempt, and the prime minister says the booster programme is vital to beat the new variant. what we do know is that the boosters can give you a lot of protection against all types of the virus, and we think that is overwhelmingly likely. so the crucial thing is for everybody now to come out and get your boosters. also from today, anyone arriving in the uk must take a pcr test within two days, and isolate until they get a negative result. the prime minister will outline
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new plans for england later today.

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