Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 30, 2021 9:00am-10:01am GMT

9:00 am
this is bbc news with the latest headlines: face mask rules return in england — in efforts to combat the spread of the omicron variant later today — borisjohnson will set out plans to accelerate the boosterjab programme — with all adults in the uk to be offered a third vaccine. what that will do is basically increase your general levels of immunity which we hope will, to some extent, counter the potential drop in vaccine effectiveness we might find with this variant. travel rules also change from today— anyone coming into the uk now needs to take a pcr test and self—isolate until they get a negative result. with new restrictions coming in to slow down the spread of the new variant of covid how do
9:01 am
you feel about the reintroduction of mandatory mask wearing in england? what other questions do you have about this new variant and what it means for you? get in touch with me on twitter @annitabbc and use the #bbcyourquestions barbados has removed the queen as head of state after almost 400 years and transitioned to a republic — swearing in its first ever barbadian president. ghislaine maxwell's criminal trial is under way in new york— with the disgraced heiress accused of providing young girls to be by the convicted sex offender jeffrey epstein good morning and welcome to bbc news. new rules aimed at limiting the spread of the omicron variant of coronavirus have come into force
9:02 am
today as more cases have been recorded in the uk. face coverings must now be worn in shops and on public transport in england. and later today the prime minister is due to speak at a downing street news conference — where he'll set out plans to accelerate the booster jabs programme — with all adults in the uk to be offered a third vaccine. also from today, if you leave the country, you'll need to complete a pcr test on your arrival back into the uk and self—isolate until you receive the result. with all the details, here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. from this morning, face coverings are now compulsory in shops and on public transport in england. face coverings are already needed for most public places and transport in wales. masks are also required in pubs and restaurants in scotland and northern ireland. but there is some concern over how shoppers in england will cope with the return of face coverings. the vast majority of the public, when it was required to wear face coverings,
9:03 am
were very good about it, and still are in scotland and wales, where the regulations were never removed. but there is definitely a minority of people who seem to think that the rules shouldn't apply to them and they are causing problems at stores. we've seen the levels of violence that shop workers faced more than doubled during the pandemic. there are changes in schools, too, where staff and pupils in year 7 and above are also being advised to wear masks in communal areas. in scotland, that rule applies in class, as well. and international travellers coming to the uk now also need to take a pcr test within two days of their arrival and self—isolate until they get a negative result. but perhaps the biggest changes are the modifications to the booster programme — slashing the gap between second jab and booster from six months to three and opening up boosters to all those over 18. vaccines and boosters remain the prime defence against the virus. this is a programme which is all about speed, so you are right, the two challenges are going to be the logistics of actually
9:04 am
delivering so much vaccine in a very short time, and, of course, it is important that people come forward and receive those jabs in good time, so they can build up that extra immunity that we need to be sure that we are protected against this new variant. so a challenging month ahead for the nhs and, obviously, people need to respond as soon as they get contacted and come forward. it's clear uk cases linked to the omicron variant are on the rise. the big unanswered questions remain — what impact the variant will have on illness, vaccines and transmission. dominic hughes, bbc news. our chief political correspondent adam fleming is at westminster: lets look ahead to later on today when the prime minister will talk about the boosterjabs programme and how it will be accelerated. what more do we know? the how it will be accelerated. what more do we know?— how it will be accelerated. what more do we know? the policy change
9:05 am
esterda more do we know? the policy change yesterday when _ more do we know? the policy change yesterday when the _ more do we know? the policy change yesterday when the government's - yesterday when the government's adviser said all adults over 18 should get the booster vaccination and the gap between the second jab and the gap between the second jab and the gap between the second jab and the booster should be shrunk to three months rather than six so we will get more operational detail about how those millions of extra doses will be delivered quite. the prime minister will be talking about enhanced role for local pharmacies, we will see a return to the football stadium model, isuspect we will see a return to the football stadium model, i suspect not, and the return of the aged ratifications when people were called forward for their vaccines in age bands, just to manage the huge extra demand. also ministers are walking a tightrope in that people understand they want advice for what they should do about social contacts, they are child's nativity play, their christmas dinner, but ministers do not want to be in the position where they are setting out rules how people should live their lives like in the old days of the pandemic. that is why the social care secretary says it is
9:06 am
“p the social care secretary says it is up to you but you should probally carry on as normal. [be up to you but you should probally carry on as normal.— up to you but you should probally carry on as normal. be sensible, we are not telling _ carry on as normal. be sensible, we are not telling people _ carry on as normal. be sensible, we are not telling people to _ carry on as normal. be sensible, we are not telling people to not - are not telling people to not continue _ are not telling people to not continue with their plans, we very much _ continue with their plans, we very much hope — continue with their plans, we very much hope that we can continue with our christmas plans, but, of course, we are _ our christmas plans, but, of course, we are putting these measures in place _ we are putting these measures in place now— we are putting these measures in place now to build up a wall of defence — place now to build up a wall of defence. ., place now to build up a wall of defence. . ., ._ place now to build up a wall of defence. . ., ~ , ., defence. later today, mps will have a three hour — defence. later today, mps will have a three hour long _ defence. later today, mps will have a three hour long debate _ defence. later today, mps will have a three hour long debate and - defence. later today, mps will have a three hour long debate and a - defence. later today, mps will have a three hour long debate and a vote on the new measures that came in at four o'clock this morning. retrospective, the majors came into force before they were approved, but there is more scrutiny than some of there is more scrutiny than some of the majors in the pandemic earlier in parliament. some niggles on the tory back bench about the end point for these precautions, only the mask regulation has an end point of the 20th of december, the other rules on international travel and pcr tests and people isolating ten days of the commented in a positive case of omicron, they are open—ended and mps
9:07 am
wonder what will happen in a few weeks when parliament is not setting and is there a chance the regulations aren't rescinded as the scientific evidence about omicron emerges but that is a debate for another day. emerges but that is a debate for another day-— another day. questions for the future, another day. questions for the future. plenty _ another day. questions for the future, plenty to _ another day. questions for the future, plenty to answer - another day. questions for the future, plenty to answer the i future, plenty to answer the immediate term. jenny harries is the chief executive of the uk health security agency. she says we're in a period of great uncertainty. almost all the public health professionals are very concerned about the variant, it has far more mutations than anything we have seen before and some of the characteristics of these mutations give us concern that it might start to evade either natural immunity where we have been affected before or the great efforts we have made with vaccination. but all of this is a period of great uncertainty and thatis a period of great uncertainty and that is the key point. we are taking precautionary measures in order that
9:08 am
we buy ourselves some time, so we can carry through the scientific tests we normally do to understand the variant better. the boss of iceland has said that his staff will not be forcing shoppers to wear masks despite the introduction of new covid—19 rules in england — as we've been hearing they're now mandatory in shops and on public transport. managing director, richard walker, told us why he made this decision. we have about 4000 reported incidences of verbal abuse each year. that increased significantly during the first lockdown and our staff received over 50 instances of abuse every week. since we stopped asking staff to challenge customers, that dropped down to five a week. that is replicated across the whole industry. recent research found that over 90% of retail workers have either been assaulted, threatened or
9:09 am
abused in the last 12 months. this is a big problem. ourstaff abused in the last 12 months. this is a big problem. our staff have been heroic, keeping food on the table and the shelves stacked throughout the pandemic and i will not put them in harm's way. i'm nowjoined by professor susan michie — an expert in health psychology at university college london and a member of the government's scientific advisory group for emergencies — sage — as well as the independent sage group. she's speaking to us in a personal capacity. thank you for your time this morning. on masks, how likely is it people who stopped wearing masks when no longer mandatory to do so will now follow this new rule and put them on again?— will now follow this new rule and put them on again? what the data su: est is put them on again? what the data suggest is the _ put them on again? what the data suggest is the overwhelming - put them on again? what the data i suggest is the overwhelming majority of people, more than 80% are in favour of masks coming back. the reasons people have not been wearing them, for those who are very much in favour, is because they have forgotten them. but the reasons given for those not in favour was
9:10 am
that it was not mandatory. so the hope is people will re—adopt this behaviour. the other thing that we have seen throughout the pandemic is when people believe that there is a real threat and believe that what they can do to make a difference, people have really risen to the challenge, often in quite challenging circumstances. it will be probably more difficult for the first around, but hopefully people will see there is uncertainty but there is also the likelihood of something quite bad coming down the track. ., ~' something quite bad coming down the track. ., ~ , ., track. you think it will be more difficult because _ track. you think it will be more difficult because people - track. you think it will be more difficult because people are - difficult because people are reluctant to return to that? is that what you are saying? on the other hand, you could argue people have had this experience already and they know what they need to do. it will be adopted _ know what they need to do. it will be adopted more _ know what they need to do. it will be adopted more quickly - know what they need to do. it will be adopted more quickly than - know what they need to do. it ll be adopted more quickly than the first time around. what is really
9:11 am
important at the moment is very clear very coherent and consistent messaging. really set an example of wearing masks in indoor spaces by those people who are prominent in the media and who are in positions of authority. if all of those things are done and people are supported, and the reasons are explained, then i think people will do it. the other reasons for those reluctant to wear them have given is that they do not believe that masks are effective. the evidence coming forward is that underlining how effective they are. especially the more tight—fitting masks. it especially the more tight-fitting masks. , , ., , ., masks. it is interesting that you sa that, masks. it is interesting that you say that. i _ masks. it is interesting that you say that. i was _ masks. it is interesting that you say that, i was going _ masks. it is interesting that you say that, i was going to - masks. it is interesting that you say that, i was going to say, - masks. it is interesting that you i say that, i was going to say, there is evidence that wearing masks reduces transmission of covid—19, but some people dispute that. for a
9:12 am
variety of reasons, others, the measured dot—mac the message doesn't come through. is there a reason to have a rethink as the new variant is more transmissible from the data we have so far?— more transmissible from the data we have so far? what the advisory group have so far? what the advisory group have been saying _ have so far? what the advisory group have been saying all _ have so far? what the advisory group have been saying all the _ have so far? what the advisory group have been saying all the way - have so far? what the advisory group have been saying all the way along, l have been saying all the way along, what is really important is to engage communities who are reluctant to ensure that they have access to good information from people they trust. often that is not the politicians, but people in their communities, localto politicians, but people in their communities, local to them. what is needed is a real multilevel multidimensional campaign at this point to really put forward the case, to ensure that it is routinely donein case, to ensure that it is routinely done in all situations. it is much easier in wales and scotland where it is simple rule, in all indoor spaces, i think there is a bit of a problem where you do not have that
9:13 am
general rule in england because people may raise the question, if it is so important, why are we not being asked to do it in cinemas, theatres, restaurants and bars? the evidence shows that if there is a good explanation, if there is consistent messaging, if people are well supported and listen to, overwhelmingly the majority of people will adopt the behaviour. briefly, beyond masks, a big push today to accelerate the booster vaccination programme, similar to people who have not worn masks before, if they have not already got a booster or a primary vaccination, what is going to need to change in the messaging to persuade them to do so now? the the messaging to persuade them to do so now? ., , the messaging to persuade them to do so now? . , ., so now? the really important thing is we have good — so now? the really important thing is we have good evidence - so now? the really important thing is we have good evidence for - so now? the really important thing is we have good evidence for this, | is we have good evidence for this, to listen to communities who have
9:14 am
concerns, have anxieties as to what they are, ensure that they can discuss this with people who respect their point of view, engage with their point of view, engage with their arguments, their point of view, engage with theirarguments, but their point of view, engage with their arguments, but are able to explain why it is not only good for them but good for their communities, their loved ones, also, the more people who get vaccinated, the quicker we will be able to manage the pandemic and the least likely we are to have further restrictions in the future. are to have further restrictions in the future-— are to have further restrictions in the future. ., ,, , ., , . ., the future. thank you very much for that. let's speak to the mayor of london, sadiq khan masks are mandatory once again on public transport, i have done a straw poll of colleagues this morning, not scientific, but one state on the underground this morning, more people seem to be wearing masks and others said it was patchy. what are you hearing this
9:15 am
morning about how well people are adapting to this? i morning about how well people are adapting to this?— morning about how well people are adapting to this? i welcome the news from the government, _ adapting to this? i welcome the news from the government, i _ adapting to this? i welcome the news from the government, i have - adapting to this? i welcome the news from the government, i have been i from the government, i have been calling for this for some time, the evidence is beforejuly the 19th when it was compulsory to wear a face mask on public transport backed up face mask on public transport backed up ijy face mask on public transport backed up by enforcement by the power to issue fines and use british transport police, we saw compliance around 85%. sincejuly the 19th, there has been a condition of carriage, you are required to wear it face mask in london, we have not been able to issue fines, we have not been able to use british transport police to enforce this, and i'm afraid compliance has gone down. i welcome the announcement from the government and i would say to all your viewers, not only in public transport or in shops where you have to wear a face mask, if you can't keep social lessons in a confined space, better safe than sorry, we do know that one in three who has the virus will not show
9:16 am
symptoms, and unselfish thing to do is to wear a face mask and reduce the chances of passing this on. we expect to see a big increase in uptake on public transport in london. ., x' , uptake on public transport in london. ., a , , , london. how quickly will defines be issued if people _ london. how quickly will defines be issued if people do _ london. how quickly will defines be issued if people do not _ london. how quickly will defines be issued if people do not comply? - london. how quickly will defines be l issued if people do not comply? how tough is transport for london going tough is transport for london going to be on enforcement and as a supplementary to that, is fair to expect staff to be the people to do this? we expect staff to be the people to do this? ~ ., expect staff to be the people to do this? . ., . ., expect staff to be the people to do this? ~ . . ., ., . , this? we have changed the notices and the announcement _ this? we have changed the notices and the announcement will - this? we have changed the notices and the announcement will be - and the announcement will be different, reminding customers there is now the ability to receive a fine and it is the law. they will be encouragement and education and in the next few days you will see more enforcement. it is not fairfor 500 staff to do this enforcement. that is why i welcome the change from the government which enables us to not just rely on the transport staff,
9:17 am
but thousands of british transport police and police officers. if i'm honest, i'd rather they were focused on reducing violent crime are not doing enforcement of face mask wearing, but the evidence in london, london is that the right thing before july the 19th, most london is that the right thing beforejuly the 19th, most londoners want to do the right thing, wearing a face mask gives others confidence to use public transport. it is win win. i to use public transport. it is win win. ~' ., to use public transport. it is win win. ~ ., ., , win. i know conversations with colleagues. — win. i know conversations with colleagues, being _ win. i know conversations with colleagues, being on - win. i know conversations with colleagues, being on the - colleagues, being on the underground, they felt uncomfortable, lots of people were not wearing masks, listening to the professor if you moments ago, does it make it more difficult in terms of the messaging if the government is saying it is mandatory in shops and public transport but not in other settings, like the cinema. it is does that make it more difficult? house of commons makes it difficult, ministers and members of parliament
9:18 am
behind the prime minister in a confined space, not social distancing, not wearing a face mask. by distancing, not wearing a face mask. by example where we can. human nature, we copy other people's behaviour, where it is possible to wear a face mask in a confined space, we should wear one. better safe than sorry. there is a good reason why in places where you eat or drink it is not compulsory, but if it's the case that you are standing and you are not drinking and you are not social distancing, better safe than sorry, where a face mask. ., . , better safe than sorry, where a face mask. ., ., , ., mask. you are relying on the individual — mask. you are relying on the individual because _ mask. you are relying on the individual because you - mask. you are relying on the | individual because you cannot possibly have enough people to patrol every single underground carriage to issue fines at a level where there are going to be a real deterrent. the where there are going to be a real deterrent. �* , , ., , ., deterrent. the british people are wonderful. _ deterrent. the british people are wonderful, not _ deterrent. the british people are wonderful, not every _ deterrent. the british people are wonderful, not every single - deterrent. the british people are wonderful, not every single car l deterrent. the british people are i wonderful, not every single car has a police officer looking to see if
9:19 am
someone is wearing a seat belt, or speeding on side roads, now that we know the law is here, there is clarity, we will see a big increase in compliance. my ask of the government is not to have a hokey corky with face mask wearing an public transport. air on the side of caution, encourage people to receive the booster and the vaccine, but also say, for the foreseeable future, on public transport, compulsory to wear a face mask backed up by enforcement and the ability to issue a fine. it will reduce the chances of transmission and increase public confidence. fin and increase public confidence. on enforcement, is transport for london going to publish statistics if it is issuing fines in the first or second week, however long the man that remains in place, and i know you wanted to stay in place over the winter period public transport. it is transport for london going to
9:20 am
issue an update on fines, a carrot and stick, to make people where the mass? �* ., g , " mass? before july the 19th, we issued 2000 — mass? before july the 19th, we issued 2000 fines, _ mass? before july the 19th, we i issued 2000 fines, conversations asking people to leave public transport, sincejuly asking people to leave public transport, since july the 19th asking people to leave public transport, sincejuly the 19th we are only talking about it a few hundred. the rule change is really important. iam hoping hundred. the rule change is really important. i am hoping there is little need to issue fines or ask people to leave public transport, but if that is the case, people are being asked to wear a face mask and do not and stay on public transport, they receive a fine. i'm nowjoined by dr denise langhor, the emergency medicine lead at the british medical association, and an a&e consultant. there is clearly a lot we do not know about this latest variant and data is being gathered. we do not
9:21 am
know what the impact truly is going to be. how aren't you and your colleagues trying to plan for a variety of scenarios? i colleagues trying to plan for a variety of scenarios?- variety of scenarios? i am an emergency _ variety of scenarios? i am an emergency medicine - variety of scenarios? i am an i emergency medicine consultant variety of scenarios? i am an - emergency medicine consultant and variety of scenarios? i am an _ emergency medicine consultant and we already know we are going into the worst winter for the already know we are going into the worst winterfor the nhs already know we are going into the worst winter for the nhs on already know we are going into the worst winterfor the nhs on record. as ever, we are doing our best to make contingency plans in relation to staffing and resources, but we know it is going to be incredibly difficult if this virus takes off. we do not know how bad it is going to be or the impact of the omicron virus but it is of massive concern. covid—19 has never gone away. we have treated patients daily up and down the uk since the beginning of the pandemic. 7500 patients with covid—19 in uk hospitals at the moment, any increase will have an impact on our ability to cope going through the winter months. the nhs
9:22 am
winter period — through the winter months. the nhs winter period starts _ through the winter months. the nhs winter period starts tomorrow? - through the winter months. the nhs winter period starts tomorrow? you | winter period starts tomorrow? you no more than _ winter period starts tomorrow? ym. no more than me there. winter period starts tomorrow? you no more than me there. i— winter period starts tomorrow? you no more than me there. i believe i winter period starts tomorrow? you no more than me there. i believe it| no more than me there. i believe it does but i — no more than me there. i believe it does but i was _ no more than me there. i believe it does but i was going _ no more than me there. i believe it does but i was going to _ no more than me there. i believe it does but i was going to say, - no more than me there. i believe it does but i was going to say, the . does but i was going to say, the idea of winter pressures, that seems archaic now because the pressure is on all year round. give us an update, existing pressures on health care, both covid—19 and non—covid—19. care, both covid-19 and non-covid-19._ care, both covid-19 and non-covid-19. ~ . ., ~ care, both covid-19 and non-covid-19. ~ . . ,, . non-covid-19. we always talk about winter pressure, _ non-covid-19. we always talk about winter pressure, but _ non-covid-19. we always talk about winter pressure, but we _ non-covid-19. we always talk about winter pressure, but we have - non-covid-19. we always talk about winter pressure, but we have been. winter pressure, but we have been there for the last few months. know at the moment our attendance to emergency medicine are the highest on record, the world college of emergency medicine issue to start report showing the impact of crowding on our emergency departments and they have highlighted we are seeing more patients than ever, breached the four hour target trying to get patients in and out in four hours, and more patients than ever spending longer than 12 hours an emergency
9:23 am
waiting for beds. they have estimated that has to 4500 excess deaths in the last 12 months. that is horrific. we should be concerned about rising pressures within the emergency department and the nhs as a whole. we are notjust dealing with pressures in emergency medicine, there is a huge backlog of elective care, 5.8 million people across the uk waiting for appointments and operations. we are doing our best to catch up with that, to deal with the rise in demand in emergency medicine, and as we head into the winter months, we know we are going to be dealing with the usual respiratory viruses along with influenza and increase in covid—19. we are keen to get the message out to the public that anything we can do to reduce the transmission of covid—19 is crucial at this stage. transmission of covid-19 is crucial at this stage-— at this stage. that is my last question- — at this stage. that is my last question- it _ at this stage. that is my last question. it bears _ at this stage. that is my last|
9:24 am
question. it bears repetition, at this stage. that is my last - question. it bears repetition, what we do as individuals, how we behave has a direct bearing on how much pressure you and your colleagues are under. what is your message to the public? mr; under. what is your message to the ublic? y , ,. under. what is your message to the ublic? g , under. what is your message to the ublic? g ., ., public? my message as please follow the ublic public? my message as please follow the public health _ public? my message as please follow the public health guidance _ public? my message as please follow the public health guidance the - the public health guidance the government are putting out, where your face mask not only on public transport, and shops, but any crowded public places, for those who are in work places, make sure you have adequate ventilation and i would ask the to have a little bit of patience with nhs staff, we are doing our best in extreme circumstances at the moment. we are seeing a rise in violence and aggression towards nhs staff as people's frustrations come to a head, and i would urge you to please, do your best to be patient with us, we are trying our hardest.
9:25 am
thank you very much. good luck to you and all of your colleagues. the chief executive of the pharmaceuticalfirm, moderna, has warned that covid vaccines are unlikely to be as effective against the omicron variant of the virus as they have been against the delta type. stephane bancel told the financial times it was unclear to what extent the effectiveness would drop but he said all the scientists he'd talked to had suggested it was, in his words, "not going to be good". many scientists belive the existing vaccines are likely to work but their effect may be weakened by the mutations to the omicron variant. moderna has already said it is working on an omicron—specific vaccine, as is us drugmaker, pfizer. barbados has become the world's newest republic and in doing so removed the queen as its head of state. prince charles attended the ceremony which saw sandra mason sworn in as the country's first president just after midnight local time. daniela relph reports from
9:26 am
the barbadian capital bridgetown. the world's newest republic and a show of national pride. this constitutional shift in barbados is about asserting self—confidence and shedding the links to its colonial past. some of this country's most well—known names were among the vip guests attending the transition ceremony. and also here to watch it all play out, the prince of wales, invited to see his mother removed as a head of state — the first time that has happened anywhere in 30 years. for the final time on this caribbean island, he viewed a military march past and took the final salute. and then, the symbolic moment of transition. as the royal standard was lowered over barbados, it became a republic.
9:27 am
it is hard to imagine that this event was not tinged with some sadness for the prince of wales. he has focused on the enduring friendship between two nations and also spoken directly about the pain of a shared history. from the darkest days of our past, and the appalling atrocity of slavery, which for ever stains our history, the people of this island forged their path with extraordinary fortitude. emancipation, self—government, and independence were your waypoints. freedom, justice and self—determination have been your guides. an acknowledgement of the past as this island looked forward and swore
9:28 am
in its first ever president. i, sandra prunella mason, do swear that i will be faithful and bear true allegiance to barbados according to law, so help me god. casting aside the official link to the british monarchy, barbados is increasingly looking east to china for financial support. there are republican rumblings, too, in other caribbean nations. they will be watching this newest republic closely. more than 100,000 homes in parts of scotland and the north of england remain without power because of damage caused by storm arwen. schools in aberdeenshire remain closed, while whole villages in cumbria still have no power and it's not clear when it will be restored — mark mcalindon has this report. it might look like a winter wonderland up here but for the people of nenthead, it really is as if hell
9:29 am
has frozen over. the power went off last week and still the village waits to be reconnected. has anyone told you when you might be able to expect to get power back on? i heard a rumour in the local shop, could be friday. how does that make you feel? it is a long time to go, isn't it? we've got the whole week. there's no lights, heating, no access to the internet. they are cut off, and for some, there is only one way to feed yourself. it's been absolutely freezing, trying to walk around the house, keep your body heat up. going out for walks, trying to cook outside. clay cooker. it's really a struggle. because i've only got wood and bits of fire. and i've had to chop a cabinet up this morning. they don't know when they will be back online, it's tough to play in the snow because there is no way for many to get warm afterwards. in alston too, some people at this reception centre are still without power, happy to be eating something warm. it's been really awful, being all alone in the cold. it's been difficult. it's been cold, dark,
9:30 am
there's not been any hot food, any hot water. the community here is doing its best to make sure no one goes without. inviting people down to either come down with a flask to take away some soup or to sit down and get warmed up, charge their mobile phones, laptops, whatever they need to do, just to keep them going. but here too we meet others who are angry, wondering when help will arrive. i have six children under the age of eight—year—old. one of them is actually a seven—month—old and deaf, she is classed as a disabled child, and not one person has even tried to get up to see if we are ok. i'm actually now trying to get out of the village to send my four—year—old child to newcastle, to live with my nana. because i don't know when it's going to come back on. back in nenthead, a free hot food van was provided but the news that will really warm the blood here is when power returns. that was mark mcalindon reporting.
9:31 am
and you can keep up to date with the latest on how storm arwen is affecting where you live on your local bbc radio station. you can listen on fm, digital radio or via bbc sounds. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. good morning to you. i heard you say there is a huge _ good morning to you. i heard you say there is a huge difference _ good morning to you. i heard you say there is a huge difference in - good morning to you. i heard you say there is a huge difference in the - there is a huge difference in the temperature today compared to yesterday in some parts of the uk? that is right. good morning. the overnight low on sunday night was -8.7, the overnight low on sunday night was —8.7, the same time last night it was almost 10 , —8.7, the same time last night it was almost10 , huge —8.7, the same time last night it was almost 10 , huge difference. today will be milder generally across the board but it is cloudy and damp. we have some rain, some drizzle. we will see some brighter skies develop across parts of the north midlands, west yorkshire, through the day the club will thicken again towards northern ireland, seeing some rain and also western scotland before the end of
9:32 am
the afternoon, with strengthening winds. these are the temperatures today 8— 12 , the average roughly north to south this time of year is 5- 8 . this north to south this time of year is 5— 8. this evening and overnight low pressure bringing this ring will deepen as it crosses us and some of the rain will be heavy. you see by looking at those isobars it will be another windy night, not as windy as the weekend but windy nonetheless with gales around the coasts and those of the temperatures. one — 11 in the far south. hello, this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines... face mask rules return in england — in efforts to combat the spread of the omicron variant later today, borisjohnson will set out plans to accelerate the boosterjab programme — with all adults in the uk to be offered a third vaccine. what that will do is basically
9:33 am
increase your general levels of immunity which we hope will, to some extent, counter the potential drop in vaccine effectiveness we might find with this variant. travel rules also change from today — anyone coming into the uk now needs to take a pcr test and self—isolate until they get a negative result with new restrictions coming in to slow down the spread of the new variant of covid, how do you feel about the reintroduction of mandatory mask wearing in england? what other questions do you have about this new variant and what it means for you? get in touch with me on twitter @annitabbc and use the #bbcyourquestions barbados has removed the queen as head of state after almost 400 years and transitioned to a republic, swearing in its first ever barbadian president. ghislaine maxwell's criminal trial is underway in new york with the disgraced heiress accused of providing young girls for convicted sex offender jeffrey epstein to abuse
9:34 am
sport and time for a full round up from the bbc sport centre. john from the bbc sport centre. watson is waiting for u good morning. from the bbc sport centre. and we start with the news that former chelsea player and coventry manager john sillett has died at the age of 85. he made his name with the london club winning the league title in 1955. it was the fa cup win with coventry which was the crowning moment of his managerial career, lifting the trophy at wembley in 1987 having beaten tottenham after extra time, in what's been called one of the most entertaining finals in history. he also played for the club under jimmy hill in the �*60s. some great pictures from that day at wembley in �*87. john sillett who's died at the age of 85. always plenty of debate over the winner of the ballon d'or and i guess we shouldn't be surprised it was lionel messi who won this year's award having helped argentina win the copa america earlier this year, his first international honour. his three boys in matching suits.
9:35 am
he was also top scorer in la liga last season before joining paris saint germain in the summer. the women's award went to barcelona captain alexia putellas. northern ireland's women enjoyed yet another big win in world cup qualifying, beating north macedonia 9—0. rachel furness scored twice, taking her tally to 37 international goals and breaking david healy�*s record as northern ireland's leading scorer. they're now second in their group behind england, who play tonight. england continue their preparations for the start of the ashes, the first test gets underway on the 8th at the gabba in brisbane. there's every chance the schedule could be affected with the emergence of the new covid variant, which could also impact some of the players�* families due to arrive in the coming days. jos buttler says it's the reality they've faced this year.
9:36 am
it's sort of being a disjointed year, the onejust it's sort of being a disjointed year, the one just gone. it's sort of being a disjointed year, the onejust gone. some good form, some bad form, but i certainly have nothing to lose. i have come here, the first time i have experienced an ashes series, and fully determined to enjoy all the challenges that that throws up and i'm excited to experience it, the good, the bad, the highs and lows along the way. good, the bad, the highs and lows along the way-— good, the bad, the highs and lows along the way. there will be plenty of those, along the way. there will be plenty of those. i'm _ along the way. there will be plenty of those, i'm sure. _ an update on the rugby union teams that have been affected by tightened travel restrictions following the new coronavirus variant identified in south africa. scarlets have made it out and are in an isolation hotel in belfast, munster can leave cape town to isolate back home, but cardiff are still stuck there, with two positive cases in the squad. cardiff chairman alunjones says there's concern in the camp. there's obviously concerned to get home, there is concern around the
9:37 am
new variant. and it's obviously very difficult to be doing in effect, self—imposed quarantine in south africa, so far from self—imposed quarantine in south africa, so farfrom home. you know, it's of paramount importance to us, really, to get them home. tiger woods has admitted he will not be the player he was after his car accident in february, saying he doesn't expect to return to the tour full time. authorities said he was lucky to survive the crash. he's spoken for the first time and says playing in a couple of events every year is possible but he still had a very long way to go. speaking to golf digest, he waid it was an "unfortunate reality" but he accepted it. we've seen a fair few shocks at the uk snooker championship so far and someone who is clearly loving it is ronnie o'sullivan. i suppose he can because he's safely into the last 16. he said he had a little chuckle to himself when several of the world's top ten were knocked out. he described it as "lovely, beautiful". o'sullivan beat mark king 6—3, making a century and five 50 plus breaks —
9:38 am
he's going for an eighth title. well, that big name exodus continued with the three—time champion and world number seven john higgins beaten by china's zhao xintong — higgins led 5—3 before zhao won three frames in a row, clinching victory with a nerveless break of 83. u psets upsets have been one of the talking point of the tournament so far. that's all the sport for now. john, thank you. from the early hours of this morning, a whole new raft of changes have come into force — in an effort to tackle the spread of the coronavirus omicron variant. masks are now compulsory in shops and on public transport in england bringing it into line with the rest of the uk. all travellers entering britain will now have to take a pcr test within two days, and must self isolate, until they test negative. plus, the booster programme is being rolled out to include all uk adults — although there's still no firm
9:39 am
timeline in place for when people will have theirjabs. how have the new rules on masks been enforced? nina warhurst reports from liverpool lime street station. you will be forgiven in england if you have got out of the habit of grabbing one of these masks on your way out the door but as of today, they become mandatory once again. if you are going into a place of retail, but if you're getting your nails done, going to the post office, booking a holiday with a travel agent, you will be asked to wear a mask and you could be fined if you refuse to do so. in scotland, wales and northern ireland masks are already being one as part of government policy and on top of that, vaccine passports are being asked for nightclubs and people are being asked to work from home where possible but certainly here in england, this is undoing a freedom given in the summer and there are questions around appliance, the
9:40 am
extent to which people will agree to wear a mask because it will be reliant by and large on the individual. let's speak to bill. good to see you. what was the reaction from the many businesses you work with? the reaction from the many businesses you work with?— reaction from the many businesses ou work with? , , ., ., you work with? the response was, no, not a . ain you work with? the response was, no, not again come — you work with? the response was, no, not again come restrictions _ you work with? the response was, no, not again come restrictions on - not again come restrictions on business that is already struggling to recover. big concern. the main concern with that is enforcement, how did they enforce people coming into their shops from wearing masks? big concern for business. br; into their shops from wearing masks? big concern for business.— big concern for business. by and larue, i big concern for business. by and large. i would — big concern for business. by and large, i would say _ big concern for business. by and large, i would say it's _ big concern for business. by and large, i would say it's 60- - big concern for business. by and large, i would say it's 60- 40 i big concern for business. by and | large, i would say it's 60- 40 this large, i would say it's 60— 40 this morning here in liverpool, some people putting on their masks as they board the train, it's not the way it was when masks were first introduced, do you think it's people getting used to it or do you think long term there will be a refusal? i long term there will be a refusal? i think there is the starter people getting used to it, numbers of people had been continuing to wear masks even when they were not mandatory because they felt more
9:41 am
comfortable, felt more reassured doing that and you are going to get people again, as they come into businesses. in fact, people again, as they come into businesses. infact, listening people again, as they come into businesses. in fact, listening to the list of businesses that are affected by it, it's only retail, as we know, or if you are going into the hairdressers and people are going to be confused about it so there is a lack of clarity in the messaging. there is a lack of clarity in the messaging-— there is a lack of clarity in the messauuin. . �* messaging. thank you. bill was tellin: messaging. thank you. bill was telling me _ messaging. thank you. bill was telling me earlier _ messaging. thank you. bill was telling me earlier at _ messaging. thank you. bill was telling me earlier at some - telling me earlier at some businesses said this time round we are not going to pay the extra to get private security to help with mask enforcement and iceland today became one retailer saying they will not ask their staff to ask customers to put masks on. they already have enough on their plate in the run—up to christmas so enforcement will be a big issue, the home secretary says the rules will be reviewed in the coming weeks to see whether those rules have to be enhanced or cancelled before christmas. let's talk more about the rules on face coverings and particularly how they can be enforced in shops. i'm joined now byjohn bright who runs two men's clothing shops
9:42 am
in london called good neighbour, and caterine hooper the owner of detaljer which is a shop and cafe in knutsford. did i pronounce your name properly? it is katarina. i got it completely wrong, i am so sorry. i do like to get names right! tell us about the situation with you.— get names right! tell us about the situation with you. well, we started wearin: situation with you. well, we started wearing the — situation with you. well, we started wearing the masks _ situation with you. well, we started wearing the masks yesterday - situation with you. well, we started l wearing the masks yesterday because with the new variant coming in, we felt it is our responsibility dealing with a lot of people, all the time, to protect others so we decided to start masks yesterday. have your customers are largely been wearing masks or were people not bothering? wearing masks or were people not botherin: ? ., , . bothering? some of them still are, with us wearing _ bothering? some of them still are, with us wearing them, _ bothering? some of them still are,
9:43 am
with us wearing them, they - with us wearing them, they automatically put their masks on anyway when they see us wearing it. i haven't had a negative response so far, everyone seems really mindful of trying to act to protect others which is really positive. this is what we have to do.— which is really positive. this is what we have to do. john, what is the situation _ what we have to do. john, what is the situation with _ what we have to do. john, what is the situation with you _ what we have to do. john, what is the situation with you so - what we have to do. john, what is the situation with you so far? - what we have to do. john, what is| the situation with you so far? how are you feeling about the return of mask wearing being mandatory? you know what. i — mask wearing being mandatory? you know what, i think retail has had such— know what, i think retail has had such a _ know what, i think retail has had such a tough time over the last two years. _ such a tough time over the last two years. if— such a tough time over the last two years, if wearing masks means we avoid _ years, if wearing masks means we avoid another lockdown or people feel more — avoid another lockdown or people feel more secure coming into the shop. _ feel more secure coming into the shop. then— feel more secure coming into the shop, then i am all for it. because when ou shop, then i am all for it. because when you think — shop, then i am all for it. because when you think about _ shop, then i am all for it. because when you think about the - shop, then i am all for it. because when you think about the various l when you think about the various measures that have been taken in the past and could be taken, mask wearing is relatively mild, compared to the opposite end of that scale, a lockdown scenario for your shops are closed. how are you going to handle the situation if someone walks into your shop and is not wearing a mask?
9:44 am
i am basically, your shop and is not wearing a mask? iam basically, of your shop and is not wearing a mask? i am basically, of the view, if they do not _ i am basically, of the view, if they do not want — i am basically, of the view, if they do not want to wear a mask, it is their— do not want to wear a mask, it is their choice. _ do not want to wear a mask, it is their choice, i do not want to wear a mask, it is their choice, lam not do not want to wear a mask, it is their choice, i am not going to be their choice, i am not going to be the police — their choice, i am not going to be the police and say you cannot come into the _ the police and say you cannot come into the shop or put the mask on. i am happy— into the shop or put the mask on. i am happy that someone is coming in the shop. _ am happy that someone is coming in the shop, really. and retail needs to get— the shop, really. and retail needs to get back— the shop, really. and retail needs to get back on track. so really, i am not — to get back on track. so really, i am not going to be enforcing it. | am not going to be enforcing it. guess it's am not going to be enforcing it. i guess it's tricky, isn't it, because she may have some customers coming in who very much want to wear a mask, obviously if they are sitting down for a cup of coffee, they will take off the mask but you may have others in the shop at the same time who are not wearing masks so as a business owner, how do you balance those competing things? iltrui’eiiiii business owner, how do you balance those competing things? well i think it's 'ust a those competing things? well i think it'sjust a question _ those competing things? well i think it'sjust a question of— those competing things? well i think it'sjust a question of kindly - it's just a question of kindly asking people to keep socially distance, if for whatever reason they cannot wear a mask. to avoid others. loss of sound
9:45 am
the thing is, ideal with a lot of people on a daily basis. the thing is, i deal with a lot of people on a daily basis.- people on a daily basis. people cominu people on a daily basis. people coming into — people on a daily basis. people coming into the _ people on a daily basis. people coming into the cafe, - people on a daily basis. people coming into the cafe, the - people on a daily basis. people| coming into the cafe, the shop, people on a daily basis. people - coming into the cafe, the shop, it's a question of being gentle and friendly and positive and acting mindfully and i think most people, the majority of people, 99% will react positively to that. i don't think as john react positively to that. i don't think asjohn said, police and anybody, is the answer. or a question... it's doing it in a positive way. i think most people will do this positively, particularly with the impact of this new variant. that is how we are going to do it. it new variant. that is how we are going to do it— going to do it. it is more a gentle nudue. going to do it. it is more a gentle nudge- exactly- _ going to do it. it is more a gentle nudge. exactly. john, _ going to do it. it is more a gentle nudge. exactly. john, is- going to do it. it is more a gentle nudge. exactly. john, is there - nudge. exactly. john, is there anything where the government could do in the way of messaging to help you as a business owner through this period? unfortunately... the line
9:46 am
has frozen. let's try again, john, can you hear me? yes, the line is a little bit glitchy, i'm going to try that one more time and see if we can make it work. i'm wondering if there is anything more as a business owner that the government can do to help you through this period in terms of the messaging it is giving to the public about mask wearing? i the messaging it is giving to the public about mask wearing? i think the first step _ public about mask wearing? i think the first step is _ public about mask wearing? i think the first step is mask— public about mask wearing? i think the first step is mask wearing. - public about mask wearing? i think the first step is mask wearing. at | the first step is mask wearing. at the first step is mask wearing. at the moment, we do not know much about— the moment, we do not know much about this _ the moment, we do not know much about this new variant. i mean, it could _ about this new variant. i mean, it could be — about this new variant. i mean, it could be that once they discover more, _ could be that once they discover more. it— could be that once they discover more. it is— could be that once they discover more, it is not particularly worse than _ more, it is not particularly worse than we — more, it is not particularly worse than we think. sol more, it is not particularly worse than we think. so i think is a good first step. — than we think. so i think is a good first step, mask wearing sets us on the right— first step, mask wearing sets us on the right track.— the right track. thank you both so much and good — the right track. thank you both so much and good luck— the right track. thank you both so much and good luck with - the right track. thank you both so much and good luck with your- much and good luck with your businesses throughout this period. let me read out a couple of your tweets. liz on twitter it says the mask requirement should never have
9:47 am
been removed. something so simple should have carried on until this is over, if it had not stopped there would now be less resistance, there will always be a few who do but less confusing than chop and change. wendy on twitter says people should think themselves lucky they can go to shops with a mask. some of us have shielded since the virus began and have not been to a shopper any buildings other than hospitals in all this time. they should wear their masks with pride, help us stay safe stop please keep your comments coming in. you can do that on twitter. use the hashtag bbc your questions. the airline, easyjet, has made a loss of more than a billion pounds for the second year in a row. its results were slightly better than in the previous 12 months, and the firm said it had good levels of bookings but it was too early to know what impact the omicron variant would have on the business. the chief executive of easyjet, johan lundgren, said that despite the introduction of new travel restrictions in the uk, he was confident the government would remove them as soon as was possible.
9:48 am
clearly, they won't have the ability as soon as it is safe to do so to remove all the restrictions so we take a lot of comfort in that, that is the right way of looking at that so we are not writing off the winter but having said that, we thought always that this winter was going to be a year of two halves, when the winter would be something that had a lot of uncertainty and that assumption seems to be the right one. i'm joined now byjulia lo bue—said, chief executive of the advantage travel partnership. lovely to see you as ever. it has been sometime since we spoke, travel had had an uptick, people starting to travel again but this new variant raises questions what impact is it having on your customers at the moment? ,., ., ., ., �* moment? good morning. you're absolutely _ moment? good morning. you're absolutely right, _ moment? good morning. you're absolutely right, we've - moment? good morning. you're absolutely right, we've seen - moment? good morning. you'rel absolutely right, we've seen chop and change in travel restrictions over the past 20 months, we started to see some recovery, a lot of my members across the uk are starting
9:49 am
to trade through and unfortunately changes over the weekend show you how uncertain the times are but also what happens, we have to be more agile as businesses and make sure we can react to government change that comes. ., �* , can react to government change that comes. . �*, , , can react to government change that comes. . �*, , comes. that's probably easier said than done. — comes. that's probably easier said than done, isn't _ comes. that's probably easier said than done, isn't it? _ comes. that's probably easier said than done, isn't it? it's— comes. that's probably easier said than done, isn't it? it's very - than done, isn't it? it's very difficult. — than done, isn't it? it's very difficult. i — than done, isn't it? it's very difficult, i was _ than done, isn't it? it's very difficult, i was listening - than done, isn't it? it's very difficult, i was listening to l than done, isn't it? it's very i difficult, i was listening to your report before, we could make those changes quickly, taking people across the world, making people already across the world, operationally it's very challenging and communication is important and unfortunately, the industry does not get information in good time, head of government announcements, so we of government announcements, so we can of government announcements, so we can make sure customers are for it they need to be in order to get them backin they need to be in order to get them back in time so incredibly difficult and frustrating. {3h back in time so incredibly difficult and frustrating.— back in time so incredibly difficult and frustrating. on the price a pcr test for people _ and frustrating. on the price a pcr test for people returning _ and frustrating. on the price a pcr test for people returning from - test for people returning from abroad, i know you are one of a number of people calling on the government to help travellers with that expense, to allow them to use
9:50 am
the nhs test and trace service. do you think the government is going to give way on that? i you think the government is going to give way on that?— give way on that? i think it's a really important _ give way on that? i think it's a really important point. - give way on that? i think it's a really important point. we - give way on that? i think it's aj really important point. we are give way on that? i think it's a - really important point. we are now in a position where travellers have started to travel again, they were using the antigen tests, the slightly cheaper test. pcr test, unfortunately, you have to rely on a private test provider and experience to date has not been favourable in the main so test results coming back late. if the government ambition and objective is to ensure we can genomic sequence of the pcr test, the best capability of being able to do that in a timely manner is through the nhs so we are really urging the government to ensure they can open this facility up to international travellers and not rely on the private sector. legs international travellers and not rely on the private sector. as you are saying _ rely on the private sector. as you are saying what _ rely on the private sector. as you are saying what is _ rely on the private sector. as you are saying what is best _ rely on the private sector. as you are saying what is best for- rely on the private sector. as you are saying what is best for the i are saying what is best for the individual is also best for the country? individual is also best for the count ? ~ , , . country? absolutely. the private test providers — country? absolutely. the private test providers do _ country? absolutely. the private test providers do not _ country? absolutely. the private test providers do not have - country? absolutely. the private test providers do not have the i country? absolutely. the private . test providers do not have the same capabilities as government in terms
9:51 am
of the labs for sequencing and we know from previous experience, the data was dynamically sequenced, we believe by doing it this way, the government meets their objective, we can start to genomic sequence much more of the pcr tests that are from international arrivals and meet the objective for everybody. it is international arrivals and meet the objective for everybody.— objective for everybody. it is the time of year _ objective for everybody. it is the time of year when _ objective for everybody. it is the time of year when we _ objective for everybody. it is the time of year when we see - objective for everybody. it is the time of year when we see and i objective for everybody. it is the i time of year when we see and hear lots of ads from holiday companies encouraging people to think about booking next summer and holidays. how much has not been thrown into chaos by the arrival of this new variant? and the uncertainty that brings? and how difficult is it going to be for companies, travel agents etc to whether that? the best thin that agents etc to whether that? the best thing that anybody _ agents etc to whether that? the best thing that anybody can _ agents etc to whether that? the best thing that anybody can do _ agents etc to whether that? the best thing that anybody can do really - agents etc to whether that? the best thing that anybody can do really is i thing that anybody can do really is think about how they book, when they are ready to book. through a travel agent you will get all the expertise, the financial protection, it is the best means to think about making your future holidays or travel plans. there is uncertainty,
9:52 am
we do hope the government will look at these restrictions in a timely manner, they have committed to three weeks so hopefully in two and a bit weeks so hopefully in two and a bit weeks we will get a further update but in the meantime, we are remaining positive, remaining optimistic. international travel is still possible, lots of bumps on the road but it is by no means are we back to work we were so i remain hopeful. back to work we were so i remain ho eful. , ., back to work we were so i remain ho eful., . ., ~ back to work we were so i remain ho eful., . . ,, i. the mass expansion of the booster programme means that many more people will be hoping to get a vaccine in the coming weeks. how easy will it be to ramp up vaccinations? john maguire is at a vaccine centre in bristol. at the university of the west of england, just on the outskirts of bristol, this was initially converted into a nightingale hospital, but didn't have to be used thankfully. since the summer, it has been a mass vaccination centre, as you say they will,
9:53 am
they've been busy. there will be busy in the foreseeable future. they see about 1800 people a day, small queue now, people have been moving through for the last half hour or so, but very busy doing both moderna and the pfizer booster this morning and throughout, and also some astrazeneca as well. even see schoolchildren here, some of those, some of the 12 to 15—year—olds who weren't seen at school. as you can see, people sitting at the end there who've had theirjab this morning. as you're well aware, i'm sure, almost everybody watching this morning will have had a vaccination. so many millions of us have. you sit for 15 minutes, don't you, at the end, just to make sure everything's all right. let's come and chat to one of the vaccinators working hard here this morning, alex, morning. alex, good to see you. you've got an interesting story, haven't you? we spoke earlier to some nurses who converted across, but you're not traditionally a nurse or a health care worker. tell us your story. no. so i used to work in the charity sector. i did sort of campaigning and volunteer management and started out with the st john's ambulance as a volunteer when we worked
9:54 am
at ashton gate. and then one of the nurses i worked there, worked with there, encouraged me to sort of apply for this job as a vaccinator. and i got that. and i've been doing this since june. how have you found it? absolutely loved it. like, it's a really nice team, really positive environment. pay's not bad. and it's obviously great to be helping people and doing something that's really important for the country. and so much so that you decided to go for a total career change. yes. so i actually start on monday off up at southmead hospital. i'm going to be a healthcare assistant which is like the real entry level role, sort of supporting people with like health and personal care. and i'm really excited. yeah. and it gets busy here. we know, we were saying up to about 1800 people. i'm always fascinated by the tricks of the trade you use to persuade people who you might be a little bit unsure, a little bit nervous, what sort of tips do you use. so obviously, the important thing is to like, try and empathise. there's lots of reasons why people might be nervous even once they're sat in the chair. it'sjust like listening to what their actual concerns are, really hearing them and sort of using the knowledge that we have. so understanding how the vaccines
9:55 am
work, a little bit of understanding of side effects and like, general health and sort of supporting them with their recovery. good stuff. alex, thanks very much. all the best with the newjob, the new career start on monday. so, yeah, very busy already here this morning. the trial of ghislaine maxwell has started in new york with the prosecution saying the former girlfriend of convicted sex offenderjeffrey epstein "preyed on vulnerable young girls, manipulated them, and served them up to be sexually abused". maxwell, who is 59, faces 8 charges of sex trafficking and other offences. she has pleaded not guilty and her defence says�* she's being made a scapegoat for epstein's crimes. the disgraced financier took his own life while in jail in 2019. from new york, nada tawfik reports. over the next few weeks, what plays out in this new york courthouse will be a crucial chapter in the twisted saga ofjeffrey epstein's sex—trafficking ring, and ghislaine maxwell's alleged role in it. as her highly—awaited trial begins,
9:56 am
the world's eyes were trained on what the evidence presented here would reveal. and so, too, were epstein's accusers, some arrived to show solidarity the alleged victims. in opening statements, the government said ghislaine maxwell was a dangerous predator who provided a cover of respectability for epstein. prosecutors said she lured victims with the promise of a bright future, only to sexually abuse them. her defence attorney told the jury she was a convenient stand—in for epstein and the government would not be able to prove their case. he said the accusers�* memories were corrupted and influenced by a desire for a big jackpot of money. there have been numerous investigations, documentaries exploring ghislaine maxwell's alleged crimes. but the allegations had never been aired in a criminal trial. the jury will be presented with a range of evidence from flight logs to testimonies from epstein's former staff. the four underage girls in the indictment, now grown women, are expected to take the stand. and other accusers from around the country can testify
9:57 am
too, those with stories similar to teresa helm. according to her, she thought she had landed a job as a professional masseuse, but instead, walked right into a nightmare. i thought that her and i were making these connections and she did her role, played her role, beautifully. she was masterful at it. i walked myself into a predator's home. ghislaine maxwell's brother ian says at least one sibling will be present every day of the trial to support her. it is impossible for me to think that she would have been engaged in these really horrendous charges. if convicted, she faces up to 80 years in prison. labour leader sir keir starmer has reshuffled his shadow cabinet. there was a big promotion for yvette cooper, to shadow home secretary, david lammy has been promoted to shadow foreign secretary, replacing lisa nandy and wes streeting becomes
9:58 am
shadow health secretary. some labour mps believe there are growing divisions between sir keir starmer and deputy leader angela rayner. you know, i've been through a lot of reshuffles in the last 11 years. the leader makes the decisions. the gaffer picks the team. that is how it goes and that is how it has always gone. frankly, i couldn't really care less about the circus around who's in, who's out, who's up, who's down, who knew, who didn't. i care about the fact that there are people across this country who deserve a better settlement — they've deserved it for a long time. now it's time for a look at the weather, lets talk to carol good morning. today is much milder thanit good morning. today is much milder than it was yesterday across the board, more or less but it is cloudy and damp. we have a weatherfront, here it is, continuing to push eastwards with rain, behind it, a lot of cloud, some dank conditions and drizzle but we will see some
9:59 am
breaks in the cloud across the north midlands and west yorkshire. we had this next weather front waiting in the winds which will bring rain across northern ireland and western scotland by the end of the afternoon with strengthening winds. these are the temperatures 8— 12 , above average for the time of year but still cold in the northern isles. through this evening and overnight low pressure bringing this weather tends to deepen as it pushes eastwards. and behind that, you see the isobars are fairly tightly packed, it's going to be a windy night with the risk of gusts and gales on exposed coasts and around hills. temperatures1 gales on exposed coasts and around hills. temperatures 1 in gales on exposed coasts and around hills. temperatures1 in lyric, you will see a touch of frost but elsewhere, colder night than the one just gone with overnight lows between 5 and potentially 11 in the south.
10:00 am
this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. face mask rules return in england — in efforts to combat the spread of the omicron variant later today — borisjohnson will set out plans to accelerate the boosterjab programme — with all adults in the uk to be offered a third vaccine. what that will do is basically increase your general levels of immunity which we hope will, to some extent, counter the potential drop in vaccine effectiveness we might find with this variant. travel rules also change from today— anyone coming into the uk now needs to take a pcr test and self—isolate until they get a negative result
10:01 am
with new restrictions coming in to slow down the spread

47 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on