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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 30, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines. boosterjabs will be offered to everyone over the age of 18 as part of a push to limit the spread of the omicron variant of coronavirus. the spread of the omicron from — the spread of the omicron from the spread of the omicron today, facemasks are again from today, facemasks are mandatory again in_ from today, facemasks are mandatory again in england on public transport and in _ again in england on public transport and in shops. what does it mean for transport _ and in shops. what does it mean for transport providers, retailers, travel— transport providers, retailers, travel agents? we will speak to them _ longer sentences for child abusers in england and wales, as tony's law becomes a reality. he is an inspiration every day. he never complains, he carries on,
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no matter what is thrown at him. all the challenges, he just gets himself back up and carries on. prince charles joins the celebrations as barbados officially becomes the world's newest republic. messi dazzles in paris after being voted the best player in the world for a record seventh time, collecting the prestigious men's ballon d'or award. good morning, this morning is milder than yesterday. for many, cloudy, some light rain. replaced by heavier rain and strengthening wind coming in from the west later. all the details this morning. it's tuesday, the 30th of november. new rules aimed at limiting the spread of the omicron variant of coronavirus have come into force affecting shoppers and public transport users in england, as well as people arriving into the uk. the health secretary, sajid javid, has insisted the measures are proportionate and will help families enjoy christmas together.
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ministers have also agreed to extend and accelerate the rollout of boosterjabs, making them available to everyone aged 18 and over, three months after a second vaccine. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. from this morning, face coverings are now compulsory in shops and on public transport in england. face coverings are already needed for most public places and transport in wales. masks are also required in pubs and restaurants in scotland and northern ireland. but there is some concern over how shoppers in england will cope with the return of face coverings. the vast majority of the public, when it was required to wear face coverings, were very good about it, and still are in scotland and wales, where the regulations were never removed. but there is definitely a minority of people who seem to think that the rules shouldn't apply to them and they are causing problems at stores. we've seen the levels of violence that shopkeepers faced more than doubled during the pandemic. there are changes in schools, too, where staff and pupils in year 7
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and above are also being advised to wear masks in communal areas. in scotland, that rule applies in class, as well. and international travellers coming to the uk now also need to take a pcr test within two days of their arrival and self—isolate until they get a negative result. but perhaps the biggest changes are the modifications to the booster programme — slashing the gap between second jab and booster from six months to three and opening up boosters to all those over 18. vaccines and boosters remain the prime defence against the virus. it is also pretty clear that, if you vaccinate, you're going to be in a better position than if you have not been vaccinated. so it's still a good idea to get vaccinated and the booster dose will boost the immune response to such a high level that we would hope they would overcome any inherent ability of this new variant to escape vaccine—induced immunity. it's clear uk cases linked to the omicron variant are on the rise. the big unanswered questions remain — what impact the variant will have on illness,
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vaccines and transmission. dominic hughes, bbc news. coming up on breakfast — we'll speak to professor adam finn from thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation — that's just after 7 o'clock. a lot of gas coming up and plenty of information. if you are asking questions that might have arisen about how you go about getting a booster, what you should do if you are in a vulnerable situation and have not had the beast. we will try to answer questions over the course of the programme. labour leader sir keir starmer has reshuffled his shadow cabinet with a big promotion for yvette cooper to shadow home secretary amongst the changes. some labour mps believe there are growing divisions between him and the deputy leader angela rayner. let's speak to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. the timing of it yesterday was fascinating. it
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the timing of it yesterday was fascinating-— the timing of it yesterday was fascinatina. ., , ., , ., fascinating. it was a bit annoying for an . ela fascinating. it was a bit annoying for angela rayner _ fascinating. it was a bit annoying for angela rayner the _ fascinating. it was a bit annoying for angela rayner the deputy - fascinating. it was a bit annoying . for angela rayner the deputy leader because when she was doing interviews like on this programme, she was asked about a reshuffle and said there would not be and she left the tvstudios, had a meeting with keir starmer to be told there would be a reshuffle that took place when she was doing a speech about something else and could not answer questions about it. either her big day was a little overshadowed or she is being kept out of the loop, which means may be keir starmer and angela rayner are not working that closely together. whichever it is it is an issue for the labour party. this morning the new shadow cabinet meets in keir starmer i think will focus on the good things to come out of the reshuffle, the fact he has the right people in the rightjobs. there is a mixture of experience, good communicators and people good at politics, and also young, fresh faces from a newer generation. the big question is, in the long term,
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does the new shadow cabinet make more of an impact than previous shadow cabinets, and does that little faces from a newer generation. the big question is, in the long term, does the new shadow cabinet make more of it something the party can live with? barbados has become the world's newest republic and in doing so removed the queen as its head of state. prince charles attended the ceremony that saw sandra mason sworn in as the country's first president just after midnight local time. daniela relph reports from the barbadian capital bridgetown. the world's newest republic and a show of national pride. this constitutional shift in barbados is about asserting self—confidence and shedding the links to its colonial past. some of this country's most well—known names were among the vip guests attending the transition ceremony.
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and also here to watch it all play out, the prince of wales, invited to see his mother removed as a head of state — the first time that has happened anywhere in 30 years. for the final time on this caribbean island, he viewed a military march past and took the final salute. and then, the symbolic moment of transition. as the royal standard was lowered over barbados, it became a republic. it is hard to imagine this event was not tinged with some sadness for the prince of wales. his focus on the continuing friendship between the nations and also speaking directly about the pain of a shared history. from the darkest days of our past, and the appalling atrocity of slavery, which for ever stains our
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history, the people of this island forged their path with extraordinary fortitude. emancipation, self—government, and independence were your waypoints. freedom, justice and self—determination have been your guides. an acknowledgement of the past as this island look forward and swore in its first ever president. i. i, sandra prunella mason do swear that i will be faithful and bear true allegiance to barbados according to law, so help me god. casting aside the official link to the british monarchy, barbados is increasingly looking east to china for financial support. there are republican rumblings, too, in other caribbean nations.
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they will be watching this newest republic closely. our correspondent celestina olulode is in bridgetown for us. tell us about last night, did it feel like the beginning of a new chapter? feel like the beginning of a new chater? ~ . ., , feel like the beginning of a new chater? . ., , q feel like the beginning of a new chater? . ., , a chapter? most certainly. as you heard, this _ chapter? most certainly. as you heard, this nation _ chapter? most certainly. as you heard, this nation as _ chapter? most certainly. as you heard, this nation as its - chapter? most certainly. as you heard, this nation as its first - chapter? most certainly. as you | heard, this nation as its first ever president. dame sandra mason. she is now the head of state of this country and so it does feel like a new chapter. a few other things that will change is this country will introduce a new honour system that will replace the british honours system. also, the name of the police will change. they will now be called the barbados police service. so all these things are changing as this country enters into a new chapter of
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its history. country enters into a new chapter of its histo . . ~' , ., , country enters into a new chapter of its histo . ., ~ i. , . its history. thank you very much. good to talk— its history. thank you very much. good to talk to _ its history. thank you very much. good to talk to you. _ the trial of ghislaine maxwell has started in new york with the prosecution saying the former girlfriend of convicted six offenderjeffrey epstein preyed on vulnerable young girls, manipulated them, and served them up to be sexually abused. maxwell, who is 59, faces eight charges of six eight charges of sex trafficking and other offences. she has pleaded not guilty and her defence say she's being made a scapegoat for epstein�*s crimes. the disgraced financier took his own life while in jail in 2019. more than 100,000 homes in parts of scotland and the north of england remain without power because of damage caused by storm arwen. schools in aberdeenshire remain closed and whole villages in cumbria remain without power, with no word yet on when supplies will be restored. utility companies said they would be offering accommodation for vulnerable customers.
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that is quite something. it is a big worry for a lot of people watching this morning. good morning. good morning. if you remember, on sunday night, it was bitterly cold in shap, almost —9. compare that to shap this morning at the same time, almost 10 degrees. 9.6. a huge leap in temperatures in 24—hour is. today, it will be milderfor us in temperatures in 24—hour is. today, it will be milder for us all. it will also be cloudy and damp. rain and drizzle and a lot of cloud across many areas. still cold in the north—east of scotland. as we go through the day, low pressure moves towards us that introduces more rain getting into northern ireland and
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western scotland. and we will notice the wind strengthened. some breaks in england and wales and we will see a little sunshine but for most it will be cloudy. look at these temperatures. still cold in lerwick but for the rest, 7—12, above average for this stage in november. overnight, low pressure moves across, taking rain with it. some of that rain will be heavy. behind it, a return to showery conditions. and it will be windy, almost anywhere. but we could see the wind touch gale force on exposed coasts and hills. tonight, temperatures, still cold in the far north but generally speaking, another mild night. we have followed the story of little
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tony hudgell closely on breakfast, as the 7—year—old double amputee set about raising more than £1.5 million for charity. tony's story is even more remarkable knowing he lost both his legs after being abused by his birth parents. now, a new law meaning tougher sentences for those who harm children has been named after him. brea kfast�*s zoe conway joined tony and his family as they were told the news byjustice secretary dominic raab. why is there a wig? judges wear wigs so that the criminals, when they are in court, can tell the difference between them and ordinary people. i think it's made of horse wool. what do you of that? tony hudgell might be in the presence of the deputy prime minister, justice secretary dominic raab, but he's certainly not daunted. and you don't know how to work that. but then seven—year—old tony hudgell isn't daunted by anything. what does this do?
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it's his fearlessness and energy that has so inspired his parents. paula and mark hudgell have been campaigning for tony's law — tougher sentences for people convicted of child cruelty. and, at this meeting, they are finding out that the government is going to act. we just think that what tony has done is inspiring. and the need to protect little ones like him is overwhelming. so we will be announcing that change very shortly and i wanted you to know before the general public. that is wonderful. thank you. you are a bit of a role model for all of us. what do you think about that? i don't know what that means. 0h. tony was just a few weeks old when he suffered horrific injuries. his doctors feared he would not survive. he had been abused by his biological parents. he had suffered multiple organ failure, septicaemia and fractures to both thighs, lower legs, ankles, toes and thumbs. his legs had to be amputated.
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paula and mark began looking after him when he was four months old. presented in front of me was this tiny, broken, shut down, underweight, legs in plaster, four—month—old baby. i broke down in tears. absolutely sobbed. and thought i can't do this. but within two hours of being with him, there was no way i was going to leave him. this is tony with his biological parents tony smith and jodie simpson. in 2018, they were convicted of causing serious physical harm to a child and cruelty to a person under 16. they were each sentenced to ten years in prison. under the government's new law, they would get longer. we are announcing the increase in sentencing for causing death
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by cruelty to children from 14 years to life in prison, and for causing serious injury by cruelty from ten years to 14 years. and the reason is because children, and young children in particular, are the most vulnerable in our society. they have got to be given the strongest protection of the law. you have just met tony. i saw the two of you staring out the window and looking at where the queen lives. what do you make of him? he is an incredible young boy. he is full of energy. you would not really have a full understanding of what he has been through, but he is full of life, full of energy and deserves every chance to make the best of his potential. he is swimming, he is horse riding, and i think we need to make sure we are protecting young boys, young children like tony. every day for a month last year, tony walked around his local park to raise money for the hospital that saved his life. inspired by captain tom, who raised millions by walking 100 times around his garden, tony set out to raise £500 by walking ten kilometres.
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sometimes, it hurt, and sometimes he fell over. but he kept going. he completed the ten kilometres and he raised more than £1.5 million. he is an inspiration every day. he never complains. he carries on, no matter what is thrown at him. all the challenges, he gets himself back up and carries on. ten years for tony's parents that received the maximum sentence just doesn't seem enough for his lifelong injuries. so now, increasing that to 1a years, which, now, with the new sentencing that they have to serve two thirds, that is going to be almost ten years that they would have to spend inside — so that is double what they would have to now. tony, what has today been like? just amazing. amazing, indeed. for how many seven—year—olds get
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to work on the deputy prime minister's speech. so where have you got up to? not very far. i have a team that draft the speech. as the justice secretary is discovering, tony hudgell never gives up. how brilliant is tony? you could take him anywhere. in control of everything. i have a feeling dominic raab did not get much done while tony was in town. paula is an incredible woman. yes, great to see tony doing so well. so lots of changes today, including face coverings now becoming mandatory again in shops and on public transport in england. nina is at liverpool lime street station this morning. where i am sure it will get busy later. good morning. if you live in
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england, you might have got used to not picking one of these up when you leave the house ready to get on public transport but that will become mandatory as of today when you are on public transport, inside a shop, getting your nails done, going to the post office, travel agent. it is not explicitly clear if masks are necessary in the station itself but we are following the guidance of a house here. in wales and scotland and northern ireland there is extra guidance for passes stepping into a nightclub and working from home where possible. for england, this is a significant change, undoing the freedoms we have become accustomed to since the late summer. will it go down well with everyone? we have spoken to people in the east midlands and yorkshire. on public transport especially it is
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important but in shops, we do not want anyone lockdown for christmas. it is essential. we want anyone lockdown for christmas. it is essential.— it is essential. we need to help us throu~h it is essential. we need to help us through these _ it is essential. we need to help us through these times. _ it is essential. we need to help us through these times. i _ it is essential. we need to help us through these times. i know - it is essential. we need to help us through these times. i know i - it is essential. we need to help us| through these times. i know i have it around _ through these times. i know i have it around my chin but i have just -ot it around my chin but i have just got off— it around my chin but i have just got off the — it around my chin but i have just got off the bus and i am having a breather — got off the bus and i am having a breather. . ~ got off the bus and i am having a breather. ., ,, ., , ., , ,, breather. talking to people. seeing them. at breather. talking to people. seeing them- at the _ breather. talking to people. seeing them. at the end _ breather. talking to people. seeing them. at the end of— breather. talking to people. seeing them. at the end of the _ breather. talking to people. seeing them. at the end of the day, - breather. talking to people. seeing them. at the end of the day, it - breather. talking to people. seeing| them. at the end of the day, it does not cost _ them. at the end of the day, it does not cost anything. _ them. at the end of the day, it does not cost anything. we _ them. at the end of the day, it does not cost anything.— not cost anything. we have been in this situation _ not cost anything. we have been in this situation before _ not cost anything. we have been in this situation before and _ not cost anything. we have been in this situation before and if - not cost anything. we have been in this situation before and if people i this situation before and if people carried on, i am not saying there would not be variants, but it might not have come to this. so would not be variants, but it might not have come to this.— not have come to this. so far, so aood not have come to this. so far, so good this — not have come to this. so far, so good this morning _ not have come to this. so far, so good this morning in _ not have come to this. so far, so good this morning in liverpool. | not have come to this. so far, so - good this morning in liverpool. most people we have seen have been wearing a mask and those encouraged to put one on have complied with that encouragement. travel rules change from today. if you are coming back from a foreign country. the rule about a lateral flow test moves to a pcr test until you get that result and it is specific about what sort of covid you might have, you
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might have to stay—at—home. for the industry, we can speak to laura who runs a travel agent in trafford. good morning. ifi runs a travel agent in trafford. good morning. if i was coming back from say tenerife, how will things change? it from say tenerife, how will things chan . e? ., from say tenerife, how will things chance? ., . ., ., ., change? it would change now that you would have normally _ change? it would change now that you would have normally purchased - change? it would change now that you would have normally purchased a - would have normally purchased a lateral flow test and completed it when you got back between day zero and a two and you could just go back to work and go out. now the rules mean you need a pcr test and when you arrive back you can do it from as sooner you arrive back up to two macro days but you now have to isolate at your home, where you reside, untilthe isolate at your home, where you reside, until the results come back and of course are negative. 50 reside, untilthe results come back and of course are negative.- and of course are negative. so pcr tests are more _ and of course are negative. so pcr tests are more expensive - and of course are negative. so pcr tests are more expensive but - and of course are negative. so pcr tests are more expensive but you i tests are more expensive but you might have to book another day's holiday to make sure you are at home until the results come out. how expensive are these tests and how
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quickly do the results coming in? for some people who have to return to work the next day it will be an inconvenience but pcr testing does have to be private and the prices have to be private and the prices have come down. just doing a general search they start from £37 50. cheaper than they were? a lot cheaper. those results probably within 2a hours. the rapid results start from £75. if i within 24 hours. the rapid results start from £75.— start from £75. if i am looking ahead to _ start from £75. if i am looking ahead to february _ start from £75. if i am looking ahead to february half - start from £75. if i am looking ahead to february half term, | start from £75. if i am looking . ahead to february half term, how much of an impact will it have on people booking for spring, easter, summertime? this people booking for spring, easter, summertime?— people booking for spring, easter, summertime? , , , summertime? this is reviewed every three weeks. — summertime? this is reviewed every three weeks, please _ summertime? this is reviewed every three weeks, please do _ summertime? this is reviewed every three weeks, please do not - summertime? this is reviewed every three weeks, please do not panic. i three weeks, please do not panic. stay positive for a brighter future in travel. �* . ~ stay positive for a brighter future in travel. . ., ,, , stay positive for a brighter future in travel. . ., ~ , , ., stay positive for a brighter future in travel. . ., ~ , i. . a in travel. and make sure you check our in travel. and make sure you check your insurance. _ in travel. and make sure you check your insurance. 10096. _ in travel. and make sure you check your insurance. 10096. the - in travel. and make sure you check| your insurance. 10096. the measure your insurance. 100%. the measure mandatory from today and you can be fined if you are encouraged to wear a mask on a train and you refuse to
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do so. the laws will be reviewed in coming weeks and there is no way of knowing that they will still be in force come christmas. barbados is the world's newest republic after a ceremony was held overnight to remove the queen as its head of state. prince charles was part of the celebrations as the country's first president was sworn in just after midnight local time. let's speak to professor sir hilary beckles, who is a historian and the vice chancellor of the university of the west indies. this really does feel like a hugely significant moment for barbados. what was it like for you watching the ceremony?— what was it like for you watching the ceremony? what was it like for you watching the ceremon ? ,., ., ., ., the ceremony? good morning. for me as an historian — the ceremony? good morning. for me as an historian and _ the ceremony? good morning. for me as an historian and citizen _ the ceremony? good morning. for me as an historian and citizen of - as an historian and citizen of barbados, it was a highly emotional moment. i thought it would go a long way towards helping citizens there to improve emotional health, to have
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that sense of responsibility for their future and to own up to their past and look to the future with enthusiasm. it was a wonderfully spiritual moment. you enthusiasm. it was a wonderfully spiritual moment.— spiritual moment. you say it was emotional. _ spiritual moment. you say it was emotional, what _ spiritual moment. you say it was emotional, what were _ spiritual moment. you say it was emotional, what were the - spiritual moment. you say it was i emotional, what were the emotions for you? emotional, what were the emotions for ou? .., , emotional, what were the emotions for ou? , ., , ., for you? recognise of course that for you? recognise of course that for many decades, _ for you? recognise of course that for many decades, we _ for you? recognise of course that for many decades, we have - for you? recognise of course that for many decades, we have been | for many decades, we have been pledging allegiance to the queen as head of state. she is not a part of this society. she does not participate in the activities of this society. she had a duty as head of state, but she appointed a full—time person to carry out her duties to this society. after a while, there was a sense of an assault on the dignity of citizens in that regard. with that circumstance, it was emotional, because now you can take
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responsibility for yourselves and your head of state is a citizen of your head of state is a citizen of your society with a good understanding of the needs with the elder people, next generation, so it is integrated, history, the present, the future, finally breaking away from the colonial scaffold we have been a part of 396 years. it is the end of the empire in barbados and the beginning of full nation—building for younger people. how do people living on the island feel about it? do they feel it is a fresh start?— feel about it? do they feel it is a fresh start? , ., , ., fresh start? the people here have been opposed _ fresh start? the people here have been opposed for— fresh start? the people here have been opposed for generations - fresh start? the people here have been opposed for generations to i been opposed for generations to colonialism. the british monarchy exercised jurisdiction over this island for 396 years. of those 396,
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213 were in slavery, and the imposition of chattel slavery. and also white supremacy apartheid. as prince charles correctly said, the british crown has been a part of the imposition as he said of appalling atrocities over the years. and the legacies of these atrocities are to be seen everywhere. the people are now trying to put this together, put it behind them the best they can to say we have a terrible history, let's hope our future, say we have a terrible history, let's hope ourfuture, we say we have a terrible history, let's hope our future, we can turn this history around. barbados was known for slavery. it was england's first slave economy and now barbados has an opportunity to become the freest democracy in society, in the
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world, by flipping this history on its head. i suspect the citizens here are looking forward to a future in which the world will look upon them and say barbados is the freest society in the world. what them and say barbados is the freest society in the world.— society in the world. what about barbados as _ society in the world. what about barbados as a _ society in the world. what about barbados as a country? - society in the world. what about barbados as a country? the - society in the world. what about i barbados as a country? the island has been hit badly, the tourism industry is important for people. what is next and how do you get barbados thriving again? the structure of _ barbados thriving again? the structure of the _ barbados thriving again? tue: structure of the economy barbados thriving again? t'ta: structure of the economy is barbados thriving again? tt2 structure of the economy is a colonial structure. structure of the economy is a colonialstructure. it structure of the economy is a colonial structure. it is a white supremacy dominated economy. the majority of black people here, 96% of the population, structurally marginalised in the economy because it is a cologne —— colonial economy. this is an opportunity in this recession and in the post covid reconstruction to say these institutions of the past have not
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served democracy well. this is an opportunity for economic reform, an opportunity for economic reform, an opportunity to create a new generation of entrepreneurs, to diversify the economy and bring younger people through innovation into the economy. effectively the population now has to dig deep to be creative, to be innovative and find confidence to go to the future. i believe this is a wonderful starting point in which to do so.— point in which to do so. professor, ureat to point in which to do so. professor, great to talk— point in which to do so. professor, great to talk to — point in which to do so. professor, great to talk to you. _ what a top feller. you can tell he is busy, books everywhere. time now to get the news where you are.
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good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. from this morning, the wearing of masks is compulsory on all public transport across london in response to rising concerns over the omicron covid variant. tfl had already made it a condition of travel on its services, but now coverings will be required on trains too as well as in shops. it comes as wandsworth and camden became the latest places in london where cases were detected. the london assembly has warned that some of the capital's river crossings could be closed unless more funding is secured. both rotherhithe tunnel and vauxhall bridge are in need of urgent repairs. tfl says they could be casualties of its £1.2 billion funding gap. but the department for transport has said the government's repeatedly shown its commitment to transport in london, including the most recent funding agreement worth over £1 billion. a new exhibition, focusing on contributions from the windrush generation, is opening this week at tate britain.
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life between islands will include work by over a0 artists, a mix of those who came to the uk in the 19505, artists of caribbean heritage and some who have been inspired by the islands. on one level, it is an art history, of the caribbean connection in british art from about the 19505 right to now, as a continuing story — mainly of artists of caribbean descent, of course. but it is also shows how the visual arts act as this amazing lens through which we can see a broader cultural, social, political story. london's famous new year's day parade will be returning on the 1st of january. but restrictions mean the traditional parade has been replaced by a ticketed arena show. it will be at waterloo place near piccadilly circus. let's take a look at the travel situation this morning. there's a good service on the tubes apart from the piccadilly line which is part suspended. for all other travel news tune in to your local bbc radio station.
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onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it was all change weather—wise last night. it was cold and frosty for a good while underneath clear skies, but temperatures unusually have been rising for the second half of the night along with a warm front that has been sweeping through, introducing cloud, some patchy outbreaks of rain and much milder air. so we start off the day on a very different note, between six and eight celsius. we will keep those cloudy skies for much of the day, there could be a few outbreaks of light patchy rain and drizzle, not amounting to very much, and there is a noticeable westerly wind. temperatures this afternoon could get as high as 11 or 12 celsius so very mild and well above the average for the time of year. the mild air is not set to last. we have got a cold front coming through overnight tonight that is going to give us some further outbreaks of rain and also eventually some colder air. so to start off the day on wednesday, nine celsius, this will be the day's highest temperature because on wednesday, it's dry, there's some sunny spells but temperatures will slip as we head throughout the day and it will feel quite cold by the afternoon.
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a frosty night on wednesday and into thursday, we are back into that very chilly air and a northerly wind. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now though it's back to dan and sally. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. coming up on breakfast this morning. we'll bring you the inspirational story of kat cordiner, who despite having incurable cancer, is attempting to break a world record rowing 3,000 miles from the canary islands to antigua with her two team mates. tv presenter paddy mcguiness and his wife christine are used to the spotlight but they'll be telling us why they've decided to let the cameras into their home for a new documentary about their family's experience of autism after all three of their children and christine were diagnosed with the condition. if you're looking for some inspiration for where to go walking this winter, dj and tv presenter nihal arthanayake has been exploring
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the coast around cumbria and lancashire for a new series of the bbc�*s winter walks. all uk adults are to be offered a covid boosterjab as part of the effort to tackle the new omicron variant. priority will still be given to older patients and those who are more vulnerable to coronavirus. let's speak to dr nighat arif. good morning, lovely to have you on the programme again, haven't seen you for a while. let's talk about this booster programme. how do you feel about it and are you slightly daunted about how much extra work it is going to be? where are you standing?— is going to be? where are you standin: ? , , . , , standing? this is a very good news sto , we standing? this is a very good news story. we were _ standing? this is a very good news story, we were hoping _ standing? this is a very good news story, we were hoping that - standing? this is a very good news story, we were hoping that the - story, we were hoping that the booster programme will be rolled out. we are already vaccinating 40—year—olds and above, now it is 18 to 39. the reduction time has happened between the second dose, it
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was six months, now it's happened between the second dose, it was six months, now its three months. but there will also be childhood immunisation and a covid vaccine has altered there, so 12—year—olds will get the second dose and then hopefully they will be given a boost as well. in amongst all of that, we have got the compromised communities, the immunocompromised, those who are on immunosuppressants, orwho immunocompromised, those who are on immunosuppressants, or who have had a chance —— transplant, they will get a third primary dose and then a fourth booster dose but we still are waiting to hear the timeline for that. in regards to being daunted, actually we are well versed to rolling out vaccination programmes. we know there is not an issue with snooty, we know there is not an issue with supply, we have enough vaccine, it is trying to get the people through. as always because the nhs is battling and bursting at the seams, we have other health care provision is that we are providing and then we have a workforce issue. it is the
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health care professionals on the ground. the vaccination programme is bolstered by these amazing volunteers, i call them the angels and the yellow jackets, volunteers, i call them the angels and the yellowjackets, because come rain or shine, they were there hurrying people along, making sure the safety precautions were in place and making sure it was done in a safe manner as possible. a huge task was something i think we are capable doing. was something i think we are capable doinu. a , was something i think we are capable doin., , , , was something i think we are capable doing. many people will be watching this morning — doing. many people will be watching this morning thinking, _ doing. many people will be watching this morning thinking, 0k, - doing. many people will be watching this morning thinking, ok, i'm - doing. many people will be watching this morning thinking, ok, i'm nowl this morning thinking, ok, i'm now eligible to get a jab, what do i do? the steps remain the same? what should people go who think they can apply for it? the should people go who think they can a--l forit? , ,, should people go who think they can apply for it?— apply for it? the steps remain the same, we apply for it? the steps remain the same. we are _ apply for it? the steps remain the same, we are still— apply for it? the steps remain the same, we are still going - apply for it? the steps remain the same, we are still going through i apply for it? the steps remain the. same, we are still going through by age categories, go on to the nhs website, put in your nhs number and your date of birth and they will say when you are eligible. if you have just tested positive for covid—19 or you have had symptoms, you need to allow four weeks before you go and
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have a child. the biggest thing that we have got his hesitancy. it is a global issue. injune at the g7 summit, there was a group of doctors trying to tackle this information and vaccine hesitancy. it is that we are not safe until everyone is vaccinated. as well as supply issues, the fact that we still have hesitancy, i am still hearing, do i really need a booster? yes, please go and get vaccinated. this is one of the tools that we are using to make sure that we do not have a timeline. now more than ever the public health measures are so important. i would like the masks extended further than transport and shops, i would like it mandatory everywhere but i do not run the country! make sure that you are hand
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washing and there is physical distancing. but life should remain as we have been doing, bringing those little measures so we don't come to a standstill when it comes to festivities. i want nothing more than people to spend it with the loved ones. t than people to spend it with the loved ones-— than people to spend it with the loved ones. , ., loved ones. i en'oyed you giggling when ou loved ones. i en'oyed you giggling when you said. — loved ones. i enjoyed you giggling when you said, i _ loved ones. i enjoyed you giggling when you said, i don't _ loved ones. i enjoyed you giggling when you said, i don't run - loved ones. i enjoyed you giggling when you said, i don't run the - when you said, i don't run the country! i think you do quite a good job! t country! i think you do quite a good “ob! ., , ., , ., ., job! i doubt it, it would be a tough 'ob job! i doubt it, it would be a tough job at the minute. _ job! i doubt it, it would be a tough job at the minute. we _ job! i doubt it, it would be a tough job at the minute. we need - job! i doubt it, it would be a tough job at the minute. we need to - job! i doubt it, it would be a tough i job at the minute. we need to make sure the people are not panicking, i am keen to say that omicron is around and we have 11 cases, but meet your friends, around and we have 11 cases, but meet yourfriends, hug around and we have 11 cases, but meet your friends, hug your nearest and dearest, just make sure you wear and dearest, just make sure you wear a mask. get yourself vaccinated. if you are worried, look at the resources. if you see something which seems off, please don't share it because thatjust feeds the algorithm into more hesitancy. and
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we need to be working together. the great british public have done so much and they have been brilliant at getting together, and we just need to keep that going. hopefully no further lockdown. and i will not be running the country. xtet! running the country. yet! great advice _ running the country. yet! great advice there, - running the country. yet! great advice there, don't| running the country. yet! - great advice there, don't feed running the country. yet! great advice there, don't feed the algorithm. — great advice there, don't feed the algorithm, says dr nighat. let�*s algorithm, says dr nighat. let's talk to john _ algorithm, says dr nighat. let's talk to john about _ algorithm, says dr nighat. let's talk to john about lionel - algorithm, says dr nighat. l2t�*3 talk to john about lionel messi. talk tojohn about lionel messi. yes, he has collected another ballon d'or, awarded by the france verbal magazine. d'or, awarded by the france verbal mauazine. , ., , , d'or, awarded by the france verbal mauazine. , . , , ., magazine. this really is the one. -- the france — magazine. this really is the one. -- the france football _ magazine. this really is the one. -- the france football magazine. - magazine. this really is the one. -- | the france football magazine. there was some controversy _ the france football magazine. there was some controversy because - was some controversy because cristiano ronaldo was not there, and the organisation said that his sole motivation is to win more awards than lionel messi but cristiano ronaldo took to instagram to say it
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was a lie. �* , ., was a lie. and he turned up, lionel messi, with — was a lie. and he turned up, lionel messi, with all _ was a lie. and he turned up, lionel messi, with all of _ was a lie. and he turned up, lionel messi, with all of his _ was a lie. and he turned up, lionel messi, with all of his family - was a lie. and he turned up, lionel messi, with all of his family in - was a lie. and he turned up, lionel messi, with all of his family in the | messi, with all of his family in the same suit. so someone must have told him he was going to win. t has him he was going to win. i was 'ealous, him he was going to win. i was jealous. i _ him he was going to win. i was jealous, i would _ him he was going to win. i was jealous, i would like _ him he was going to win. i was jealous, i would like that! - him he was going to win. i was jealous, i would like that! it. him he was going to win. i was. jealous, i would like that! it was him he was going to win. i was i jealous, i would like that! it was a ve ali jealous, i would like that! it was a very glitzy and _ jealous, i would like that! it was a very glitzy and glamorous - jealous, i would like that! it was a very glitzy and glamorous night i jealous, i would like that! it was a very glitzy and glamorous night in| very glitzy and glamorous night in paris, at the ballon d'or awards. always plenty of debate over the winner, guess we shouldn't be surprised it was messi who won this year's award. having helped argentina win the copa america earlier this year, his first international honour. his three boys in matching suits. he was also top scorer in la liga last season before joining paris saint germain in the summer. the women's award went to barcelona captain alexia putellas. tiger woods has admitted he will not be the player he was after his car accident in february, saying he doesn't expect to return to the tourfull time. authorities said he was lucky to survive the crash. he's spoken for the first time and says playing in a couple
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of events every yea r�*s likely. i don't have to compete and play against the best players of the world to have a great life. i know that after my back fusion, for me, i had to prove to myself, i had to climb mount everest one more time. i had to do it. and i did. this time around, i don't think i'll have the body to climb mount everest and that's ok. not that i can't participate in the game at all. i can still maybe, if my leg gets good enough, maybe kick off a tournament here or there. speaking for the first time since that crash in february. this fight has been a long time coming, with a rivalry that dates back more than a decade. amir khan and kell brook will finally go head to head. after years of failed negotiations, the long—term rivals have agreed to the all—british showdown on the 19th of february in manchester. things were already heated as the pair had to be split up
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during a fiery press conference. we've seen a fair few shocks at the uk snooker championship so far and someone who is clearly loving it is ronnie o'sullivan. i suppose he can because he's safely into the last 16. he said he had a little chuckle to himself when several of the world's top ten were knocked out. "lovely, beautiful", he said after beating mark king 6—3, making a century and five 50+ breaks. he's going for an eighth title. he always likes to rock the boat a little bit, ronnie o'sullivan. tie is little bit, ronnie o'sullivan. he is aood fun, little bit, ronnie o'sullivan. he is good fun. so _ little bit, ronnie o'sullivan. he is good fun, so entertaining. - little bit, ronnie o'sullivan. he is good fun, so entertaining. he i little bit, ronnie o'sullivan. he is| good fun, so entertaining. he can, he is so confident _ good fun, so entertaining. he can, he is so confident in _ good fun, so entertaining. he can, he is so confident in his _ good fun, so entertaining. he can, he is so confident in his ability. i he is so confident in his ability. it has been a story of the tournament so far, so mooney big names being looked at in the early rounds. —— so many big names. he can be smug as the path is clear for him. ., ., ., , , him. there are not many sports --eole him. there are not many sports people in _ him. there are not many sports people in the — him. there are not many sports people in the world _ him. there are not many sports people in the world that - him. there are not many sports people in the world that even . him. there are not many sports people in the world that even if| him. there are not many sports i people in the world that even if you do not like the sport he would pay to watch him. do not like the sport he would pay to watch him-— do not like the sport he would pay to watch him. yes, like tiger wood, the sort to watch him. yes, like tiger wood, the sport hangs _ to watch him. yes, like tiger wood, the sport hangs on _ to watch him. yes, like tiger wood,
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the sport hangs on his _ to watch him. yes, like tiger wood, the sport hangs on his shoulders. i sir keir starmer has made significant changes to his top team, in his second reshuffle since taking over the labour party from jeremy corbyn. yvette cooper returns to the shadow cabinet as shadow home secretary, while david lammy becomes shadow foreign secretary, taking over from lisa nandy, who will shadow michael gove's levelling up brief. we can speak to her now. good morning, great to see this morning. good morning, great to see this morninu. good morning, great to see this mornin. _ ,., ., ., good morning, great to see this morning-_ how i good morning, great to see thisl morning._ how did good morning, great to see this i morning._ how did it morning. good morning. how did it feel yesterday. _ morning. good morning. how did it feel yesterday, a _ morning. good morning. how did it feelyesterday, a big _ morning. good morning. how did it feel yesterday, a big change i morning. good morning. how did it feel yesterday, a big change for i feel yesterday, a big change for you, did it feela feel yesterday, a big change for you, did it feel a little bit like a demotion? it felt a bit like coming home, to be honest. the demotion? it felt a bit like coming home, to be honest.— demotion? it felt a bit like coming home, to be honest. the entire time i have home, to be honest. the entire time i have been — home, to be honest. the entire time i have been in _ home, to be honest. the entire time i have been in parliament _ home, to be honest. the entire time i have been in parliament for - home, to be honest. the entire time i have been in parliament for“ i i have been in parliament for 11 years, i have been fighting for politicians of all political party to take seriously the fact that there are people across this country who have watched good jobs and investment leave our communities. we have a level of ambition not matched by politicians from many political parties certainly this one for our young people and towns and villages. i can say for absolute certainty
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that that is going to change and i will make it my mission to bring labour home to people and deliver on the promises that the government is not capable of doing. you the promises that the government is not capable of doing.— not capable of doing. you have gone from bein: not capable of doing. you have gone from being shadow _ not capable of doing. you have gone from being shadow foreign - not capable of doing. you have gone | from being shadow foreign secretary to, what is your title? the from being shadow foreign secretary to, what is your title?— to, what is your title? the very lona to, what is your title? the very long title _ to, what is your title? the very long title that _ to, what is your title? the very long title that michael - to, what is your title? the very long title that michael gove i to, what is your title? the very| long title that michael gove has concocted for himself. the job is to deliver on the broken promises of the last 11 years. to get investment back into town... tote the last 11 years. to get investment back into town. . ._ back into town... we have got your 'ob title back into town... we have got your job title on — back into town... we have got your job title on the _ back into town... we have got your job title on the screen, _ back into town... we have got your job title on the screen, that - back into town... we have got your job title on the screen, that is i back into town... we have got your job title on the screen, that is a i job title on the screen, that is a lot! tt job title on the screen, that is a lot! , . , job title on the screen, that is a lot! , ., , ., ., ~ lot! it is a big agenda. and there is a lot to _ lot! it is a big agenda. and there is a lot to do. _ lot! it is a big agenda. and there is a lot to do. a _ lot! it is a big agenda. and there is a lot to do. a hell— lot! it is a big agenda. and there is a lot to do. a hell of _ lot! it is a big agenda. and there is a lot to do. a hell of a - lot! it is a big agenda. and there is a lot to do. a hell of a lot, i is a lot to do. a hell of a lot, excuse my language. but there is a pressing need to do it because right around this country, we can see what happens when you have good local and regional government investing in areas. young people do not have to get out to get on, it means you can rebuild the high streets and the shops and the community pubs that have been lost because the spending
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power has been stripped from areas. this is about the future of this country and this is a battle for the future of this country. you can probably see, having loved every second of being shadow foreign secretary, i could not be more excited about taking this on. it is about time somebody started to deliver like for towns like mine and labour will be the town —— the party to do it. tt labour will be the town -- the party to do it. . , . . to do it. it was a wide-ranging reshuffle but _ to do it. it was a wide-ranging reshuffle but one _ to do it. it was a wide-ranging reshuffle but one person i to do it. it was a wide-ranging reshuffle but one person who | to do it. it was a wide-ranging i reshuffle but one person who did not hear about it for the deputy leader of the party who seem surprised, what with the situation with angela rayner? t what with the situation with angela ra ner? . �* what with the situation with angela ra ner? ., �* , ., ~ ., rayner? i haven't spoken to angela since the reshuffle _ rayner? i haven't spoken to angela since the reshuffle happened, i rayner? i haven't spoken to angela since the reshuffle happened, we i since the reshuffle happened, we have been getting a team together so we can get out into the country and listen to communities who want to rebuild their towns and villages. i have been through a lot of reshuffles over the last 11 years, i think the leader makes the decisions, the gaffer picks the team, that is how it goes and that is how it has always gone. i couldn't really care less about the
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circus around who is in and who is out, who is up and down, who knew and who didn't, i care about the fact that there are people across this country who deserve a better settlement and they have deserved it for a long time. all they have had is empty slogans and broken promises for the past ten years and i am determined that is going to change. you don't care about the circus but he made to the circus, where did that come from? —— who made that circus, where did it come from? the focus in the — circus, where did it come from? tt2 focus in the media has very much been on whether angelic new and whether keir gave her prior warning, and how much warning. what happened yesterday is that we remodelled our team so are absolutely focused on the interest of the country and you could see that from the fact that the key battleground for the next election, the fourth for the future of our communities, keir has put that up front and centre and i am delighted he has asked me to lead on it. i'm not going to spend a minute
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more focusing on what is going on in the westminster bubble cuff bubble, —— the westminster bubble, i could not care less when we have got workers across this country who have not got the decent future they deserve and we are going to deliver on this after a very long time. unfortunately this reshuffle is much broader than the westminster bubble, we are all talking about it, it is in all of the papers, and there appear to be significant cracks at the top of the labour party. how does a voter trust to put their vote with the labour party when you look at the top and say, those two don't get on? t at the top and say, those two don't net on? ., �* ~' ., get on? i don't think there are significant _ get on? i don't think there are significant cracks _ get on? i don't think there are significant cracks at _ get on? i don't think there are significant cracks at all- get on? i don't think there are significant cracks at all and i i significant cracks at all and i don't think for one moment people are talking about this across the country. i havejust come are talking about this across the country. i have just come down to london from wigan to get things together, i will be getting back out into the country as quickly as possible, and back home that is not what people are talking about. they are talking about the fact that they want a better future for their
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communities. they want the good jobs and investment back in their towns and investment back in their towns and cities. they say they are going to work in a pandemic without the pay and support that they need and deserve. these other issues that angela was talking about yesterday when she was making the speech to the institute of government, rather than focusing on the reshuffle, these are the issues i will be talking about as well and we are going to set forward a plan that will deliver on those ambitions, finally, after a lot of broken promises from this government that have not been met over the last ten years. have not been met over the last ten ears. . y ., have not been met over the last ten ears. ., , ., ., have not been met over the last ten ears. ., i. ., ., have not been met over the last ten ears. ., ., ., ,, ,, years. have you had a new business cards printed _ years. have you had a new business cards printed with _ years. have you had a new business cards printed with your— years. have you had a new business cards printed with your new - years. have you had a new business cards printed with your new job i cards printed with your newjob title on? are they a5 size? thea;r cards printed with your new 'ob title on? are they a5 size? they -- that sells at _ title on? are they a5 size? they -- that sells at the _ title on? are they a5 size? they -- that sells at the 1980s _ title on? are they a5 size? they -- that sells at the 1980s calling, i i that sells at the 19805 calling, i don't know the last time i saw a business card! myjob i5 don't know the last time i saw a business card! myjob is to stand up for communities who feel like nobody has spoken for them for a long time,
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my business card i made a —— job di5cu55ion my business card i made a —— job discussion is for the people and i will speak to them. lisa discussion is for the people and i will speak to them.— will speak to them. lisa nandy, shadow levelling _ will speak to them. lisa nandy, shadow levelling up, _ will speak to them. lisa nandy, shadow levelling up, local i shadow levelling up, local government, housing a community secretary. t government, housing a community secreta . . , government, housing a community secreta . ., , ., , secretary. i am trying to come up with a big — secretary. i am trying to come up with a big job — secretary. i am trying to come up with a big job title _ secretary. i am trying to come up with a big job title for— secretary. i am trying to come up with a big job title for carol! i good morning. you are going to notice this morning how mild it is this morning compared to yesterday, particularly for the time of year. six to 10 degrees, some of us already at 11 degrees. temperatures went up through the night rather than down. the exception is the far north—east of scotland. much milder this morning but it will be fairly cloudy and damp. we have some rain and drizzle pushing 5outh, al5o cloudy and damp. we have some rain and drizzle pushing 5outh, also some rain with summerhill 5now acro55 and drizzle pushing 5outh, also some rain with summerhill 5now across the far north of scotland. that will
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continue through the day —— rain with hill 5now. two degrees in lerwick, but as you come 5outh, nine in belfast, and ten in liverpool. we will see some breaks in the cloud today. north yorkshire will have the best 5un5hine but it will also be quite dying and cloudy. we will see some breaks acro55 part5 quite dying and cloudy. we will see some breaks acro55 parts of oakland and wales, and the low pressure coming into the —— england and wales, and low pressure initially coming into northern ireland and western scotland. there will be rain we5tern scotland. there will be rain here. the low pressure will be with us as we head through the evening and overnight, if anything it will be deepening acro55 u5, ringing rain with it. it is going to be a windy
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night with some gale5 around the coasts and hills. temperature wise, not particularly cold for the time of year, except for in lerwick where you could see some frost but generally, five to eight degrees, milder in the channel islands. tomorrow will have some showers pushing 5outh, some will be wintry, at mode5t levels across scotland. they will then —— tend to fade away. another component to the wind will make it feel colder. not as cold as the weekend. in the south 5till milder conditions with ten and 11. into thursday, some wintry showers on the northerly wind on the east coast, dry and bright weather, 5till coast, dry and bright weather, still some showers coast, dry and bright weather, still some 5hower5 acro55 coast, dry and bright weather, still some showers across wales in the south—west. the next weather front will in from the after that. that was where the of the longest
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title in british medial —— that was worthy of the blog title in british meteorology —— longest title! with the winter olympics ju5t round the corner it's time for us to brush up on our curling knowledge. there so with stones, broom and stick at the ready our reporter fiona lamdin's been getting some tips on how to play the sport. let's take a look. have you dusted off your 5lider5, fiona? have you dusted off your sliders, fiona? , ~ . ., have you dusted off your sliders, fiona? , . _, ., . fiona? yes! welcome to the curling club, literally _ fiona? yes! welcome to the curling club, literally a _ fiona? yes! welcome to the curling club, literally a winter _ fiona? yes! welcome to the curling club, literally a winter wonderland i club, literally a winter wonderland ju5t club, literally a winter wonderland just off oxford circus. it has been 5nowing, chri5tmas just off oxford circus. it has been 5nowing, christmas trees, and a bbc breakfast is on the board because we are going to curl this morning. we have been getting some tips from an olympian. in central london, novice curlers are transported to an alpine village high in the alps. there's three curling rink5 and tonight carolyn and her daughter
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naomi are trying the sport for the first time. we've always been pretty 5porty family, like running, we both play netball. you also do lacro55e. so, yeah, we're always on the lookout really for new sports. do you think you might take up curling? well, you are pretty good! so i might push her to carry it on. you're saying the next olympics? yeah, four years? three years. that's enough time. and it's backed by eve muirhead. three—time olympian and the current team gb skip. she fell in love with the sport and she was nine years old, when she was nine years old, watching her dad play. you know what you're like when you're small and you're watching your dad play a sport, you want to just be part of that sport, don't you? you want to be on there and give it a go and that's exactly what we did. just this weekend, she and her team won gold for scotland in the european world championships in norway. we've trained very hard. it is hard work, and i think when you get medal5 round your neck
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and you're standing on top of the podium, itju5t shows you that all that hard work is worth it. now training for the winter olympics, she hopes the curling club will attract more people to the sport she loves. i do think it's a great way of getting people involved in the sport. and for me, i'm always wanting to get young people involved as well. and i think if we can get girls and boys involved in curling at a young age, then hopefully in a few years' time, there will be more people who are hopefully representing their country and then going on to great things. if you just use the weight of the stone and gravity, then you can get it down to the end. having myself never been on a curling rink before, i needed some tips. there you go, you got that in the house. curling is an inaccessible, underexposed sport. the relevance is only every four years when the winter olympics comes in and we are just safeguarding the future and for people to have a lot of fun. nicknamed a5 chess on ice, due to the strategy and teamwork that goes into the game, they're just hoping this ta5ter is enough to get people hooked.
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well, we are here, and we are curling here! cassia i5 well, we are here, and we are curling here! cassia is the coach, 5he curling here! cassia is the coach, she is doing it beautifully. took me through what we are doing? tote she is doing it beautifully. took me through what we are doing? we are -la in: a through what we are doing? we are playing a shorter— through what we are doing? we are playing a shorter and _ through what we are doing? we are playing a shorter and faster i playing a shorter and faster ver5ion, playing a shorter and faster version, the aim of the game is to get inside the house at the end, the blue circle. the team wants to get their stone as close to the red button in the middle. but their stone as close to the red button in the middle.- their stone as close to the red button in the middle. but if you hit the back it is _ button in the middle. but if you hit the back it is bad? _ button in the middle. but if you hit the back it is bad? yes, _ button in the middle. but if you hit the back it is bad? yes, you i button in the middle. but if you hit| the back it is bad? yes, you cannot cross this line, _ the back it is bad? yes, you cannot cross this line, and _ the back it is bad? yes, you cannot cross this line, and you _ the back it is bad? yes, you cannot cross this line, and you cannot i cross this line, and you cannot touch the sides of the back. let’s touch the sides of the back. let's have a go- _ touch the sides of the back. let's have a go- i _ touch the sides of the back. let's have a go. i must _ touch the sides of the back. let's have a go. i mustjust _ touch the sides of the back. let's have a go. i mustjust point i touch the sides of the back. let's have a go. i mustjust point out, this is not a chilly ice. let's have a little guy. —— this is not actually ice. i need a bit more into that! how has it been going down, have people been playing? tlat that! how has it been going down, have people been playing? hot at that! how has it been going down, have people been playing? not a lot of --eole
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have people been playing? not a lot of people have _ have people been playing? not a lot of people have done _ have people been playing? not a lot of people have done it _ have people been playing? not a lot of people have done it before i have people been playing? not a lot of people have done it before so i have people been playing? not a lotj of people have done it before so you have had lots of groups, boys ver5u5 girl5, boys play differently, they throw it with a bit of power and girls are 5trategic so they have been really amazing at it. let’s been really amazing at it. let's come and _ been really amazing at it. let's come and meet _ been really amazing at it. let's come and meet well. - been really amazing at it. let's come and meet well. this i been really amazing at it. let's come and meet well. this was | been really amazing at it. let's come and meet well. this was your idea, tell us where it all came from, will? zf} idea, tell us where it all came from, will?— idea, tell us where it all came from, will? 20 years ago again, there or thereabouts, _ from, will? 20 years ago again, there or thereabouts, rhona i from, will? 20 years ago again, i there or thereabouts, rhona martin was infamous for shouting harry in salt lake city as she drove team gb to gold. ever since then, every four years, curling comes onto the map. it is a sport which people don't really understand and do not really play, and we are here to increase participation for the younger demographic and safeguard the future of the game. demographic and safeguard the future of the name. ~ ., ., ., of the game. where would i go and curl? where _ of the game. where would i go and curl? where is _ of the game. where would i go and curl? where is the _ of the game. where would i go and curl? where is the nearest - of the game. where would i go and curl? where is the nearest drink? i curl? where is the nearest drink? the honest _
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curl? where is the nearest drink? the honest answer— curl? where is the nearest drink? the honest answer is _ curl? where is the nearest drink? the honest answer is that i curl? where is the nearest drink? the honest answer is that they i curl? where is the nearest drink? | the honest answer is that they are closing the time. we are here at the langham in london to give people the opportunity to play the game. there are lots of curling rinks in scotland, but there are not really many down here in england. last niiht many down here in england. last night when _ many down here in england. last night when we — many down here in england. last night when we were here, there were some people from scotland here who were so excited because they were saying they would never expect to find this year in london.— find this year in london. indeed, this is a platform _ find this year in london. indeed, this is a platform for _ find this year in london. indeed, this is a platform for people i find this year in london. indeed, this is a platform for people to l this is a platform for people to play a short and fast form of the game, giving people something fun, different and ultimately a celebration of a winter sport which is underplayed but very fun. tote celebration of a winter sport which is underplayed but very fun. we have not to do is underplayed but very fun. we have got to do some _ is underplayed but very fun. we have got to do some curling. _ is underplayed but very fun. we have got to do some curling. i _ is underplayed but very fun. we have got to do some curling. i had i is underplayed but very fun. we have got to do some curling. i had a i got to do some curling. i had a shocking go there. i wasn't that bad when i was practising earlier. are you going to go first or me? it is all about a nice big swing. i have been doing it too hard. i'm not happy with that. you go. these are actually surprisingly heavy. you are good. i'm going to give it one more
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go. i am going to get into that button. that's too strong! luckily i have got a couple more hours. when you come back to us later, i will have nailed it. one more go? tremendous curling there. hold on, let's stay for this. that tremendous curling there. hold on, let's stay for this.— let's stay for this. that was good. she is doing _ let's stay for this. that was good. she is doing a _ let's stay for this. that was good. she is doing a little _ let's stay for this. that was good. she is doing a little bit _ let's stay for this. that was good. she is doing a little bit more i she is doing a little bit more tenpin bowling.— she is doing a little bit more tenpin bowling. she is doing a little bit more tenin bowlini. .,, ., ,, ., tenpin bowling. last one, you are still on. strewth! _ tenpin bowling. last one, you are still on. strewth! gave _ tenpin bowling. last one, you are still on. strewth! gave it - tenpin bowling. last one, you are still on. strewth! gave it the i tenpin bowling. last one, you are still on. strewth! gave it the fulll still on. strewth! gave it the full ower still on. strewth! gave it the full power there- — still on. strewth! gave it the full power there. good _ still on. strewth! gave it the full power there. good curling i power there. good curling commentary. _ power there. good curling commentary. have - power there. good curling commentary. have you i power there. good curling i commentary. have you done power there. good curling - commentary. have you done it power there. good curling _ commentary. have you done it before? once, yes! i do prefer this one! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. time now to get the news where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. from this morning, the wearing of masks is compulsory on all public transport across london in response to rising concerns over the omicron covid variant.
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tfl had already made it a condition of travel on its services, but now coverings will be required on trains, too, as well as in shops. it comes as wandsworth and camden became the latest places in london where cases were detected. the london assembly has warned that some of the capital's river crossings could be closed unless more funding is secured. both rotherhithe tunnel and vauxhall bridge are in need of urgent repairs. tfl says they could be casualties of its £1.2 billion funding gap. the government has said it's repeatedly shown its commitment to transport in london, including the most recent funding agreement worth over a billion pounds. a new exhibition focusing on contributions from the windrush generation is opening this week at tate britain. life between islands will include work by over a0 artists. on one level, it is an art history, of the caribbean connection
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in british art from about the 19505, right to now, as a continuing story — mainly of artists of caribbean descent, of course. but it is also shows how the visual arts act as this amazing lens through which we can see a broader cultural, social, political story. london's famous new year's day parade will be returning on the first of january. but restrictions mean the traditional parade has been replaced by a ticketed arena show. it will be at waterloo place near piccadilly circus. let's take a look at the travel situation. there's a good service on the tubes apart from the piccadilly line, which is part—suspended. for all other travel news tune in top your local bbc radio station. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it was all change weather—wise last night. it was cold and frosty for a good while underneath clear skies, but temperatures unusually have been
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rising for the second half of the night along with a warm front that has been sweeping through, introducing cloud, some patchy outbreaks of rain and much milder air. so we start off the day on a very different note, between six and eight celsius. we will keep those cloudy skies for much of the day, there could be a few outbreaks of light patchy rain and drizzle, not amounting to very much, and there is a noticeable westerly wind. temperatures this afternoon could get as high as 11 or 12 celsius, so very mild and well above the average for the time of year. the mild air is not set to last. we have got a cold front coming through overnight tonight that is going to give us some further outbreaks of rain and also eventually some colder air. so we start off the day on wednesday, nine celsius, this will be the day's highest temperature because on wednesday, it's dry, there's some sunny spells but temperatures will slip as we head throughout the day and it will feel quite cold by the afternoon. a frosty night on wednesday and into thursday, we are back into that very chilly air and a northerly wind. i'm back with the latest from bbc
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london in half an hour. now though it's back to dan and sally. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. pharmacies are expected to be a key part of plans to accellerate the boosterjab roll—out, to try and limit the spread of the omicron variant of coronavirus. to try and limit the spread of mandatory to try and limit the spread of masks are back in eng as mandatory masks are back in england as of today on public transport and in shops. what does it mean for you and those are to enforce rules again? i am and those are to enforce rules again? iam in and those are to enforce rules again? i am in liverpool and those are to enforce rules again? iam in liverpool finding out. longer sentences for child abusers in england in wales, he is an inspiration every day. he never complains, he carries on, no matter what is thrown at him. all the challenges, he just gets himself back up and carries on. prince charles joins the celebrations
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as barbados officially becomes the world's newest republic. and in sport, former fa cup winning manager john sillett has died. he won the trophy with coventry and lifted the league title as a player with the chelsea in the fifties. this morning, a milder start. it will be a milder day generally but cloudy with light rain and drizzle replace later with heavier rain and strengthening wind across northern ireland in western scotland. it's tuesday, the 30th of november. the prime minister will set out plans to accelerate england's boosterjab programme later today, and it could include the use of more pharmacies. new rules to try and limit the spread of the omicron variant of coronavirus have come into force this morning, meaning masks must be worn in shops and on public transport in england. the health secretary, sajid javid, has insisted the measures are proportionate and will help
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families enjoy christmas together. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. from this morning, face coverings are now compulsory in shops and on public transport in england. face coverings are already needed for most public places and transport in wales. masks are also required in pubs and restaurants in scotland and northern ireland. but there is some concern over how shoppers in england will cope with the return of face coverings. the vast majority of the public, when it was required to wear face coverings, were very good about it, and still are in scotland and wales, where the regulations were never removed. but there is definitely a minority of people who seem to think that the rules shouldn't apply to them and they are causing problems at stores. we've seen the levels of violence that shopworkers faced more than doubled during the pandemic. there are changes in schools, too, where staff and pupils in year 7 and above are also being advised to wear masks in communal areas. in scotland, that rule applies in class, as well. and international travellers coming
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to the uk now also need to take a pcr test within two days of their arrival and self—isolate until they get a negative result. but perhaps the biggest changes are the modifications to the booster programme — slashing the gap between second jab and booster from six months to three and opening up boosters to all those over 18. vaccines and boosters remain the prime defence against the virus. it is also pretty clear that, if you vaccinate, you're going to be in a better position than if you have not been vaccinated. so it's still a good idea to get vaccinated and the booster dose will boost the immune response to such a high level that we would hope they would overcome any inherent ability of this new variant to escape vaccine—induced immunity. it's clear uk cases linked to the omicron variant are on the rise. the big unanswered questions remain — what impact the variant will have on illness, vaccines and transmission. dominic hughes, bbc news.
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labour leader sir keir starmer has reshuffled his shadow cabinet with a big promotion for yvette cooper, to shadow home secretary, amongst the changes. some labour mps believe there are growing divisions between him and the deputy leader angela rayner. let's speak to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. what is going on? keir starmer thinks he now has the people he wants in the jobs that suit them and it is a combination of experience, people who are good politicians, good communicators, and also a couple of people from the next generation of labour mps. in terms of what it means for here you will see on this programme, we will see the return of yvette cooper, the cabinet minister in the tony blair and gordon brown era. she is shadow home secretary and has a good track record of quizzing home secretaries and even getting them to resign. david lammy has been promoted from
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shadowjustice secretary to shadow foreign secretary. and in terms of one of the new mps, wes streeting will be shadow health secretary and he has just had treatment for kidney cancer so has experience of the nhs this year. it has been well received by commentators who think it is a good combination keir starmer has got, but there was a rocky process because yesterday morning when angela rayner the deputy leader was on tv, she denied the reshuffle would happen. she was then told about it after she left the studio and the reshuffle happened while she did a speech about something different and she could not answer questions about it, and that is the second time this year keir starmer has reshuffled the top team in a way that has ruffled feathers of his deputy. so that relationship will be one to watch. we deputy. so that relationship will be one to watch-— deputy. so that relationship will be one to watch. ~ ~ , ., . one to watch. we will keep watching. thank ou. child abusers will face tougher sentences in england and wales under
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plans announced today by the ministry ofjustice. the new measures are being dubbed tony's law, following a campaign by the adoptive family of seven—year—old tony hudgell, who had both legs amputated after being abused by his birth parents. deputy prime minister dominic raab met tony to discuss the law change. we are announcing the increase in sentencing for causing death by cruelty to children from 14 years to life in prison and for causing serious injury by cruelty from ten years to 14 years. and the reason is because children are, and young children in particular, the most vulnerable in our society. they have got to be given the strongest protection of the law. ten years for tony's parents that received the maximum sentence just doesn't seem enough for his lifelong injuries. so now, increasing that to 14 years, which, now, with the new sentencing that they have to serve two—thirds, that is going to be almost ten years
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that they would have to spend inside, so that is double what they would have to now. barbados has become the world's newest republic and in doing so removed the queen as its head of state. prince charles attended the ceremony which saw sandra mason sworn in as the country's first president just after midnight local time. daniela relph reports from the barbadian capital bridgetown. the world's newest republic and a show of national pride. this constitutional shift in barbados is about asserting self—confidence and shedding the links to its colonial past. some of this country's most well—known names were among the vip guests attending the transition ceremony. and also here to watch it all play out, the prince of wales, invited to see his mother removed as a head of state — the first time that has happened
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anywhere in 30 years. for the final time on this caribbean island, he viewed a military march past and took the final salute. and then, the symbolic moment of transition. as the royal standard was lowered over barbados, it became a republic. it is hard to imagine that this event was not tinged with some sadness for the prince of wales. he has focused on the enduring friendship between two nations and also spoken directly about the pain of a shared history. from the darkest days of our past, and the appalling atrocity of slavery, which for ever stains our history, the people of this island forged their path with extraordinary fortitude. emancipation, self—government, and independence were your waypoints.
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freedom, justice and self—determination have been your guides. an acknowledgement of the past as this island look forward and swore in its first ever president. i, sandra prunella mason, do swear that i will be faithful and bear true allegiance to barbados according to law, so help me god. casting aside the official link to the british monarchy, barbados is increasingly looking east to china for financial support. there are republican rumblings, too, in other caribbean nations. they will be watching this newest republic closely. our correspondent celestina olulode
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is in bridgetown. celestina, did last night feel like the beginning of a new chapter? welcome to the world's newest republic. it did feel like a new chapter being at the ceremony because after 55 years to the day that this country became independent, it has finally removed the queen as head of state and ushered in a barbadian, dame sandra mason, to take that place. we ushered in a barbadian, dame sandra mason, to take that place.— mason, to take that place. we are seeinu mason, to take that place. we are seeing pictures — mason, to take that place. we are seeing pictures of— mason, to take that place. we are seeing pictures of the _ mason, to take that place. we are seeing pictures of the ceremony i mason, to take that place. we are i seeing pictures of the ceremony that looks quite formal. was there an element of celebration about it? certainly, especially at the beginning, before the formality began, before prince charles began. you had poets, you had really amazing steel bands made up of
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schoolchildren, who really helped to bring a party atmosphere to the night. bring a party atmosphere to the niuht. . ~' ,, bring a party atmosphere to the niuht. ., ~ in . bring a party atmosphere to the niuht. ., ~ . ., bring a party atmosphere to the niuht. . ~' . ., ., ~ night. thank you so much for talking to us. bridgetown _ night. thank you so much for talking to us. bridgetown looks— night. thank you so much for talking to us. bridgetown looks beautiful. . to us. bridgetown looks beautiful. it is dark at the moment that you can tell it is warmer than here. more than 100,000 homes in parts of scotland and the north of england remain without power because of damage caused by storm arwen. schools in aberdeenshire remain closed and whole villages in cumbria remain without power — with no word yet on when supplies will be restored. utility companies said they would be offering accommodation for vulnerable customers. all looking pretty grim at the moment. which it is why it is important to listen to carol today because she has the weather. good morning. good morning. you might be pleased to hear it is milder than yesterday. the day will be milder, but tomorrow will be
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colder. temperatures this week flip—flopping. also cloudy and damp. you can see the cloud. we have rain and drizzle, especially in the hills and drizzle, especially in the hills and coasts in the west. we will see breaks in the cloud in england and wales, especially the north midlands and west yorkshire. through the day the cloud will build towards the west introducing heavier rain and strengthening wind across northern ireland and western scotland. apart from in the far north—east where maximum temperatures will be three degrees, we are on the mild side. temperatures at this time, 5—8 north to south. overnight low pressure bringing rain deepens as it moves across, taking rain with it. some of the rain heavy, especially in south—west scotland and cumbria. and you can tell it will be windy where ever you are. on the coasts and
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hills the wind will be around gale force. temperatures tonight one degree in lerwick, ii force. temperatures tonight one degree in lerwick, 11 towards the channel islands, so a chance of a frost in the northern isles but elsewhere we probably will not have that. tomorrow, showers, wintry at modest levels across the hills in scotland. it will move south during the day. and through the day temperatures will go down, so cold in the afternoon than it will be in the morning for most but in the south we hang onto milder air. thanks. there are now i! known cases of the omicron coronavirus variant in the uk, and that number's expected to go up over the coming days. as part of the effort to tackle the spread, the rollout of the covid booster programme is being sped up. boosterjabs are to be offered to all over—18s to help stop a potential wave of infections driven by the new variant. thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation also
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says the minimum gap between the second vaccine dose and the booster should be reduced from six to three months. the experts also say children aged 12 to 15 should be invited for a second jab. let's speak to professor adam finn, who's from the jcvi, which made those recommendations. good morning. how concerned should we be about omicron? i do good morning. how concerned should we be about omicron?— we be about omicron? i do think we need to take _ we be about omicron? i do think we need to take this _ we be about omicron? i do think we need to take this seriously. - we be about omicron? i do think we need to take this seriously. it - we be about omicron? i do think we need to take this seriously. it is - we be about omicron? i do think we need to take this seriously. it is a l need to take this seriously. it is a possibility this will not turn out to be a major problem but there are signs to suggest it might. it looks like it is quite a transmissible virus. we do not yet know if it causes worse disease, it may well not do that, but the question is whether it is able to evade the immunity we have got to some extent
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from the vaccine so far and infections we have had. because of that and the possibility of a major wave the thing to do now is to act immediately and not wait. we heard this morning — immediately and not wait. we heard this morning that _ immediately and not wait. we heard this morning that pharmacies - immediately and not wait. we heard this morning that pharmacies are . this morning that pharmacies are likely to be deployed in plans for accelerating the boosterjab accelerating the booster jab programme accelerating the boosterjab programme and we heard from thejcvi the time limit is coming down to three months for the booster programme. how important is it to get the booster as souness people can? , , ., get the booster as souness people can? , ., get the booster as souness people can? , , ., ., ., , can? this is a programme that is about speed _ can? this is a programme that is about speed so _ can? this is a programme that is about speed so you _ can? this is a programme that is about speed so you are - can? this is a programme that is about speed so you are right, . can? this is a programme that is| about speed so you are right, the challengers will be the logistics of delivering so much vaccine in a short time, and it is important people come forward and receive those boosters in good time to build up those boosters in good time to build up extra immunity to ensure we are protected. challenging month ahead for the nhs. people need to respond as soon as they get contacted. for
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eo - le as soon as they get contacted. for people who have not been contacted yet, who have not had their booster, what should they be doing with this new variant? should they stay at home, work from home, should they go to the supermarket? what home, work from home, should they go to the supermarket?— to the supermarket? what is your advice? we _ to the supermarket? what is your advice? we have _ to the supermarket? what is your advice? we have been _ to the supermarket? what is your advice? we have been in - to the supermarket? what is your advice? we have been in a - to the supermarket? what is your. advice? we have been in a position of a lot of viral transmission with delta for months now. that is still the major worry, that is the predominant virus. we are waiting to see what happens, we are seeing cases and we will see more. it goes on making sense people should recognise this virus has not gone away and anything they can do to reduce risk to themselves and people they are in contact with makes good sense. i am they are in contact with makes good sense. iam pleased people they are in contact with makes good sense. i am pleased people are encouraged to wear masks indoors.
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lateral flow tests are a good way to find out whether you have the infection and people should carry on doing those. at this time, it is a time for caution, to be careful, stay at home when they can, avoid contact with others, to help us through this difficult period. we are coming up to a busy sociable time of year with people getting together over christmas and new year. what would you say to families perhaps with older generations mixing with younger kids at school? we do not want to cancel christmas again but in the build—up, the more we can keep an eye open for this virus, reduce the risk of getting close to it, and i am a big fan of these lateral flow tests. they are a good way of finding out if you have infection. because young people can haveit infection. because young people can have it without realising. if you have it without realising. if you have the infection you can avoid
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contact with vulnerable people, elderly members of the family, people who have a new nose depression and other conditions. there is a lot we can do to minimise risk. ., . ~' there is a lot we can do to minimise risk. ., ., ~ ., , ., risk. you talked about it being an intense few _ risk. you talked about it being an intense few weeks _ risk. you talked about it being an intense few weeks as _ risk. you talked about it being an intense few weeks as we - risk. you talked about it being an intense few weeks as we try - risk. you talked about it being an intense few weeks as we try to i risk. you talked about it being an. intense few weeks as we try to get more vaccines into arms. does the nhs have resources to do this when they are already under incredible pressure. they are already under incredible ressure. . , . they are already under incredible ressure. ., , ., ., pressure. that is an important question- _ pressure. that is an important question. the _ pressure. that is an important question. the worry _ pressure. that is an important question. the worry is - pressure. that is an important question. the worry is that i pressure. that is an important question. the worry is that if i pressure. that is an important i question. the worry is that if you give someone a job of work to do they cannot do whatever its was they would have been doing while they do that. in bristol, we are recruiting people into the scheme, training people into the scheme, training people to give vaccines, to get extra pairs of hands, focusing not just on retired staff but members of the public who are willing to come forward. there will be a build—up to try to deliver this accelerated programme. iam sure try to deliver this accelerated programme. i am sure that is going on all over the country.—
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on all over the country. professor, thank you- — as we've been hearing, the booster programme is going to be vital in plans to contain the impact of the omicron variant. but a number of the former mass vaccination centres have closed down meaning the remaining ones will be under increased pressure. john is at a centre in bristol this morning. john, it's a busy time ahead isn't it? yes, they absolutely have. as the way of all of these things, often they like us have seen the headlines but are waiting to hear the details on how to execute the government's plan over the next days and weeks, months, who knows how long it will take? we are at the university of the west of england on the outskirts of bristol. you will see the pipework and booths set up as a
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nightingale hospital but thankfully never used. since the summer it has been a vaccination centre. taking over from the sports centre in the centre of the city. 1800 people here a day, so pretty busy. norris is the boss. —— and morris is the boss. i suppose you are waiting to hear the details. what are you expecting the next weeks and months to be like? it will be busy but we have planned for it to be busy. things change in the programme. we expect people want to know more about when they can get vaccinations and that guidance will come out of the sooner it does we will tell people how they can go about getting a vaccination now the eligibility criteria have changed. what i would say is wait until you hear more. if you are eligible, please come forward and be
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vaccinated. but we will tell you when you need to come forward. the nhs will be in touch with you. please do not try to come forward now. we are still waiting for guidance to come out.- now. we are still waiting for guidance to come out. good luck. that is a key _ guidance to come out. good luck. that is a key message. _ guidance to come out. good luck. that is a key message. nothing i guidance to come out. good luck. i that is a key message. nothing has changed quite yet. please do not queue up unless you have appointments and have made arrangements. two people in the front line, both senior nurses vaccinating today. for people who have not been, or most of us who have not been, or most of us who have come in and look gone out, what is it like working in a centre like this? it is it like working in a centre like this? , ., , ., is it like working in a centre like this? , ., ~ ., ., this? it is a privilege to know! am makin: a this? it is a privilege to know! am making a difference. _ this? it is a privilege to know! am making a difference. the - this? it is a privilege to know! am making a difference. the team - this? it is a privilege to know! am making a difference. the team is. making a difference. the team is fabulous. we have great team working. there can be hard days when it is really busy but what drives the team on is knowing we are helping the community and making a difference in the fight against
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covid. i difference in the fight against covid. . . difference in the fight against covid. ., ., , ., covid. i have had vaccines and millions of— covid. i have had vaccines and millions of people _ covid. i have had vaccines and millions of people have - covid. i have had vaccines andj millions of people have across covid. i have had vaccines and - millions of people have across the uk. there always seems a carnival atmosphere but others are slightly nervous. you must have tricks of the trade to persuade people everything will be all right. we trade to persuade people everything will be all right.— will be all right. we want people to be confident _ will be all right. we want people to be confident when _ will be all right. we want people to be confident when they _ will be all right. we want people to be confident when they come - will be all right. we want people to be confident when they come in. i will be all right. we want people to l be confident when they come in. we are more _ be confident when they come in. we are more than happy to have a chat with them — are more than happy to have a chat with them. we can create a safe space _ with them. we can create a safe space for— with them. we can create a safe space for them and if they are feeling — space for them and if they are feeling nervous, we have a wonderful team and _ feeling nervous, we have a wonderful team and they can let us know and we can help _ team and they can let us know and we can help these people. we want people — can help these people. we want pe0ple to — can help these people. we want people to feel confident with the vaccine, — people to feel confident with the vaccine, to give them a lot of information. most of the time, everything is going really well. and exected everything is going really well. jifuc expected now to everything is going really well. fific expected now to get busier? everything is going really well. and expected now to get busier? that l everything is going really well. and | expected now to get busier? that is what i am impressed _ expected now to get busier? that is what i am impressed with _ expected now to get busier? that is what i am impressed with the - what i am impressed with the team about. every time the government announces a change, they rise to the challenge. that can be difficult. people expect changes to take place
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almost overnight. we have to spend time telling people it takes time to put changes in place. we try to give them time frames when they can come to get their vaccine but what has impressed me is the way we rise to meet the changes that can happen incredibly quickly as we found out yesterday. incredibly quickly as we found out esterda . ~ . . incredibly quickly as we found out esterda . ~ ., ., , ., incredibly quickly as we found out esterda .~ ., ., yesterday. what are you start, ei . ht? yesterday. what are you start, eight? now- — yesterday. what are you start, eight? now. 0h, _ yesterday. what are you start, eight? now. oh, there- yesterday. what are you start, eight? now. oh, there is- yesterday. what are you start, eight? now. oh, there is a - yesterday. what are you start, - eight? now. oh, there is a queue. i will get out of their way and let them get their vaccines. from here, back to you. thank you. we are aiming to keep you informed about the changes including changes to face coverings that are now mandatory in shops and public transport in england. nina is at liverpool lime street station. masks
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are back in england. you would be forgiven that you have got out of the habit of grabbing one of these when you go out so there might be a scramble in england for people to get one of these on again. as of today they are mandatory again on public transport. and in retail environments, even getting your nails done, going to the post office, they can be asked to wear a mask and you can be fined if you refuse. in scotland, wales, northern ireland, you probably think that is already the case here which it is and on top of that you might be asked to show your covid status at a nightclub and be encouraged to work from home. things have been different in england which is why there are questions around. is it harder to ask someone to do something a second time than the first time? the boss of the retailer iceland said today they have decided
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not to ask staff to enforce the wearing of masks and they will leave it to the consumer's discretion, which is where tension comes in. we asked people in the east midlands and yorkshire how they felt. on public transport, especially, it's really important, but in shops, you don't want anywhere to be shut down. we don't want lockdown for christmas, so start early. i think it's essential. it is such a small price to pay to help us through these times. i know i'm standing here, ridiculous, with mine on my chin, but i've just got off the bus and i'm just having a breather. it makes it more difficult talking to people. - but, at the end of the day, it's not costing anything. i we've been in this situation before and if people had just carried on, we might not have been... i'm not saying there would not be variants, but it might not have come to this. the government say they are relying on people adhering to the rules out of personal choice but a lot of
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changes if you are coming back from holiday orforeign changes if you are coming back from holiday or foreign travel. you will be asked to take a pcr test which is more expensive although prices are coming down and you will have to wait at home until the negative result comes through. the reason is that the tests are more specific on the variant of covid you have. a lot of changes for businesses. bill works closely with businesses in liverpool city centre. a big adjustment again for business. what have they said to you? the adjustment again for business. what have they said to you?— have they said to you? the big issue is a . ain it have they said to you? the big issue is again it is — have they said to you? the big issue is again it is another _ have they said to you? the big issue is again it is another big _ is again it is another big adjustment. they had got used to operating in the environment and now they have this latest imposition about how they can engage with customers about how they wear face coverings. businesses want certainty and clarity and to understand the regulations and the reasons. the majority understand the reasons but it would help to protect staff and
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people and reduce infection, and allow businesses to continue to operate because it is an important portion of the year, the period up to christmas.— portion of the year, the period up to christmas. enforcement can be difficult for _ to christmas. enforcement can be difficult for staff _ to christmas. enforcement can be difficult for staff in _ to christmas. enforcement can be difficult for staff in retail - to christmas. enforcement can be difficult for staff in retail to - difficult for staff in retail to cross that line.— difficult for staff in retail to cross that line. ., ., , cross that line. how do they feel? there has been _ cross that line. how do they feel? there has been a _ cross that line. how do they feel? there has been a high _ cross that line. how do they feel? there has been a high level- cross that line. how do they feel? there has been a high level of - there has been a high level of issues with aggression towards staff which we have seen through the pandemic. that is the worry they have. shops tell me they cannot enforce it themselves and so they rely on external forces. will they rely on external forces. will they rely on external forces. will they rely on the police, local authority to enforce it? this is about people themselves being complicit. we talked about people being kind and patient and responsible in retailers, that is the message, because it is difficult for retailers to enforce this. ideli]!!! retailers to enforce this. will retailers to enforce this. will retailers invest _ retailers to enforce this. will retailers invest less - retailers to enforce this. will retailers invest less in outside enforcement this time? i think potentially _ enforcement this time? i think potentially they _ enforcement this time? i think potentially they will. _ enforcement this time? i think potentially they will. they - enforcement this time? i think| potentially they will. they want
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enforcement this time? i think i potentially they will. they want to get their business open and encourage people to come in. it is that vital financial period up to christmas. this morning, i would say it has been about 60—40, mask wearers to those without. whether it is people have not been reminded or decided not to. it is the case in scotland, wales, northern ireland. it will be around enforcement and the impact it has on the spread on the impact it has on the spread on the new variant with the home secretary saying it will be reviewed and we will find out then if there will be more rules leading up to christmas. ijust christmas. i just dropped my christmas. ijust dropped my pen. i do not think anyone would have known if you have not told them. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc
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london, i'm tolu adeoye. from this morning, the wearing of masks is compulsory on all public transport across london in response to rising concerns over the omicron covid variant. tfl had already made it a condition of travel on its services, but now coverings will be required on trains too as well as in shops. it comes as wandsworth and camden became the latest places in london where cases were detected. london and the uk's economy could be boosted by up to £4 billion by hosting major sporting events over the next decade. a report commissioned by uk sport and the city of london corporation has found staging events uncluding the 2025 women's rugby world cup and the 2030 men's football world cup would result in huge trade and investment benefits. in may, uk sport said it had earmarked 97 events it would be interested in hosting. a new exhibition focusing on contributions from the windrush generation is opening this week at tate britain.
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life between islands will include work by over a0 artists. on one level, it is an art history, of the caribbean connection in british art from about the 19505, right to now, as a continuing story — mainly of artists of caribbean descent, of course. but it also shows how the visual arts act as this amazing lens through which we can see a broader cultural, social, political story. london's famous new year's day parade will be returning on the 1st of january. but restrictions mean the traditional parade has been replaced by a ticketed arena show. it will be at waterloo place near piccadilly circus. let's take a look at the travel situation this morning. the piccadilly line is part suspended, and there are minor delays on the victoria line. for all other travel news tune in top your local bbc radio station. onto the weather now
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with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it was all change weather—wise last night. it was cold and frosty for a good while underneath clear skies, but temperatures unusually have been rising for the second half of the night along with a warm front that has been sweeping through, introducing cloud, some patchy outbreaks of rain and much milder air. so we start off the day on a very different note, between six and eight celsius. we will keep those cloudy skies for much of the day, there could be a few outbreaks of light patchy rain and drizzle, not amounting to very much, and there is a noticeable westerly wind. temperatures this afternoon could get as high as 11 or 12 celsius so very mild and well above the average for the time of year. the mild air is not set to last. we have got a cold front coming through overnight tonight that is going to give us some further outbreaks of rain and also eventually some colder air. so to start off the day on wednesday, nine celsius, this will be the day's highest temperature because on wednesday, it's dry, there's some sunny spells
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but temperatures will slip as we head throughout the day and it will feel quite cold by the afternoon. a frosty night on wednesday and into thursday, we are back into that very chilly air and a northerly wind. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in an hour. now though it's back to dan and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. let's talk about the new measures aimed at slowing the spread of omicron with the care minister, gillian keegan. thank you for being with us. i feel like it is want — but one of those mornings where all of the levers will wanting as much information as possible, so what can you tell us about the boosterjabs and how it will be rolled out and which age groups? we will be rolled out and which age arou s? ~ . will be rolled out and which age u-rous? ., , , will be rolled out and which age u-rous? . , , ., groups? we are yesterday on the advice of the _ groups? we are yesterday on the advice of the jcvi _ groups? we are yesterday on the advice of the jcvi that _ groups? we are yesterday on the
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advice of the jcvi that booster i groups? we are yesterday on the i advice of the jcvi that boosterjabs advice of thejcvi that boosterjabs will be offered right down to 18 years old, so 18 and above. we are working on the operation of the plan right now so in the next couple of days we will tell you who will contact you, the nhs will contact you, the booking system will be updating as well. and we will also be advising people in cohorts when to come forward and the overall plan of how long it will take us. this to come forward and the overall plan of how long it will take us.— of how long it will take us. as you well know. _ of how long it will take us. as you well know. so _ of how long it will take us. as you well know, so many— of how long it will take us. as you well know, so many questions i of how long it will take us. as you i well know, so many questions coming in, can they book online now? do they have to wait to be contacted? detail will come out in the coming days? detail will come out in the coming da s? ~ ., ., detail will come out in the coming da 5? . ., ., , detail will come out in the coming da s? ~ ., .,, detail will come out in the coming das? ., detail will come out in the coming da ., ., days? wait to be contacted for now because we — days? wait to be contacted for now because we need _ days? wait to be contacted for now because we need to _ days? wait to be contacted for now because we need to update i days? wait to be contacted for now because we need to update the i because we need to update the booking system with the three month interval which was advised by the jcvi yesterday which will take as a couple of days. you will know very shortly. wait to be contacted. we have done this before, it will likely be age cohort starting with oldest people. we have done 17 million boosterjabs already so a lot of the elderly and vulnerable are already boosted, if you are in
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that category continue to come forward. we will be setting out more detail to which cohort and we will open it up one cohort as a time. 25 million eligible and 17 million jabs. in terms of timescale, what do you thinking timescale, the other 25 million? is there a date in mind? we have not million? is there a date in mind? , have not got a date in mind yet, we are going to the plan. we will be setting a target as we have done in the past. we are pretty good at doing this. we have the supply and we have people who are trained, we have lots of vaccination centres and the ability to do pop—ups if we need more. wejust need the ability to do pop—ups if we need more. we just need to give the nhs a day or two to work out what they are going to do but we have all of the ingredients. bi going to do but we have all of the ingredients-— ingredients. at the current rate that we are _ ingredients. at the current rate that we are vaccinating, i ingredients. at the current rate that we are vaccinating, it i ingredients. at the current rate |
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that we are vaccinating, it would not be completed until the end of february. not be completed until the end of februa . ~ , , ., february. we will be trying to increase the _ february. we will be trying to increase the rate _ february. we will be trying to increase the rate from i february. we will be trying to increase the rate from the i february. we will be trying to i increase the rate from the current rate. �* . increase the rate from the current rate. . ., ., , , increase the rate from the current rate. ~ ., ., , , , ., increase the rate from the current rate. ~ ., .,, , i. , rate. and what measures will you be usina to rate. and what measures will you be using to do — rate. and what measures will you be using to do that? _ rate. and what measures will you be using to do that? speculation i rate. and what measures will you be using to do that? speculation this i using to do that? speculation this morning that pharmacies will be involved? , ., ., ., , ., involved? they are already involved, ou can involved? they are already involved, you can already _ involved? they are already involved, you can already get _ involved? they are already involved, you can already get your _ involved? they are already involved, you can already get your booster- involved? they are already involved, you can already get your boosterjab| you can already get your boosterjab at a pharmacy. you can already get your booster 'ab at a pharmacyfi at a pharmacy. something -- interesting — at a pharmacy. something -- interesting that _ at a pharmacy. something -- interesting that jonathan i at a pharmacy. something -- i interesting that jonathan van-tam, at a pharmacy. something -- - interesting that jonathan van-tam, a interesting thatjonathan van—tam, a lot unknown about this omicron variant, so much that we don't know, given that we don't know how effective the vaccine will be against this new variant that you are placing all of your eggs in one basket? we are placing all of your eggs in one basket? ~ ., ., ., .., basket? we are doing what we can with the tools _ basket? we are doing what we can with the tools we _ basket? we are doing what we can with the tools we have _ basket? we are doing what we can with the tools we have available. l with the tools we have available. the vaccine has so far given protection, they think it will give some protection, but we need to give the scientists a couple of weeks to work out just the scientists a couple of weeks to work outjust how effective it is. and we also know that they have said in the past they would also have the
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capability to tweak vaccines in the future. right now, we don't have a lot of information. but we are doing everything we can to build that wall of defence as high as we can, which is why we are bringing forward the booster jab for everybody over the age of 18, and for younger cohorts to get a second dose. if age of18, and for younger cohorts to get a second dose.— to get a second dose. it has been ureat to get a second dose. it has been treat to to get a second dose. it has been great to speak — to get a second dose. it has been great to speak to _ to get a second dose. it has been great to speak to government i great to speak to government ministers almost every day of this programme during the whole phase of the pandemic for many months now. one thing that has come through on a lot of the interviews is about learning lessons from the past. i wonder what you think the one thing was that you learned last year that will aid you this time around in terms of implementation and dealing with this new variant? the terms of implementation and dealing with this new variant?— with this new variant? the things we have learned — with this new variant? the things we have learned is _ with this new variant? the things we have learned is to _ with this new variant? the things we have learned is to work _ with this new variant? the things we have learned is to work together, i with this new variant? the things we have learned is to work together, so j have learned is to work together, so first of all working with the scientific community, that has been very important. this new variant was identified extremely quickly and we could take action extremely quickly
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because we have been working with those international scientists. the other thing is to put things in place quickly, we got the travel restrictions, a couple of countries went on the red list, we did it very quickly. and to communicate with the british public as well, i think the most important thing, and this is for everybody, we are all in this together. what we are really urging is for people, if you have not had your first dose, is for people, if you have not had yourfirst dose, please is for people, if you have not had your first dose, please come forward, if you have not had your second dose, please come forward. the boosterjab, please come forward and take it as soon as he was asked. —— is you are asked. all we want for christmas is for ever and get your jabs. christmas is for ever and get your 'abs. ., ., ," christmas is for ever and get your 'abs. ., ., i. ., christmas is for ever and get your 'abs. ., ., ., . jabs. can i ask you about ice -- mask wearing? _ jabs. can i ask you about ice -- mask wearing? the _ jabs. can i ask you about ice -- mask wearing? the mds i jabs. can i ask you about ice -- mask wearing? the mds of- jabs. can i ask you about ice -- i mask wearing? the mds of iceland and co—op say they are not going to ask shoppers to wear masks if they are not wearing them in their shops. what do you say to that? it is the
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british public's _ what do you say to that? it is the british public's personal - british public's personal responsibility to follow the rules and wear the masks. shopkeepers have done a brilliantjob of keeping our shelves supplied under very trying circumstances and we thank them for their service and everything they do. clearly there has been occasions where that has been confrontational. we have a lot of sympathy for that. it is for the british public to see it —— be sensible and wear the masks but the police should enforce it. so it is ok for the iceland and the co—op to say that? it is ok for the iceland and the co-op to say that?— it is ok for the iceland and the co-op to say that? their 'ob is to stock our shelves i co-op to say that? their 'ob is to stock our shelves and i co-op to say that? theirjob is to stock our shelves and serve i co-op to say that? theirjob is to stock our shelves and serve as i co-op to say that? theirjob is to i stock our shelves and serve as food. and make sure that we can buy food. i understand, i had richard walker this morning, it isn't theirjob to police it, that's what he said. he said they will put signs up and asked people to respect the rules and the law and to wear a mask, and thatis and the law and to wear a mask, and that is reasonable. but really it is
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down to individuals. we are all in this together. it's not for everybody to be going around being policed by shop assistants. we all have to do the right thing. that policed by shop assistants. we all have to do the right thing.- have to do the right thing. that is an interesting _ have to do the right thing. that is an interesting point, _ have to do the right thing. that is an interesting point, lots- have to do the right thing. that is an interesting point, lots of- have to do the right thing. that is. an interesting point, lots of people will be making very personal decisions. you mentioned christmas, what is your advice, what would you say to those people who maybe this morning are waiting there third dose or a boosterjab and they are clinically vulnerable or find themselves to be high risk? what should they do the next few weeks about doing things like going to christmas parties or plays or attending social events, what if the government devise about things like that? we government devise about things like that? ~ ., government devise about things like that? ., ,.,,.._ government devise about things like that? ., , that? we are basically saying, we are bein: that? we are basically saying, we are being proportionate _ that? we are basically saying, we are being proportionate and i that? we are basically saying, we i are being proportionate and balanced in our response. continue with your christmas plans. we don't know, as jonathan van—tam said yesterday, we don't know an awful lot about the virus, about this variant. so we need to wait for the information. but be cautious. people are
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exclaiming —— people who are extremely clinically vulnerable are very cautious anyway, they will continue to wear masks and consider where they go and make sure they have the right arrangements in place. be sensible and make sure you do what you feel comfortable doing but we are not saying that people should not continue with their plans. we very much hope that we can continue with our christmas plans. we are putting these measures in place now to build up a wall of defence. �* , , . . place now to build up a wall of defence. �* ,, . . place now to build up a wall of defence. . , , . ., i. ., ~ defence. appreciate your time, thank ou. as we've been hearing this morning travel restrictions have been tightening around the world in response to the omicron variant so how will it affect the airline industry? let's speak to the chief executive of easyjet, johan lundgren. good morning. great to see you. how is this affecting you so far? i think it's fair to say that it's very early to tell. we only found out about this in the middle of last week. and we had restrictions being introduced at the end of last week
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as well. we have seen that there has been an impact on more of the bookings that are the closest, in the next few weeks, the departures, just because people have taken the opportunity to transfer and book again next year. it's too arty to tell what this will stabilise at, and it's not the same drop—off in the bookings that we have seen from previous times when restrictions have been introduced.— have been introduced. easyjet re orted have been introduced. easyjet reported a _ have been introduced. easyjet reported a loss _ have been introduced. easyjet reported a loss of _ have been introduced. easyjet reported a loss of more i have been introduced. easyjet reported a loss of more than i have been introduced. easyjetl reported a loss of more than £1 billion. you must be incredibly concerned. you have extended the time period that customers can change their flights but how concerned are you about further restrictions in travel coming in? l restrictions in travel coming in? i don't think that we can say this is necessarily huge surprise. we always knew that the virus would evolve and they would be variants of concern and we are very supportive of the red list introduced by the government. i would red list introduced by the government. iwould have red list introduced by the government. i would have thought that this financial year would be
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one of two halves, you would have a difficult period in the winter which would be more uncertain and then a strong summer with the bookings for next summer, they are doing quite well and they have not been interrupted at all. this is something which we have expected. we came into this is one of the strong airlines, 4.4 billion in restricted liquidity and the least amount of debt of any major european airline. this is unwelcome news but i don't think we can say that we could say that this would never have happened. because we always knew it could happen. underlying it, the recovery will still happen even if we have a bad period of the winter. will still happen even if we have a bad period of the winter. 50 will still happen even if we have a bad period of the winter.- will still happen even if we have a bad period of the winter. so you say ou need bad period of the winter. so you say you need clarity. — bad period of the winter. so you say you need clarity, what _ bad period of the winter. so you say you need clarity, what you - bad period of the winter. so you say you need clarity, what you need - you need clarity, what you need clarity on?— you need clarity, what you need clari on? ~ ' . ,, clarity on? about the effectiveness of current vaccinations _ clarity on? about the effectiveness of current vaccinations and - clarity on? about the effectiveness of current vaccinations and how - clarity on? about the effectiveness. of current vaccinations and how they worse, and if it is needed — rigour and how they work, and if ——
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effectiveness of current vaccinations and how they work, and if we need a new vaccine, how long that will take. 50 we will continue to monitor this over the next few weeks. at to monitor this over the next few weeks. �* .,, , to monitor this over the next few weeks. �* , ., ' to monitor this over the next few weeks.�* ., ', ., to monitor this over the next few weeks. ', ., , weeks. a loss of £1 billion, these results truly _ weeks. a loss of £1 billion, these results truly reflect _ weeks. a loss of £1 billion, these results truly reflect how - weeks. a loss of £1 billion, these results truly reflect how difficult | results truly reflect how difficult the last year has been for you. absolutely. we have been reporting on this for the full year where we have been impacted by the pandemic in the winter and the summer. we came into this in a stronger position and we have transformed the airline through the period, in terms of reallocating capacity into those routes that are in most demand, we have reduced costs, and we also have leading policies when it comes to flexibility when people want to make changes to their booking. so there are a lot of things coming out of
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this that we will be stronger. it's not a surprise to us that we would see that it would be not a surprise to us that we would see that it would he sometimes time is not a straightforward road to recovery. clearly we are seeing this taking place over the winter, and we will have a strong summer next year. are you in a position now where you are basically writing off winter because of the situation we are in? not at all. i think that the government have rightly said that they want to review the restrictions at the end of august as well, and i think that is the same thing that the other european governments have acted on. they clearly want to have the ability as soon as it is safe to do so is to remove all of the restrictions. we take a lot of confidence in that. so we are not writing of the winter. but having said that, we always thought that this year would be a year of two halves, where the winter would be
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with a lot of uncertainty and that assumption seems to be the right one. , ., . . assumption seems to be the right one. , ., ., . . one. johan lundgren, chief executive of eas jet, one. johan lundgren, chief executive of easyjet. thank _ one. johan lundgren, chief executive of easyjet, thank you. _ of easyjet, thank you. busy morning this morning, lots to get through. and lots for carol to tell us about. weather is causing real problems in parts of the uk. yes, that's right, good morning. yesterday, at about 1am, it was —8, and today, it was nine degrees. 50 there is a huge difference in temperature in some areas. in this stage in late november these temperatures are very high to start the day. i'll stay ahead, cloudy and damp. we are pulling in more of a westerly, —— a mild day ahead. later westerly, —— a mild day ahead. later we will see a cold front coming in to change things. for today, look at
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the colours in the chart, yellow and amber indicating it will be a mild j. amber indicating it will be a mild j. a lot of clout —— mild day. there is a lot of cloud and drizzle, we will see some holes in the cloud in parts of england and wales but later the cloud will thicken again towards the cloud will thicken again towards the west. bringing some rain across northern ireland and western scotland, with some strengthening winds. these are the maximum temperatures today. this time of year roughly, the average would be five to eight, north to south. it is going to be cold in the northern isles. the low pressure bringing the rain our way, isles. the low pressure bringing the rain ourway, it isles. the low pressure bringing the rain our way, it will deepen as it crosses us. heavy bursts of rain across southern scotland into cumbria, and one look at the isobars tells you it is going to be windy. wherever you are but we could see gusts up to gale force in exposed coasts and hills. and it will be a chilly night for many of us. not so
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in the south, temperature is hanging on to ii in the south, temperature is hanging on to 11 degrees in the channel islands, only one degree in lerwick. a mild note to start off in the south tomorrow, as we pull in the northerly wind, the blues moved across the chart. the highest temperatures will be in the morning and as we go through the day, the temperature will fall away. it will feel cold as we are exposed to a northerly wind. snow in the morning down to low levels across north of scotland, increasingly that will be rain and we will see rain pushed further south but it will be patchy. temperatures, two degrees in the north, eight or nine further south. into thursday, still wintry showers coming in along the north sea coastline. there will —— the wind will be coming from a cold direction, the north. a lot of dry weather and a fair bit of sunshine, but there's temperatures, chilly for the time of year. below average
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having been above average today. and then towards the west we have the next system will bring in tomorrow. 50 roughly, mild today, then cold so roughly, mild today, then cold tomorrow, then mild, then cold, temperatures are all over the place this week. some sad news from the world of sport now, people will know the face ofjohn sillett if they remember fa cup in the 1980s. he won the cup with coventry in 1987, it was one of the great finals. he played alongside jimmy he played alongsidejimmy greaves at chelsea, they had a great friendship playing in the 50s where he played with his brother at the same time. john sillett who's died at the age of 85, he made his name as a player
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with chelsea before further success followed in management. it was that fa cup win with coventry which was the crowning moment of his career after finishing as a player, lifting the trophy at wembley in 1987 having beaten tottenham after extra time, in what's been called one of the most entertaining finals in history. he also played for the club under jimmy hill in the 60s and before that at chelsea where he won the championship, then the top league in english football. some great pictures from that day at wembley in 1987. john sillett who's died at the age of 85. in paris last night, lionel messi collected yet another men's ballon d'or award, after being voted the best player on the planet for a record extending seventh time. he helped argentina win the copa america earlier this year, his first major international honour. his three boys were there with him in matching suits. he's two ahead of ronaldo now, who didn't attend but took to instagram to deny claims made by the organisers france football magazine that his sole motivation is to win more ballon d'ors than messi. the women's award went to barcelona
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captain alexia putellas. tiger woods has admitted he will not be the player he was after his car accident in february, saying he doesn't expect to return to the tourfull time. authorities said he was lucky to survive the crash. he's spoken for the first time and he told golf digest that playing in a couple of events every year's likely. i don't have to compete and play against the best players of the world to have a great life. i know that after my back fusion, for me, i had to prove to myself, i had to climb mount everest one more time. i had to do it. and i did. this time around, i don't think i'll have the body to climb mount everest and that's ok. but i can participate in the game of golf. i can still maybe, if my leg gets good enough, maybe kick off a tournament here or there.
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let's give you an update on the rugby union teams that have been affected by tightened travel restrictions following the new coronavirus variant identified in south africa. they were there to play in the united rugby championship. scarlets have made it out and are in an isolation hotel in belfast, munster can leave cape town to isolate back home, but cardiff are still stuck there, with two positive cases in the squad. there is obviously concerned to get home, there is a visually concerned around the new vary —— there is obvious he can turn around the new variant. it's obviously very difficult to be doing in effect a self—imposed quarantine in south africa so far from home. self—imposed quarantine in south africa so farfrom home. so paramount importance to us is to get them home. it just goes to itjust goes to show how sport is being affected by the —— by the situation changing so quickly. the ashes are due to be getting under
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soon, if people have to quarantine for 14 days in australia... i did learn something _ for 14 days in australia... i did learn something quite - for 14 days in australia... i c c learn something quite significant from ballon d'or, didier drogba was on stage with lionel messi and at the end, he had to press the buzzer to light up the eiffel tower. i learned that the french for press the buzzer is almost the same as the english. he gives a lovely speech in french and then he points to the thing and says, press the buzzer! we'll help you learn something! it sounds like something that del boy would _ sounds like something that del boy would say! sounds like something that del boy would sa ! ~ ., i. ~. ~ would say! think on your feet! make it u -' would say! think on your feet! make it up! marsh — would say! think on your feet! make it up! marsh two. — would say! think on your feet! make it up! marsh two, john! _ —— mange tout, john!
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it's described as the world's toughest row. crossing 3,000 miles from the canary islands to antigua in a rowing boat, battling sleep deprivation, salt sores and physical extremes, but that hasn't put kat cordiner off the challenge. despite having been diagnosed with incurable cancer she's attempting to complete the race and break a world record with her two team mates abbyjohnston and charlotte irving. we can speak to them now. good morning to you all, great to see you. good morning to you all, great to see ou. a, good morning to you all, great to see you- kat. _ good morning to you all, great to see you.- kat, tell- good morning to you all, great to see you.- kat, tell me i good morning to you all, great to i see you.- kat, tell me what see you. morning! kat, tell me what on earth possessed _ see you. morning! kat, tell me what on earth possessed you _ see you. morning! kat, tell me what on earth possessed you to _ see you. morning! kat, tell me what on earth possessed you to try - see you. morning! kat, tell me what on earth possessed you to try to - see you. morning! kat, tell me what on earth possessed you to try to do | on earth possessed you to try to do this and how important is it that you are able to do it at the moment? what possessed me, i totally blame abbey, it was her idea years ago and i said yes. they're why i think now has changed over the years in terms of going from a challenge to, i guess, proving that i can do it. now it is about raising much—needed funds for cancer charity. 50. it is about raising much-needed funds for cancer charity. so, abby, if it was your _ funds for cancer charity. so, abby, if it was your idea, _ funds for cancer charity. so, abby,
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if it was your idea, tell _ funds for cancer charity. so, abby, if it was your idea, tell us - funds for cancer charity. so, abby, if it was your idea, tell us a - funds for cancer charity. so, abby, if it was your idea, tell us a bit - if it was your idea, tell us a bit about the challenge ahead, what sort of things you are expecting and what sort of things which will push you to the limits? 50. sort of things which will push you to the limits?— to the limits? so, it is the talisker— to the limits? so, it is the talisker whiskey - to the limits? so, it is the talisker whiskey atlantic i to the limits? so, it is the - talisker whiskey atlantic challenge, we are _ talisker whiskey atlantic challenge, we are growing 3000 miles from the canary— we are growing 3000 miles from the canary islands to sunny antigua. and there _ canary islands to sunny antigua. and there are _ canary islands to sunny antigua. and there are so — canary islands to sunny antigua. and there are so only things that can happen— there are so only things that can happen out there. 3000 miles of open water, _ happen out there. 3000 miles of open water, we _ happen out there. 3000 miles of open water, we were just chatting about it and _ water, we were just chatting about it and saying, what could be the worst _ it and saying, what could be the worst thing? maybe capsizing, something breaks, basically something breaks, basically something which end the race the biggest _ something which end the race the biggest fear. capsizing would not be great! _ biggest fear. capsizing would not be treat! . ., , , ., great! charlotte, 'ust tell us how much rowing — great! charlotte, just tell us how much rowing experience - great! charlotte, just tell us how much rowing experience you - great! charlotte, just tell us how much rowing experience you all. great! charlotte, just tell us how i much rowing experience you all had previously? aha, much rowing experience you all had reviousl ? �* , ., much rowing experience you all had reviousl ? ~ , ., . much rowing experience you all had previously?— previously? a bit of a mixed bag. abb and previously? a bit of a mixed bag. abby and i _ previously? a bit of a mixed bag. abby and i met — previously? a bit of a mixed bag. abby and i met at _ previously? a bit of a mixed bag. abby and i met at school- previously? a bit of a mixed bag. abby and i met at school when i previously? a bit of a mixed bag. | abby and i met at school when we rode and — abby and i met at school when we rode and university— abby and i met at school when we rode and university and _ abby and i met at school when we rode and university and a - abby and i met at school when we rode and university and a little - abby and i met at school when we rode and university and a little hit| rode and university and a little bit afterwards — rode and university and a little bit afterwards together. _ rode and university and a little bit afterwards together. but - rode and university and a little bit afterwards together. but kat, - rode and university and a little bit afterwards together. but kat, to. rode and university and a little bit i afterwards together. but kat, to add an extra _ afterwards together. but kat, to add an extra leve!— afterwards together. but kat, to add an extra level to _ afterwards together. but kat, to add an extra level to the _ afterwards together. but kat, to add an extra level to the challenge, - an extra level to the challenge, came _ an extra level to the challenge, came into — an extra level to the challenge, came into it— an extra level to the challenge, came into it with _ an extra level to the challenge, came into it with no _
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an extra level to the challenge, came into it with no previous. an extra level to the challenge, - came into it with no previous rowing experience — came into it with no previous rowing experience she— came into it with no previous rowing experience. she had _ came into it with no previous rowing experience. she had taken- came into it with no previous rowing experience. she had taken to - came into it with no previous rowing experience. she had taken to it- came into it with no previous rowing experience. she had taken to it like| experience. she had taken to it like a duck— experience. she had taken to it like a duck to— experience. she had taken to it like a duck to water. _ experience. she had taken to it like a duck to water. nice _ experience. she had taken to it like a duck to water. nice long - experience. she had taken to it like a duck to water. nice long levers! l a duck to water. nice long levers! so she _ a duck to water. nice long levers! so she has— a duck to water. nice long levers! so she has come _ a duck to water. nice long levers! so she has come along _ a duck to water. nice long levers! so she has come along well. - a duck to water. nice long levers! - so she has come along well. learning to row— so she has come along well. learning to row on— so she has come along well. learning to row on a _ so she has come along well. learning to row on a river _ so she has come along well. learning to row on a river is _ so she has come along well. learning to row on a river is so _ so she has come along well. learning to row on a river is so different - so she has come along well. learning to row on a river is so different to - to row on a river is so different to learning _ to row on a river is so different to learning to — to row on a river is so different to learning to row— to row on a river is so different to learning to row on _ to row on a river is so different to learning to row on the _ to row on a river is so different to learning to row on the open - to row on a river is so different to learning to row on the open sea. i to row on a river is so different to| learning to row on the open sea. i think— learning to row on the open sea. i think you — learning to row on the open sea. i think you can— learning to row on the open sea. i think you can go— learning to row on the open sea. i think you can go as _ learning to row on the open sea. i think you can go as fast _ learning to row on the open sea. i think you can go as fast as - learning to row on the open sea. i think you can go as fast as slow . learning to row on the open sea. i| think you can go as fast as slow as the sea _ think you can go as fast as slow as the sea wants— think you can go as fast as slow as the sea wants you _ think you can go as fast as slow as the sea wants you to. _ think you can go as fast as slow as the sea wants you to. it's - think you can go as fast as slow as the sea wants you to. it's about i the sea wants you to. it's about putting — the sea wants you to. it's about putting on— the sea wants you to. it's about putting on the _ the sea wants you to. it's about putting on the hard _ the sea wants you to. it's about putting on the hard work- the sea wants you to. it's about putting on the hard work and i the sea wants you to. it's about - putting on the hard work and seeing what happens — putting on the hard work and seeing what happens-— what happens. plus, our boat is a lot heavier _ what happens. plus, our boat is a lot heavier than _ what happens. plus, our boat is a lot heavier than at _ what happens. plus, our boat is a lot heavier than at boat _ what happens. plus, our boat is a lot heavier than at boat on - what happens. plus, our boat is a lot heavier than at boat on the i what happens. plus, our boat is a l lot heavier than at boat on the row, so... ~ ., .. lot heavier than at boat on the row, so. , , ~ ., . ., , lot heavier than at boat on the row, so... ~ ., , . she so... who came up with the name? she was already _ so... who came up with the name? she was already cold — so... who came up with the name? she was already cold dolly _ so... who came up with the name? she was already cold dolly so _ so... who came up with the name? she was already cold dolly so it _ so... who came up with the name? she was already cold dolly so it is _ so... who came up with the name? she was already cold dolly so it is bad i was already cold dolly so it is bad —— she was already called dolly, it is bad luck to change the name. is it true there is no toilet on board? i am slightly concerned about this. that is true, that is a bucket. i
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that is true, that is a bucket. have heard that is true, that is a bucket. i have heard a rumour there is a christmas theme to the bucket, tell us about that. christmas theme to the bucket, tell us about that-— us about that. one of my work colleagues _ us about that. one of my work colleagues gave _ us about that. one of my work colleagues gave us _ us about that. one of my work colleagues gave us some i us about that. one of my work| colleagues gave us some tinsel us about that. one of my work. colleagues gave us some tinsel to put around it, and we have got some christmas inspired toilet paper. they will be using the bucket with a santa hat and all of the added extras on christmas day. slightly concerned about _ extras on christmas day. slightly concerned about tinsel _ extras on christmas day. slightly concerned about tinsel around i extras on christmas day. slightly| concerned about tinsel around the top of the bucket but let's move on. what about sleeping and all that business? there's not that much space on the boat, where do you do that? i would space on the boat, where do you do that? iwould imagine space on the boat, where do you do that? i would imagine someone has to be rowing at all times? yes, they do. m be rowing at all times? yes, they do- my mum _ be rowing at all times? yes, they do. my mum has _ be rowing at all times? yes, they do. my mum has made _ be rowing at all times? yes, they do. my mum has made as - be rowing at all times? yes, they do. my mum has made as a i be rowing at all times? yes, they do. my mum has made as a bean j be rowing at all times? yes, they i do. my mum has made as a bean bag which _ do. my mum has made as a bean bag which is _ do. my mum has made as a bean bag which is the _ do. my mum has made as a bean bag which is the height of luxury, so we will be _ which is the height of luxury, so we will be having that on deck. it can -et will be having that on deck. it can get hot _ will be having that on deck. it can get hot in — will be having that on deck. it can get hot in the cabins during the day especially— get hot in the cabins during the day especially close to antigua so during — especially close to antigua so during the day, there will be three of us _ during the day, there will be three of us -- _ during the day, there will be three of us -- to— during the day, there will be three of us —— to reverse rowing and someone _ of us —— to reverse rowing and someone having a nap on the beanbag, and at _
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someone having a nap on the beanbag, and at night, _ someone having a nap on the beanbag, and at night, one person rowing and one person — and at night, one person rowing and one person in each end. as a team of three. _ one person in each end. as a team of three. it _ one person in each end. as a team of three. it is _ one person in each end. as a team of three, it is relatively spacious. some — three, it is relatively spacious. some of— three, it is relatively spacious. some of the bigger teams will have to bunk— some of the bigger teams will have to bunk up — some of the bigger teams will have to bunk up together and it might not be as— to bunk up together and it might not be as cosy~ — to bunk up together and it might not be as cos . ~ , ., to bunk up together and it might not beascos . ~ ., to bunk up together and it might not beascos. ., be as cosy. when you told your doctors, be as cosy. when you told your doctors. kat. _ be as cosy. when you told your doctors, kat, what _ be as cosy. when you told your doctors, kat, what you - be as cosy. when you told your doctors, kat, what you wanted| be as cosy. when you told your. doctors, kat, what you wanted to be as cosy. when you told your- doctors, kat, what you wanted to do, what did they say to you? i doctors, kat, what you wanted to do, what did they say to you?— what did they say to you? i think the think what did they say to you? i think they think i'm — what did they say to you? i think they think i'm a _ what did they say to you? i think they think i'm a little _ what did they say to you? i think they think i'm a little bit - what did they say to you? i think they think i'm a little bit mad, . what did they say to you? i think they think i'm a little bit mad, if| they think i'm a little bit mad, if i'm honest. i know when i found out about my cardiac make soma, the guy told me, the first thing i said was, can i still row the atlantic? he was like, how is that your first question? they are really supportive. they're making sure that i am in the best condition i can be. so now theyjust i am in the best condition i can be. so now they just think i am in the best condition i can be. so now theyjust think i'm a bit mad but also quite proud. so so now theyjust think i'm a bit mad but also quite proud.— but also quite proud. so you start on the 12th _ but also quite proud. so you start on the 12th of _ but also quite proud. so you start on the 12th of december, - but also quite proud. so you start on the 12th of december, what'sl but also quite proud. so you start i on the 12th of december, what's the plan between now and then? is it all rowing crap, are you bulking up, what
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-- is it —— is it all rowing pratt? it is all inspections, dolly parton left the — it is all inspections, dolly parton left the uk a month ago so we shoved everything _ left the uk a month ago so we shoved everything in her, we need to go and sort her_ everything in her, we need to go and sort her out — everything in her, we need to go and sort her out and pack everything into various hatches. i�*m sort her out and pack everything into various hatches.— into various hatches. i'm 'ust concerned, if i into various hatches. i'm 'ust concerned, if someone i into various hatches. i'm just concerned, if someone has l into various hatches. i'm just l concerned, if someone has not into various hatches. i'm just - concerned, if someone has not known what you were talking about, you said, dolly parton left of the uk and we shoved everything in her. dolly parton is an eight metre boat! it dolly parton is an eight metre boat! it starts _ dolly parton is an eight metre boat! it starts on — dolly parton is an eight metre boat! it starts on the 12th of december, when you hope to arrive? irate it starts on the 12th of december, when you hope to arrive? we hope to arrive end of — when you hope to arrive? we hope to arrive end ofjanuary _ when you hope to arrive? we hope to arrive end ofjanuary beginning i when you hope to arrive? we hope to arrive end ofjanuary beginning in i arrive end ofjanuary beginning in february, ideally within 39 —— 49
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days so we break the fastest female trio record. find days so we break the fastest female trio record. �* . . , trio record. and that will arrive my birthda ! trio record. and that will arrive my birthday! have _ trio record. and that will arrive my birthday! have a _ trio record. and that will arrive my birthday! have a great _ trio record. and that will arrive my birthday! have a great time, i trio record. and that will arrive my birthday! have a great time, takel birthday! have a great time, take care of your _ birthday! have a great time, take care of your sales _ birthday! have a great time, take care of your sales and _ birthday! have a great time, take care of your sales and each i birthday! have a great time, take care of your sales and each other| care of your sales and each other and hopefully we will talk to you on the way somewhere. irate and hopefully we will talk to you on the way somewhere.— the way somewhere. we will definitely — the way somewhere. we will definitely be _ the way somewhere. we will definitely be speaking i the way somewhere. we will definitely be speaking to i the way somewhere. we will i definitely be speaking to them again. they are going to be brilliant. i again. they are going to be brilliant. ~ ., , , , , brilliant. i know it is high spirits before it starts _ brilliant. i know it is high spirits before it starts but _ brilliant. i know it is high spirits before it starts but i _ brilliant. i know it is high spirits before it starts but i think- brilliant. i know it is high spirits before it starts but i think they | before it starts but i think they are going to dig in.— before it starts but i think they are going to dig in. they have got dolly parton. _ are going to dig in. they have got dolly parton, they _ are going to dig in. they have got dolly parton, they can't _ are going to dig in. they have got dolly parton, they can't lose. i are going to dig in. they have got| dolly parton, they can't lose. stay with this, headlines are coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. face masks become compulsory in shops and on public transport in england, but some stores say they won't make people wear them. and as the booster programme prepares to be ramped up, these mass vaccination centres will be in the front line against the omicron variant. longer sentences for child abusers in england in wales, as tony's law becomes a reality. he is an inspiration every day. he never complains, he carries on, no matter what is thrown at him. all the challenges, he just gets himself back up and carries on. prince charles joins the celebrations as barbados officially becomes the world's newest republic. ourfamily and autism — paddy and christine mcguinness let in the cameras as they learn more
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about the condition which affects all three of their children. and i'll go, "who's your best friend?" and he'll go, "you are." and i'll go, "do you love daddy? and he'll go, "yeah." gosh. today's milder. certainly a milder start to the day. it will be cloudy and damp and later rain in northern ireland and western scotland with strengthening wind. all the details coming up. it's tuesday, the 30th of november. the prime minister will set out plans to accelerate england's boosterjab programme later today, and it could include the use of more pharmacies. new rules to try to limit the spread of the omicron variant of coronavirus have come into force this morning, meaning masks must be worn in shops and on public transport in england. the health secretary, sajid javid, has insisted the measures are proportionate and will help families enjoy christmas together. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. from this morning, face coverings are now compulsory in shops
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and on public transport in england. face coverings are already needed for most public places and transport in wales. masks are also required in pubs and restaurants in scotland and northern ireland. but there is some concern over how shoppers in england will cope with the return of face coverings. the vast majority of the public, when it was required to wear face coverings, were very good about it, and still are in scotland and wales, where the regulations were never removed. but there is definitely a minority of people who seem to think that the rules shouldn't apply to them and they are causing problems at stores. we've seen the levels of violence that shopworkers faced more than doubled during the pandemic. there are changes in schools, too, where staff and pupils in year 7 and above are also being advised to wear masks in communal areas. in scotland, that rule applies in class, as well. and international travellers coming to the uk now also need to take a pcr test within two days of their arrival and self—isolate until they get a negative result. but perhaps the biggest changes are the modifications to the booster programme —
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slashing the gap between second jab and booster from six months to three and opening up boosters to all those over 18. vaccines and boosters remain the prime defence against the virus. this is a programme which is all about speed, so you are right, the two challenges are going to be the logistics of actually delivering so much vaccine in a very short time, and, of course, it is important that people come forward and receive those jabs in good time, so they can build up that extra immunity that we need to be sure that we are protected against this new variant. so a challenging month ahead for the nhs and, obviously, people need to respond as soon as they get contacted and come forward. it's clear uk cases linked to the omicron variant are on the rise. the big unanswered questions remain — what impact the variant will have on illness, vaccines and transmission. dominic hughes, bbc news.
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we'll speak to the head of the uk health security agency about those changes — that's at 8.20. let's speak to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. adam, we're expecting more detail this morning on the plans for booster vaccines aren't we? and you have more information to share. the prime minister will do a press conference in downing street this afternoon where he will set out plans for accelerating the roll—out of boosters now that all adults over 18 are entitled to one and also 12-15 18 are entitled to one and also 12—15 year olds will get their second dose and the fact that vaccines will happen with a smaller gap between them. a huge undertaking for the nhs in england and so i think we will get more details about how the undertaking will be delivered. looking at more local pharmacies getting involved and more local pharmacies the rather then going back to the football stadium model. the other thing coming back
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is the idea of doing it through age bands. if you are closer to 18 than 240, you will be at the back of the queue, and that is to help manage the millions of extra doses that will have to be delivered more quickly than people expected. in terms of what is happening with the omicron variant, ministers and scientists are trying to work out what these mutations mean for the spread of the virus. they are taking a precautionary approach with new protections coming in today. and ministers say you should carry on with your plans as normal. this is the social care minister. ibe the social care minister. be sensible. — the social care minister. be sensible, do what you feel comfortable doing, but we are not telling _ comfortable doing, but we are not telling people to not continue with their plans. we hope we can continue with christmas plans. of course, we are putting — with christmas plans. of course, we are putting these measures in place now to _ are putting these measures in place now to build up our wall of defence. the other— now to build up our wall of defence. the other thing happening is mps will vote on measures that came in
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at 4am. voting after they came in but that is more scrutiny than some covid measures have had some points in the pandemic.— labour leader sir keir starmer has reshuffled his shadow cabinet. there was a big promotion for yvette cooper, to shadow home secretary. david lammy has been promoted to shadow foreign secretary, replacing lisa nandy and wes streeting becomes shadow health secretary. some labour mps believe there are growing divisions between sir keir starmer and deputy leader angela rayner. you know, i've been through a lot of reshuffles in the last 11 years. the leader makes the decisions. the gaffer picks the team. that is how it goes and that is how it has always gone. frankly, i couldn't really care less about the circus around who's in, who's out, who's up, who's down, who knew, who didn't. i care about the fact that there are people across this country who deserve a better settlement — they've deserved it for a long time. barbados has officially removed the queen as its head of state and became a republic
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in an overnight ceremony in the capital of bridgetown. dame sandra mason was sworn in as president during a midnight event coinciding with the country's 55th anniversary of independence. the prince of wales and barbadian singer rihanna attended the event. more than 100,000 homes in parts of scotland and the north of england remain without power because of damage caused by storm arwen. schools in aberdeenshire remain closed and whole villages in cumbria remain without power — with no word yet on when supplies will be restored. utility companies said they would be offering accommodation for vulnerable customers. it isa it is a worrying time which is why the forecast is important and we can go straight to carol. good morning. the temperatures this week are all over the place and today we are looking at temperatures above average, and tomorrow below
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average for the time of year. i'll start but it will be cloudy and damp. we have rain in parts of scotland coming across northern england and drizzle on the coasts and hills. through the day in parts of england and wales we will see cloud break and some will see sunshine. by the end of the afternoon, heavy rain comes in a cross northern ireland into western scotland, accompanied by a strengthening wind. temperatures are 8-12 strengthening wind. temperatures are 8—12 and roughly speaking at this time of year we would look at 5—8, north to south. it will still be cold in lerwick. overnight, low pressure will deepen as it moves across so heavy rain across parts of southern scotland and cumbria. the isobars tell you it will be a windy night wherever you are with the potential for gusts to gale force on coasts and hills. it will be colder
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than the nightjust gone. 5—11 in the south. cold in the northern isles, cold enough for a touch of frost. tomorrow, cold air again. we've followed the story of little tony hudgell closely on breakfast as the 7—year—old double amputee set about raising more than £1.5 million for charity. he is amazing. remarkable. when you think about the fact he lost his legs after being abused by his birth parents. now a new law meaning tougher sentences for those who harm children, has been named after him. brea kfast�*s zoe conway joined tony and his family as they were told the news byjustice secretary dominic raab why is there a wig? judges wear wigs so that the criminals, when they are in court, can tell the difference between them
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and ordinary people. i think it's made of horse wool. what do you of that? what do you think of that? tony hudgell might be in the presence of the deputy prime minister, justice secretary dominic raab, but he's certainly not daunted. and you don't know how to work that. but then seven—year—old tony hudgell isn't daunted by anything. what does this do? it's his fearlessness and energy that has so inspired his parents. paula and mark hudgell have been campaigning for tony's law — tougher sentences for people convicted of child cruelty. and, at this meeting, they are finding out that the government is going to act. we just think that what tony has done is inspiring. and the need to protect little ones like him is overwhelming. so we will be announcing that change very shortly and i wanted you to know before the general public. that is wonderful. thank you. you are a bit of a role model for all of us. what do you think about that? i don't know what that means.
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aw. tony was just a few weeks old when he suffered horrific injuries. his doctors feared he would not survive. he had been abused by his biological parents. he had suffered multiple organ failure, septicaemia and fractures to both thighs, lower legs, ankles, toes and thumbs. his legs had to be amputated. paula and mark hudgell began looking after him when he was four months old. presented in front of me was this tiny, broken, shut down, underweight, legs in plaster, four—month—old baby. i broke down in tears. absolutely sobbed. and thought i can't do this. but within two hours of being with him, there was no way i was going to leave him. this is tony with his biological parents tony smith and jodie simpson. in 2018, they were convicted of causing serious physical harm to a child and cruelty to a person under 16. they were each sentenced
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to ten years in prison. under the government's new law, they would get longer. we are announcing the increase in sentencing for causing death by cruelty to children from 14 years to life in prison, and for causing serious injury by cruelty from ten years to 14 years. and the reason is because children, and young children in particular, are the most vulnerable in our society. they have got to be given the strongest protection of the law. you have just met tony. i saw the two of you staring out the window and looking at where the queen lives. what do you make of him? he is an incredible young boy. he is full of energy. you would not really have a full understanding of what he has been through, but he is full of life, full of energy and deserves every chance to make the best of his potential. he is swimming, he is horse riding. and i think we need to make sure we are protecting young boys,
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young children like tony. every day for a month last year, tony walked around his local park to raise money for the hospital that saved his life. inspired by captain tom, who raised millions by walking 100 times around his garden, tony set out to raise £500 by walking ten kilometres. sometimes, it hurt, and sometimes he fell over. but he kept going. he completed the ten kilometres and he raised more than £1.5 million. he is an inspiration every day. he never complains. he carries on, no matter what is thrown at him. all the challenges, he gets himself back up and carries on. ten years for tony's parents that received the maximum sentence just doesn't seem enough for his lifelong injuries. so now, increasing that to 14 years, which, now, with the new sentencing that they have to serve two thirds, that is going to be almost ten years that they would
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have to spend inside — so that is double what they would have to now. tony, what has today been like? just amazing. amazing, indeed. for how many seven—year—olds get to work on the deputy prime minister's speech? so where have you got up to? not very far. — i have a team that draft the speech. as the justice secretary is discovering, tony hudgell never gives up. zoe conway, bbc news. tony and his adoptive mum paula join us now, with their local mp tom tugendhat, who supported the campaign. good morning. paula, can i say
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congratulations, tony, on the best interview with dominic raab we have seen on national television. he was causing chaos. seen on national television. he was causing chaos-— causing chaos. what was the daylight? — causing chaos. what was the daylight? it _ causing chaos. what was the daylight? it was _ causing chaos. what was the daylight? it was an - causing chaos. what was the | daylight? it was an incredible causing chaos. what was the i daylight? it was an incredible day, very emotional to start, to find out tony's law had succeeded and we would have tougher sentences for child cruelty but dominic raab was amazing. he was incredible with tony. spent a lot of time with him, explaining what was in his office and everything. even when we left the office tony made his own way back to the office and back to his desk and said he was the new deputy prime minister.— prime minister. tony, i think we will vote for _ prime minister. tony, i think we will vote for year. _ prime minister. tony, i think we will vote for year. paula, - prime minister. tony, i think we will vote for year. paula, you i prime minister. tony, i think we i will vote for year. paula, you must be so proud of him and what you have achieved together.— achieved together. absolutely, so -roud achieved together. absolutely, so roud of achieved together. absolutely, so proud of him- _ achieved together. absolutely, so proud of him. he _ achieved together. absolutely, so proud of him. he his—
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achieved together. absolutely, so proud of him. he his inspiration i achieved together. absolutely, so proud of him. he his inspiration is contagious. that has kept us going. really, he should not have made it, he should not be here today, but he is, and what a testament that a seven—year—old can change the law, which is incredible. tam seven-year-old can change the law, which is incredible.— which is incredible. tom tugendhat has been watching _ which is incredible. tom tugendhat has been watching this _ which is incredible. tom tugendhat has been watching this closely. it l has been watching this closely. it must be an inspiration for you. do you have a message for the family? i have congratulations for them all. it is have congratulations for them all. it is right— have congratulations for them all. it is right tony is inspirational but the — it is right tony is inspirational but the truth is so the whole family — but the truth is so the whole family. they are a loving family who demonstrate what a real family can do is _ demonstrate what a real family can do is not _ demonstrate what a real family can do is not only protect themselves and look— do is not only protect themselves and look after each other but make life better— and look after each other but make life better for all of us by looking out for _ life better for all of us by looking out for everyone in society and that is what _ out for everyone in society and that is what they— out for everyone in society and that is what they have achieved to date. i am enormously proud of them and it has been _ i am enormously proud of them and it has been a _ i am enormously proud of them and it has been a privilege to work with them _ has been a privilege to work with them and — has been a privilege to work with them and support them through this.
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what difference will this law may? it makes a clear statement that the most _ it makes a clear statement that the most vulnerable, children, who are betrayed _ most vulnerable, children, who are betrayed by them who owe them the greatest _ betrayed by them who owe them the greatest duty of care, a parent, those _ greatest duty of care, a parent, those looking after the smallest infants — those looking after the smallest infants in — those looking after the smallest infants in society, will be treated as harshly— infants in society, will be treated as harshly as they would be if they were _ as harshly as they would be if they were abusing an adult who could give evidence _ were abusing an adult who could give evidence. untiltony's were abusing an adult who could give evidence. until tony's law past, there _ evidence. until tony's law past, there was— evidence. until tony's law past, there was effectively an extraordinary defence which was the silence _ extraordinary defence which was the silence of— extraordinary defence which was the silence of the child meant the full prosecution could not be brought but now it _ prosecution could not be brought but now it can _ prosecution could not be brought but now it can and that is because of tony _ now it can and that is because of tony. tony— now it can and that is because of tony. tony has managed to change the law to _ tony. tony has managed to change the law to make _ tony. tony has managed to change the law to make the protection of children— law to make the protection of children full proof. and it is a fantastic— children full proof. and it is a fantastic achievement for anybody but particularly a seven—year—old boy~ _ but particularly a seven-year-old bo . , . , , boy. there must have been times when ou thou . ht boy. there must have been times when you thought it — boy. there must have been times when you thought it would _ boy. there must have been times when you thought it would not _ boy. there must have been times when you thought it would not be _ you thought it would not be possible, but the fight has
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continued.— possible, but the fight has continued. , ., , . , continued. yes. tony has made us car on. continued. yes. tony has made us carry on- the _ continued. yes. tony has made us carry on- the way _ continued. yes. tony has made us carry on. the way he _ continued. yes. tony has made us carry on. the way he is _ continued. yes. tony has made us carry on. the way he is and - continued. yes. tony has made us carry on. the way he is and the i continued. yes. tony has made us| carry on. the way he is and the way he goes _ carry on. the way he is and the way he goes about — carry on. the way he is and the way he goes about life. _ carry on. the way he is and the way he goes about life. he _ carry on. the way he is and the way he goes about life. he does - carry on. the way he is and the way he goes about life. he does not i carry on. the way he is and the wayi he goes about life. he does not give up he goes about life. he does not give up and _ he goes about life. he does not give up and we _ he goes about life. he does not give up and we cannot— he goes about life. he does not give up and we cannot give _ he goes about life. he does not give up and we cannot give up. _ he goes about life. he does not give up and we cannot give up. it - he goes about life. he does not give up and we cannot give up. it all- up and we cannot give up. it all worked — up and we cannot give up. it all worked out _ up and we cannot give up. it all worked out-— up and we cannot give up. it all worked out. . . , . worked out. paula, tell us about the challenges- — worked out. paula, tell us about the challenges- it _ worked out. paula, tell us about the challenges. it has _ worked out. paula, tell us about the challenges. it has not _ worked out. paula, tell us about the challenges. it has not always - worked out. paula, tell us about the challenges. it has not always been l challenges. it has not always been easy. there must have been moments when you did not expect this day to come. how did tony help you through that? it come. how did tony help you through that? ., , , come. how did tony help you through that? . , , . come. how did tony help you through that? ., , . ., ., that? it has been a roller-coaster of a journey _ that? it has been a roller-coaster of a journey from _ that? it has been a roller-coaster of a journey from day _ that? it has been a roller-coaster of a journey from day one - that? it has been a roller-coaster of a journey from day one macro l that? it has been a roller-coaster- of a journey from day one macro when we had him, through to the trial, and campaigning for tougher sentences. it has been almost four years of hard work. tom has been fantastic, our absolute rock throughout. he has inspired us. he
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never once said we would not do this. just that inspiration. tony has never given up so we could not give up. campaigning carries on. as i told dominic raab. he asked if there was anything else he could do and i said absolutely, we need a child cruelty register. he was confident over that. he did not know there was not one already, so if we carry on pushing, it does not stop here. wejust want carry on pushing, it does not stop here. we just want to make all children as safe as possible. tam children as safe as possible. tom tugendhat _ children as safe as possible. tom tugendhat that _ children as safe as possible. tom tugendhat that is _ children as safe as possible. tom tugendhat that is the _ children as safe as possible. tom tugendhat that is the point we put to you, a child cruelty register. i5 to you, a child cruelty register. is that something you support? absolutely and it is something we are campaigning on and paula and mark— are campaigning on and paula and mark do— are campaigning on and paula and mark do not give up. i am delighted with dominic raab and what he has given— with dominic raab and what he has given out, — with dominic raab and what he has given out, recognising the importance of this request they have announced _ importance of this request they have
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announced today. but as they have seen, _ announced today. but as they have seen. tony— announced today. but as they have seen, tony does not give up and we will push _ seen, tony does not give up and we will push for — seen, tony does not give up and we will push for a child cruelty will push fora child cruelty register— will push for a child cruelty register which is a logical thing to do and _ register which is a logical thing to do and i_ register which is a logical thing to do and i am looking forward to the government recognising that. so dominic— government recognising that. so dominic raab, if you are watching. tony. _ dominic raab, if you are watching. tony. lovely — dominic raab, if you are watching. tony, lovely to speak to you. i wonder if you could tell us what yesterday was like? was it fun? talk us through the day. yes yesterday was like? was it fun? talk us through the day.— us through the day. yes it was really fun- _ us through the day. yes it was really fun. what _ us through the day. yes it was really fun. what was - us through the day. yes it was really fun. what was the i us through the day. yes it was really fun. what was the best| us through the day. yes it was i really fun. what was the best bit about being _ really fun. what was the best bit about being in _ really fun. what was the best bit about being in dominic- really fun. what was the best bit about being in dominic raab's i about being in dominic raab's office? ,, ,, �* , about being in dominic raab's office? ,, ,, h ., , office? seen the queen's house? the stam s? office? seen the queen's house? the stamps? 0r — office? seen the queen's house? the stamps? 0r being _ office? seen the queen's house? the stamps? or being on _ office? seen the queen's house? the stamps? or being on his _ office? seen the queen's house? the stamps? or being on his computer? | stamps? or being on his computer? oh, stamps? or being on his computer? 0h, right. he got to go on his computer. tony, we are so glad you had a lovely day and i am glad you sorted out his speech and had a good
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look round his office. in sorted out his speech and had a good look round his office.— look round his office. in case an bod look round his office. in case anybody doesn't _ look round his office. in case anybody doesn't know, i look round his office. in case anybody doesn't know, we i look round his office. in case i anybody doesn't know, we have set look round his office. in case - anybody doesn't know, we have set up the tony hudgell foundation to enhance the lives of children affected by abuse and we have set up affected by abuse and we have set up a christmas present appeal. if anybody wants to donate, tony will play santa, and spread some magic to children not quite so fortunate. tony, are you dressing up? he is auoin to tony, are you dressing up? he is going to be- _ tony, are you dressing up? he is going to be- of— tony, are you dressing up? he is going to be. of course _ tony, are you dressing up? he is going to be. of course he - tony, are you dressing up? he is going to be. of course he is. i going to be. of course he is. fantastic. i sense there are more details to be firmed up by tony. we will need a photo at some stage. tony, i hope you enjoy being father christmas. have a lovely christmas and congratulations. and tom tugendhat, grateful to talk to you, you got up in the middle of
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the night in washington. it is to you, you got up in the middle of the night in washington.— the night in washington. it is a wonderful— the night in washington. it is a wonderful event _ the night in washington. it is a wonderful event so _ the night in washington. it is a wonderful event so i _ the night in washington. it is a wonderful event so i am i the night in washington. it is a i wonderful event so i am pleased to be with_ wonderful event so i am pleased to be with you — wonderful event so i am pleased to be with you my— wonderful event so i am pleased to be with vom— be with you. my favourite bit, it was the plate — be with you. my favourite bit, it was the plate of _ be with you. my favourite bit, it was the plate of sweets. - be with you. my favourite bit, it was the plate of sweets. did - be with you. my favourite bit, it l was the plate of sweets. did you be with you. my favourite bit, it - was the plate of sweets. did you see that? is that how you roll in your house, on a plate? no. well as we've been hearing, the booster programme is going to play a vital role in plans to contain the impact of the omicron variant. but a number of the former mass vaccination centres have closed down, meaning the remaining ones will be under increased pressure, john is at a centre in bristol this morning. john it's a busy time ahead isn't it? they really have. we are at the university of the west of england outside bristol, initially converted into a nightingale hospital but thankfully did not have to be used and since the summer it has been a mass vaccination centre. they have been busy and they will be busy.
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they see 1800 day. a small queue now. people have been moving through the last half hour, but very busy doing the pfizer and moderna boosters and also some astrazeneca. some schoolchildren here, 12—15 year olds who were not seen at school. people at the end have had theirjab this morning. so many millions have had a vaccination, use it for 15 minutes at the end to make sure everything is all right. we can talk to a vaccinator. alex. you have an interesting story. we spoke earlier to some nurses who converted a cross, but you are not traditionally a health care worker. i cross, but you are not traditionally a health care worker.— cross, but you are not traditionally a health care worker. i used to work in the charity _ a health care worker. i used to work in the charity sector _ a health care worker. i used to work in the charity sector and _ a health care worker. i used to work in the charity sector and did - in the charity sector and did campaigning and volunteer management and started with stjohn�*s ambulance as a volunteer and a nurse i worked
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with there encouraged me to apply for thejob as with there encouraged me to apply for the job as vaccinator and i have been doing this sincejune. i have loved it. it is a really nice team and a positive environment. the pay is not bad. it is great to be helping people and doing something important for the country. find helping people and doing something important for the country.— important for the country. and so much so you _ important for the country. and so much so you are _ important for the country. and so much so you are going _ important for the country. and so much so you are going for- important for the country. and so much so you are going for a - important for the country. and so | much so you are going for a career change. i much so you are going for a career chance. , ., ., much so you are going for a career chance. _, ., a, .,, much so you are going for a career chance. _, ., ., change. i start on monday as a health care _ change. i start on monday as a health care assistant, - change. i start on monday as a health care assistant, an - health care assistant, an entry—level supporting people with health and basic care. you entry-level supporting people with health and basic care.— entry-level supporting people with health and basic care. you get up to 1800 peeple — health and basic care. you get up to 1800 people here. _ health and basic care. you get up to 1800 people here. i _ health and basic care. you get up to 1800 people here. i am _ health and basic care. you get up to 1800 people here. i am fascinated l health and basic care. you get up to. 1800 people here. i am fascinated by the tricks of the trade to persuade people who are nervous. the important — people who are nervous. the important thing _ people who are nervous. the important thing is _ people who are nervous. the: important thing is try people who are nervous. tte: important thing is try to people who are nervous. tt2 important thing is try to empathise. there are lots of reasons people are nervous. it is listening to their concerns and really hearing them and using knowledge. understanding how the vaccine work, understanding of side effects and general health and
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supporting them with a recovery. mit supporting them with a recovery. all the best with the new career start on monday. very busy already here. and as you said, sadly, there has been the downscaling of the vaccination programme but places like this will now see a ramping up but they say they have planned, they are expecting it, and are ready to go. everybody wearing face masks but lots of smiles here today. thanks. from the early hours of this morning, a whole new raft of changes have come into force in an effort to tackle the spread of the coronavirus omicron variant. masks are now compulsory in shops and on public transport in england — bringing it into line with the rest of the uk. all travellers entering britain will now have to take a pcr test within two days, and must self isolate, until they test negative. plus the booster programme is being rolled out to include all uk adults — although there's still no firm timeline in place for when people will have theirjabs.
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we'rejoined now byjenny harries, chief executive of the uk health security agency. a lot of viewers are interested in what will happen today and in the coming weeks. give an idea of how concerned you are by the new variant on where you think we will be in the coming days. t on where you think we will be in the coming days-— coming days. i think you have seen almost all public _ coming days. i think you have seen almost all public health _ almost all public health professionals are very concerned about the variant. it has more mutations than anything we have seen and some of the characteristics of those give us concern that it might start to evade either natural immunity when we have been infected before, all the great effort we have made with vaccination. all of this is a period of great uncertainty and thatis is a period of great uncertainty and that is the key point. we are taking precautionary measures in order that
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we buy time so we can carry through scientific tests we do to understand the variant better. is it scientific tests we do to understand the variant better.— the variant better. is it fair to sa we the variant better. is it fair to say we do _ the variant better. is it fair to say we do not _ the variant better. is it fair to say we do not know— the variant better. is it fair to say we do not know how - the variant better. is it fair to - say we do not know how effective the vaccines are against omicron? but this is the best scenario until we find out more about the variant? it find out more about the variant? tit is quite a difficult message because viewers might hear on the one hand we are talking about escaping vaccine effectiveness and on the other hand saying please get your booster. but the two are not incompatible. we know that after a second dose of vaccine you get a good effect, but that starts to wane. the advicejcvi gave is about ringing forward booster doses and giving them to all adults over 18. the interval is now three months and people will be invited by the nhs to get a booster. that will increase
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your general levels of immunity, which we hope to some extent will counter the potential drop in vaccine effectiveness you might find with this variant. we have seen with beta and dealt a slight drop off because the vaccines originally were managed... were designed to manage the original variant. on the one hand we are worried about that but on the other hand the thing people can do is to get their booster. i am hearing back from the director of public health colleagues that people who did not get their primary are getting embarrassed about turning up. we getting embarrassed about turning u . _ . . ., ., getting embarrassed about turning u -. ~ . ., ., , ., getting embarrassed about turning up. we encourage everyone to come forward. up. we encourage everyone to come forward- you — up. we encourage everyone to come forward. you can _ up. we encourage everyone to come forward. you can understand - up. we encourage everyone to come i forward. you can understand concerns about people watching thinking about what might happen in the coming weeks. are we potentially looking at measures like going back to working from home if we do not get control of this variant? the from home if we do not get control of this variant?— from home if we do not get control of this variant? the point about the booster programme _ of this variant? the point about the booster programme and _
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of this variant? the point about the l booster programme and introduction of mandatory face mask wearing in enclosed public spaces is to try to avoid that. because we have made huge progress, we have great defences. in the background, the dominant strain in the uk is delta. these vaccines will help that, it will keep serious infection, infection and hospitalisation at bay. but we need time to understand the new variant and we would prefer a precautionary approach and then take action. a precautionary approach and then take action-— a precautionary approach and then take action. ~ . ., take action. what timescale are we lookin: at take action. what timescale are we looking at before _ take action. what timescale are we looking at before you _ take action. what timescale are we looking at before you might - looking at before you might potentially see further measures? taste potentially see further measures? we will potentially see further measures? - will be looking at what is happening overseas particularly in south africa, where cases have risen sooner. their population is different, it is much younger. we need to be careful to compare like for like. the second thing, we have looked at structural biology which is why we are concerned, we look at
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the shape of the variant is from genome sequencing and trying to create a pseudo— risk, a pretend virus that looks like the genome we know. the third is looking at how this behaves and how the live virus works with serum that has been taken from people who have had infection or vaccinations. and if it starts causing serious illness and we have had no hospitalisations in the uk yet, we look at characteristics of individuals admitted to hospital. thank you for speaking to us. the prime minister is going to be holding a press conference later and that will be on all bbc news channels. and on the radio. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc
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london, i'm tolu adeoye. from this morning, the wearing of masks is compulsory on all public transport across london in response to rising concerns over the omicron covid variant. tfl had already made it a condition of travel on its services, but now coverings will be required on trains too as well as in shops. it comes as wandsworth and camden became the latest places in london where cases were detected. the london assembly has warned that some of the capital's river crossings could be closed unless more funding is secured. both rotherhithe tunnel and vauxhall bridge are in need of urgent repairs. tfl says they could be casualties of its £1.2 billion funding gap. the government says it's repeatedly shown its commitment to transport in london, including the most recent funding agreement worth over £1 billion. a new exhibition focusing on contributions from the windrush generation is opening this week at tate britain.
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life between islands will include work by over a0 artists. on one level, it is an art history, of the caribbean connection in british art from about the 19505, right to now, as a continuing story — mainly of artists of caribbean descent, of course. but it also shows how the visual arts act as this amazing lens through which we can see a broader cultural, social, political story. london's famous new year's day parade will be returning on the 1st january. but restrictions mean the traditional parade has been replaced by a ticketed arena show. it will be at waterloo place near piccadilly circus. let's take a look at the travel situation this morning. the piccadilly line is part suspended, and there are minor delays on the tfl rail. for all other travel news inclduing what's happening on the roads tune in to your local bbc radio station. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning.
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it was all change weather—wise last night. it was cold and frosty for a good while underneath clear skies, but temperatures unusually have been rising for the second half of the night along with a warm front that has been sweeping through, introducing cloud, some patchy outbreaks of rain and much milder air. so we start off the day on a very different note, between six and eight celsius. we will keep those cloudy skies for much of the day, there could be a few outbreaks of light patchy rain and drizzle, not amounting to very much, and there is a noticeable westerly wind. temperatures this afternoon could get as high as 11 or 12 celsius so very mild and well above the average for the time of year. the mild air is not set to last. we have got a cold front coming through overnight tonight that is going to give us some further outbreaks of rain and also eventually some colder air. so to start off the day on wednesday, nine celsius, this will be the day's highest temperature because on wednesday, it's dry, there's some sunny spells but temperatures will slip as we head throughout the day and it will feel quite cold by the afternoon. a frosty night on wednesday and into thursday, we are back into that very chilly air
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and a northerly wind. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now though it's back to dan and sally. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. morning live is on bbc one after breakfast. let's find out what kimberley and gethin have in store. good morning both! coming up on morning live. from anxiety, to aggression and even hallucinations. if someone you know is acting out of character, they could be suffering from a common infection that affects 92 million people worldwide. yes, they're just some of the surprising symptoms. dr punam is telling us how to spot the signs. yes, from how you can get this infection, - to getting treatment, i'll give you all- the advice you need. plus, i'll clear up some of the confusion abouti who they can affect. also, you might think
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they've got a dream job cuddling cute animals all day and being paid a good wage, but being a vet is a lot tougher than you might think. drjames greenwood uncovers why those working in his industry are three to four times more likely to take their own lives and finds out what help is out there. plus, they're taking some time out for themselves by lacing up their walking boots. shepherdess amanda owen and broadcaster alastair campbell invite us along on a winter walk and share some breathtaking views of the yorkshire countryside. and it's the brand new interior design show bringing trends and technology together. we'll meet one of the experts from virtually home attempting to push us out of our decorating comfort zones. you have got to live a little! and what a career he's had! gyles brandreth reflects on his partying days withjoanna lumley and gossiping with her majesty the queen. he is full of heart this morning!
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gossipihg — he is full of heart this morning! gossiping with the queen? we only have 45— gossiping with the queen? we only have 45 minutes. it will take a white! — have 45 minutes. it will take a while! . ~' ,, tv presenter paddy mcguinness and his wife christine have three children, eight—year—old twins leo and penelope and five—year—old felicity. all three of their children are autistic. the mcguinnesses have opened up the doors to their home for a new bbc documentary which follows the family as they meet other parents, experts and people on the autism spectrum. let's take a look. when the kids were diagnosed, a paediatrician told us that they may have difficulty recognising emotion, and that thought has stayed with me. what gets to me with them all... and again, it is only what i think. i think, god, will they ever know how loved they are? do you know what i mean? do they understand what love is? so when i'm with leo, every night, in bed, i will always say to him, "who loves you more than anything in the world?" and he'll go, "you do."
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and i will go, "who is your best friend?" and he'll go, "you are." and i'll go, "do you love daddy?" and he'l go, "yeah." gosh. but... i think to myself, is he just saying that, or does he know that? of course he knows you love him. i know, but with all three of them... you've said this for years about the love thing. you've said it for years, and it's something we've not disagreed on, but patrick has worried for years that the children might not feel loved or they don't understand it. i have always said they do. paddy and christine are with us now. good morning, my goodness, that is a hugely emotionalfilm. really good morning, my goodness, that is a hugely emotional film. really deeply personal. christine, why did you decide to open your doors like this
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and how important is it that you could tell your story? it and how important is it that you could tell your story?— and how important is it that you could tell your story? it wasn't an easy decision. _ could tell your story? it wasn't an easy decision. we _ could tell your story? it wasn't an easy decision. we have _ could tell your story? it wasn't an easy decision. we have been - could tell your story? it wasn't an i easy decision. we have been talking about_ easy decision. we have been talking about this _ easy decision. we have been talking about this for four years now. we have, about this for four years now. we have. yeah- _ about this for four years now. we have. yeah- we _ about this for four years now. we have, yeah. we didn't _ about this for four years now. we have, yeah. we didn't know- about this for four years now. we have, yeah. we didn't know if- about this for four years now. we have, yeah. we didn't know if it | about this for four years now. we i have, yeah. we didn't know if it was the riaht have, yeah. we didn't know if it was the right time _ have, yeah. we didn't know if it was the right time of _ have, yeah. we didn't know if it was the right time of the _ have, yeah. we didn't know if it was the right time of the right _ have, yeah. we didn't know if it was the right time of the right thing - have, yeah. we didn't know if it was the right time of the right thing to i the right time of the right thing to do. the right time of the right thing to do but— the right time of the right thing to do but we — the right time of the right thing to do. but we knew the more we spoke about— do. but we knew the more we spoke about autism, there seemed to be quite _ about autism, there seemed to be quite an— about autism, there seemed to be quite an outcry for more. and we khew— quite an outcry for more. and we knew that — quite an outcry for more. and we knew that we needed to do something -ood knew that we needed to do something good with— knew that we needed to do something good with it. and we were just hoping — good with it. and we were just hoping that people will understand if we can_ hoping that people will understand if we can educate and help, that's all if we can educate and help, that's at! we _ if we can educate and help, that's at! we want — if we can educate and help, that's all we want to do.— if we can educate and help, that's all we want to do. that's the thing, ou learn all we want to do. that's the thing, you learn so _ all we want to do. that's the thing, you learn so much _ all we want to do. that's the thing, you learn so much when _ all we want to do. that's the thing, you learn so much when you - all we want to do. that's the thing, you learn so much when you are i all we want to do. that's the thing, i you learn so much when you are doing a programme at this, and as you learn, you are teaching everyone who is watching. it's about how we learn about the people who live around us. absolutely, as a parent with children with autism, we are still learning everything all day. we learning everything all day. we learn something everyday. when we got the diagnosis, i was doing that thing of going down the rabbit hole of google, trying to find out everything. it's only when other people start talking about it, that
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helped me, you think, i'm not on my own. there are plenty of people to talk to and share information and everything else. that was one of the things that triggered us to do the documentary. i thought, things that triggered us to do the documentary. ithought, if things that triggered us to do the documentary. i thought, if someone can watch it and think, do you know what, actually, that is us, and it will get better, or, there is something we can do about it, we are doing something right. it’s something we can do about it, we are doing something right.— doing something right. it's so true, i imaaine doing something right. it's so true, i imagine it — doing something right. it's so true, i imagine it can _ doing something right. it's so true, i imagine it can be _ doing something right. it's so true, i imagine it can be overwhelming . i imagine it can be overwhelming with that first diagnosis. if you were talking to someone now and you had to explain to them what this means for yourfamily and had to explain to them what this means for your family and also as a means for your family and also as a means for yourfamily, in means for your family and also as a means for your family, in simple terms, what would you say, how would you explain it to someone who doesn't know anything? in you explain it to someone who doesn't know anything? in simple terms? i don't _ doesn't know anything? in simple terms? i don't think... _ doesn't know anything? in simple terms? i don't think... i- doesn't know anything? in simple terms? i don't think... i don't - terms? i don't think... i don't think there is a simple way of putting it! it's a different way of looking at the world. and every child is different with autism. i can't... ~., child is different with autism. i can't... , �* child is different with autism. i can't. .. maybe you can't explain it. the spectrum _
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can't. .. maybe you can't explain it. the spectrum is — can't. .. maybe you can't explain it. the spectrum is massive _ can't. .. maybe you can't explain it. the spectrum is massive and - can't. .. maybe you can't explain it. the spectrum is massive and we i can't. .. maybe you can't explain it. i the spectrum is massive and we have tried to _ the spectrum is massive and we have tried to cover— the spectrum is massive and we have tried to cover that on the show. it's tried to cover that on the show. it's hard — tried to cover that on the show. it's hard to— tried to cover that on the show. it's hard to cover loosely everything, we wish you could have done _ everything, we wish you could have done absolutely a lot more. —— it hard _ done absolutely a lot more. —— it hard to— done absolutely a lot more. —— it hard to cover _ done absolutely a lot more. —— it hard to cover absolutely everything, we wish _ hard to cover absolutely everything, we wish we — hard to cover absolutely everything, we wish we could have covered more. if we wish we could have covered more. if you _ we wish we could have covered more. if you meet _ we wish we could have covered more. if you meet one person with autism, you have _ if you meet one person with autism, you have met one, not everyone. i'm autistic— you have met one, not everyone. i'm autistic myself, our three children are autistic, — autistic myself, our three children are autistic, but we did don't define — are autistic, but we did don't define autism. there are people who are going _ define autism. there are people who are going to— define autism. there are people who are going to be non—verbal to the rest of— are going to be non—verbal to the rest of the — are going to be non—verbal to the rest of the lives, and then there are high— rest of the lives, and then there are high functioning who well go out and have _ are high functioning who well go out and have relationships and children and have relationships and children and have _ and have relationships and children and have jobs. everyone is individual and unique and we are all different _ individual and unique and we are all different. it�*s individual and unique and we are all different. �* , ., individual and unique and we are all different. �* , . , �* different. it's that thing, isn't it? we are — different. it's that thing, isn't it? we are both _ different. it's that thing, isn't it? we are both parents, - different. it's that thing, isn'tl it? we are both parents, when different. it's that thing, isn't - it? we are both parents, when you've got kids, you wonder what they're going to be like when they grow up. that's something that you both speak very openly and honest about. you want to know whether your kids can have a fulfilled life when they are older. �* ., ., , have a fulfilled life when they are older. 1, ., , .,, , older. both of us as parents, were not really eating _ older. both of us as parents, were
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not really eating up _ older. both of us as parents, were not really eating up with _ older. both of us as parents, were not really eating up with what - older. both of us as parents, were| not really eating up with what they want to do as a career, we want them to have independence. they are always going to need some kind of support around them, that's the biggest worry for us. when they guess —— get older, how they will cope with certain things. we do everything as it later on in life, they will have all the opportunities they will have all the opportunities they deserve, really. taste they will have all the opportunities they deserve, really.— they will have all the opportunities they deserve, really. we want them to be understood, _ they deserve, really. we want them to be understood, that's _ they deserve, really. we want them to be understood, that's the - to be understood, that's the biggest reason _ to be understood, that's the biggest reason we _ to be understood, that's the biggest reason we are doing this show. we want _ reason we are doing this show. we want our— reason we are doing this show. we want our children to grow up in a world— want our children to grow up in a world that — want our children to grow up in a world that understand them and accept _ world that understand them and accept them and include them. you mentioned your _ accept them and include them. tm. mentioned your own diagnosis. that was quite a race and then, is that right? how did you get to that point? right? how did you get to that oint? ~ ., right? how did you get to that oint? ~ . ., , ., point? we have always got the ruestion point? we have always got the question of— point? we have always got the question of why _ point? we have always got the question of why we _ point? we have always got the question of why we had - point? we have always got the question of why we had three i question of why we had three autistic— question of why we had three autistic children and we knew they could _ autistic children and we knew they could be _ autistic children and we knew they could be a — autistic children and we knew they could be a genetic link. it has been apparent _ could be a genetic link. it has been apparent for years between us, we have discussed it, little things, i have _ have discussed it, little things, i have got— have discussed it, little things, i have got in— have discussed it, little things, i have got in common with the children. _ have got in common with the children, its vast we were filming i decided _ children, its vast we were filming i decided to— children, its vast we were filming i decided to go and do it and have an assessment. it took a while. it is
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quite _ assessment. it took a while. it is quite an— assessment. it took a while. it is quite an in—depth assessment and i was diagnosed with autism in august. it was diagnosed with autism in august. it has _ was diagnosed with autism in august. it has been _ was diagnosed with autism in august. it has been quite a big relief. it's helped _ it has been quite a big relief. it's helped a — it has been quite a big relief. it's helped a lot. it has opened up a lot of conversation between us which is great _ of conversation between us which is great i_ of conversation between us which is areat. ., _, ., of conversation between us which is areat. ., ., ., ., great. i would encourage anyone to net that, great. i would encourage anyone to get that. if— great. i would encourage anyone to get that, if anyone _ great. i would encourage anyone to get that, if anyone in _ great. i would encourage anyone to get that, if anyone in their - great. i would encourage anyone to get that, if anyone in their family, | get that, if anyone in their family, or they think of themselves, little things before the kids were born, me and christine, stuff you get on with and christine, stuff you get on with and you think, that's just us. we go to restaurants and christine would ask me to order for her. you feel a bit like that overbearing husband, my wife will have the fish! you don't need to speak to her, speak to me! even though i felt awkward doing it, we decided to do it. looking back now, all of these little things, they'll added up to where we are up to now. you things, they'll added up to where we are up to now— are up to now. you talk in the clip there about _ are up to now. you talk in the clip there about that _ are up to now. you talk in the clip there about that issue _ are up to now. you talk in the clip there about that issue of - are up to now. you talk in the clip there about that issue of knowing | there about that issue of knowing whether your kids understand that you love them as much as you do. and they love you in return. has not always been the issue for you? you
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said in the clip that is something you struggled with for a long time. yeah, growing up myself in a single—parent household, my mum loved me to bits, i know she did but it wasn't a household where it was mentioned a lot. there wasn't a lot of, i love you, all that carry on. so now, i go overboard with it with my kids. they are sick of me telling me i love them. obviously as time goes on, and you learn anything else, at the beginning, i thought, i hope they know how loved they are. t hope they know how loved they are. i think where that came from with patrick. — think where that came from with patrick, it's quite common for autistic— patrick, it's quite common for autistic people to struggle with understanding emotions. you have heard _ understanding emotions. you have heard that — understanding emotions. you have heard that somewhere and he has got " gone. _ heard that somewhere and he has got -- gone, i_ heard that somewhere and he has got —— gone, i hope they know how much they are _ —— gone, i hope they know how much they are loved. i -- gone, i hope they know how much they are loved-— they are loved. i imagine when you do aet they are loved. i imagine when you do get that — they are loved. i imagine when you do get that moment _ they are loved. i imagine when you do get that moment when - they are loved. i imagine when you do get that moment when the - they are loved. i imagine when you | do get that moment when the penny drops, there must be magical when you see them respond to you. drops, there must be magicalwhen you see them respond to you. yeah,
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it is. all three _ you see them respond to you. yeah, it is. all three of _ you see them respond to you. yeah, it is. all three of my _ you see them respond to you. yeah, it is. all three of my children - you see them respond to you. yeah, it is. all three of my children are - it is. all three of my children are different. penelope, my oldest daughter, she says she loves you, it's like, oh, hi five moment. that's because of how she is, her personality. she is does not naturally an out there child. felicity and leo are the opposite, they will sate all the time. it's just kids at the end of the day. what sort of response have you had and what do you hope people will take away? it and what do you hope people will take away?— take away? it has been quite overwhelming, _ take away? it has been quite overwhelming, it's _ take away? it has been quite overwhelming, it's been - take away? it has been quite - overwhelming, it's been amazing from people _ overwhelming, it's been amazing from people for— overwhelming, it's been amazing from people for me. from when we started talking _ people for me. from when we started talking about our children being autistic, — talking about our children being autistic, i— talking about our children being autistic, i have been inundated with messages _ autistic, i have been inundated with messages from parents who feel like they have _ messages from parents who feel like they have got no one to talk to and no one _ they have got no one to talk to and no one understands. unless you have -ot no one understands. unless you have got autistic _ no one understands. unless you have got autistic children, it is hard to truly— got autistic children, it is hard to truly understand what it's like for us. truly understand what it's like for us and _ truly understand what it's like for us and it's— truly understand what it's like for us. and it's different for every family— us. and it's different for every family anyway. it has been really positive, — family anyway. it has been really positive, hasn't it? we family anyway. it has been really positive, hasn't it?— family anyway. it has been really positive, hasn't it? we are exactly the same as _ positive, hasn't it? we are exactly the same as those _
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positive, hasn't it? we are exactly the same as those parents, - positive, hasn't it? we are exactly the same as those parents, we i positive, hasn't it? we are exactly| the same as those parents, we are still looking and understanding for help and understanding and little things that will improve our children's lives. if we are in air quotes celebrities who have fantastic lives, and we are struggling, fitting that on camera, people will think, —— putting that on camera, people will think, it's ok to talk about it. but we don't have the answers. we are not saying, we will help you out. taste have the answers. we are not saying, we will help you out.— we will help you out. we are not exert we will help you out. we are not expert on _ we will help you out. we are not expert on autism, _ we will help you out. we are not expert on autism, we _ we will help you out. we are not expert on autism, we are - we will help you out. we are not expert on autism, we are just i expert on autism, we are just parents _ expert on autism, we are 'ust arents. �* ., , , parents. but also, it can be very frustrating _ parents. but also, it can be very frustrating for _ parents. but also, it can be very frustrating for parents _ parents. but also, it can be very frustrating for parents and - parents. but also, it can be very i frustrating for parents and carers. depending on where you live in the country, you can get better access to care, assessments much more quickly than other areas. like to care, assessments much more quickly than other areas.- to care, assessments much more quickly than other areas. like a lot of thins, quickly than other areas. like a lot of things, which _ quickly than other areas. like a lot of things, which is _ quickly than other areas. like a lot of things, which is a _ quickly than other areas. like a lot of things, which is a shame, - quickly than other areas. like a lot of things, which is a shame, it - quickly than other areas. like a lot of things, which is a shame, it is i quickly than other areas. like a lot of things, which is a shame, it is a| of things, which is a shame, it is a postcode lottery. even the diagnosis. some parents can be waiting two years. it diagnosis. some parents can be waiting two years.— diagnosis. some parents can be waiting two years. it can be seven ears in waiting two years. it can be seven years in some _ waiting two years. it can be seven years in some places. _ waiting two years. it can be seven years in some places. that's - waiting two years. it can be seven years in some places. that's a - years in some places. that's a massive amount _ years in some places. that's a
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massive amount of _ years in some places. that's a massive amount of time - years in some places. that's a massive amount of time for i years in some places. that's a i massive amount of time for your child not to progress and get the help they need. they has —— that has got to change. the help they need. they has -- that has got to change-— got to change. the more that it is talked about, _ got to change. the more that it is talked about, people _ got to change. the more that it is talked about, people can - got to change. the more that it is talked about, people can spot - got to change. the more that it is talked about, people can spot it i talked about, people can spot it earlier, — talked about, people can spot it earlier, we knew a lot about autism by the _ earlier, we knew a lot about autism by the time — earlier, we knew a lot about autism by the time we had our third child, she was— by the time we had our third child, she was diagnosed quicker and easier because _ she was diagnosed quicker and easier because we _ she was diagnosed quicker and easier because we knew what we were looking for. because we knew what we were looking for~ if _ because we knew what we were looking for~ if we _ because we knew what we were looking for. if we knew nothing about it, she might — for. if we knew nothing about it, she might not have been diagnosed yet. earty— she might not have been diagnosed yet. early intervention is key and it made — yet. early intervention is key and it made a — yet. early intervention is key and it made a huge difference for us. were _ it made a huge difference for us. were you — it made a huge difference for us. were you surprised when you are making the documentary, did you find, listening to what you are saying, did you find that may be some people did not want to talk about it so much at first? and by talking about it in an over way that you have, you have helped people? yeah... �* ., , you have, you have helped people? yeah...�* ., y,, ., ., yeah... i'm only speaking as a dad now. i yeah. .. i'm only speaking as a dad now- i think— yeah... i'm only speaking as a dad now. i think blokes _ yeah... i'm only speaking as a dad now. i think blokes struggle - yeah... i'm only speaking as a dad now. i think blokes struggle a - yeah... i'm only speaking as a dad now. i think blokes struggle a bit i now. i think blokes struggle a bit more. and i did, and i threw myself into work because i thought, i'm a man, i'll work. that's what i do, i
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will provide for them. but it's not all about that. and i think it's important for dads to sort of not feel bad, because right at the beginning, we talk about it at the documentary, i ended up being diagnosed with clinical depression. but i didn't realise that, because i kept so much bottled up. i got up and every day now with my kids, —— i gothelp, every day with my kids, it's not like a disney movie where everyone is dancing around the house! but it is so much better now because i started talking about it. we have said that in all areas of life, it makes a difference. if you can talk to someone about how you are feeling and those emotions impacting on other people as well, it makes a huge change for so many. definitely, wejust it makes a huge change for so many. definitely, we just hope it makes a huge change for so many. definitely, wejust hope it it makes a huge change for so many. definitely, we just hope it helps someone — definitely, we just hope it helps someone somewhere. i�*m definitely, we just hope it helps someone somewhere.— definitely, we just hope it helps someone somewhere. i'm sure it will and i'm sure — someone somewhere. i'm sure it will and i'm sure you _ someone somewhere. i'm sure it will and i'm sure you will— someone somewhere. i'm sure it will and i'm sure you will get _ someone somewhere. i'm sure it will and i'm sure you will get a _ someone somewhere. i'm sure it will and i'm sure you will get a lot - someone somewhere. i'm sure it will and i'm sure you will get a lot of - and i'm sure you will get a lot of messages and we will get a lot of
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messages and we will get a lot of messages this morning. 'paddy and christine mcguinness: our family and autism' airs on wednesday 1st december at 9pm on bbc one and on the bbc iplayer. thank you so much for coming. thank ou. what thank you so much for coming. thank you- what time _ thank you so much for coming. thank you. what time is _ thank you so much for coming. thank you. what time is it? _ thank you so much for coming. thank you. what time is it? 8:49am. - the boss of iceland has said that his staff will not be forcing shoppers to wear masks despite the introduction of new covid—i9 rules in england. from today they will be mandatory in shops and on public transport. iceland chairman richard walkerjoins us now. great to see you. tell me what the advice is that you are giving to staff in iceland shops today? it’s staff in iceland shops today? it's uuite staff in iceland shops today? it�*s quite simple. we will politely ask customers, via a window poster and install necessary, to wear a mask. —— and within the store if necessary. we fully support the introduction of compulsory face masks. this isn't a question of whether we should mandate face
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masks, it's whether we can. ultimately we will politely ask customers but i will not be asking mike store colleagues to police those who refuse to wear one. haste those who refuse to wear one. have ou in the those who refuse to wear one. have you in the past— those who refuse to wear one. have you in the past or— those who refuse to wear one. have you in the past or have _ those who refuse to wear one. have you in the past or have you - you in the past or have you struggled with your staff, have they struggled with your staff, have they struggled asking people to put a mask on in stores?— struggled asking people to put a mask on in stores? certainly in our business, mask on in stores? certainly in our business. we _ mask on in stores? certainly in our business, we have _ mask on in stores? certainly in our business, we have around - mask on in stores? certainly in our business, we have around 4000 i business, we have around 4000 reported incidences of verbal abuse each year. that increased significantly during the first lockdown, and our staff received over 50 instances of abuse every week. since we stopped asking staff to challenge customers, that has dropped down to only five per week. that is replicated across the whole industry. recent research by unite found that over 90% of retail workers have either been assaulted, threatened or abused in the last 12 months. this is a big problem. our
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staff have been heroic, keeping food on the table and the shelves stacked throughout the pandemic and i will not be putting them in harm's way. so what advice are you giving to staff about what they are able to say? if they are not comfortable about people not wearing masks in a store, what can they do? thea;r about people not wearing masks in a store, what can they do?— store, what can they do? they can ask them. — store, what can they do? they can ask them. and _ store, what can they do? they can ask them, and avoid _ store, what can they do? they can ask them, and avoid the _ store, what can they do? they can | ask them, and avoid the customers wherever possible. this is a divisive issue. and i'm aware that it is a bit of a lightning rod issue for some people, for some bizarre reason. i think the government has done well to act so quickly and like i said, i do support it. but ultimately the government must step in and help businesses like iceland to enforce the wearing of masks if thatis to enforce the wearing of masks if that is what they need. we do spend millions on security each year. but the scale of this issue is such that
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we cannot police every store every hour of every day, it would cost millions per week and quite frankly put us out of business. itruthat millions per week and quite frankly put us out of business. what would ou like put us out of business. what would you like the — put us out of business. what would you like the government _ put us out of business. what would you like the government to - put us out of business. what would you like the government to do? - put us out of business. what would you like the government to do? i l you like the government to do? i think the government has been you like the government to do? t think the government has been fairly clear, and just now, i heard that they are not looking for us to police it ourselves, they are looking for common sense. if that is the case, fine. we'll need to use a bit ofjudgment in this issue. if theyjust want people to be sensible, the vast majority of our customers will adhere to to it. it is crucial to rebuild consumer confidence in the high street. and make people feel safe in store, and if they do not, we have opened up 100,000 delivery slot every day so people can shop online. there are a number of different ways consumers can shop with us, either online or
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in high street store. i think that is probably a good compromise. richard walker, managing director of iceland foods, thank you. {so richard walker, managing director of iceland foods, thank you.— iceland foods, thank you. go on, do it. it's time for us to brush up on our curling knowledge. glad you liked that. so with stones, broom and stick at the ready we've sent our reporter fiona lamdin to an event in london where they're trying to get more people to try the sport. good morning, welcome to the curling club. as you can see, it is filling up, people are here ready to curl, it has even been snowing here overnight. our name is on the board, bbc breakfast, we are all ready to play. we have been getting some tips from an olympian first of all. in central london, novice curlers are transported to an alpine village high in the alps. there's three curling rinks and tonight carolyn and her daughter naomi are trying the sport for the first time.
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we've always been a pretty sporty family, we like running, we both play netball. you also do lacrosse. so, yeah, we're always on the lookout really for new sports. do you think you might take up curling? well, you are pretty good! so i might push her to carry it on. you're saying the next olympics? yeah, four years? three years. that's enough time. and it's backed by eve muirhead. three—time olympian and the current team gb skip. she fell in love with the sport when she was nine years old, watching her dad play. you know what you're like when you're small and you're watching your dad play a sport, you want to just be part of that sport, don't you? you want to be on there and give it a go and that's exactly what we did. just this weekend, she and her team won gold for scotland in the european world championships in norway. we've trained very hard. it is hard work, and i think when you get medals round your neck and you're standing on top
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of the podium, itjust shows you that all that hard work is worth it. now training for the winter olympics, she hopes the curling club will attract more people to the sport she loves. i do think it's a great way of getting people involved in the sport. and for me, i'm always wanting to get young people involved as well. and i think if we can get girls and boys involved in curling at a young age, then hopefully in a few years' time, there will be more people who are hopefully representing their country and then going on to great things. if you just use the weight of the stone and gravity, then you can get it down to the end. having myself never been on a curling rink before, i needed some tips. there you go, you got that in the house. curling is an inaccessible, underexposed sport. the relevance is only every four years when the winter olympics comes in and we are just safeguarding the future and for people to have a lot of fun. nicknamed as chess on ice, due to the strategy and teamwork that goes into the game, they're just hoping this taster is enough to get people hooked.
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well, kez is here, she is a coach, took me to the rules of the game? this is a shorter and fished part of the rules of the same. you want to get your stone into the house at the end, the circle. and you slide it along the sheet and get your stone is near to the red button as possible. is near to the red button as possible-— is near to the red button as ossible. , . ., ., , ., possible. they are heavier than you think. you possible. they are heavier than you think- you go. _ possible. they are heavier than you think. you go, then _ possible. they are heavier than you think. you go, then i _ possible. they are heavier than you think. you go, then i will— possible. they are heavier than you think. you go, then i will go. - think. you go, then i will go. nicely done. let's see if i can knock you out. oh, too much power! how have you found people have been finding it, the girl by dynamic? tt finding it, the girl by dynamic? tt has been so much fun, not a lot of people have done this before so it is neutral territory. the girls are a bit more strategic, so they tend to win more. the boys will power it and go to heavy.
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to win more. the boys will power it and go to heavy-— and go to heavy. let's meet will, ste ed and go to heavy. let's meet will, stepped across — and go to heavy. let's meet will, stepped across the _ and go to heavy. let's meet will, stepped across the sheet, - and go to heavy. let's meet will, stepped across the sheet, this i and go to heavy. let's meet will, stepped across the sheet, this is| stepped across the sheet, this is not ice so you are not in danger! tell us where the idea came from. about 20 years ago, rhona martin was guiding _ about 20 years ago, rhona martin was guiding team gb to olympic gold in salt lake _ guiding team gb to olympic gold in salt lake city. and from there, every _ salt lake city. and from there, every four— salt lake city. and from there, every four years, the nation seemed to gather— every four years, the nation seemed to gather in — every four years, the nation seemed to gather in this amazing concept and game — to gather in this amazing concept and game called curling. we are here today— and game called curling. we are here today to _ and game called curling. we are here today to offer a younger demographic an opportunity to play the game in a shorter, _ an opportunity to play the game in a shorter, faster version. 50 an opportunity to play the game in a shorter, faster version.— shorter, faster version. so you 'ust don't shorter, faster version. so you 'ust don-t want — shorter, faster version. so you 'ust don-t want to fl shorter, faster version. so you 'ust don't want to see i shorter, faster version. so you 'ust don't want to see the i shorter, faster version. so you 'ust don't want to see the sport i shorter, faster version. so you 'ust don't want to see the sport dieh shorter, faster version. so you just l don't want to see the sport die out? exactly, curling rinks across the nation _ exactly, curling rinks across the nation are — exactly, curling rinks across the nation are dropping off. there are a number— nation are dropping off. there are a number in _ nation are dropping off. there are a number in scotland that there are very few— number in scotland that there are very few in — number in scotland that there are very few in england. so we're here at the— very few in england. so we're here at the langham london now, and we are in— at the langham london now, and we are in finsbury square as of tomorrow— are in finsbury square as of tomorrow for the next few weeks, and we are _ tomorrow for the next few weeks, and we are here _ tomorrow for the next few weeks, and we are here to promote what is food,
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drink— we are here to promote what is food, drink and _ we are here to promote what is food, drink and curling, ultimately. have ou found drink and curling, ultimately. have you found with _ drink and curling, ultimately. have you found with covid, _ drink and curling, ultimately. the: you found with covid, people have found they have spent so long is a real appetite for people to socialise again and do it in a safe outdoor space?— socialise again and do it in a safe outdoor space? sure, it has been a reall had outdoor space? sure, it has been a really had 18 _ outdoor space? sure, it has been a really had 18 months. _ outdoor space? sure, it has been a really had 18 months. and - outdoor space? sure, it has been a really had 18 months. and we - outdoor space? sure, it has been a really had 18 months. and we as i outdoor space? sure, it has been a really had 18 months. and we as a | really had 18 months. and we as a concept _ really had 18 months. and we as a concept of— really had 18 months. and we as a concept of bringing people back together. the numbers that we have seen coming through the doors is fantastic. — seen coming through the doors is fantastic, and ultimately is a team game _ fantastic, and ultimately is a team game. anyone can have a go. and with a few— game. anyone can have a go. and with a few other— game. anyone can have a go. and with a few other elements, actors and all sortst _ a few other elements, actors and all sorts, it's _ a few other elements, actors and all sorts, it's really fun. so a few other elements, actors and all sorts, it's really fun.— sorts, it's really fun. so let's do some curling! _ sorts, it's really fun. so let's do some curling! i _ sorts, it's really fun. so let's do some curling! i must _ sorts, it's really fun. so let's do some curling! i must to - sorts, it's really fun. so let's do some curling! i must to say - sorts, it's really fun. so let's do some curling! i must to say at i sorts, it's really fun. so let's do i some curling! i must to say at this point, dan, idid some curling! i must to say at this point, dan, i did notice you say that i am doing tenpin bowling but just have a look at this. let's have another go. before we go, we all have a very special message for you here. ahead of saturday, everyone.
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keep curling!— keep curling! right on the button! thank ou keep curling! right on the button! thank you very — keep curling! right on the button! thank you very much _ keep curling! right on the button! thank you very much for - keep curling! right on the button! thank you very much for that. - keep curling! right on the button! thank you very much for that. i i keep curling! right on the button! | thank you very much for that. i will definitely keep curling.— definitely keep curling. looking forward to that. _ definitely keep curling. looking forward to that. i _ definitely keep curling. looking forward to that. i might - definitely keep curling. looking forward to that. i might say - definitely keep curling. looking | forward to that. i might say that definitely keep curling. looking - forward to that. i might say that on saturday instead _ forward to that. i might say that on saturday instead of _ forward to that. i might say that on saturday instead of keep _ forward to that. i might say that on saturday instead of keep curling i forward to that. i might say that on saturday instead of keep curling -- saturday instead of keep curling —— keep dancing, i will get a scale from tess daly! you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines: face mask rules return in england — in efforts to combat the spread of the omicron variant later today — borisjohnson will set out plans to accelerate the boosterjab programme — with all adults in the uk to be offered a third vaccine. what that will do is basically increase your general levels of immunity which we hope will, to some extent, counter the potential drop in vaccine effectiveness we might find with this variant. travel rules also change from today— anyone coming into the uk now needs to take a pcr test and self—isolate until they get a negative result. with new restrictions coming in to slow down the spread of the new variant of covid how do you feel about the reintroduction
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of mandatory mask wearing in england?

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