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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 29, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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a m—year—old, who murdered schoolboy keon lincoln, has been jailed for at least 16 years. british socialite ghislaine maxwell goes on trial in new york — accused of trafficking under—age girls, for herformer lover, jeffrey epstein. after 400 years, barbados removes the queen as its head of state, to become the world's, newest republic. and twitter�*s co—founder and ceo jack dorsey has stepped down with immediate effect. good evening and welcome to bbc news, i'm shaun ley.
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as the world watches and waits to see the impact of the omicron covid variant, here boosterjabs are to be offered to everyone over 18. the gap between the second vaccine dose and the booster will be cut from 6 months to three. and all twelve to fifteen year olds will now be offered a second vaccine dose. the government's deputy chief medical officer jonathan van tam says it's pretty likely that vaccine effectiveness will be reduced by the new variant but hopefully only to a small extent when it comes to preventing severe disease. as the number of cases increase in the uk and around the world, scientists believe it will take about three weeks to understand the effects of omicron. our health editor hugh pym has the latest. boosting the boosters, like those being given in derby today. that's now the official response to the new variant. experts have told ministers that, as well as all adults being offered boosterjabs, the gap between the second dose
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and the next should be slashed to three months. the message is that, with the chance the vaccines won't be so effective against omicron, more immunity is needed. we therefore want to provide boosters early enough such that it is before any possible wave. i'm not here predicting that there will be a wave of the new variant, but should there be a wave we want to be in the best possible position. that urgency, he said, was why the time between second and third doses should be cut, and a three—month gap would still mean good protection. we asked people in birmingham for their reaction. as soon as we can get everybody vaccinated then we can make everywhere safer and more places can open up. it reaches out to younger people and if it helps then it's— a positive thing, really. with a few cases of the new variant being confirmed in scotland as well as england,
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the first minister made clear there was a need for extra caution. while we all hope the emerging understanding of it will reduce rather than increase our level of concern, there is no doubt this presents potentially the most challenging development in the course of the pandemic for quite some time. at westminster the health secretary explained why new restrictions were needed, including tougher rules on face coverings in england. we're building our defences and putting these measures in place without delay. scientists are working at speed, at home and abroad, to determine whether this variant is more dangerous. and i can assure the house that if it emerges that this variant is no more dangerous than the delta variant, then we won't keep measures in place for a day longer than necessary. but labour said the government should have gone further. keeping masks in place would always have been our plan a.
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will the secretary of state extend the use of masks to hospitality and other settings? or does covid not spread in pubs? the new rules on masks in shops and on public transport in england will come into line with the rest of the uk tomorrow. this butcher in louth in lincolnshire isn't happy. many, many people are now fed up of the situation and don't really know whether they agree with the masking situation so you are going to have problems with customers facing each other. children at an essex school are being tested because of a link to a new variant case. more generally, face masks are being recommended in communal areas at secondaries and communal colleges in england. they're already required in scottish schools. so there's a lot for the health service to think about as they're asked to ramp up the roll—out of the vaccination booster programme, and care for patients as winter sets in. until more is known about the new variant the nhs can only focus on patients coming through the doors,
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and although hospitals are under a lot of pressure, covid numbers are well down on this time last year, and considerably lower than injanuary — largely thanks to the success of the vaccines. these are uncertain times, but while officials argue it's not all doom and gloom, some ministers have been stressing people should plan for christmas as normal. hugh pym, bbc news. wales first minister mark drakeford says people should take precautions when they make their christmas plans this year. he's also said that the welsh vaccination team has put together a plan to provide booster doses to all adults, three months after they have had their second dose. our vaccination team has been very successful during the pandemic, we were meeting all through the weekend. i have met with them today, they have done a remarkable job already, putting together a plan to respond to the latest advice from the jcvi. there is more work to do on it, of course, with our partners in the local health boards. we will want to move as fast
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as we can and if there is any advice to people in wales, it is this, if you have not had a vaccination already, come forward now and be vaccinated. if you have been invited for a booster, make that your priority and under the circumstances we are facing, vaccination remains the most powerful defence we have. we will want to maximise what we can make of that here in wales. professor saul faust is the chief investigator of the trial and the director of the southampton nihr clinical research facility. thank you very much for being with us and it is good to talk to you again. let us talk about the background to the work you have been doing, what have you been trying to assess? we know it has been in the news quite widely for coming up to a year, orwe news quite widely for coming up to a year, or we are the stage to have enough real time evidence of the
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impact on all the groups that would not have featured in some of the trials. if not have featured in some of the trials. , ., ~' not have featured in some of the trials. i. ~ . ~ ., trials. if you think back to when we started the — trials. if you think back to when we started the trial, _ trials. if you think back to when we started the trial, we _ trials. if you think back to when we started the trial, we enrolled - started the trial, we enrolled people injune who had pfizer or astrazeneca at the beginning of the programme and what we were studying is whether we could give one of the covid vaccinations that have been approved are some that are not approved are some that are not approved as the third dose and we got a lot of the data available and ready for the jcvi in august so they could make decisions about the programme and that has further been used today to make decisions to bring down that gap between the second and third doses and in the trial that we did, again people might remember that we got the data at the end of the summer and we did only have a 10— 12 week gap between the second and third dose. we have already tested that and that is the
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basis for some of the safety data that has been used. in fact, the results of the trial will probably be out later or in full later on this week, but we cannot talk about them in detail until then. this week, but we cannot talk about them in detail untilthen. i this week, but we cannot talk about them in detail until then.— them in detail untilthen. i quite understand. _ them in detail untilthen. i quite understand, it _ them in detail untilthen. i quite understand, it is _ them in detail untilthen. i quite understand, it is helpful- them in detail untilthen. i quite understand, it is helpful to - them in detail untilthen. i quite understand, it is helpfulto havei understand, it is helpful to have the background. in light of the announcements made today, can i ask you, the thing i suppose people will be worried about in terms of their protection from infection is if you accelerate, does that mean you will have to have more doses? in terms of over a year, notjust obviously you will need more, but you see what i am saying. i will need more, but you see what i am saying-— am saying. i don't think we know that at this _ am saying. i don't think we know that at this stage _ am saying. i don't think we know that at this stage and _ am saying. i don't think we know that at this stage and i _ am saying. i don't think we know that at this stage and i think - am saying. i don't think we know that at this stage and i think one | that at this stage and i think one of the things that we and other people are keeping a very close eye on is the relationship between the antibodies that give us immunity immediately now and that he sells that are an indicator perhaps of our memory, immunological memory and ability to remember different forms
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of covid in the future and we have got lots and lots of people in many different trials now, many of whom are still contributing blood samples on a regular basis and we will gather that data going forward and what we have to do right now, as the deputy chief medical officer was explaining today, is to make sure that people are as protected as possible for the winter period and maximise that going forward. of course, the higher you boost people now, the longer it will take to reduce down and of course, we don't normally have so much of a problem in the summer months. i normally have so much of a problem in the summer months.— normally have so much of a problem in the summer months. i was talking to claire bennett _ in the summer months. i was talking to claire bennett from _ in the summer months. i was talking to claire bennett from the _ to claire bennett from the university of cambridge yesterday and she reminded us that one of the things that with the original source, coronaviruses part of the family, new variants appeared and eventually they had a variant that was spreading easily but was not anything like as dangerous and at the minute, doctor think omicron is spreading rapidly but may not be as
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dangerous, but we do not know it at this stage. there is room for optimism amid all the gloom, isn't there? i optimism amid all the gloom, isn't there? ~ ., , , there? i think that is right. it is not so gloomy. _ there? i think that is right. it is not so gloomy, many _ there? i think that is right. it is not so gloomy, many of - there? i think that is right. it is not so gloomy, many of us, - there? i think that is right. it is i not so gloomy, many of us, many people are many health care professionals have been waiting for masks on trains and buses and indoors for some time, because of the pressure on the health service, and i think we are at a steady state and i think we are at a steady state and you are right and your interviewee yesterday was right, what normally happens in a pandemic is overtime things settle down and pandemics last around three years in history. we are not out of the woods yet, we need to through this winter, but people should really, if you're offered a booster, everyone over 18, for the young people, 12— 15 who are now able to get a second dose after three months, i think all of us would encourage people to take up
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these offers and maximise your own protection but also your own ability to transmit the different forms of coronavirus to other people. can i ask a brief— coronavirus to other people. can i ask a brief final _ coronavirus to other people. can i ask a brief final question, - coronavirus to other people. can i ask a brief final question, as - coronavirus to other people. can i ask a brief final question, as a - ask a brief final question, as a paediatrician, giving that is your background, are you pleased with how children have both reacted to the vaccination and also the kind of general levels of their ability to deal with this infection when they get it? i deal with this infection when they . et it? 4' ., , get it? i think from the beginning ofthe get it? i think from the beginning of the pandemic, _ get it? i think from the beginning of the pandemic, all— get it? i think from the beginning of the pandemic, all of— get it? i think from the beginning of the pandemic, all of us - get it? i think from the beginning | of the pandemic, all of us working in paediatrics have been really grateful that children are not as affected as adults, otherwise we would have been in much bigger trouble, but i think the more infectious variance, the variant such as delta that transmit more, or a reason that we might immunise teenagers now that we know that the vaccinations are safe. remember, at the end of the summer holidays we were still worrying a lot more about the incidence of myocarditis and how quickly we should give people second
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doses, but i think what the mhra and thejcvi are saying is there's a lot more data and we can be more confident and advise parents and young people that they can safely go and get their second dose after the three and that will help reduce the transmission and spread, notjust in schools, but in families and in society as well. let us be clear, as paediatricians we have been pretty upset by the fact that we have effectively been discriminating against children, of all kinds and all ages as we have restricted them and tested them while adults have basically given up on the pandemic and i really think we have a responsibility as adults in our community now to use masks, the coronavirus seriously and get our boosters and hopefully by next summer we will be heading towards the end of the pandemic.
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the government's latest coronavirus figures show there were 42,583 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. on average, there were just over 43—thousand new cases reported per day in the last week. the latest figures show there were 7,530 people in hospital being treated for coronavirus on friday. 35 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 120 covid—related deaths were recorded every day. on vaccinations, nearly 17 point 9 million people have now had a boosterjab.
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and at 8.30 we'll be putting your questions about the omicron variant to the experts. join us for your questions answered with professor of virology at the university of nottingham jonathan ball and professor of medicine at the university of east anglia paul hunter. some breaking news. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, has been reshuffling his shadow cabinet. yvette cooper returns to the front bench, with key appointments for david lammy, bridget phillipson and wes streeting. let's speak to our correspondent in westminster, chris mason. chris, you have had a long day of this. eversince chris, you have had a long day of this. ever since those stories first broke when you were listening to angela rayner, the odd thing about this is it is the second reshuffle in a matter of months and it is the second one where everyone has been talking about relations between the leader and deputy leader, not the actual reshuffle. that leader and deputy leader, not the actual reshuffle.— actual reshuffle. that is right, that is a pithy— actual reshuffle. that is right, that is a pithy summary - actual reshuffle. that is right, that is a pithy summary of - actual reshuffle. that is right, - that is a pithy summary of labour reshuffles of 2021. there was a bit of a ding dong in the summer when
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there was a more minor reshuffle between sir keir starmer and angela rayner and then another one this morning are bursting out into the open during a speech that angela rayner was giving about parliamentary standards just as the reshuffle was getting under way. she looked pretty bamboozled by it all though there had been a brief meeting beforehand about a reshuffle coming and then we got dribs and drabs, maybe evenjust coming and then we got dribs and drabs, maybe even just drips during the day of detail about the reshuffle until the last hour when we got the whole thing and it is pretty extensive. a pretty significant reshaping of the top team. quite a few people have been promoted, most notably the return of yvette cooper to the labour front bench as shadow home secretary. she will shadow priti patel in a very newsy political brief and if you were mentioning, she spent time chairing the committee that look specifically at the work of the home
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office, so she is across all of the detail of the home office and what priti patel does. that could be really quite something. she is willing to be combative and that can be quite a tussle between priti patel and yvette cooper. a couple of names were focusing on, where is it straight in, big promotion for him, he will be shadow secretary of state for health, recently came back from a period of work having had cancer treatment and he has tweeted and said that the nhs has saved his life and now he is shadowing the work of the health secretary overseen the work of the nhs. a big promotion for him, he was in the shadow cabinet but a less prominent role. also as far as the advancement of relative youth, bridget philipson becoming the shadow education secretary, another big brief in the shadow cabinet and a big promotion as far as prominence as far as she is concerned. a couple of other things
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worth mentioning, lisa nandy is no longer shadow foreign secretary, she will shadow michael gove in the communities department which also does what the government calls levelling up. labour see the whole question of helping out communities that they left behind as absolutely crucial as a battleground ahead of the next election and lisa nandy is seen as one of the better communicators in labour and she moves there. plenty of others, lucy powell, shadow culture secretary, nick thomas—symonds moving to international trade and the whole question of brexit. a couple of other movements elsewhere and no doubt further news to come about the lower ministerial ranks. sir keir starmer is saying he is pleased he has a team that is smaller and leaner, the shadow cabinet was getting rather big at the front bench was absolutely colossal and this involves something of a pruning of the numbers answer keir starmer
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hoping this will be the team that can take him into the next election. as you point out, he did all of this six months ago, albeit on a smaller scale, and has felt the need to do it again. scale, and has felt the need to do it aaain. , , ., scale, and has felt the need to do itaaain. , it again. chris, you will recall, it was a reshuffle _ it again. chris, you will recall, it was a reshuffle with _ it again. chris, you will recall, it was a reshuffle with a _ it again. chris, you will recall, it was a reshuffle with a lot - it again. chris, you will recall, it was a reshuffle with a lot of - it again. chris, you will recall, it was a reshuffle with a lot of bad j was a reshuffle with a lot of bad headlines with almost no changes, this is quite a substantial change. you mentioned yvette cooper, let us say a word for long servers who have come through thick and thin like yvette cooper and one of the only people who survive continuously since the years of tony blair, john healy given prominence as shadow defence secretary which could become quite an important brief. it is interesting — quite an important brief. it is interesting when _ quite an important brief. it 3 interesting when you look back, the rise of relative youth but also those who have been around for a long time, john healy being one of them. those who recall labour's time in government which is increasingly distant and a memory as far as
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parliamentary experience is concerned, did not exist for a number of prominent people now in the labourfold. an attempt number of prominent people now in the labour fold. an attempt as far as sir keir starmer�*s team see it tonight to sharpen up their act, place those who have got good reputations for socking it to the government in places where they can do that most effectively and then blend, i guess, as any political leader attempts to do experience and relative youth, the sort of vim and vigour from those relatively new at the top table, with the experience that only comes from the miles on the clock of the likes ofjohn healy and yvette cooper. such is the significance of this reshuffle that circular will hope will blow away some of those awkward conversations that reporters like they were having with people like you during the day earlier on about the disagreements between the two at the top of the party. angela rayner, as is
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traditional, directly elected by the labour membership, that is one post, however tempting or not it might have been for sir keir starmer to have been for sir keir starmer to have someone else in the post, he cannot do. that is a gate he does not have direct responsibility for. chris mason, thank you, good to speak to you. 66,000 people remain without power in the wake of storm arwen that battered the uk with winds close to 100 miles an hour. (ani)worst affected are these areas of the north east of scotland. all schools in aberdeenshire are closed and they'll stay shut tomorrow. in england, people across the north east, yorkshire and lincolnshire have been affected by power cuts. our north of england correspondent fiona trott reports. are you warm enough? battling the elements. but this is indoors.
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the crosshill nursing home in county durham has been without power for three days —— the crosshill nursing home they are trying to keep warm as they can. a neighbour donated this heater. to get people away from the coldest place you - would ever wish to be in, _ suddenly very cold, from the storm. to come round through the night every hour. how much do you want electricity to come back on? i would love it to come on. i think the staff would, _ because they have had very hard work with it. i don't think some of them have hardly slept much. i some staff are even taking food away to cook it in their own homes. but they are frustrated as well. it would be nice to know how long. if on friday we knew it would be a few days then obviously our contingency would have been different than the fact we are going hour by hour. it is notjust our residents at risk, but it is also the fact we're quite lucky because we are all together and have a lovely community. what about the poor vulnerable person who lives on their own and knows about? the people who they are going to find in a few days having not
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unfortunately survive this? we really feel for our customers in the circumstances and our team are really doing their best to get the lights back on so i ask for people to be patient with us. we are really trying very best to help them and we are going to be there for them and we will keep them informed as to how we go. the effects of storm arwen are felt across the uk. at this nature reserve in berwickshire, around 800 grey seals have perished. in aberdeenshire residents into our thin are bracing themselves for a third cold night. stores have been set up with hot food and drinks. in abergele and conway itv have confirmed that i'm a celebrity programme will be scrapped for a third night while work continues to repair damage there. back at the nursing home, more help has arrived. a massive generator donated by the local funfair. i would just like to give something back. idon't mind.
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kindness is keeping them going. in these pandemic times it is the community once again helping to keep people safe —— kindness is keeping them going. fiona trott, bbc news, county durham. we will have more on that and how people are dealing with storm arwen later. the trial of ghislaine maxwell, on charges linked to her relationship with the convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein, has begun in new york. she denies trafficking and grooming under—age girls. ms maxwell, who's 59, is the youngest daughter of the disgraced media tycoon and former mp, robert maxwell. let's get more from our correspondent in new york, michelle fleury. michelle, hello. a busy day in court today? it michelle, hello. a busy day in court toda ? ., michelle, hello. a busy day in court toda? ., , michelle, hello. a busy day in court toda? ., i, , today? it got off slowly but things, the ace is today? it got off slowly but things, the pace is picking _ today? it got off slowly but things, the pace is picking up. _ today? it got off slowly but things, the pace is picking up. the - today? it got off slowly but things, the pace is picking up. the jury - today? it got off slowly but things, j the pace is picking up. the jury has the pace is picking up. thejury has been sworn in and we have heard opening remarks from the prosecution. she outlined what she
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called a pyramid of abuse, saying that ghislane maxwell, fostered a culture of silence, she added make no mistake, she knew what epstein was doing, she knew what was going to happen and the defendant was essential to this game. as an adult woman, she was able to provide a cover of respectability for mr epstein. now she has been accused of helping to recruit and groom for underage girls, they are being referred to in court as victims one, two, three and four, their identity is kept secret, they will be referred to during the trial under pseudonyms. once we heard the opening comments from the prosecution and then it was the turn of miss maxwell's lawyer who came up and very quickly took a strident turn saying that women are often villain eyes to more than men ever are and added that the charges against maxwell are four things that
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jeffrey epstein did, but she is not like epstein, she said, not like any of the other powerful men. it is worth noting that this trial comes following the back of the meat to movement when many women came forward and accuse powerful men, these included harvey weinstein and r kelly, but the difference here is that the person in the dock is a woman. ~ . . ~' that the person in the dock is a woman. ~ . ., ~ ,, that the person in the dock is a woman. ~ . ., ~ i. that the person in the dock is a woman. ~ . ., ~' i., a, ., woman. michelle, thank you. more on the trial during — woman. michelle, thank you. more on the trial during the _ woman. michelle, thank you. more on the trial during the course _ woman. michelle, thank you. more on the trial during the course of - woman. michelle, thank you. more on the trial during the course of the - the trial during the course of the week here. four teenagers have beenjailed for life for killing the fifteen year old schoolboy, keon lincoln, in birmingham injanuary. the four, aged between fourteen and eighteen, have been given minimum terms of sixteen to nineteen years. ben godfrey reports. it was a barbaric and senseless attack. keon lincoln was stabbed from behind and it shot, just metres from home. the gunfire was heard by his own mother, charmaine. my first instinct was,
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where is my son? and then to figure out what has happened and the reasons why. it wasn't established in court whether keon's life was taken during a gang dispute but cctv pointed to a premeditated and brazen attack on the schoolboy in the middle of the afternoon. a group, all under18, hunting down a victim. the fact that we have got youngsters of that age going around carrying weapons, using firearms, it's an absolutely terrible state of affairs. tahjgeem breakenridge and michael ugochukwu were convicted of murder, jailed for life with a minimum of 19 years. today in court the judge lifted reporting restrictions to allow the naming of the gunman. he was 14—year—old yussuf mustapha. he will serve at least 16 years. another 16—year—old boy who can't be named received 17 years,
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while18—year—old kieron donaldson, who supplied weapons, receives a 12 yearjail term. i can only hope that the convictions offer some sort of solace for keon lincoln's family, but to put the message out there amongst the community, we will investigate these matters and we will find those who are responsible and we will convict them. the motive for the attack is still not clear and the chaos of that january afternoon and has only brought sadness, reflection and more confusion for keon's family and friends. the crime that was committed is heinous, as i said, just diabolical, and we just really want to put an end to this. we want this to be one of those springboards that we can use, that can start bringing some questions to our community, and getting some answers. the gunman yussuf mustapha lied about his whereabouts that day, claiming he had been on an online school lesson during lockdown.
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keon's killers covered their faces in hoods. they felt untouchable as they inflicted eight knife wounds inside 30 seconds. keon had an unbelievable laugh, his mother said, he was a loving child with a jolly spirit. ben godfrey, bbc news. this afternoon the judge at birmingham crown court lifted reporting restrictions — meaning one of the two boys under 18 can now be named. gunman yussuf mustapha, who is 1a years old and from birmingham, was sentenced to life with a minimum of 16 years for murder and possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good evening. temperatures for some of us struggled to get much above freezing this afternoon. it was another very cold day across the uk, but things have been beginning to change, with more cloud rolling in from the west and some milder
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air, which lifted temperatures in some parts of the west of scotland and northern ireland all the way up into double digits and that milder air is now extending further eastwards and with it, a lot of cloud, some splashes of rain and drizzle, some missed and mark in places, but temperatures by the end of the night all the way up at nine, ten or 11 in quite a few places. so, a very different start to tuesday morning in terms of the feel of the weather. with that, though, there will be a lot of cloud, splashes of rain and drizzle and through the day, a few brighter glimpses will develop, but at the same time, this band of heavy rain will sweep into northern ireland and the north of scotland later on, but temperatures for the vast majority of us are up into double digits. now, we will see some wet and windy weather on tuesday night and then for wednesday and thursday, it starts to turn colder again.
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hello, this is bbc news with me, shaun ley. the headlines — all adults over 18 will be offered a booster three months after their second jab, and 12—15—year—olds will be offered a second dose. yvette cooper becomes shadow home secretary, as the labour leader reorganises his top team. david lammy is promoted to shadow foreign secretary. 66,000 people are still without power in the aftermath of storm arwen at the weekend. a 14—year—old who murdered schoolboy keon lincoln has been jailed for at least 16 years. british socialite ghislaine maxwell goes on trial in new york, accused of trafficking under—age girls for her former loverjeffrey epstein. welcome to your questions answered on bbc news.
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with me isjonathan ball, professor of virology at the university of nottingham, and paul hunter, professor of medicine at the university of east anglia. thank you both not only for doing this but also being willing to put your knowledge against the questions as it were. let's kick straight off all across omicron and the impact of it. paul, claire asked do the current lateral flow tests pick up the new omicron variant? it appears that they d0- — the new omicron variant? it appears that they do. certainly _ the new omicron variant? it appears that they do. certainly early - that they do. certainly early results suggest that, so the answer is yes. results suggest that, so the answer is es. , ., ., ~ ., is yes. interesting looking at the world health _ is yes. interesting looking at the world health organization's - is yes. interesting looking at the world health organization's firstj world health organization's first details of this on friday, and they said there is sort of a bit of the genetic code that is present in all the other variants that appears to be missing in omicron. will that make it a bit easier to potentially detect? , , , , i.
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detect? yes, but it depends if you have a test _ detect? yes, but it depends if you have a test that _ detect? yes, but it depends if you have a test that will _ detect? yes, but it depends if you have a test that will do _ detect? yes, but it depends if you have a test that will do that. - detect? yes, but it depends if you have a test that will do that. it's l have a test that will do that. it's called the s gene target fate which was characteristic as well of the alpha variant, where one of the tests that some labs used, a pcr test, failed to give a positive despite the fact that all the other targets do. and that was a very useful indicator of the alpha variant, and now it will be a useful indicator of the omicron variant in those labs that actually use that target. those labs that actually use that taruet. . ~' ,, those labs that actually use that taruet. . ~ g ., ., ., ., target. thank you. jonathan, pauline in'ection it target. thank you. jonathan, pauline injection it would _ target. thank you. jonathan, pauline injection it would like _ target. thank you. jonathan, pauline injection it would like to _ target. thank you. jonathan, pauline injection it would like to ask - target. thank you. jonathan, pauline injection it would like to ask is - injection it would like to ask is that no one of the positive omicron cases in the uk are in vaccinia people or unvaccinated people? yeah, it's of treat people or unvaccinated people? yeah, it's of great interest _ people or unvaccinated people? yeah, it's of great interest to _ people or unvaccinated people? yeah, it's of great interest to how _ people or unvaccinated people? yeah, it's of great interest to how much - it's of great interest to how much vaccines are going to protect from the infection for some of the moment, i don't think we know the details for the cases in the uk. what i can say is for other cases that have — what i can say is for other cases that have been reported around the
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world, _ that have been reported around the world, as _ that have been reported around the world, as infections reported in people — world, as infections reported in people that have been vaccinated as well as— people that have been vaccinated as well as unvaccinated, but of course well as unvaccinated, but of course we need _ well as unvaccinated, but of course we need to— well as unvaccinated, but of course we need to remember that it's not purely— we need to remember that it's not purely about whether or not you can be infected. it's more about disease severity _ be infected. it's more about disease severity. and that's where we are mostly— severity. and that's where we are mostly interested in terms of seeing whether_ mostly interested in terms of seeing whether or— mostly interested in terms of seeing whether or not the vaccines still protect— whether or not the vaccines still protect against severe disease. paul, _ protect against severe disease. paul, carolasks protect against severe disease. paul, carol asks i am immunosuppressed and have had first and second pfizer doses plus a booster. how long is she going to have to wait to have her third dose? actually she's already had that because the third primary dose and the dose used for the boosters are pretty much identical. so, essentially, she's had that. the issueisif essentially, she's had that. the issue is if she is in a particularly amin younes oppressed group, then perhaps she might have another dose of three months after the last one.
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— immunosuppressed group. so essentially she is either had hurt booster or her third primary dose but they are the same. that booster or her third primary dose but they are the same.— booster or her third primary dose but they are the same. that will be i ho -e but they are the same. that will be i hope reassuring _ but they are the same. that will be i hope reassuring to _ but they are the same. that will be i hope reassuring to you, _ but they are the same. that will be i hope reassuring to you, carol. - i hope reassuring to you, carol. jonathan, we are asked why is after zeneca not being offered as a booster with my i know when i went last week and it was moderna. so the jcvi. last week and it was moderna. so the ml, the last week and it was moderna. so the jcvi, the committee _ last week and it was moderna. so the jcvi, the committee who _ last week and it was moderna. so the jcvi, the committee who decide - last week and it was moderna. so the jcvi, the committee who decide on i last week and it was moderna. so the jcvi, the committee who decide on a| jcvi, the committee who decide on a vaccine _ jcvi, the committee who decide on a vaccine policy looked at data including a large truck carried out including a large truck carried out in the _ including a large truck carried out in the uk — including a large truck carried out in the uk but as yet i have not seen the data _ in the uk but as yet i have not seen the data from that trial. it was a covert _ the data from that trial. it was a covert booster trial. but what is likely— covert booster trial. but what is likely to — covert booster trial. but what is likely to have happened with that data is _ likely to have happened with that data is is— likely to have happened with that data is is indicated pointing towards _ data is is indicated pointing towards the fact that the mrna vaccines— towards the fact that the mrna vaccines are a much better boost than _ vaccines are a much better boost than the — vaccines are a much better boost than the az vaccine. and indeed some data that _ than the az vaccine. and indeed some data that is _ than the az vaccine. and indeed some data that is already out there from previous _ data that is already out there from previous studies, looking at the
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impact — previous studies, looking at the impact of— previous studies, looking at the impact of the second dose in a normai— impact of the second dose in a normal schedule, if you had the mrna after the _ normal schedule, if you had the mrna after the az_ normal schedule, if you had the mrna after the az vaccine for your second dose, _ after the az vaccine for your second dose. then— after the az vaccine for your second dose, then you got much better boost to your _ dose, then you got much better boost to your immunity. also you got a few more _ to your immunity. also you got a few more of— to your immunity. also you got a few more of the — to your immunity. also you got a few more of the magical t cells that we hear so _ more of the magical t cells that we hear so much about than you would if you had _ hear so much about than you would if you had to _ hear so much about than you would if you had to had just the two doses of al so _ you had to had just the two doses of al so i _ you had to had just the two doses of a2. so i think it's also do with the az. so i think it's also do with the booster— az. so i think it's also do with the booster effects of the mrna, but of course _ booster effects of the mrna, but of course if _ booster effects of the mrna, but of course if you cannot have the mrna, then you _ course if you cannot have the mrna, then you can— course if you cannot have the mrna, then you can have the az as a boost and it— then you can have the az as a boost and it still— then you can have the az as a boost and it still will boost, just not as much _ and it still will boost, just not as much as— and it still will boost, just not as much as the mrna. and it still will boost, “ust not as much as the mrna._ and it still will boost, “ust not as much as the mrna. paul, sarah asks how lona much as the mrna. paul, sarah asks how long after _ much as the mrna. paul, sarah asks how long after your _ much as the mrna. paul, sarah asks how long after your second _ much as the mrna. paul, sarah asks how long after your second dose - much as the mrna. paul, sarah asks how long after your second dose can | how long after your second dose can you receive your booster? weill. you receive your booster? well, toda it you receive your booster? well, today it is _ you receive your booster? well, today it is six — you receive your booster? well, today it is six months, - you receive your booster? well, today it is six months, 182 - you receive your booster? well, today it is six months, 182 days| you receive your booster? well, i today it is six months, 182 days but tomorrow it will be three months or about 91 days. so that's a big change bring it down from six months to three months, but i'm not entirely sure when that will be implemented. but we have got a lotta
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people who are already queuing for their boosters at the moment, and it's being rolled out in much the same way as the primary course in terms of order of priority, interns people who are most at risk. so we will, people will get to that but it will, people will get to that but it will take some time before we get down to the people who are just going on to the waitlist at the moment. but technically, as of tomorrow, it will be three months or 90 or 91 days. bud tomorrow, it will be three months or 90 or 91 days-— 90 or 91 days. and there is no issue of su- -l 90 or 91 days. and there is no issue of supply as — 90 or 91 days. and there is no issue of supply as such — 90 or 91 days. and there is no issue of supply as such was _ 90 or 91 days. and there is no issue of supply as such was that - 90 or 91 days. and there is no issue of supply as such was that we - 90 or 91 days. and there is no issue of supply as such was that we have | of supply as such was that we have plenty of vaccine and have been accused of hoarding in the westlock presume enough in the uk to supply the need. bud presume enough in the uk to supply the need. . ., , . ., the need. and actually the world health organization _ the need. and actually the world health organization has - the need. and actually the world health organization has been - the need. and actually the world | health organization has been very critical of countries like the uk for hoarding vaccines, for very good reasons. but, yes, i believe we have
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got enough, but certainly i've got no particular insights into the supply chain at the moment. good. let's move — supply chain at the moment. good. let's move on _ supply chain at the moment. good. let's move on to _ supply chain at the moment. good. let's move on to jonathan - supply chain at the moment. good. let's move on to jonathan and - supply chain at the moment. good. let's move on to jonathan and this| let's move on tojonathan and this is a question from barry in liverpool and he says if a new variant appears like this one that is more profitable, is it possible it might be less potent and therefore could become the dominant variant because it's moving around much more quickly, it is exhilarating, but actually it's exhilarating, but actually its impact is less dramatic on people who get it. it’s impact is less dramatic on people who et it. 3 . impact is less dramatic on people who aet it. �*, ., ., impact is less dramatic on people who get it— who get it. it's a great question and something _ who get it. it's a great question and something that _ who get it. it's a great question and something that we - who get it. it's a great question and something that we hear - who get it. it's a great question i and something that we hear talked about— and something that we hear talked about a _ and something that we hear talked about a lot. and that is is it evolutionarily beneficial for a virus — evolutionarily beneficial for a virus to — evolutionarily beneficial for a virus to become less dangerous to its host. _ virus to become less dangerous to its host. to — virus to become less dangerous to its host, to become less pathogenic. we often _ its host, to become less pathogenic. we often hear it, but actually it's not wholly — we often hear it, but actually it's not wholly true. i think over the long-term, _ not wholly true. i think over the long—term, overthousands not wholly true. i think over the long—term, over thousands of years potentiaiiv — long—term, over thousands of years potentially chemically was in that pan out _ potentially chemically was in that pan out and we might even see it pan out weaker— pan out and we might even see it pan out weaker than that. but essentially what a virus needs to do
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is to transmit in its host. it needs to transmit — is to transmit in its host. it needs to transmit as efficiently as it can — to transmit as efficiently as it can now— to transmit as efficiently as it can. now if a virus keeps killing its host. — can. now if a virus keeps killing its host, then very shortly it will run out — its host, then very shortly it will run out of — its host, then very shortly it will run out of hosts do in fact. so, certainty— run out of hosts do in fact. so, certainly killing hosts is not a great — certainly killing hosts is not a great game plan for the virus. but in terms _ great game plan for the virus. but in terms of— great game plan for the virus. but in terms of disease severity, it could — in terms of disease severity, it could he — in terms of disease severity, it could be the case that a virus that causes _ could be the case that a virus that causes a — could be the case that a virus that causes a hit — could be the case that a virus that causes a bit more disease if that then— causes a bit more disease if that then helps— causes a bit more disease if that then helps the virus to transmit, the net — then helps the virus to transmit, the net could be the route that it takes _ the net could be the route that it takes was — the net could be the route that it takes was a bit of a thing about this coronavirus and compare it to the sars — this coronavirus and compare it to the sars coronavirus it appeared 'ust the sars coronavirus it appeared just over— the sars coronavirus it appeared just over a — the sars coronavirus it appeared just over a decade ago, one of the biggest _ just over a decade ago, one of the biggest difference is that we see is that the _ biggest difference is that we see is that the sars coronavirus, the original— that the sars coronavirus, the original one, caused serious disease _ original one, caused serious disease. it also causes symptoms in virtually— disease. it also causes symptoms in virtually all — disease. it also causes symptoms in virtually all people who were infected and therefore it was very easy to _ infected and therefore it was very easy to identify people infected. it was very— easy to identify people infected. it was very easy to control the virus outbreak— was very easy to control the virus outbreak through infection control measures — outbreak through infection control measures. the advantage of the current— measures. the advantage of the current coronavirus is the fact that
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it causes— current coronavirus is the fact that it causes lots and lots of mild infections, and that has allowed the virus to— infections, and that has allowed the virus to spread amongst populations under— virus to spread amongst populations under the _ virus to spread amongst populations under the radar. and so it could well— under the radar. and so it could well he — under the radar. and so it could well be that a virus requires mutations that makes it less severe, pa rticuia riv _ mutations that makes it less severe, particularly if that helps it transmit, but of course the moment it is early— transmit, but of course the moment it is early days and we don't know how the mutations are doing to the virus _ how the mutations are doing to the virus. ., ., , a , ., how the mutations are doing to the virus. ., ., , , ., ., virus. paul, to pick up on that, the resident virus. paul, to pick up on that, the president of _ virus. paul, to pick up on that, the president of celebrity _ virus. paul, to pick up on that, the president of celebrity it _ virus. paul, to pick up on that, the president of celebrity it was - virus. paul, to pick up on that, the president of celebrity it was say i president of celebrity it was say and a promise to the botswana border that they have gone from 500 cases on average a date of the seven days to this week 1600 cases every day. that's a dramatic rate of progress for want of a better word is certainly progress from the virus's point of view. certainly progress from the virus's point of view— certainly progress from the virus's point of view. absolutely, and that i think is particularly _ point of view. absolutely, and that i think is particularly what - point of view. absolutely, and that i think is particularly what has - i think is particularly what has galvanised the world community. that sort of rate of growth associated with the new variant does mean it is
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spreading more readily. whether or not that is because it is intrinsically more infectious or because it is less controlled by vaccine or indeed by immunity from a prior infection i think it's still not clear at the moment and will be hoping to see some evidence of that in the coming days.— hoping to see some evidence of that in the coming days. jonathan, simon asks how much _ in the coming days. jonathan, simon asks how much can _ in the coming days. jonathan, simon asks how much can you _ in the coming days. jonathan, simon asks how much can you tweak- in the coming days. jonathan, simon asks how much can you tweak a - asks how much can you tweak a vaccine or does it effectively become a new vaccine? again a great ruestion become a new vaccine? again a great question for — become a new vaccine? again a great question for survey _ become a new vaccine? again a great question for survey what _ become a new vaccine? again a great question for survey what point - become a new vaccine? again a great question for survey what point does l question for survey what point does the old _ question for survey what point does the old vaccine become a new vaccine? _ the old vaccine become a new vaccine? in march of this year, the nhra, _ vaccine? in march of this year, the nhra, the — vaccine? in march of this year, the nhra, the regulatory body that improves vaccine, approved a progress _ improves vaccine, approved a progress where companies could fashion — progress where companies could fashion a — progress where companies could fashion a new vaccine particularly one that — fashion a new vaccine particularly one that was targeting variance. provided — one that was targeting variance. provided it was using a similar kind of vaccine — provided it was using a similar kind of vaccine platform and by that we mean _ of vaccine platform and by that we mean if _ of vaccine platform and by that we mean if it — of vaccine platform and by that we mean if it was the same kind of
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delivery— mean if it was the same kind of delivery system. a chimpanzee had no virus for— delivery system. a chimpanzee had no virus for him _ delivery system. a chimpanzee had no virus for him both from the az vaccine — virus for him both from the az vaccine or— virus for him both from the az vaccine or mrna for the pfizer and moderna _ vaccine or mrna for the pfizer and moderna sa provided that the platform itself had been shown to be safe, platform itself had been shown to be safe and _ platform itself had been shown to be safe, and the target for the vaccine _ safe, and the target for the vaccine, in this case we would have the spike _ vaccine, in this case we would have the spike protein of the virus as the spike protein of the virus as the target — the spike protein of the virus as the target provided those two things are the _ the target provided those two things are the same, than the regulatory body— are the same, than the regulatory body would like to sort of fast track — body would like to sort of fast track the _ body would like to sort of fast track the approval of those vaccines in very— track the approval of those vaccines in very much the same way that we have _ in very much the same way that we have influenza vaccines fast tracked everv _ have influenza vaccines fast tracked every year — have influenza vaccines fast tracked every year. because essentially they are the _ every year. because essentially they are the same, it isjust a small week— are the same, it isjust a small week in— are the same, it isjust a small week in the _ are the same, it isjust a small week in the vaccine. but honestly if week in the vaccine. but honestly if we change — week in the vaccine. but honestly if we change platforms or if we change the target, _ we change platforms or if we change the target, then that's a different kettle _ the target, then that's a different kettle of— the target, then that's a different kettle of fish.— kettle of fish. professorjonathan ball and professor _ kettle of fish. professorjonathan ball and professor paul _ kettle of fish. professorjonathan ball and professor paul hunter, | ball and professor paul hunter, think you both very much for answering questions from our viewers. , ., ,
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and more of your questions answered of course throughout the week. the scottish child payment will double to £20 per week from april. the first minister, nicola sturgeon, has told her party's online conference that it will involve "hard choices elsewhere", but that eradicating child poverty is "essential" to scotland's future. she also pledged to begin the process to allow for another referendum on scottish independence by the end of 2023. here's our scotland editor sarah smith. with people's minds on covid and what omicron could mean for christmas, this is not the season for a hard sell on political ideas like scottish independence, so nicola sturgeon urged caution and emphasised that the pandemic is her top priority. while also announcing more money for gps, an increase in child payments for those receiving benefits. iam pleased, indeed proud,
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to announce today in our budget on the 9th of december will fund the doubling of the scottish child payment immediately from the start of the new financial year. the scottish child payment will increase to £20 per child per week, four times the amount originally demanded by campaigners from april. nicola sturgeon is scathing about borisjohnson's leadership, accusing him of undermining the powers of the scottish parliament and condemning a political system that allows someone like him to become prime minister. i defy anyone to look at the broken, corrupt, self—serving westminster system that we are currently part of and conclude that it provides a secure basis for the future of scotland. so, i would not be discharging my duty to the people of scotland if i did not seek to keep the promise on which we were elected, to offer the people of scotland the choice of a better future through independence. the campaign for scottish
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independence has been overshadowed by the pandemic, but has not gone away. nicola sturgeon may not be able to push for another referendum right now, but remains determined to have a vote within the next two years. in the course of next year, i will initiate the process necessary to enable a referendum before the end of 2023. and just as importantly, our party will set out afresh the positive case for independence. we will outline the opportunities and advantages that independence will open up. the people of scotland should be allowed to decide the country's future, said the snp leader, telling the prime minister not to try and prevent a vote on independence. but in a pandemic, debate over scotland's place in the uk must wait until the worst of the crisis is past, and no politician can say when that might be. sarah smith, bbc news, glasgow. the headlines on bbc news —
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all adults over 18 will be offered a booster three months after their second jab, and 12—15—year—olds will be offered a second dose. yvette cooper becomes shadow home secretary, as the labour leader reorganises his top team. david lammy is also promoted to shadow foreign secretary. 66 people are still without power in the aftermath of storm arwen at the weekend. the father of the youngest victim of the manchester arena attack has said that the response to the attack was shameful and inadequate. saffie—rose roussos was eight years old when she was killed. the public inquiry heard how saffie asked if she was going to die. her father, andrew roussos, said that instead of help from the emergency services, she just got "an advertising board and untrained people". judith moritz reports.
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saffie—rose roussos loved pop music, especially ariana grande. she was so excited when she got tickets to the star's manchester concert for christmas. she went on a girly night with her mum lisa and sister ashley. the three were in the foyer when the bomb exploded. saffie called out for her mum and lay on the floor for half an hour. there were no stretchers, so she was taken down these stairs on a hoarding and a passing ambulance was flagged down. herfather, andrew, arrived at the arena and had no idea where his little girl was. the response on that night was shameful and inadequate. everyone in that sitting room was let down, and the people that excuse it should feel shame. what saffie went through, i will never forgive. that poor little girl hung in there for someone to come help her.
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what she received was a bloody advertisement board and untrained people doing the best they could. saffie was drifting in and out of consciousness. those with her kept urging her to stay awake, but the little girl realised what was happening, and she asked a paramedic, "am i going to die?" i rememberthinking, "help will come soon, just stay where you are..." lisa roussos was severely injured and couldn't reach her daughter. i want to thank those that tried to help saffie that night and for being with her. i also want to say to the professionals, like the emergency services and m15, that this inquiry isn't about protecting yourjob, your reputation or your uniform. we understand the sheer panic and fear you were faced with that night, but until you admit the failings, how can there be a positive change? saffie died more than an hour after the explosion. experts disagree over whether she might have survived had her emergency care been different.
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judith moritz, bbc news, manchester. prince charles has arrived in barbados ahead of a ceremony to mark the island's transition to a republic. the queen will be removed as head of state, and the country's first president will be sworn in. in an interview with the bbc�*s celestina olulode, the prime minister of barbados, mia mottley, said it was time for the nation to move forward. we believe that the unfinished business ought not to go past the 55th anniversary of independence. a large part of what we are doing requires us to engage with the world, and i want us to engage with the world as the best possible person that we can be. that requires us being confident in ourselves and understanding that a barbadian has the potential to be in charge of the affairs of this nation. the president of barbados is now someone that any barbadian child can aspire to be,
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and that's so powerful. this country has had a british monarchical system for 396 years. the time has come. we believe that we have it within our power to do more and better, but the first thing that that requires is looking in the mirror and loving who you see. and changing that mental landscape which is reversing centuries of, of, of, of... how do i put it? ..centuries of being told that anything black is negative or that systems that come from you are not valid. something that keeps coming up when we talk about the republic, does china have any influence on all of this? the notion that we are a pawn of the british empire or the chinese empire or any empire is a nonsense, and it has to stop.
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i find it offensive in the extreme that because people choose to claim their own destiny as a small state, we can't view as doing it in our own interests, on our own terms, at our own instance. the 2020 throne speech declared that the time has come for barbados to fully leave its colonial past behind. tell me a bit more about how being a republic will help to facilitate that? if you go to government house now, you see no images of barbadians. that will change as of december 1st. and don't get me wrong, i am one of the biggest respecters of her majesty. i think queen elizabeth is one of the great leaders of the 20th century going into the 21st century, but equally it comes home when you put it in a different context. would you expect the president of the united states of america to come from brazil? it's almost preposterous to think about it. so, that whilst you say that, you begin to understand why
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dismantling those aspects of the colonial legacy become absolutely important, but not in a way that is antagonistic or adversarial. and i'm very happy that we continue to work as friends, as close partners with the united kingdom. i'm happy that prince charles has accepted our invitation to join us. we believe and have tremendous respect for him, but we've also felt that we have a younger generation that is ready to say, "look, we want to be global citizens with barbadian roots." the prime minister of barbados explaining the decision to become a republic. we can speak now to guy hewitt, former barbados high commissioner to the uk. he joins us live from florida. thank you much for being with us. it's good to speak to you. do you view this decision with mixed feelings? in view this decision with mixed feelin . s? . view this decision with mixed feelinas? ., , , , ,
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view this decision with mixed feelinas? , i, feelings? in a sense, yes. i accept iaarhados's — feelings? in a sense, yes. i accept barbados's journey _ feelings? in a sense, yes. i accept barbados's journey to _ feelings? in a sense, yes. i accept barbados's journey to republic - feelings? in a sense, yes. i accept barbados's journey to republic is l feelings? in a sense, yes. i accept barbados's journey to republic is a j barbados's journey to republic is a natural— barbados's journey to republic is a natural progression of the country coming _ natural progression of the country coming into its own and really signifying as was stated to the world that we have come of age. the people _ world that we have come of age. the people is— world that we have come of age. the people is an — world that we have come of age. the people is an analogy to win our children— people is an analogy to win our children grow up, get their own house _ children grow up, get their own house and _ children grow up, get their own house and give us back to house kevs _ house and give us back to house keys. however, ithat house and give us back to house keys. however, i that the question is how— keys. however, i that the question is how did — keys. however, i that the question is how did we go about it? because in the _ is how did we go about it? because in the constitutional commission positive — in the constitutional commission positive recommendations, they suggested that barbados had consulted a process with its citizens _ consulted a process with its citizens of a referendum to really ensure _ citizens of a referendum to really ensure that becoming a republic, which _ ensure that becoming a republic, which is — ensure that becoming a republic, which is relayed by definition a government of the people, that the people _ government of the people, that the people are actively involved in this process _ people are actively involved in this process. unfortunately, due to covid-19 — process. unfortunately, due to covid—19 and the devastation economically and socially and all of the restrictions, barb radians have not been _ the restrictions, barb radians have not been able to dissipate in this journey— not been able to dissipate in this journey that ultimately it should
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have _ journey that ultimately it should have started with them and included them _ have started with them and included them. in _ have started with them and included them. , ., a, .,, them. in terms of timing, barbados rained its them. in terms of timing, barbados gained its independence _ them. in terms of timing, barbados gained its independence from - them. in terms of timing, barbadosl gained its independence from britain in 1966. it was one of the first caribbean nations afterjamaica and trinidad and tobago to do so. many would say, look, this has been the next step and it is kind of long overdue, notjust barbados but in many of the other islands of caribbean as well. this many of the other islands of caribbean as well.— many of the other islands of caribbean as well. as i say, i resect caribbean as well. as i say, i respect the _ caribbean as well. as i say, i respect the decision - caribbean as well. as i say, i respect the decision and - caribbean as well. as i say, i respect the decision and the| caribbean as well. as i say, i - respect the decision and the journey that we _ respect the decision and the journey that we are — respect the decision and the journey that we are taking. the only problem is that— that we are taking. the only problem is that the _ that we are taking. the only problem is that the timing is slightly off, not because of anything the government has done in a sense but because _ government has done in a sense but because of— government has done in a sense but because of the restrictions that covid—19 has placed on barbados citizens— covid—19 has placed on barbados citizens being able to take part in thisjourney. so it almost becomes a decision— thisjourney. so it almost becomes a decision by— thisjourney. so it almost becomes a decision by the government for the people _ decision by the government for the people rather than eightjourney decision by the government for the people rather than eight journey of the people as manifested by the
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actions — the people as manifested by the actions taken by the government. do actions taken by the government. div: you actions taken by the government. you think actions taken by the government. drr you think events of the past few years have accelerated the kind of momentum for this? i'm thinking obviously of the controversy of the wind rush generation, some of whom would've been from barbados, who kind of are treated as if they did not belong in the uk and some of the argument over post—colonialism and black lives matter, the issue of reparations which the president helped bring up with the organisation of caribbean countries only a few months ago? yes. organisation of caribbean countries only a few months ago?— organisation of caribbean countries only a few months ago? yes, i mean we would have _ only a few months ago? yes, i mean we would have recognised _ only a few months ago? yes, i mean we would have recognised that - we would have recognised that because — we would have recognised that because again as well referenced by the prime _ because again as well referenced by the prime minister, her majesty is held the prime minister, her majesty is heid in_ the prime minister, her majesty is held in such high regard across the commonwealth, people would have been reluctant— commonwealth, people would have been reluctant to _ commonwealth, people would have been reluctant to take action at this time _ reluctant to take action at this time that— reluctant to take action at this time that might have been seen as personai~ — time that might have been seen as personal. but i don't think in any way this— personal. but i don't think in any way this is— personal. but i don't think in any way this is a _ personal. but i don't think in any way this is a slight on her. but what _ way this is a slight on her. but what would have happened in the last three or— what would have happened in the last three or four years is what you
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referenced, the windrush scan it which _ referenced, the windrush scan it which put — referenced, the windrush scan it which put her majesty as the queen of the _ which put her majesty as the queen of the uk _ which put her majesty as the queen of the uk and queen of barbados in a difficult _ of the uk and queen of barbados in a difficult position because the nations— difficult position because the nations that she represents were held back — nations that she represents were held back. the black lives matter movement met people conscious of their colonial history and more recently— their colonial history and more recently in barbados we took in the statue _ recently in barbados we took in the statue of— recently in barbados we took in the statue of lord nelson, which predates— statue of lord nelson, which predates the one in trafalgar square and as— predates the one in trafalgar square and as he _ predates the one in trafalgar square and as he spoke about the issues of reparations, — and as he spoke about the issues of reparations, there have been a number— reparations, there have been a number of— reparations, there have been a number of things that have been catalytic— number of things that have been catalytic in terms of making people ask the _ catalytic in terms of making people ask the question does the royal family— ask the question does the royal family reflect where a young country should _ family reflect where a young country should be _ family reflect where a young country should be in the 21st century? and in that— should be in the 21st century? and in that regard, i think that those events— in that regard, i think that those events may have been catalytic and causing _ events may have been catalytic and causing us— events may have been catalytic and causing us to move faster than we may have — causing us to move faster than we may have otherwise, but it is probably— may have otherwise, but it is probably a necessaryjourney
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may have otherwise, but it is probably a necessary journey that we take as _ probably a necessary journey that we take as a _ probably a necessary journey that we take as a country. the probably a necessary 'ourney that we take as a country.— take as a country. the caribbean, after i take as a country. the caribbean, afteri recall— take as a country. the caribbean, after i recall from _ take as a country. the caribbean, after i recall from my _ take as a country. the caribbean, after i recall from my childhood i take as a country. the caribbean, i after i recall from my childhood was eugenia charles from dominica who became internationalfigure. your became international figure. your minister became internationalfigure. your minister is fast approaching that kind of status in the world. people in other parts of the world listen when she goes to international events and she makes speeches about the caribbean. is it possible that what is happening now in barbados will act as a catalyst for other countries currently in him a and particularly in the caribbean to look to their own futures independent of the british crown? i anticipate that barbados has opened the door— anticipate that barbados has opened the door the other countries now will consider going through. no one likes to _ will consider going through. no one likes to be — will consider going through. no one likes to be first and now that barbados has done this in this contemporary period, other countries in the _ contemporary period, other countries in the caribbean and i think across the commonwealth will currently hold on to her— the commonwealth will currently hold on to her majesty as a head of state might— on to her majesty as a head of state might consider having taken this
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journey— might consider having taken this journey as— might consider having taken this journey as well. and i have done interviews — journey as well. and i have done interviews in australia and canada and i_ interviews in australia and canada and i know — interviews in australia and canada and i know there is a growing appetite _ and i know there is a growing appetite to ask the question is it not time — appetite to ask the question is it not time for us as barbados is doing to have _ not time for us as barbados is doing to have the — not time for us as barbados is doing to have the native citizens as our head _ to have the native citizens as our head of— to have the native citizens as our head of state.— to have the native citizens as our head of state. , ., , , ., ,, ., head of state. very good to speak to ou and head of state. very good to speak to you and thank— head of state. very good to speak to you and thank you _ head of state. very good to speak to you and thank you very _ head of state. very good to speak to you and thank you very much - head of state. very good to speak to you and thank you very much for- head of state. very good to speak to | you and thank you very much for your time. . ~ you and thank you very much for your time. ., ~' ,, you and thank you very much for your time. ., ,, i. ., ., ., ., time. thank you for allowing me to 'oin ou. time. thank you for allowing me to join you- as _ time. thank you for allowing me to join you. as malcolm _ time. thank you for allowing me to join you. as malcolm turnbull, - join you. as malcolm turnbull, former prime _ join you. as malcolm turnbull, former prime minister- join you. as malcolm turnbull, former prime minister of- join you. as malcolm turnbull, . former prime minister of australia put it, we may be a elizabethans but not necessarily monarchists and it seemed to be the case there is well. twitter co—founderjack dorsey is stepping down as chief how far would you go to show your love for a special somebody in your life? in india, a lovestruck husband has gone the extra mile, showing his devotion by building his wife a replica of the famous taj mahal. the original taj mahal was a love letter from the heartbroken mughal emperor shahjahan to house the tomb of his wife mumtaz in the 17th century. fast—forwa rd to 2021 and anand prakashchoke—see felt that he wanted to express his love
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while his wife was still alive. it's not quite as big, though. it's a third of the size of the real one. quite frankly big enough and it has toilets unlike the original taj mahal. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good evening. temperatures for some of us struggled to get much above freezing this afternoon. it was another very cold day across the uk, but things have been beginning to change, with more cloud rolling in from the west and some milder air, which lifted temperatures in some parts of the west of scotland and northern ireland all the way up into double digits and that milder air is now extending further eastwards and with it, a lot of cloud, some splashes of rain and drizzle, some missed and mark in places, but temperatures by the end of the night all the way up at nine, ten or 11 degrees in quite a few places. so, a very different start to tuesday morning in terms of the feel of the weather. with that, though, there will be a lot of cloud, splashes of rain and drizzle and through the day, a few brighter glimpses will develop, but at the same time, this band of heavy rain will sweep into northern ireland and the north of scotland later on, but temperatures for the vast majority of us are up into double digits.
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now, we will see some wet and windy weather on tuesday night and then for wednesday and thursday, it starts to turn colder again. this is bbc news with this is bbc news with me christian fraser. me christian fraser. the new covid variant omicron the new covid variant omicron is turning up in more and more is turning up in more and more countries as travel restrictions countries as travel restrictions are tightend further. are tightend further. president biden says president biden says the new variant is a cause the new variant is a cause for concern — but not panic. for concern — but not panic. in the uk the vaccination in the uk the vaccination programme will be widened programme will be widened further and the booster further and the booster programme speeded up. programme speeded up. the british socialite the british socialite ghislaine maxwell goes ghislaine maxwell goes on trial in new york — on trial in new york — accused of trafficking under—age accused of trafficking under—age girls, for herformer girls, for herformer lover, jeffrey epstein. lover, jeffrey epstein. twitter confirms that its founder twitter confirms that its founder jack dorsey has stepped down as ceo jack dorsey has stepped down as ceo with immediate effect. with immediate effect.
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and it's the biden's first christmas in the white house — we'll take a look at their decorations and how they compare with the last four years.

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