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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 29, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall. the headlines... nine cases of the omicron variant of coronavirus have been identified in the uk — six of them in scotland. the first minister, nicola sturgeon, says she's not afraid to take difficult decisions to keep people safe. there is no doubt that this presents potentially the most challenging development in the course of the pandemic for quite some time. this afternoon, scientists are expected to approve giving boosterjabs to more people to help fight omicron. more than 60,000 homes in scotland and the north—east of england remain without power after storm arwen. a memorial service is held for police sergeant matt ratana, shot dead in a custody centre in croydon last year. and the british socialite ghislaine maxwell, a close associate of the convicted paedophile jeffrey epstein, goes
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on trial in new york for sex trafficking. the afternoon, welcome to bbc news. —— good afternoon. six cases of the 0micron coronavirus variant have been detected in scotland, taking the total to nine so far in the uk. the scottish and welsh first ministers have written to borisjohnson calling for tougher travel restrictions. meanwhile, approval is expected to be given by the uk's vaccine advisory body later today for all adults to have boosterjabs. they're currently being offered to the over—40s, frontline health and social workers, and those with certain health issues. from tomorrow, face masks will be required in shops and on public transport in england to combat the new variant.
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our first report is from our health correspondent dominic hughes. testing is the key to monitoring the spread of the new 0micron variant. cases in england and now scotland have already been identified and more are bound to follow. this morning, scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon was urging caution, calling for tougher rules on self isolation and travel and working from home where possible. firstly, get vaccinated. it is the single most important thing we can do to protect ourselves and each other. secondly, test for covid regularly. as i said, we will be increasing testing in areas where the new variant has been identified. but for all of us, wherever we are, even if we are feeling fine, regular lateral flow testing is a really important way of finding out if we might have the virus. in england, so far, three cases have been found — in nottingham, brentwood in essex and central london. in scotland, four cases
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have been identified, in lanarkshire and two in the greater glasgow and clyde area, not all related to foreign travel. all close contacts of suspected cases will be advised to self—isolate for ten days regardless of their vaccination status. there is a lot we still don't know about the new variant, what protection the existing vaccines can offer, how contagious it is and the extent to which it makes people sicker. experts say it will take some time before those questions can be answered. we may start to get an indication from south africa of whether the increase in cases is leading to an increase in deaths but we won't really have the kind of detailed information that we developed for delta and alpha which only became available when it was widespread in the uk. concerns about the new variant have led the government in england to reintroduce some measures. from tomorrow, face masks will be compulsory in shops
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and on public transport, bringing england into line with the rest of britain. masks are also required in pubs and restaurants in scotland and northern ireland. staff and secondary school pupils in year seven and above are also being advised to wear masks in communal areas. in scotland, that rule applies in class as well. they are proportionate and balanced measures which will hopefully bias the time by slowing down the seeding and the spreading of this new variant to give our scientists time to understand exactly how it behaves — is it more transmissible? is it more dangerous? and how does it interact with the vaccine? and we hope to understand that in the next few weeks a lot more clearly. so what next? the independent panel that advises the government on the vaccine roll—out is expected to make an announcement on whether it will recommend an expansion of the booster programme. that could mean cutting the time between the second vaccine jab and boosters and extending the programme to the under—40s.
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inevitably, everybody will be offered a booster, but what we want to do is make sure it is done insensible —— in a sensible order so that i was her most vulnerable from this infection can get busted and their natural immunity levels can go up. this might feel like familiar territory, when the alpha or kent variant started to spread this time last year. but the really important questions overjust how severe an illness the new variant can cause and whether the vaccines keep on working. those answers will dictate how the next few weeks and months pan out. dominic hughes, bbc news. 0ur political correspondent nick eardley is in glasgow. he said that the cases identified in scotland overshadowed today's snp conference. it is worth bearing in mind that some of the rules here are already tighter than the ones that were announced for england over the weekend. for example, face coverings are required here in hospitality settings, people are still being urged to work from home where possible. but one of the things that is concerning some in the scottish government is the fact that a couple of the cases confirmed
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here are people who have not travelled abroad and have no connection to southern africa. they think that means that these cases have been transmitted in the community and that could continue to happen, although at the moment it's not widespread. so the message from nicola sturgeon in her snp conference address and in a briefing she gave this morning was to up compliance, to think extra hard about some of the restrictions that are already in place to try and avoid the need for new ones over the coming weeks. one thing, though, that the scottish government and the welsh government are both concerned about is that the travel rules which were implemented over the weekend don't go far enough. they want people returning to the uk to have to isolate for eight days, to test themselves on day two and eight, and only if both of those and only if both of those tests are negative would they be able to break that isolation, though, at the moment,
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there's no sign at all of downing street agreeing to that. joining me now is professor adam finn, a member of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. thank you very much forjoining us. what i the question is at your committee is considering at the moment regarding vaccine? the immediate _ moment regarding vaccine? tue: immediate question moment regarding vaccine? tte: immediate question is the one that was mentioned in the reportjust now which is whether there should be changes made to the programme in response to this variant. in terms of who is being offered are vaccine doses and when exactly. i can't pre—empt that announcement. i am afraid i am constrained about that but we will heed in the next hour or so what those recommendations are. and i would not ask you to pre—empt them at all. how effective any current vaccines against this new varianti i wish i knew the answer to that. variantl i wish i knew the answer to that. ~ ., , ., �* ~ .,
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variantl i wish i knew the answer to that. ., , ~ ., ~ ., that. we really don't know. what we know is that — that. we really don't know. what we know is that is _ that. we really don't know. what we know is that is a _ that. we really don't know. what we know is that is a distinct _ know is that is a distinct possibility that they will be less effective protection against this variant and we have against the currently dominant variant, which is a delta, and the reason we know that is a possibility is the many genetic changes we have seen in the genetic code of this variant include ones in the area where the antibodies we make when we get the vaccine bind to the virus. so with that being different, there was antibodies might not bind so well and that might not bind so well and that might mean they do not work so well. that does not mean that people should stop getting their vaccines, stop getting their boosters? fin should stop getting their vaccines, stop getting their boosters? on the contra , it stop getting their boosters? on the contrary, it means _ stop getting their boosters? on the contrary, it means that _ stop getting their boosters? on the contrary, it means that it _ stop getting their boosters? on the contrary, it means that it is - stop getting their boosters? on the contrary, it means that it is all- contrary, it means that it is all the more important. the one where you can compensate for antibodies not working quite so well is by having more of them and do so by having more of them and do so by having your vaccine doses and getting the highest possible level
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of antibodies, you will maximise your protection. i would emphasise that in one is predicting that the vaccines are simply going to stop working entirely, it is really much more a question of whether they will at all and if so, how much. but in the position where you have that concern, it actually drives you towards getting vaccinated, rather than the opposite and the people we are more concerned about are those who have not yet received any vaccine at all. 50 who have not yet received any vaccine at all.— who have not yet received any vaccine at all. so we are talking about potentially _ vaccine at all. so we are talking about potentially rolling - vaccine at all. so we are talking about potentially rolling out - vaccine at all. so we are talkingi about potentially rolling out the booster vaccines to all adults, but some people, as you say, have not had their first dose. how much some people, as you say, have not had theirfirst dose. how much more powerfully can you express the need to have your vaccine than you already have?— to have your vaccine than you already have? very, very hard to sa . of already have? very, very hard to say- of course — already have? very, very hard to say. of course those _ already have? very, very hard to say. of course those in - already have? very, very hard to say. of course those in public. say. of course those in public health terms, there was a several million people have not been vaccinated at all for various
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reasons are the ones who we are most concerned about but they do actually have to come forward and be vaccinated if they are to be protected so one can go on saying that, but in the end, it is down to people to roll up their sleeves and show up and be vaccinated to benefit from that protection. and one can't force people to do that. tito. from that protection. and one can't force people to do that.— force people to do that. no, quite literally rell _ force people to do that. no, quite literally roll up _ force people to do that. no, quite literally roll up your _ force people to do that. no, quite literally roll up your sleeve. - force people to do that. no, quite literally roll up your sleeve. howl literally roll up your sleeve. how powerful is the argument for having everyone in the country vaccinated, irrespective of age? t everyone in the country vaccinated, irrespective of age?— irrespective of age? i think there does need _ irrespective of age? i think there does need to _ irrespective of age? i think there does need to be _ irrespective of age? i think there does need to be a _ irrespective of age? i think there does need to be a structure. - irrespective of age? i think there does need to be a structure. you irrespective of age? i think there - does need to be a structure. you had a clip from anthony harding just there, and there is a risk if you just indiscriminately vaccinate everyone all at the same time, you actually end up vaccinating people who are less in immediate need and not vaccinating those that are in more immediate need. the biggest
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predictor of risk is age and the second biggest is how recently you received a previous dose, assuming you've already had some vaccine before, so there does need to be some structure and order to the way this is done. and that is one of the things we are really working on to try and get that right. haifa try and get that right. how effective — try and get that right. how effective is _ try and get that right. how effective is it _ try and get that right. how effective is it to _ try and get that right. how effective is it to bring - try and get that right. how effective is it to bring forward the booster dose, that third dose after your second when? what is the sort of shortest informal you think is permissible? == of shortest informal you think is permissible?— of shortest informal you think is permissible? -- interval. ithink that varies _ permissible? -- interval. ithink that varies with _ permissible? -- interval. ithink that varies with the _ permissible? -- interval. ithink. that varies with the circumstances. when you get your first twomac doses of these vaccines, you get a very, very high level of protection. that peeks after a month or so and then it does begin to go down so there is an optimal point to get a booster to get up to that level of protection. if you do it it, you're vulnerable. if you do it it, you're vulnerable. if you do it it, you're vulnerable.
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if you do it too early,... when you're confronted with a new variant that might be more able to escape vaccine protection, the goal posts do move a bit in terms of the timing and age groups and so on and that is what the announcements coming up will try to address, i think. what will try to address, i think. what is the scene _ will try to address, i think. what is the scope for _ will try to address, i think. what is the scope for adjusting - will try to address, i think. what is the scope for adjusting the current vaccines we have if we need to to make them more effective if it is necessary for 0micron and how quickly could that be done? that is necessary for omicron and how quickly could that be done? that is a really important _ quickly could that be done? that is a really important question - quickly could that be done? that is a really important question and - a really important question and absolutely can be done, for all vaccines, in fact, we can reformulate them and we do this with flu vaccines every year. the challenges are several — one is that you do not want to rush off after a variant and reformulate all your vaccines and then discover it was the wrong one. we already did that, we started reformulating towards the beta variant which disappeared
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instead of the delta variant, which then dominated. so you need to have a sense of direction. actually, the platforms we are using at the moment can be reformatted quite quickly but you still need to get a regulatory approval that the vaccine you have now made a safe and effective and manufacture enough of it so that there is availability for the very large numbers of people who would need it. that means the whole process is not a matter of days or weeks, it is really a matter of months. so it is not an immediate solution to this problem, to something that we could potentially see at some point next year. professor adam finn from thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation from whom we will hear later, thank you very much.— later, thank you very much. thank ou ve later, thank you very much. thank you very much- — the head of the world health organisation says the emergence of the 0micron variant shows the global pandemic remains the most acute health crisis in a century. japan is the latest country
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to reinstate travel restrictions forforeigners, as more new cases of the variant are detected across europe. here's naomi grimley. there is an eerie quiet atjohannesburg airport. south africa first raised the alarm about the 0micron variant, but is now finding itself increasingly cut off from the rest of the world. meanwhile, on the ground, there is a big push to get vaccines into arms. only 23% of the south african population is fully vaccinated. we still don't know yet whether this version of covid is more severe than previous ones. one of those on the front line is reassured by what she has seen so far in her patients. for now, we are seeing patients with mild symptoms that we can treat at home, that would most probably not require intensive care or hospital admission.
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amsterdam is one of the world's cities now discovering cases. 13 people were found to have it after flying in from south africa. the police even had to arrest a couple who tried to escape from a quarantine hotel. portugal has also announced it has got 13 cases. all involve a local football club where one of its players had recently returned from a south african trip. many countries don't want to take any chances at all. switzerland has toughened its quarantine requirements. britons entering the country must produce a negative test and quarantine for ten days. morocco is stopping all internationalflights, and japan, where covid infections are low, is doing something similar. translation: we will ban all entries of foreign nationals from all over - the world as of november 30. the head of the world health
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organization has been saying for months that better vaccine coverage everywhere is the only way to get out of this global emergency. his frustration is now more obvious than ever. we shouldn't need another wake—up call. we should all be wide awake to the threat of this virus. but omicron's very emergence is another reminder that although many of us might think we are done with covid—i9, it's not done with us. there is no doubt the world has reacted quicker than it did with the delta variant which emerged in india earlier this year. the uk is chairing a g7 meeting of health ministers today to work out what concerted action is needed. but whatever the variant involved, everybody knows this crisis is a long way from over. naomi grimley, bbc news. secondary schools in england have
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been told that students in year 7 and above must wear face masks in communal areas. joining me now is dr patrick roach, general secretary of nasuwt, the teachers�* union. thank you very much forjoining us. how important is it for you that the government acts more quickly than it has any past?— has any past? what are you calling for? firstly. _ has any past? what are you calling for? firstly. the — has any past? what are you calling for? firstly, the government - has any past? what are you calling| for? firstly, the government needs to be commended for having responded as quickly as it has done. that is a welcome development. i think the issue for the nasuwt and our members issue for the nasuwt and our members is whether the government has done enough. tough action is needed whenever we face new threats. we just cannot simply hope for the best. and we are seeing this virus continuing to spread both in schools and the wider community. we need to learn the lessons from last year
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that, actually, it is important to take effective action, tough action to break those chains of transmission, particularly given this a new variant which has been identified. 50 this a new variant which has been identified. ., ., , ., ., identified. so what does that tough action look like _ identified. so what does that tough action look like in _ identified. so what does that tough action look like in addition - identified. so what does that tough action look like in addition to - identified. so what does that tough action look like in addition to the l action look like in addition to the guidance about masks? the guidance about masks — guidance about masks? the guidance about masks in _ guidance about masks? the guidance about masks in communal _ guidance about masks? the guidance about masks in communal areas, - guidance about masks? the guidance about masks in communal areas, we | about masks in communal areas, we feel, was overdue. it is extremely important that we keep schools open, we keep pupils in schools and keep them in schools safely. we think there are a number of things that can be done to affect that, firstly the position in relation to face coverings could be extended to cover classrooms and secondly, testing we know it is an extremely important defence against the spread of this virus. but we know that home testing, using the lateral flow devices, take above that is lower thanit devices, take above that is lower than it should be, so we want to see more on—site testing at schools,
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both in the run—up to christmas and when schools return after christmas. there is more work to be done on ventilation and, of course, it is important we identify, quickly, close contacts of those have tested positive with covid, including the new variant, and that there was close contacts are tested again quickly to break those chains of transmission. tt quickly to break those chains of transmission.— quickly to break those chains of transmission. , ., , , ., transmission. if your members are convinced of— transmission. if your members are convinced of the _ transmission. if your members are convinced of the importance - transmission. if your members are convinced of the importance of - transmission. if your members are convinced of the importance of the members you're talking about, what is to stop head teachers introducing on—site testing and increasing ventilation themselves ahead of any guidance from the government? qt guidance from the government? of course guidance from the government? qt course we are encouraging guidance from the government? t>t course we are encouraging schools to do as much as they possibly can, but what the government has said, its contingency free market is that the decisions on that particular regard only matter i therefore government —— contingency framework, these decisions are for government or local directors of public health and we want to work with them to make
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the right decisions and decisions quickly. but if schools are also to step up their own coronavirus safety measures, schools will also need the support of government and any resources are to be able to do so. and at those resources have been relatively slow in coming. haifa relatively slow in coming. how likel is relatively slow in coming. how likely is it. _ relatively slow in coming. how likely is it, do _ relatively slow in coming. how likely is it, do you _ relatively slow in coming. how likely is it, do you think, - relatively slow in coming. how likely is it, do you think, that it would be effective, necessary to reintroduce the bubbles that schools put in place?— put in place? well, the reality is that bubbles _ put in place? well, the reality is that bubbles had _ put in place? well, the reality is that bubbles had a _ put in place? well, the reality is that bubbles had a place. - put in place? well, the reality is that bubbles had a place. they l put in place? well, the reality is. that bubbles had a place. they may still have a place yet, but the reality is that there is a lot more that could be done without disrupting children's education, and we have pointed to a number of those measures, you know, the measures in relation to the extension of facemasks, the issues in relation to effective testing regime at school level and, of course, supporting
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schools to maintain good ventilation in all classrooms. that is absolutely crucial if we are going to curb the spread of this virus within schools and to keep schools open to pupils throughout the winter. idr open to pupils throughout the winter. , ., m open to pupils throughout the winter. , . ., winter. dr patrick roach from the nas uwr, _ winter. dr patrick roach from the nas uwr, thank _ winter. dr patrick roach from the nas uwt, thank you _ winter. dr patrick roach from the nas uwt, thank you for - winter. dr patrick roach from the nas uwt, thank you forjoining l winter. dr patrick roach from the i nas uwt, thank you forjoining us. we'll and we'll be getting a downing street coronavirus briefing at 15:00. speaking at the briefing will be england's deputy chief medical officer, profjonathan van—tam, prof wei shen lim, chair of thejcvi and drjune raine, regulatory agency. that will be followed by a statement from the health secretary sajid javid in the commons. we will bring all of that live on bbc news.
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a report on standards in the commons is just out in the last few minutes — it's from the chair of the house of commons mps standards committee. and it's been a busy morning at westminster — the labour leader sir keir starmer is carrying out a reshuffle of his frontbench team. our political correspondent chris mason joins us — first tell us about this report on standards, chris. what does it say? it has just been published in the last 15 minutes and predates the headlines of the last couple of weeks and sets out proposals which will be subject to further discussions and nothing will change in the immediate term, but let me talk you through some of the headline suggestions from the standards committee. they say there should be a ban on mps are providing paid parliamentary advice. , consultancy or strategic services and an end to the exemption whereby ministers are not required to register gifts and hospitality they receive in their ministerial capacity with the commons register.
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there should be an improvement in the transparency and searchability of the commons register of members' financial interests and one thing that stood out to me, a new road to the code of conduct suggested by this committee prohibiting a member from subjecting anyone to what they describe as unreasonable and excessive personal attack in any medium. this is a reflection that the committee and the parliamentary committee head of standards is now a platform where mps can attack one another bluntly and rather personally and the existing is rules predated the extent to which social media dominated people's lives now so there should be a willing of the conduct of mp they're on on social media because —— mps conduct on
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social media as it may not break the law, but could be regarded as disreputable. the report today from chris bryant, who we will hear from later, chiming in with what we have seen to a degree from borisjohnson and now from sir keir starmer in the context of the row was in the last couple of weeks, but this piece of work predating that and has been under way for the best part of the year and is likely to form the basis on which his committee and any political parties will hope to coalesce around a something of a consensus about how the rules will have to change because it will require that consensus for it to change because it is not really a party political thing, it has to be something that mps are collectively willing to back because it governance of their day—to—day behaviour here at westminster. and at the drama of the reshuffle in labour? the extraordinary thing this
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morning is there was a speech by the deputy labour leader on the subject of standards and that she had been speaking for barely a minute or two when rumours started flashing around on social media that there was going to be a reshuffle under way. on labour's front bench. when it came to questions after the speech about standards, i asked a question about standards, i asked a question about standards and, indeed, about the reshuffle and there were umpteen other questions about the reshuffle in which angela rayner said she knew very little about it and she was focused on standards. afterwards, she and her team said there had been a meeting this morning between angela rayner and keir starmer about the reshuffle, that was something that was confirmed by keir starmer�*s team, but the bottom line is she had a very little to say about the reshuffle, was clearly irritated she had not been consulted about it and onlyjust knew
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had not been consulted about it and only just knew that had not been consulted about it and onlyjust knew that it had not been consulted about it and only just knew that it was had not been consulted about it and onlyjust knew that it was happening and then, the added insult to injury for her was the directly elected deputy of the labour party, elected by the members are rather than appointed by keir starmer, is all of this was bubbling outjust at the point she was attempting to make a particularly focus the political attack on any conservatives and yet, so much of the attention was taken away by talk of a reshuffle, that is still under way and we still are now pretty limited details about who is moving where. but we may get some of those bigger movements between now and 60. i better let you go and find out what is on, then. —— and a 6pm. much going on some of which we know about and the rest were trying to find out, each day at westminster. you will not get very far sitting there, so off you trot! thank you. you're watching bbc news. a teenager has been remanded in secure accommodation, charged with the murder of a 12—year—old girl. ava white was stabbed in liverpool
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city centre on thursday. she was out with friends to watch the christmas lights being switched on when she was attacked. the boy, who's ia, cannot be named because of his age. he's due to appear at liverpool crown court on wednesday. tens of thousands of people have spent another night without power as temperatures dropped to as low as minus six in some parts of the uk. yellow ice warnings remain in place for much of scotland, england and wales, with some schools closed and rail services cancelled, as luxmy gopal reports. the impact of storm arwen continues. snow, ice and gusts of up to 100 mph caused severe damage with thousands of people facing a fourth day without power. worst hit is the north—east of scotland, where a major incident was declared. your viewers will remember the beast from the east in 2018. this is three times worse than that and probably some of the worst conditions we've seen for the electricity network in about 15 years.
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hundreds of thousands of homes across the country were without electricity for much of the weekend. it's been tough. we've got a couple of kids, one nine, one six, so it's been quite hard work. luckily my father—in—law lives about half a mile down the road, so we've been able to camp out down at his and have a few cups of tea and things like that. but, yeah, a bit of a nightmare not having any lights and no heating. it's been freezing and i've got two young kids, so we've had nothingl to do and nowhere to go. it's been really cold and awful. it's warned pockets of aberdeenshire could potentially be without power until wednesday. vaccination clinics in the area have been cancelled today and schools are closed today and tomorrow. northern powergrid said north—east england's network experienced its worst damage in 20 years. following heavy snowfall, more than 60 customers and an oasis tribute band have been trapped at a pub in the yorkshire dales since friday night, when the only
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road in and out was blocked. to be honest, they've been absolutely lovely. and the cliche i've been saying is they came as strangers and a lot of them are leaving as friends. and we are talking about a reunion next year. last night was the coldest of this season so far. temperatures fell as low as around minus nine celsius, recorded in cumbria. gritters were out in the early hours. it's been the busiest weekend so far of the season. the road temperatures got down to minus four degrees last night. our drivers have been out this morning since four o'clock treating the network, the roads and the cycleways and the footways across the city of york. the gritters are back after what's been a busy morning. in fact, for many teams, it was the busiest weekend of the season so far, as a result of the drop in temperatures and the conditions brought by storm arwen. while the worst of the storm has passed, authorities in aberdeenshire say it's left worse damage
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than first feared — and recovery will take longer than expected. luxmy gopal, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise. hello there. and the talking point with the weather this morning was just how cold it was and frosty, but thatis just how cold it was and frosty, but that is changing literally as we speak. quite a lot of cloud spilling in from the west, outbreaks of rain across much of scotland and some light drizzle across west facing coasts. a warm front introducing milder air as coasts. a warm front introducing milderairas we go coasts. a warm front introducing milder air as we go through the day so we keep some sunshine and a coolerfeel so we keep some sunshine and a cooler feel across eastern england but out to the us, temperatures peaking at 10 degrees. that warm front sinks its way steadily south through the night —— out to the east. producing quite a lot of cloud and showery epics, rain turning hoever into the far north—west but more importantly, it continues to dry in this milder air. temperature
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setting 8—11 in the morning. the pressure will move in, bringing heavy rain with it, behind that low the wind direction will change once again. it will strengthen and mean a speu again. it will strengthen and mean a spell of wet weather to the north—west and a milder story. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: nine cases of the omicron variant of coronavirus have been identified in the uk — six of them in scotland. the first minister, nicola sturgeon, says she's not afraid to take difficult decisions to keep people safe. there is no doubt that this presents potentially the most challenging development in the course of the pandemic for quite some time. this afternoon, scientists are expected to approve giving boosterjabs to more people to help fight the omicron variant. more than 60,000 homes in scotland and the north—east of england remain without power after storm arwen.
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the british socialite, ghislaine maxwell, a close associate of the convicted paedophile, jeffrey epstein, goes on trial in new york for sex trafficking fashion designer and creative director of louis vuitton, virgil abloh, has died at the age of a1. he'd been diagnosed with cancer. he founded the brand off—white, and had worked with some of the industry's biggest names. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre with holly. good afternoon. ralf rangick has said he is "excited to be joining manchester united and focused on making this a successful season." the club confirmed the german as interim boss for the next six months. the german takes over from ole gunnar solskjaer, who was sacked last week after the defeat to watford. michael carrick has been in caretaker charge since. rangnick has left his role as head of sports and development at russian club lokomotiv moscow to take
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up thejob. in a statement he added... the netherlands and arsenal striker vivianne miedema has been crowned bbc women's footballer of the year. she was presented with her award at arsenal's training ground. you are the bbc women's footballer of the year 2021, congratulations. cheering what a year she has had, scoring 10 goals at the tokyo olympics and breaking the women's super league all time goal scoring record. she won the award ahead of australia and chelsea striker sam kerr and spain and barcelona's alexia putellas. well, we saw the premier league game between burnley and tottenham
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called off yesterday due to snow — and now england's open training session in newcastle was cancelled because of a frozen pitch. not the best preparation for their world cup qualifier against latvia tomorrow — but they will train at an alternative venue. northerner beth mead said she wasn't surprised by the weather. i think for everyone we are frustrated, because it is what we love doing and we want to be on the pitch as much as possible. reparation for the game tomorrow. it is a bit annoying but like i said to serena this morning, i'm not surprised if stuff like this happens up surprised if stuff like this happens up north. — preparation for the game tomorrow. england captainjoe root said he has spoken to his former yorkshire team mate azeem rafiq and they plan to meet up after the ashes tour in australia. rafiq has said he thinks the english game is "institutionally racist" and he was hurt that root couldn't "recall" any instances of racism occuring. we exchanged a couple of messages
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quite recently and hopefully when we finish this tour we will get the opportunity to sit down and talk about this whole situation, about how we can move the game forward and, as i mentioned in my statement, as well, along with talking to azeem, i wanted to speak to lord patel at the club and those dialogues have started as well. i think it's important that we keep finding ways of bettering the sport, finding ways how we can individually affect things for the better and make a real change in things. suzann pettersen has been named has europe's next solheim cup captain. she's competed in the contest nine times in total — most famously as a wild card selection in 2019 — when she holed the winning putt on the 18th green at gleneagles. she takes over from catriona matthew, as europe chase three consecutive victories
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for the first time. the uk snooker championships continues at the moment. ronnie o'sullivan is _ continues at the moment. ronnie o'sullivan is leading _ continues at the moment. ronnie o'sullivan is leading 2-0 - continues at the moment. ronnie o'sullivan is leading 2-0 againstl o'sullivan is leading 2—0 against mark king at the moment. john higgins is up against xao and that game is on the bbc sport website. you can also read about how amir khan will face fellow former world champion kell brook at the ao arena in manchester on 19 february. after years of failed negotiations, the long—term rivals have finally agreed
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to the all—british clash. brook has not fought since being stopped in the fourth round by american terence crawford in november 2020, while khan won a points decision over australia's billy dib injanuary. that is it from me. four teenagers have beenjailed for life for killing the 15 year old schoolboy, keon lincoln, in birmingham injanuary. the four, aged between 1a and 18, have been given minimum terms of 16 to 19 years. ben godfrey reports. it was a barbaric and senseless attack. keon lincoln was stabbed from behind and it shot, just metres from behind and it shot, just metres from home. the gunfire was heard by his own mother, charmaine. mr; from home. the gunfire was heard by his own mother, charmaine.- his own mother, charmaine. my first instinct was. — his own mother, charmaine. my first instinct was, where _ his own mother, charmaine. my first instinct was, where is _ his own mother, charmaine. my first instinct was, where is my _ his own mother, charmaine. my first instinct was, where is my son? - his own mother, charmaine. my first instinct was, where is my son? and | instinct was, where is my son? and then to figure out what has happened and the reasons why. tt then to figure out what has happened and the reasons why.— and the reasons why. it wasn't established _ and the reasons why. it wasn't established in _ and the reasons why. it wasn't established in court _ and the reasons why. it wasn't established in court whether i and the reasons why. it wasn't - established in court whether keon lincoln's life was taken during a gang dispute but cctv pointed to a premeditated and brazen attack on
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the schoolboy in the middle of the afternoon. a group all under 18 hunting down a victim. the afternoon. a group all under 18 hunting down a victim. the fact that we have got — hunting down a victim. the fact that we have got youngsters _ hunting down a victim. the fact that we have got youngsters of- hunting down a victim. the fact that we have got youngsters of that - hunting down a victim. the fact that we have got youngsters of that age | we have got youngsters of that age going around carrying weapons, using firearms, it is an absolutely terrible state of affairs. tiara firearms, it is an absolutely terrible state of affairs. two were convicted of _ terrible state of affairs. two were convicted of murder, _ terrible state of affairs. two were convicted of murder, jailed - terrible state of affairs. two were convicted of murder, jailed for. terrible state of affairs. two were | convicted of murder, jailed for life with a minimum of 19 years. today in court thejudge lifted with a minimum of 19 years. today in court the judge lifted reporting restrictions to allow the naming of the gunman. he was a 1a—year—old. he will serve at least 16 years. another 16—year—old boy who can't be named received 17 years, while an 18—year—old kieran donaldson who supplied weapons, receives a 12 year jail term. t supplied weapons, receives a 12 year “ail term. u, supplied weapons, receives a 12 year 'ailterm. ., , ., jail term. i can only hope that the convictions _ jail term. i can only hope that the convictions offer _ jail term. i can only hope that the convictions offer some _ jail term. i can only hope that the convictions offer some sort - jail term. i can only hope that the convictions offer some sort of- convictions offer some sort of solace for keon lincoln's family, but to put the message out there amongst the community, we will investigate these matters and we
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will find those who are responsible and we will convict them. the motive for the attack — and we will convict them. the motive for the attack is _ and we will convict them. the motive for the attack is still _ and we will convict them. the motive for the attack is still not _ and we will convict them. the motive for the attack is still not clear - for the attack is still not clear and the chaos of that january afternoon and has only brought sadness, reflection and more confusion for keon lincoln the's family and friends. the confusion for keon lincoln the's family and friends.— confusion for keon lincoln the's family and friends. the crime that was committed _ family and friends. the crime that was committed is _ family and friends. the crime that was committed is a _ family and friends. the crime that was committed is a heinous - family and friends. the crime that| was committed is a heinous crime, family and friends. the crime that - was committed is a heinous crime, as i said, and wejust really was committed is a heinous crime, as i said, and we just really want to put an end to this. we want this to be one of those springboards that we can use, that can start bringing some questions to our community, and getting some answers. the some questions to our community, and getting some answers.— getting some answers. the gunman lied about his _ getting some answers. the gunman lied about his whereabouts - getting some answers. the gunman lied about his whereabouts that - getting some answers. the gunman | lied about his whereabouts that day, claiming he had been on an online school lesson during lockdown. keon lincoln's killers covered their faces in hoods and they felt untouchable as they inflicted eight knife wounds inside 30 seconds. keon had an unbelievable laugh, his mother said, had an unbelievable laugh, his mothersaid, he had an unbelievable laugh, his mother said, he was a loving child with a jolly spirit.
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ben godfrey, bbc news. the trial of ghislaine maxwell, on charges linked to her relationship with the convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein, will shortly open in new york. she denies trafficking and grooming under—age girls. ms maxwell, who's 59, is the youngest daughter of the disgraced media tycoon and former mp, robert maxwell. nada tawfik reports from new york. ghislaine maxwell and jeffrey epstein attracted friends in high places, increasing the intrigue around the duo. his death in 2019, under unusual circumstances, only raised more questions, leaving behind a dark cloud of mystery. the fallen heiress's trial may yet provide the most explicit details to date. in this indictment, ghislaine maxwell is charged with sex trafficking and recruiting and grooming four underage girls for epstein to abuse from 19911—2004. the jury here in new york will have to decide whether she's being made
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a scapegoat for epstein, or if she was his chief enabler. that abuse included sexualised massages. these sexualised massages developed into sexual encounters for which maxwell, in some instances, was present and participated. ghislaine maxwell's life before she met epstein was very different, but not without its own drama. she was the youngest child of the late disgraced newspaper baron robert maxwell. part of her appeal to epstein was her circle of rich and famous friends, including prince andrew. her trial comes at a very inconvenient time for the royal, as he fights off his own separate civil lawsuit by one of epstein's most outspoken accusers, virginia guiffre. ghislaine tells me that i have to do for andrew what i do forjeffrey. and that made me sick. i just didn't expect it from royalty. she said epstein and ghislaine maxwell forced her to have sex with the duke of york
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when she was just 17, in london, new york, and the us virgin islands. prince andrew has previously denied all of the allegations. but his attempts to put the scandal behind him have so farfailed. ian maxwell says at least one sibling will be present every day of his sister's trial. it is impossible for me to think that she would have been engaged in these really horrendous charges that she's now facing. it doesn't stack up in any single way. all those people who do not know her but who have some regard for the system ofjustice that operates in the united states, they should suspend theirjudgment. her case is expected to last six weeks, after which herfate is in the hands of the jury. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york.
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let's get more on storm arwen. 29,000 homes are facing a third day without electricity and travel is still disrupted, following the damage caused by the bad weather. northern powergrid says engineers are continuing to work round the clock to get remaining supplies restored. train operator lner says it will now not be able to run services between newcastle and edinburgh today. julie smith reports. weathering the storm in cumbria, both hartside pass and the a66 between county durham and cumbria have been closed due to snow. in alston today the community are keeping an eye out for each other. it's been a hard weekend for everybody. some people have been ok. some people have no power at all and are concerned about their water pipes because it's obviously freezing, but we are a pretty tough bunch so most are kind of saying it is what it is but can we have the power back as soon as possible, please? northumberland fire
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and rescue service received around 600 emergency calls and attended 170 incidents over the weekend. this afternoon officers are working across the county to help with the clear—up. we continue to work really closely with council, colleagues and other emergency services, utilities and the local communities themselves, really, to support residents and keep the county moving. we've got multiple resources deployed across all partner groups across northumberland to mobilise towards the needs of the local communities. nobody could have second guessed the impact storm arwen would have on our region. the gusting winds brought damage to property and vehicles with falling trees and bricks. in bamburgh many trees in the centre of the village were brought down by friday's storm. and the metro service was another casualty of fallen trees — with just weeks to go until xmas the whole system was off after a power cable was damaged. over the weekend 240,000 homes were without power.
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by today 29,000 homes are facing a third day without electric. whilst the storm may have passed there's much work left behind and the damage could take many days to assess. julie smith, bbc look north. our correspondent ben philipps has spent the day in torpins, in aberdeenshire which was badly hit by the storm. people in the north—east of scotland are feeling the after—effects of storm arwen which battered this area on friday and into saturday, over the weekend a major incident was declared because of this storm impact. to date schools and vaccination centres in aberdeenshire are closed and thousands of people are closed and thousands of people are still without power up, internet, running water and heating. internet, running water and heating. in the aberdeenshire village here, locals are now facing a third day without power, a stall has been set “p without power, a stall has been set up by a nearby cafe to provide essential supplies, including hot food and drink and bottled water, and there are a few of the locals
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now around the fire pit, to try and get a bit of warmth. one woman we spoke to who received a bacon sandwich said it was like winning the lottery. energy providers said the lottery. energy providers said the storm has caused catastrophic damage to their network and engineers are working around the clock to get people back online and an update from them at that 211,000 customers are still without power and some people have been told it could be later in the weeks until the power is restored. and you can keep up to date with the latest on how storm arwen is affecting where you live on your local bbc radio station. you can listen on fm, digital radio or via bbc sounds. the headlines on bbc news... nine cases of the omicron variant of coronavirus have been identified in the uk — six of them in scotland. the british socialite, ghislaine maxwell, a close associate of the convicted paedophile, jeffrey epstein, goes on trial in new york,
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for alleged sex trafficking. more than 60,000 homes in scotland and the north—east of england, remain without power after storm arwen. a memorial service has been held for the police sergeant matt ratana, shot dead in a custody centre in croydon last year. shot dead in a custody centre his colleagues in the metropolitan police, remember him as a unique, larger than life man, who loved rugby and motorbikes, and whose best asset was his ability to talk to anyone. here's our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford. on a crisp london morning, walking along silent streets lined by police officers, sergeant matt ratana's partner, sue bushby, accompanied by the commissioner, cressida dick, and the home secretary, priti patel. on their way into the memorial service in the guards�* chapel, they met police dogs from the ratana litter, named
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after the custody sergeant killed on duty last year. a new zealander and a keen rugby player, sergeant ratana was shot dead inside croydon custody centre in south london. a man has been charged with murder. # may the lord bless. you and keep you...#. inside the chapel, hundreds of officers were there to remember a larger than life colleague and a good friend. # to shine upon you and be gracious unto you #. - matt was a leader, a coach, a mentor, an inspiration. human, compassionate, decent. kind, fun, generous. a brilliant team—mate and a brilliant partner. sergeant ratana's partner then
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read a poignant poem. i thank you for the love that you have shown, but now it is time i travel on alone. so grieve for me a while, if grieve you must. then let your grief be comforted by trust. some of sergeant ratana's closest colleagues recalled their time with him in the force. there are still those people that when you open the door and walk in the custody suite or walk in the office, you think, today is going to be a good one, and matt was top of the list of those people. if you worked with matt, you felt safe. he had that... i can't put it into words but he had the ability to make police officers and the publicjust feel safe purely by his presence. if the world was full of matt ratanas, the world would be a better place. he's a tragic loss to the service. people could not help but like him, | even if they were anti—police, they| would love matt ratana. the questions about how he came to be shot dead inside a police
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station are yet to be resolved, but today was about remembering sergeant matt rata na. daniel sandford, bbc news. prince charles has arrived in barbados for a ceremony marking the removal of the queen as head of state. from midnight tonight, the island nation will formally become the world's newest republic. the governor general, sandra mason, will be inaugurated as the first president, but barbados will remain in the commonwealth. our correspondent celestina olulode has travelled back to the island, to find out what barbadians make of the move. it's the holiday destination sun seekers flock to, but a breeze of change is about to push through. barbados is becoming a republic. i'm of barbadian heritage. it's my first time back since i was a child. i'm curious to know what people on this island
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with a complex history think. links to the country's past can be found all over the island. this is where slave ships once docked. barbados was built and sustained on the backs of enslaved africans. 183a was the year slavery formally came to an end, but barbados remained a british colony. despite gaining its independence in 1966, the queen has remained the queen of the island. but that's about to change. the country is about to get its first president, a barbadian. travelling around, i hear how covid has affected tourism and the economy, but some still have strong opinions about going republic. we need to be free. like this family and their friends. lashawna griffith is a poet. she feels strongly about becoming a republic.
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i believe becoming a republic is to cut our colonial ties. in the last 55 years, you know, we have been fighting to become who we believe barbados can be. and for me, becoming a republic means we end that subservience to england and the monarchy and so on. but her mum feels differently. it changes nothing. it's not going to be better tomorrow. 0k, we are going to be, we are going to be a republic. is it going to be better? are the people still going to be living from paycheque to paycheque? theirfriend amina wants more information. i've been following a lot on television and suchlike. and, you know, the question is why now, why now? but the bunting has gone up and preparations for republic day continue. for the last few weeks, we were drained... i've come to meet the prime minister
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who, like those before her, have pushed to make this a reality. we believe that the unfinished business ought not to go past the 55th anniversary of independence. a large part of what we are doing requires us to engage with the world, and i want us to engage with the world as the best possible person that we can be. but the process of decolonisation is a slow one. debates on whether to remove colonial symbols like this statue of lord nelson remain a hot topic. what did it used to look like? alex downes campaigned last year for the monument to be removed from national hero square, once known as trafalgar square. we took down the statue to symbolise, look, this is in the heart of barbados. we are taking down the statue. and now we're going to become a republic. so it's all part of the process. it's not a debate. the natural scenery of this island remains the same,
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whilst the ripple effects of this move may take time to be fully felt. but lashawna's message is one of pride. republic day has begun. we have painted new areas and given birth to the reshaping of our society, reclaiming our sovereignty, reclaiming our cultural identity, knowing this is who we are. how young barbadians view themselves and look back at this moment years from now will be the most crucial part of the story of a nation that's fought hard to stand tall on its own. the fashion designer and creative director of louis vuitton, virgil abloh, has died at the age of a1. he'd been diagnosed with cancer. he founded the brand off—white, and had worked with some of the industry's biggest names including kanye west and jay z. sodaba haidare has more.
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virgil abloh made history in 2018 as the first black man to become the creative director of luxury brand louis vuitton, but the path to success wasn't always easy. it took me that sort of period to question myself and be like, "am "i going to believe in the myth that i can't be a designer "at the highest level, that i am supposed to make printed "t—shirts that are called streetwear?" i hope that through my narrative, people see that in themselves, that anything is achievable and those different genres arejust made to bejumped over. when he got his moment, abloh redefined the idea of the modern fashion designer, adding dj, artist and architect to his creative arsenal. announcing the sad news of his passing on instagram, a statement to his 6 million followers read...
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atjust age a1, abloh was seen as a trailblazer. he had been working with industry leaders and artists like kanye west and in 2013 he founded his own streetwear label. his clothes were worn by the likes of naomi campbell and kim kardashian. but he often said, "everything i do is for the 17—year—old "version of myself." virgil was of a scene that sort of was emerging in the fashion space. young kids, young guys who were buying tonnes of fashion, buying sneakers, listening to hip hop. and virgil was in touch with this audience. he was this customer at one time in his life. and so i think he just understood something that a lot of people in paris don't fully understand. abloh was one of the most visible black creatives in the industry. he took design into arenas where it had not gone before, like creating a rug out of an ikea receipt.
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the news of his passing has left the industry in shock, with big names taking to twitter to pay tribute to him. virgil abloh made a mark in the industry. he may be gone, but his influence on fashion is expected to live on. virgil abloh, who's died aged a1. now it's time for a look at the weather. storm arwen may have passed but it has left a legacy of cold it sitting in its wake. a bitterly cold start first thing this morning, down 2—9 in cumbria, and the cold air is across the country as we speak but thatis across the country as we speak but that is set to change to the cause
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of the day today. you can see the milder air, the yellow, waiting in the wings, and the temperatures are set to climb, they will climb through the night tonight, so first thing tomorrow morning, not —9 but we could see ten which is quite widely sitting as nine degrees. back to the here and now, the warm front is producing some rain out of scotland and northern ireland, quite a lot of cloud through north—west england and wales, and the best of the sunshine is to the east of the pennines down into the south—east. it will stay relatively cold down here but the mild air is already pushing into the course of the afternoon. there is the front, and behind that, the warmer air mass will start to tuck in, so through the night, quite a lot of cloud around, showers at times, some heavy and persistent into the far north—west of scotland but it will be the temperatures that will be the talking point first thing tomorrow morning. quite widely sitting at
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around 9—11 but a bit cooler in the far north of scotland. tomorrow we begin on a grey note, a lot of cloud around but a mild one, showers will turn increasingly heavy into western scotland and northern ireland is more significant rain arrives late in the day, top temperatures between 10-12. as in the day, top temperatures between 10—12. as we move at of tuesday into wednesday, the front sinks south and east so a spell of wet weather through the night, the spell of strong winds across the far north, but once again it is going to drag down the northerly air flow and the colder air is set to return, so a brief milder spell, and by the time we get into wednesday with the low moves away and we see plenty of showers piling in and the showers once again turning increasingly to sleet and snow especially over northern scotland and north—east england. top temperatures 3—7 in the north may and may be 8—10 further south. the cold air could continue to bring wintry showers on thursday but also a little more sunshine.
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this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall. the headlines: nine cases of the omicron variant of coronavirus have been identified in the uk, with six of them in scotland. the first minister, nicola sturgeon, says she's not afraid to take difficult decisions, to keep people safe. there is no doubt that this presents potentially the most challenging development in the course of the pandemic for quite some time. in the next half hour, scientists are expected to approve giving boosterjabs to more people to help fight the omicron variant. we'll bring you that live when it starts shortly. more than 60,000 homes in scotland and the north—east of england remain without power after storm arwen. the commons standards committee is calling for mps to be banned from providing paid
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parliamentary advice. its report follows recent concerns about lobbying and second jobs. the british socialite ghislaine maxwell, a close associate of the convicted paedophile jeffrey epstein, goes on trial in new york for alleged sex trafficking. good afternoon, welcome to bbc news. six cases of the omicron coronavirus variant have been detected in scotland, taking the total to nine so far in the uk. the scottish and welsh first ministers have written to borisjohnson calling for tougher travel restrictions. let's go to downing st where a covid data briefing
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is about to take place. i'mjonathan i'm jonathan van—tam, deputy chief medical officer of the department of health and social care and joined as usual byjune raine to my left, chief executive of the nhra and on my right by professor wei shen lim, chair of the covid—19 vaccine subcommittee of the jvc i —— june raine, chief executive of the mhra. i will open with a fury marks and then a pass over to my colleagues. we have known from the outset of this pandemic that variants have always been inevitable and we have seen many, alpha, beta, gamma, delta, which she will be familiar, and there are others. when a variant appears, it always causes initial concern because at that point we do
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not know quite how it will behave and, in particular, we do not know how our vaccines will hold up against that variant. it has always been the case that at some point, we have always said it, we are going to get a variant that gives us heightened concern. we are at that moment with omicron. it is the new kid on the block for now and i think it is a true to say that scientists around the world, notjust in the uk, unfortunately agree that this one is of increased concern. but in acknowledging that concern, i want to be very clear, and i want to emphasise the very high degree of current uncertainty in our knowledge. there are far more things we do not know yet then things we do know. that is going to change very
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rapidly as a scientist around the world mobilise on this over, i predict, the next three weeks, but please, everyone needs to give us time to assemble that data. what we can say in terms of the things we are certain of at this point, the omicron variant has many mutations, some of them are ones we already know something about and some are new. the number of mutations present already on first principles makes us worry about a possible effect on vaccine effectiveness. the other thing that is certain at the moment is that in south africa, there is definitely an elevated growth rate associated with the omicron variant. that is not the same as saying there
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is definitely an increase in transmissibility compared to the previous delta variant that they experience. that is a piece of science that still needs a bit more work. so the uncertainties are — transmissibility, severity of disease, where there is no definitive signal at this point from south africa, but we should all know that even without increased severity, as every case numbers grow, hospitalisations will also grow. finally, on the effects of the new variant and how well vaccine effectiveness will hold up, i wanted to be clear here this is not all doom and gloom at this stage and i doom and gloom at this stage and i do not want people to panic at this stage. if vaccine effectiveness is a reduced, as seems pretty likely to
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some extent, the biggest effects are likely to be in preventing infections and hopefully there will be smaller effects on preventing severe disease. but that is something that is there for scientists to work out in the next few weeks. there is also some science which professor lim will refer to in more detail that higher antibody protect better than the antibody protect better than the antibody levels. while we work this out, there are two basic things the scientists will have to do and at the first is to get some alive omicron virus and test that against the blood samples from people who have already been double vaccinated and people who have been double vaccinated and then busted. that will be part of boosted. the other
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piece that can be done his epidemiological studies which, as you know, involving large numbers of people and you also need large numbers of cases. at the moment, the only place those kind of studies can realistically be done are in south africa and there we rely on the world health organization under the south african public health authorities who are truly excellent and i hope they will get has an answer soon. and i hope they will get has an answersoon. on and i hope they will get has an answer soon. on that point, i think we have to again pay tribute to the excellence of a south african signs and at the authorities there —— south african signs and at the authorities to help bring this to the royal's attention at the earliest point they could do so. that is the —— to the world's
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attention. before that i will turn to dr raine to give an update on the safety situation and booster programme in particular. thank you. as the uk's — programme in particular. thank you. as the uk's independent _ programme in particular. thank you. as the uk's independent regulator, l as the uk's independent regulator, our role _ as the uk's independent regulator, our role is — as the uk's independent regulator, our role is to continue to ensure that— our role is to continue to ensure that a _ our role is to continue to ensure that a safe — our role is to continue to ensure that a safe and high and effective vaccines— that a safe and high and effective vaccines are provided to the public. your safety is always our highest priority and we have continued — our highest priority and we have continued to proactively monitor the safety— continued to proactively monitor the safety of— continued to proactively monitor the safety of all covid—19 vaccines scenes — safety of all covid—19 vaccines scenes at _ safety of all covid—19 vaccines scenes at the roll—out began a year a-o. scenes at the roll—out began a year ago our— scenes at the roll—out began a year ago. our regulatory position remains that covered vaccines available for use -- _ that covered vaccines available for use -- covid — that covered vaccines available for use —— covid vaccines available for use —— covid vaccines available for use in_ use —— covid vaccines available for use in the — use —— covid vaccines available for use in the uk, pfizer, astrazeneca and moderna have a positive balance in their— and moderna have a positive balance in their use — and moderna have a positive balance in their use. our role is ensuring continued — in their use. our role is ensuring continued use can be conducted in an effective _
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continued use can be conducted in an effective way and be confirmed in september available vaccines can be used as— september available vaccines can be used as a _ september available vaccines can be used as a safe and effective booster doses _ used as a safe and effective booster doses. since the access to boosters was extended to be rolled out in people _ was extended to be rolled out in people aged a0 and over, we have identified — people aged a0 and over, we have identified no new safety concerns. our identified no new safety concerns. 0ur careful— identified no new safety concerns. our careful review of the data found that the _ our careful review of the data found that the majority of adverse events were mild — that the majority of adverse events were mild or moderate and related to reactogenicity, the vaccine working, such as _ reactogenicity, the vaccine working, such as a _ reactogenicity, the vaccine working, such as a sore arm or headache or tiredness — such as a sore arm or headache or tiredness so— such as a sore arm or headache or tiredness. so when you're cold for your— tiredness. so when you're cold for your booster dose, you can come forward _ your booster dose, you can come forward confident that any benefits of the _ forward confident that any benefits of the vaccine by preventing serious covid-19 _ of the vaccine by preventing serious covid—19 outweigh any risks. briefly turning _ covid—19 outweigh any risks. briefly turning to _ covid—19 outweigh any risks. briefly turning to people aged 12—15 years, and ahead — turning to people aged 12—15 years, and ahead of our authorisation back in the _ and ahead of our authorisation back in the june — and ahead of our authorisation back in the june to extend the approval of the _ in the june to extend the approval of the pfizer—biontech vaccine, we carried _ of the pfizer—biontech vaccine, we carried out — of the pfizer—biontech vaccine, we carried out a robust regulatory review — carried out a robust regulatory review to _ carried out a robust regulatory review to determine this vaccine is safe and _ review to determine this vaccine is safe and effective for there is a younger— safe and effective for there is a youngerage safe and effective for there is a younger age group. we carried out a
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thorough _ younger age group. we carried out a thorough review of all clinical trial— thorough review of all clinical trial data _ thorough review of all clinical trial data in since then we have continued — trial data in since then we have continued to monitor, and monitoring all of— continued to monitor, and monitoring all of these _ continued to monitor, and monitoring all of these side effects aged under 18 has— all of these side effects aged under 18 has shown that these are, again, raise _ 18 has shown that these are, again, raise and _ 18 has shown that these are, again, raise and no— 18 has shown that these are, again, raise and no new safety issues. our message _ raise and no new safety issues. our message to — raise and no new safety issues. our message to people aged 12—15 is it is safe _ message to people aged 12—15 is it is safe to — message to people aged 12—15 is it is safe to have a second dose of the pfiler— is safe to have a second dose of the pfizer vaccine. is safe to have a second dose of the pfizervaccine. if is safe to have a second dose of the pfizer vaccine. if your code to receive — pfizer vaccine. if your code to receive your second dose, please go and take _ receive your second dose, please go and take up— receive your second dose, please go and take up that offer —— you're cold _ and take up that offer —— you're cold it— and take up that offer —— you're cold it will— and take up that offer —— you're cold. it will ensure your further protected — cold. it will ensure your further protected from covid—19. turning to the new_ protected from covid—19. turning to the new variant, we do not have evidence — the new variant, we do not have evidence at _ the new variant, we do not have evidence at the moment that the vaccines— evidence at the moment that the vaccines are used do not work against — vaccines are used do not work against any new omicron strain, but we are _ against any new omicron strain, but we are making this issue a priority. we are _ we are making this issue a priority. we are in— we are making this issue a priority. we are in discussion with vaccine manufacturers and the world health organization on potential modifications that may be needed for the current— modifications that may be needed for the current vaccines are to be maximally _ the current vaccines are to be maximally effective against any new variants _ maximally effective against any new variants if _ maximally effective against any new variants if required. my message
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here _ variants if required. my message here -- — variants if required. my message here -- the — variants if required. my message here —— the new variant. no vaccine will be _ here —— the new variant. no vaccine will be authorised for supply in the uk unless— will be authorised for supply in the uk unless the expected standards of safety, _ uk unless the expected standards of safety, quality and effectiveness are met — safety, quality and effectiveness are met. thank you.— safety, quality and effectiveness are met. thank you. thank you, dr raine. i are met. thank you. thank you, dr raine- twill— are met. thank you. thank you, dr raine. i will now _ are met. thank you. thank you, dr raine. i will now turn _ are met. thank you. thank you, dr raine. i will now turn to _ are met. thank you. thank you, dr raine. i will now turn to professor| raine. i will now turn to professor lim to make the substance of the jcvi announcement today.- lim to make the substance of the jcvi announcement today. thank you. ch jcvi announcement today. thank you. jcvi has been — jcvi announcement today. thank you. jcvi has been meeting _ jcvi announcement today. thank you. jcvi has been meeting regularly - jcvi announcement today. thank you. jcvi has been meeting regularly once| jcvi has been meeting regularly once a tutor— jcvi has been meeting regularly once a tutor two _ jcvi has been meeting regularly once a tutor two times a week over the last few— a tutor two times a week over the last few weeks because we are constantly reviewing the vaccine programme and constantly looking ahead _ programme and constantly looking ahead to what changes might be needed — ahead to what changes might be needed. seems that the emergence of omicron, _ needed. seems that the emergence of omicron, we have redoubled their efforts— omicron, we have redoubled their efforts and — omicron, we have redoubled their efforts and in the last few days, we have been— efforts and in the last few days, we have been reviewing vaccine response measures— have been reviewing vaccine response measures in— have been reviewing vaccine response measures in the light of this emerging new variant. there are two important _ emerging new variant. there are two important considerations that underpin our advice. the first is
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the importance of boosters and this is a really— the importance of boosters and this is a really important point. the vaccines— is a really important point. the vaccines we are using in the uk and that are _ vaccines we are using in the uk and that are being used globally were developed against the original virus type _ developed against the original virus type. viruses that develop variants and that— type. viruses that develop variants and that are different compared to the original virus increase the likelihood of a mismatch between the vaccine _ likelihood of a mismatch between the vaccine on _ likelihood of a mismatch between the vaccine on the one hand and at the variant— vaccine on the one hand and at the variant on— vaccine on the one hand and at the variant on the other hand. the larger— variant on the other hand. the larger the _ variant on the other hand. the larger the mismatch between vaccine and variant, — larger the mismatch between vaccine and variant, the greater the likelihood that the level of protection provided by the vaccine will be _ protection provided by the vaccine will be lowered. from what we know that the _ will be lowered. from what we know that the omicron variant so far, it may be _ that the omicron variant so far, it may be that — that the omicron variant so far, it may be that the vaccines we had at the moment may be less good than against _ the moment may be less good than against the current circulating delta — against the current circulating delta variant. one way of reducing
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the impact — delta variant. one way of reducing the impact of this mismatch between vaccine _ the impact of this mismatch between vaccine and _ the impact of this mismatch between vaccine and variant is to increase the strength of the immune response provided _ the strength of the immune response provided by the current vaccine. in other— provided by the current vaccine. in other words, provided by the current vaccine. in otherwords, if provided by the current vaccine. in other words, if we can raise the level— other words, if we can raise the level of— other words, if we can raise the level of the _ other words, if we can raise the level of the immune response generated by the vaccine, that higher— generated by the vaccine, that higher level of immune response will reach _ higher level of immune response will reach out _ higher level of immune response will reach out and provide extra protection to mismatched variants. that is— protection to mismatched variants. that is what we can do, fortunately. because _ that is what we can do, fortunately. because we — that is what we can do, fortunately. because we know that with the mrna vaccines, _ because we know that with the mrna vaccines, the moderna vaccine and the pfizer—biontech vaccine, and to a lesser— the pfizer—biontech vaccine, and to a lesser extent, the astrazeneca vaccine — a lesser extent, the astrazeneca vaccine a — a lesser extent, the astrazeneca vaccine, a boost of the vaccines provides— vaccine, a boost of the vaccines provides a — vaccine, a boost of the vaccines provides a very, very strong immune response _ provides a very, very strong immune response. the immune response provided — response. the immune response provided with the boost is measured to be higherthan the immune response _ to be higherthan the immune response obtained after the second
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dose _ response obtained after the second dose so— response obtained after the second dose. so there is a stepwise increase _ dose. so there is a stepwise increase. this increase in women response — increase. this increase in women response will broaden the protection -- in _ response will broaden the protection —— in immune response will broaden protection, — —— in immune response will broaden protection, hopefully against the new variant. that is the first important _ new variant. that is the first important consideration. the second important _ important consideration. the second important consideration. the second important consideration is timing. with any— important consideration is timing. with any vaccine during a pandemic, we get _ with any vaccine during a pandemic, we get the _ with any vaccine during a pandemic, we get the greatest benefit of the vaccine _ we get the greatest benefit of the vaccine both for individuals and society, — vaccine both for individuals and society, if— vaccine both for individuals and society, if the vaccine is deployed before _ society, if the vaccine is deployed before the — society, if the vaccine is deployed before the wave starts. if we deploy a vaccine _ before the wave starts. if we deploy a vaccine in — before the wave starts. if we deploy a vaccine in the middle of a wave or after— a vaccine in the middle of a wave or after even _ a vaccine in the middle of a wave or after even at — a vaccine in the middle of a wave or after even at the peak of a wave, then— after even at the peak of a wave, then any— after even at the peak of a wave, then any benefit from the vaccine is much _ then any benefit from the vaccine is much lower~ — then any benefit from the vaccine is much lower. we therefore want to provide _ much lower. we therefore want to provide boosters early enough such that it _ provide boosters early enough such that it is _ provide boosters early enough such that it is before any possible way. this i_ that it is before any possible way. this i am — that it is before any possible way. this i am not here predicting there
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will be _ this i am not here predicting there will be a _ this i am not here predicting there will be a wave of the new variant, but should — will be a wave of the new variant, but should there be a wave, we want to be _ but should there be a wave, we want to be in_ but should there be a wave, we want to be in the — but should there be a wave, we want to be in the best possible position. so there _ to be in the best possible position. so there is— to be in the best possible position. so there is an advantage in having boosters _ so there is an advantage in having boosters and an advantage in boosting _ boosters and an advantage in boosting before any imminent wave arrives _ boosting before any imminent wave arrives. with those two principles in mind, — arrives. with those two principles in mind, we — arrives. with those two principles in mind, we have five pieces of advice — in mind, we have five pieces of advice we _ in mind, we have five pieces of advice we want to give as part of the vaccine — advice we want to give as part of the vaccine response against this new variant. the first, we are advising — new variant. the first, we are advising me booster programme should now be _ advising me booster programme should now be extended to adults aged 18—39 years old. _ now be extended to adults aged 18—39 years old, in addition to the existing _ years old, in addition to the existing programme for boosters, meaning — existing programme for boosters, meaning that from now, all adults a-ed meaning that from now, all adults aged 18 _ meaning that from now, all adults aged 18 years and above would be eligible _ aged 18 years and above would be eligible for a booster. the second piece _ eligible for a booster. the second piece of— eligible for a booster. the second piece of advice is the booster programme should follow prioritisation according to age and
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being _ prioritisation according to age and being in_ prioritisation according to age and being in an — prioritisation according to age and being in an at—risk group, so someone _ being in an at—risk group, so someone with an underlying health condition— someone with an underlying health condition has a higher risk of covid-id _ condition has a higher risk of covid—19. the reason for this is that— covid—19. the reason for this is that we — covid—19. the reason for this is that we have not seen any data to suggest _ that we have not seen any data to suggest that the new variant is in any way— suggest that the new variant is in any way different from the previous variants _ any way different from the previous variants in — any way different from the previous variants in terms of who is most at risk of— variants in terms of who is most at risk of severe disease. as we know from _ risk of severe disease. as we know from before, older age to people and those _ from before, older age to people and those with— from before, older age to people and those with underlying health conditions are at higher risk of severe — conditions are at higher risk of severe disease and so we want to protect _ severe disease and so we want to protect them as a priority. the booster— protect them as a priority. the booster programme is therefore prioritise — booster programme is therefore prioritise now accorded ding to age with any— prioritise now accorded ding to age with any booster dose given and no sooner— with any booster dose given and no sooner than— with any booster dose given and no sooner than three months after the second _ sooner than three months after the second dose. the first piece of advice — second dose. the first piece of advice is — second dose. the first piece of advice is that people who are severely _ advice is that people who are severely immune a compromise should now be _ severely immune a compromise should now be offered a booster dose ——
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third _ now be offered a booster dose —— third piece — now be offered a booster dose —— third piece. forthem, this would be their fourth— third piece. forthem, this would be their fourth vaccine dose, the three doses— their fourth vaccine dose, the three doses they— their fourth vaccine dose, the three doses they have had so far would be considered _ doses they have had so far would be considered a primary dose and their fourth _ considered a primary dose and their fourth would be considered the booster— fourth would be considered the booster dose, it should be given no sooner— booster dose, it should be given no sooner than— booster dose, it should be given no sooner than three months after their last vaccine — sooner than three months after their last vaccine dose. firstly, regardless of the type of vaccine that was — regardless of the type of vaccine that was given for the primary course — that was given for the primary course, the first two doses, either of the _ course, the first two doses, either of the mrna vaccines, the moderna vaccine _ of the mrna vaccines, the moderna vaccine or— of the mrna vaccines, the moderna vaccine or the pfizer—biontech vaccine or the pfizer— biontech vaccine — vaccine or the pfizer—biontech vaccine can and should be used in preference — vaccine can and should be used in preference as at the booster vaccine _ preference as at the booster vaccine. the moderna vaccine at a 50 mcg, _ vaccine. the moderna vaccine at a 50 mcg, which— vaccine. the moderna vaccine at a 50 mcg, which is— vaccine. the moderna vaccine at a 50 mcg, which is half the dose used in the primary— mcg, which is half the dose used in the primary course, and at the pfizer—biontech vaccine at 30 mcg, a standard _ pfizer—biontech vaccine at 30 mcg, a standard adult dose, both gave extremely good antibody levels. they
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generate _ extremely good antibody levels. they generate a _ extremely good antibody levels. they generate a very strong immune response — generate a very strong immune response given as a boost. there are some _ response given as a boost. there are some people who are unable to receive — some people who are unable to receive an _ some people who are unable to receive an mrna vaccine and they may have had _ receive an mrna vaccine and they may have had at— receive an mrna vaccine and they may have had at the astrazeneca vaccine both for— have had at the astrazeneca vaccine both for their first dose and their second _ both for their first dose and their second doses. for them, we advise that they— second doses. for them, we advise that they receive as their booster, the astrazeneca vaccine again. the astrazeneca vaccine does give a good boost, _ astrazeneca vaccine does give a good boost, albeit not as good as at the moderna _ boost, albeit not as good as at the moderna and pfizer—biontech vaccines _ moderna and pfizer—biontech vaccines. but it is still a good boost — vaccines. but it is still a good boost and _ vaccines. but it is still a good boost and we would advise that they have a _ boost and we would advise that they have a boost, rather than have no booster— have a boost, rather than have no booster dose all. lastly, we advise that children aged 12—15 years are offered _ that children aged 12—15 years are offered a — that children aged 12—15 years are offered a second dose of vaccine at the standard dose of 30 mcg of a
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pfizer—biontech vaccine, 12 weeks after their— pfizer—biontech vaccine, 12 weeks after their first dose. this is the same _ after their first dose. this is the same schedule as a16—17 —year—olds at the _ same schedule as a16—17 —year—olds at the moment. we are —— for 16 and 17 euros _ at the moment. we are —— for 16 and 17 euros we — at the moment. we are —— for 16 and 17 euros. we are closely watching emerging — 17 euros. we are closely watching emerging data on omicron and if there _ emerging data on omicron and if there is— emerging data on omicron and if there is a — emerging data on omicron and if there is a need to advise an interval— there is a need to advise an interval between dose one and two being _ interval between dose one and two being altered, we will do so but at the moment the interval between dose one and _ the moment the interval between dose one and two, a12 and 15 euros 16 and 16 one and two, a12 and 15 euros 16 and itiand— one and two, a12 and 15 euros 16 and 16 and 17—year—olds is a 12 weeks. 16 and17—year—olds is a 12 weeks. -- for— 16 and17—year—olds is a 12 weeks. -- for 12_ 16 and 17—year—olds is a 12 weeks. -- for 12 - — 16 and 17—year—olds is a 12 weeks. —— for 12 —17—year—olds. those with underlying — —— for 12 —17—year—olds. those with underlying health conditions that put them at higher risk for covid-id _ put them at higher risk for covid—19. the majority of people who are aged _ covid—19. the majority of people who are aged 50 — covid—19. the majority of people who are aged 50 years and above are already— are aged 50 years and above are already eligible for a booster. some of those _
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already eligible for a booster. some of those who are already eligible have not— of those who are already eligible have not yet received at their booster— have not yet received at their booster vaccination. have not yet received at their boostervaccination. i have not yet received at their booster vaccination. i strongly urge everyone _ booster vaccination. i strongly urge everyone who has already eligible to please _ everyone who has already eligible to please make the effort, book your appointment, and have the booster. that will— appointment, and have the booster. that will be — appointment, and have the booster. that will be the best way to protect yourselves, your loved ones and the wider— yourselves, your loved ones and the wider society against any possible new variant wave of infection. thank you. new variant wave of infection. thank ou. . ~' new variant wave of infection. thank ou. . ~ , ., new variant wave of infection. thank ou. . ~ �* ., new variant wave of infection. thank ou. ., ~ �* ., new variant wave of infection. thank ou. . �* ., ., you. thank you. before we open for questions. — you. thank you. before we open for questions. |— you. thank you. before we open for questions, i would _ you. thank you. before we open for questions, i would just _ you. thank you. before we open for questions, i would just like - you. thank you. before we open for questions, i would just like to - you. thank you. before we open for questions, i would just like to sum | questions, i would just like to sum up questions, i would just like to sum up a little bit. today we have heard some very reassuring words from dr raine about the safety of any booster programme as it is monitored on an ongoing way. and i think the three key themes we have heard in relation to omicron and thejcvi advice are uncertainty, concern, and timing. an opportunity now to get
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the timing right. jcvi has today announced a renewed urgency and a further expansion of the uk booster programme. we do not know what is going to happen next. as i explained to you, the next three weeks will be weeks of scientific uncertainty, but whilst we wait for the best to clear on what this concerning variant actually means, there is no time to delay, it is our opportunity to get ahead, and vaccine boosting is everything we can do most easily whilst we wait for that science best to clear. to me, and as you know, i love football, we started with 11 players in the team with the wuhan vaccine, and you could say we have kind of picked up a couple of injuries, when alpha came along,
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then a delta came along, those are variants that are slightly different from the wuhan original strain. and we have had to use our subs off the bench to keep us in the game, but we are well in the game and you can see that with the current epidemiology in relation to delta that the vaccines are holding up very well and are largely keeping us out of trouble. now, omicron is like now picking up a couple of yellow cards to key players on top. we may be ok, but we kind of are starting to feel at risk that we might go down to ten players. if that happens or is a risk that is going to happen, we need everyone on the pitch to up their game in the meantime. that is really upping your game in terms of boosters and antibody responses. we are not going to wait for the red card to happen, we are going to act decisively now and were asking everyone to up their game, we are
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asking everyone to play their part in the urgency now of the booster programme, coming forward the moment your call by the nhs. it has really, frankly, never been more vital that the booster campaign has never been more vital at this point in time. thank you. i will now open for questions and the first question is fromjim reed questions and the first question is from jim reed at the bbc. this sounds like _ from jim reed at the bbc. this sounds like quite _ from jim reed at the bbc. this sounds like quite a _ from jim reed at the bbc. this sounds like quite a significant, or very significant _ sounds like quite a significant, or very significant extension - sounds like quite a significant, or very significant extension of - sounds like quite a significant, or very significant extension of the i very significant extension of the booster— very significant extension of the booster programme. _ very significant extension of the booster programme. can- very significant extension of the booster programme. can you i very significant extension of the i booster programme. can you tell very significant extension of the - booster programme. can you tell us how competent _ booster programme. can you tell us how competent you _ booster programme. can you tell us how competent you are _ booster programme. can you tell us how competent you are that - booster programme. can you tell us how competent you are that the - booster programme. can you tell usi how competent you are that the nhs can deliver— how competent you are that the nhs can deliver all — how competent you are that the nhs can deliver all these _ how competent you are that the nhs can deliver all these doses _ how competent you are that the nhs can deliver all these doses before i can deliver all these doses before christmas? — can deliver all these doses before christmas? are _ can deliver all these doses before christmas? are will— can deliver all these doses before christmas? are will there - can deliver all these doses before christmas? are will there be - can deliver all these doses before . christmas? are will there be people who will— christmas? are will there be people who will struggle _ christmas? are will there be people who will struggle to _ christmas? are will there be people who will struggle to get _ christmas? are will there be people who will struggle to get these - who will struggle to get these appointments _ who will struggle to get these appointments before - who will struggle to get these appointments before that - who will struggle to get these appointments before that a l who will struggle to get these - appointments before that a festive break? _ appointments before that a festive break? so — appointments before that a festive break? , , ., , break? so this is a very new guidance — break? so this is a very new guidance indeed, _ break? so this is a very new guidance indeed, as - break? so this is a very new guidance indeed, as you - break? so this is a very new| guidance indeed, as you will understand. we have had to work at extreme pace given the news coming out of south africa being so recent. the nhs is now working through the updated guidance and it is going to set out in the next few days how
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that will be operationalised. i would say it is undoubtedly a very complex phase in the nhs vaccination programme because we have still got people coming for first doses, thankfully, second doses, as well as a third doses for the immunocompromised, and boosters and young people in schools, so there is a great deal going on. an important message to the nhs wanted me to convey today is that they understand the real urgency of this, they are up the real urgency of this, they are up for the task, but they say they will contact you when you need to act and they will open any booking in a kind of orderly way because one of the things we do not want is people from the very youngest no eligible cohorts somehow getting in front of people who are at much
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higher risk of a bad outcome if they were to get covid—19. emily morgan from itv. were to get covid-19. emily morgan from itv. ., , ., were to get covid-19. emily morgan from itv. ., , , were to get covid-19. emily morgan fromitv. ., , , ., from itv. you 'ust asked people not to anic, from itv. you 'ust asked people not to panic. but — from itv. you just asked people not to panic. but you — from itv. you just asked people not to panic, but you are _ from itv. you just asked people not to panic, but you are reducing - from itv. you just asked people not to panic, but you are reducing the i to panic, but you are reducing the -ap to panic, but you are reducing the gap between _ to panic, but you are reducing the gap between the _ to panic, but you are reducing the gap between the second - to panic, but you are reducing the gap between the second dose - to panic, but you are reducing the gap between the second dose and to panic, but you are reducing the - gap between the second dose and the booster— gap between the second dose and the booster from — gap between the second dose and the booster from five _ gap between the second dose and the booster from five months _ gap between the second dose and the booster from five months to - booster from five months to three months. _ booster from five months to three months. is — booster from five months to three months, is that _ booster from five months to three months, is that not _ booster from five months to three months, is that not a _ booster from five months to three months, is that not a sign - booster from five months to three months, is that not a sign that. booster from five months to threel months, is that not a sign that you yourself— months, is that not a sign that you yourself are — months, is that not a sign that you yourself are extremely— months, is that not a sign that you yourself are extremely worried - months, is that not a sign that you . yourself are extremely worried about this variant _ yourself are extremely worried about this variant and _ yourself are extremely worried about this variant and people will— this variant and people will naturally— this variant and people will naturally panic? _ this variant and people will naturally panic? so - this variant and people will naturally panic?— this variant and people will naturally panic? this variant and people will naturall anic? ., ., . naturally panic? so i will allow wei shen to answer— naturally panic? so i will allow wei shen to answer the _ naturally panic? so i will allow wei shen to answer the question - naturally panic? so i will allow wei shen to answer the question on i naturally panic? so i will allow wei| shen to answer the question on the interval but in terms of the panic bit, i am asking people not to panic, but i'm not asking them to completely ignore the weather forecast either. you know, we look at south africa, it is our kind of weather forecast here in the same way that the weather forecasters have warned us about storm arwen in the last few days, you cannot ignore what you see around the world and it is more urgent than ever before because of what has happened. on any
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three—month point, there is a specific answer that wei shen should give you. specific answer that wei shen should rive ou. . ., specific answer that wei shen should rive ou. . ~' ,, specific answer that wei shen should rive ou. ., ,, i. ., specific answer that wei shen should rive ou. ., ,, ., ., give you. thank you. in general on any logical— give you. thank you. in general on any logical principles, _ give you. thank you. in general on any logical principles, the - give you. thank you. in general on any logical principles, the longer l any logical principles, the longer the duration between one dose —— immunological principles, the longer the duration between one dose and the duration between one dose and the next _ the duration between one dose and the next we know the better the effect _ the next we know the better the effect. we know that from other vaccines — effect. we know that from other vaccines and other immunisation programmes. when it is possible, it is usually— programmes. when it is possible, it is usually advisable and beneficial to extend — is usually advisable and beneficial to extend the duration between two vaccine _ to extend the duration between two vaccine doses. that is what we have tried to _ vaccine doses. that is what we have tried to do _ vaccine doses. that is what we have tried to do from the very start. on the balance — tried to do from the very start. on the balance of that, we also need to be aware _ the balance of that, we also need to be aware that, as i said, timing of the vaccine — be aware that, as i said, timing of the vaccine dose is important. we do not want _ the vaccine dose is important. we do not want to— the vaccine dose is important. we do not want to wait so long that a wave is upon _ not want to wait so long that a wave is upon us _ not want to wait so long that a wave is upon us and we have not delivered the booster— is upon us and we have not delivered the booster dose either. we need to strike _ the booster dose either. we need to strike a _ the booster dose either. we need to strike a balance between waiting
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longer, — strike a balance between waiting longer, but not waiting so long that we miss— longer, but not waiting so long that we miss the chance. in shorting the dose _ we miss the chance. in shorting the dose duration, we have chosen three months _ dose duration, we have chosen three months because there is data from the booster study trial in the uk which _ the booster study trial in the uk which is — the booster study trial in the uk which is due to be published and that if— which is due to be published and that if you — which is due to be published and that if you give a booster dose at about _ that if you give a booster dose at about a _ that if you give a booster dose at about a three month interval from dose _ about a three month interval from dose two. — about a three month interval from dose two, one still sees a very strong — dose two, one still sees a very strong booster response. a lot of trials _ strong booster response. a lot of trials have — strong booster response. a lot of trials have used a longer interval between — trials have used a longer interval between dose two and the booster dose and _ between dose two and the booster dose and show a very strong response. _ dose and show a very strong response, but this trial in the uk showed — response, but this trial in the uk showed that very strong response even _ showed that very strong response even when the booster dose was given at three _ even when the booster dose was given at three months. so we feel that it is a reasonable to shorten the duration— is a reasonable to shorten the duration to three months, but no shorter— duration to three months, but no shorter than that. because that is where _ shorter than that. because that is where the — shorter than that. because that is where the evidence lies. we can give a booster—
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where the evidence lies. we can give a booster dose at three months and expect— a booster dose at three months and expect a _ a booster dose at three months and expect a good response based on trial data — expect a good response based on trial data. we do not want to go to early _ trial data. we do not want to go to earl . . ., trial data. we do not want to go to earl . ., ,, i. trial data. we do not want to go to earl. ., ~' ,, ~ trial data. we do not want to go to earl. ., ,, i. . ,, trial data. we do not want to go to earl . ., ~' i., ~ ,, ., early. thank you, wei shen. tom clark from _ early. thank you, wei shen. tom clark from sky — early. thank you, wei shen. tom clark from sky news. _ early. thank you, wei shen. tom clark from sky news. given - early. thank you, wei shen. tom clark from sky news. given that| clark from sky news. given that --eole in clark from sky news. given that people in younger— clark from sky news. given that people in younger age _ clark from sky news. given that people in younger age groups i clark from sky news. given that i people in younger age groups will clark from sky news. given that - people in younger age groups will be waiting _ people in younger age groups will be waiting three — people in younger age groups will be waiting three months _ people in younger age groups will be waiting three months for _ people in younger age groups will be waiting three months for their- waiting three months for their booster— waiting three months for their boosterjabs, _ waiting three months for their boosterjabs, i— waiting three months for their boosterjabs, i imagine- waiting three months for their boosterjabs, i imagine manyl waiting three months for their. boosterjabs, i imagine many will not get _ boosterjabs, i imagine many will not get them _ boosterjabs, i imagine many will not get them until— boosterjabs, i imagine many will not get them until omicron - boosterjabs, i imagine many will not get them until omicron is- boosterjabs, i imagine many will. not get them until omicron is more transmissible _ not get them until omicron is more transmissible, makes _ not get them until omicron is more transmissible, makes its _ not get them until omicron is more transmissible, makes its way - not get them until omicron is more transmissible, makes its way herel not get them until omicron is more. transmissible, makes its way here in large _ transmissible, makes its way here in large numbers _ transmissible, makes its way here in large numbers. did— transmissible, makes its way here in large numbers. did any— transmissible, makes its way here in large numbers. did anyjcvi - transmissible, makes its way here inj large numbers. did anyjcvi consider whether— large numbers. did anyjcvi consider whether it _ large numbers. did anyjcvi consider whether it would _ large numbers. did anyjcvi consider whether it would be _ large numbers. did anyjcvi consider whether it would be better— large numbers. did anyjcvi consider whether it would be better to - large numbers. did anyjcvi consider whether it would be better to use - whether it would be better to use those _ whether it would be better to use those doses — whether it would be better to use those doses elsewhere _ whether it would be better to use those doses elsewhere in - whether it would be better to use those doses elsewhere in the - whether it would be better to use . those doses elsewhere in the world? i'm those doses elsewhere in the world? i'm taking _ those doses elsewhere in the world? i'm taking your— those doses elsewhere in the world? i'm taking your football— those doses elsewhere in the world? i'm taking your football analogy, - those doses elsewhere in the world? i'm taking your football analogy, is l i'm taking your football analogy, is it time _ i'm taking your football analogy, is it time the — i'm taking your football analogy, is it time the premiership _ i'm taking your football analogy, is it time the premiership was - i'm taking your football analogy, is it time the premiership was a - i'm taking your football analogy, is it time the premiership was a bit . it time the premiership was a bit more _ it time the premiership was a bit more generous— it time the premiership was a bit more generous to _ it time the premiership was a bit more generous to less _ it time the premiership was a bit more generous to less fortunate j more generous to less fortunate leagues, — more generous to less fortunate leagues, less— more generous to less fortunate leagues, less wealthy _ more generous to less fortunate leagues, less wealthy leagues . more generous to less fortunate l leagues, less wealthy leagues and surely— leagues, less wealthy leagues and surely vaccinate _ leagues, less wealthy leagues and surely vaccinate as _ leagues, less wealthy leagues and surely vaccinate as that _ leagues, less wealthy leagues and surely vaccinate as that is - leagues, less wealthy leagues and surely vaccinate as that is what . surely vaccinate as that is what these _ surely vaccinate as that is what these new _ surely vaccinate as that is what these new variants _ surely vaccinate as that is what these new variants are - surely vaccinate as that is what| these new variants are teaching surely vaccinate as that is what - these new variants are teaching us? on the _ these new variants are teaching us? on the point — these new variants are teaching us? on the point about _ these new variants are teaching us? on the point about global _ these new variants are teaching us? on the point about global supply- these new variants are teaching us? on the point about global supply ofl on the point about global supply of vaccines, all public health people in the uk and around the world are
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very clear that none of us are safe until we are all safe. we are very committed to the international supplier vaccines to all countries. so far, the uk has donated 30.6 million doses of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine and already be scheduled in commitments for 2022 amount to another 20 million doses of oxford—astrazeneca and 20 million yarns in doses that were also ascribed to the uk —— jansen doses. we will have given half of our total order of astrazeneca to countries in need. but we also have a responsibility to try to login and protect the gains we have made against this virus in the uk and it has a difficult balancing act.—
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the uk and it has a difficult balancin: act. g , ., balancing act. chris? just more broadly with — balancing act. chris? just more broadly with the _ balancing act. chris? just more broadly with the situation - balancing act. chris? just more broadly with the situation in . balancing act. chris? just more| broadly with the situation in the uk, the — broadly with the situation in the uk, the scottish— broadly with the situation in the uk, the scottish government i broadly with the situation in the l uk, the scottish government said they found — uk, the scottish government said they found cases _ uk, the scottish government said they found cases with _ uk, the scottish government said they found cases with no - uk, the scottish government said they found cases with no history. uk, the scottish government saidl they found cases with no history of travel— they found cases with no history of travel and — they found cases with no history of travel and have _ they found cases with no history of travel and have suggested - they found cases with no history of. travel and have suggested community transmission — travel and have suggested community transmission is — travel and have suggested community transmission is there _ travel and have suggested community transmission is there and _ travel and have suggested community transmission is there and clearly- transmission is there and clearly there _ transmission is there and clearly there are — transmission is there and clearly there are dozens— transmission is there and clearly there are dozens of— transmission is there and clearly there are dozens of suspected . transmission is there and clearly- there are dozens of suspected cases, suggesting _ there are dozens of suspected cases, suggesting some _ there are dozens of suspected cases, suggesting some element _ there are dozens of suspected cases, suggesting some element of- there are dozens of suspected cases, i suggesting some element of community transmission _ suggesting some element of community transmission more — suggesting some element of community transmission more widely. _ suggesting some element of community transmission more widely. how- transmission more widely. how concerned _ transmission more widely. how concerned should _ transmission more widely. how concerned should we _ transmission more widely. how concerned should we be - transmission more widely. how concerned should we be aboutl transmission more widely. how. concerned should we be about this and what _ concerned should we be about this and what does _ concerned should we be about this and what does it _ concerned should we be about this and what does it tell _ concerned should we be about this and what does it tell about - concerned should we be about this and what does it tell about the - and what does it tell about the potential— and what does it tell about the potential increase _ and what does it tell about the i potential increase transmissibility of this— potential increase transmissibility of this variant? _ potential increase transmissibility of this variant? i _ potential increase transmissibility of this variant? i suppose - potential increase transmissibility l of this variant? i suppose secondly, link to— of this variant? i suppose secondly, link to that, — of this variant? i suppose secondly, link to that, even _ of this variant? i suppose secondly, link to that, even if _ of this variant? i suppose secondly, link to that, even if it _ of this variant? i suppose secondly, link to that, even if it is— of this variant? i suppose secondly, link to that, even if it is more - link to that, even if it is more transmissible _ link to that, even if it is more transmissible and _ link to that, even if it is more transmissible and is - link to that, even if it is more transmissible and is here - link to that, even if it is more transmissible and is here in. link to that, even if it is more - transmissible and is here in large numbers, — transmissible and is here in large numbers, given— transmissible and is here in large numbers, given how— transmissible and is here in large numbers, given how many- transmissible and is here in large numbers, given how many deltal transmissible and is here in large - numbers, given how many delta cases it is, it _ numbers, given how many delta cases it is, it will— numbers, given how many delta cases it is, it will probably— numbers, given how many delta cases it is, it will probably be _ numbers, given how many delta cases it is, it will probably be into _ numbers, given how many delta cases it is, it will probably be into the - it is, it will probably be into the new_ it is, it will probably be into the new year— it is, it will probably be into the new year before _ it is, it will probably be into the new year before it _ it is, it will probably be into the new year before it is _ it is, it will probably be into the new year before it is dominantl it is, it will probably be into the - new year before it is dominant even if it is— new year before it is dominant even if it is as _ new year before it is dominant even if it is as bad — new year before it is dominant even if it is as bad as— new year before it is dominant even if it is as bad as feared _ new year before it is dominant even if it is as bad as feared and - new year before it is dominant even if it is as bad as feared and is- new year before it is dominant even if it is as bad as feared and is the . if it is as bad as feared and is the hope _ if it is as bad as feared and is the hope that— if it is as bad as feared and is the hope that we _ if it is as bad as feared and is the hope that we can _ if it is as bad as feared and is the hope that we can get _ if it is as bad as feared and is the hope that we can get the - if it is as bad as feared and is thel hope that we can get the majority if it is as bad as feared and is the i hope that we can get the majority of those _ hope that we can get the majority of those at _ hope that we can get the majority of those at most — hope that we can get the majority of those at most at _ hope that we can get the majority of those at most at risk _ hope that we can get the majority of those at most at risk boasted - hope that we can get the majority ofj those at most at risk boasted before that wave _ those at most at risk boasted before that wave takes _ those at most at risk boasted before that wave takes hold _ those at most at risk boasted before that wave takes hold your? - it is important for us now, havin- it is important for us now, having the advanced warnin- we have had the advanced warning we have had thanks to the south african authorities, to try and slow the increase of a variant into the uk. and we do that because the science
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is uncertain at the moment about how the vaccines will hold up and the extent to which they will hold up. they are clearly going to hold up better based on the science, with boosters, and we want to buy time to do that, so these are all interrelated points. yes, the more boosting we can do by the time we have any significant amount of omicron activity in the uk, is going to be very, very important. how fast that we will build up in the uk and to what extent it will build up in the uk, is something we don't know. we are in uncharted territory. we do have a highly vaccinated population already but not yet as fully a boosted population as we both like and there aren't many people still over the age of 50 who have not come
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forward for a booster and they are especially at risk from a drifted variant without that booster, so thatis variant without that booster, so that is really important. like you, i don't have any concrete timelines at the moment but i can say it is as urgent as it could possibly be. nick mcdermott at the sun newspaper. fine mcdermott at the sun newspaper. one of our mcdermott at the sun newspaper. one of your colleagues, professor, described _ of your colleagues, professor, described the _ of your colleagues, professor, described the decision - of your colleagues, professor, described the decision the - of your colleagues, professor, described the decision the few of your colleagues, professor, - described the decision the few had to make _ described the decision the few had to make as— described the decision the few had to make as a — described the decision the few had to make as a difficult _ described the decision the few had to make as a difficult moment, - described the decision the few had to make as a difficult moment, so| to make as a difficult moment, so you have — to make as a difficult moment, so you have explained _ to make as a difficult moment, so you have explained your— to make as a difficult moment, so you have explained your timings, i to make as a difficult moment, so i you have explained your timings, but can you _ you have explained your timings, but can you explain — you have explained your timings, but can you explain to— you have explained your timings, but can you explain to the _ you have explained your timings, but can you explain to the younger- can you explain to the younger people — can you explain to the younger people why— can you explain to the younger people why they _ can you explain to the younger people why they do _ can you explain to the younger people why they do need - can you explain to the younger people why they do need a - can you explain to the younger- people why they do need a booster over the _ people why they do need a booster over the next— people why they do need a booster over the next few _ people why they do need a booster over the next few weeks _ people why they do need a booster over the next few weeks and - people why they do need a booster over the next few weeks and i - people why they do need a boosterl over the next few weeks and i don't see any— over the next few weeks and i don't see any downsides _ over the next few weeks and i don't see any downsides in _ over the next few weeks and i don't see any downsides in your- over the next few weeks and i don't see any downsides in your plans - over the next few weeks and i don't see any downsides in your plans so| see any downsides in your plans so why did _ see any downsides in your plans so why did we — see any downsides in your plans so why did we not _ see any downsides in your plans so why did we not enact _ see any downsides in your plans so why did we not enact this - see any downsides in your plans so why did we not enact this sooner? i why did we not enact this sooner? and to _ why did we not enact this sooner? and to the — why did we not enact this sooner? and to the doctor, _ why did we not enact this sooner? and to the doctor, we _ why did we not enact this sooner? and to the doctor, we have -
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why did we not enact this sooner? and to the doctor, we have seen i why did we not enact this sooner? . and to the doctor, we have seen the approvalm — and to the doctor, we have seen the approval... would _ and to the doctor, we have seen the approval... would we _ and to the doctor, we have seen the approval... would we expect - and to the doctor, we have seen the approval... would we expect a - approval... would we expect a response — approval... would we expect a response from _ approval... would we expect a response from your— approval... would we expect a response from your team - approval... would we expect a response from your team for. response from your team for christmas? _ response from your team for christmas? a— response from your team for christmas? a quick- response from your team for christmas? a quick one - response from your team for christmas? a quick one for. response from your team for- christmas? a quick one forjonathan van-tam _ christmas? a quick one forjonathan van-tam you — christmas? a quick one forjonathan van—tam. you talked _ christmas? a quick one forjonathan van—tam. you talked about - christmas? a quick one forjonathan van—tam. you talked about the - christmas? a quick one forjonathanl van—tam. you talked about the need for boosters — van—tam. you talked about the need for boosters and _ van—tam. you talked about the need for boosters and as _ van—tam. you talked about the need for boosters and as a _ van—tam. you talked about the need for boosters and as a team _ van—tam. you talked about the need for boosters and as a team effort - van—tam. you talked about the need for boosters and as a team effort to i for boosters and as a team effort to ramp— for boosters and as a team effort to ramp up— for boosters and as a team effort to ramp up the — for boosters and as a team effort to ramp up the numbers, _ for boosters and as a team effort to ramp up the numbers, we - for boosters and as a team effort to ramp up the numbers, we are - ramp up the numbers, we are encouraging _ ramp up the numbers, we are encouraging volunteers - ramp up the numbers, we are encouraging volunteers to - ramp up the numbers, we are . encouraging volunteers to come forward, — encouraging volunteers to come forward, is _ encouraging volunteers to come forward, is that _ encouraging volunteers to come forward, is that the _ encouraging volunteers to come forward, is that the action - encouraging volunteers to come forward, is that the action we i encouraging volunteers to come i forward, is that the action we need to see _ forward, is that the action we need to see over— forward, is that the action we need to see over the _ forward, is that the action we need to see over the next— forward, is that the action we need to see over the next days - forward, is that the action we need to see over the next days as - forward, is that the action we need to see over the next days as we - forward, is that the action we need to see over the next days as we try to see over the next days as we try to get— to see over the next days as we try to get ahead — to see over the next days as we try to get ahead of— to see over the next days as we try to get ahead of this? _ to see over the next days as we try to get ahead of this? if— to see over the next days as we try to get ahead of this? if i _ to see over the next days as we try to get ahead of this?— to get ahead of this? if i can start first. to get ahead of this? if i can start first- thank _ to get ahead of this? if i can start first. thank you _ to get ahead of this? if i can start first. thank you for _ to get ahead of this? if i can start first. thank you for asking - to get ahead of this? if i can start first. thank you for asking about | first. thank you for asking about the young — first. thank you for asking about the young adults, and the current variant— the young adults, and the current variant circulating is delta and the vaccine _ variant circulating is delta and the vaccine effectiveness against it is not as _ vaccine effectiveness against it is not as good as it was as it was against — not as good as it was as it was against alpha and that is because delta _ against alpha and that is because delta is _ against alpha and that is because delta is slightly mismatched compared to the original virus that the vaccines were developed against.
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nevertheless, the vaccine protection against _ nevertheless, the vaccine protection against severe disease in younger people _ against severe disease in younger people 18—39, for delta, it is extremely good. it is over 95% protection, really very good. studio: _ protection, really very good. studio: sajidjavid protection, really very good. studio: sajid javid hasjust stood studio: sajid javid has just stood up studio: sajid javid has just stood up in the house of commons to make a statement but we are going to stay with this downing street data briefing and then we willjoin the health secretary very shortly. brute health secretary very shortly. we have confidence that we can keep going _ have confidence that we can keep going and — have confidence that we can keep going and not deployed the booster quite so _ going and not deployed the booster quite so soon. harnessing the advantage, as i said before, that a longer— advantage, as i said before, that a longer duration between doses is better~ _ longer duration between doses is better. but that is not the situation we might be in should we have a _ situation we might be in should we have a wave of the new variant, especially —
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have a wave of the new variant, especially if the new variant is highly— especially if the new variant is highly mismatched against vaccine. it is highly mismatched against vaccine. it is for— highly mismatched against vaccine. it is for that reason that we are now— it is for that reason that we are now saying, let's not wait any further — now saying, let's not wait any further before opening the booster programme to young adults. let's bring _ programme to young adults. let's bring younger adults into the booster— bring younger adults into the booster programme now so that any drop in— booster programme now so that any drop in vaccine protection that they might— drop in vaccine protection that they might get— drop in vaccine protection that they might get will be mitigated by it having _ might get will be mitigated by it having the booster dose.- might get will be mitigated by it having the booster dose. thank you. an application _ having the booster dose. thank you. an application for _ having the booster dose. thank you. an application for use _ having the booster dose. thank you. an application for use of— having the booster dose. thank you. an application for use of the - having the booster dose. thank you. an application for use of the pfizer i an application for use of the pfizer vaccine in children aged 5—11 will be very carefully assessed as you would expect, for safety, effectiveness, at the proposed dose, and for quality. you ask if this will be concluded, this rigorous assessment, by christmas, and i would say very likely. i say that because as you will be aware, we have allowed use of the vaccine for
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at—risk children since very early on and amount of safety data this population. in terms of timeframe, very likely before christmas, but we don't know until we have rigorously looked at all the data. you don't know until we have rigorously looked at all the data.— looked at all the data. you have cleverly managed _ looked at all the data. you have cleverly managed to _ looked at all the data. you have cleverly managed to get - looked at all the data. you have cleverly managed to get three i cleverly managed to get three questions into the same sentence, so well done. your question to me was about the effort required now on the booster programme and about the jab army. the questions about how this will be done by the nhs will be announced in the next few days but i think back to the almost heady days of early 2021 when it was a true national effort and we were very grateful to your army of volunteers for the help they gave. it is going to take that kind of spirit again to
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work with the same kind of enthusiasm and pace, to get us into the best possible position we can be in the weeks ahead. the final question today comes from hugo guy at the i. ., , question today comes from hugo guy atthe i. ., ~ question today comes from hugo guy atthe i. ., . ,, at the i. professor wei shen lim, it is less than — at the i. professor wei shen lim, it is less than a _ at the i. professor wei shen lim, it is less than a week _ at the i. professor wei shen lim, it is less than a week since _ at the i. professor wei shen lim, it is less than a week since the - is less than a week since the omicron _ is less than a week since the omicron variant— is less than a week since the omicron variant came - is less than a week since the omicron variant came up, i is less than a week since the i omicron variant came up, why is less than a week since the - omicron variant came up, why can you act so _ omicron variant came up, why can you act so quickly — omicron variant came up, why can you act so quickly now— omicron variant came up, why can you act so quickly now but _ omicron variant came up, why can you act so quickly now but previously- act so quickly now but previously you have — act so quickly now but previously you have taken _ act so quickly now but previously you have taken a _ act so quickly now but previously you have taken a long _ act so quickly now but previously you have taken a long time - act so quickly now but previously you have taken a long time to i act so quickly now but previously. you have taken a long time to make decisions, _ you have taken a long time to make decisions, for— you have taken a long time to make decisions, for example, _ you have taken a long time to make decisions, for example, starting - you have taken a long time to makej decisions, for example, starting the booster— decisions, for example, starting the booster campaign _ decisions, for example, starting the booster campaign initially _ decisions, for example, starting the booster campaign initially and - decisions, for example, starting the booster campaign initially and are l booster campaign initially and are rolling _ booster campaign initially and are rolling vaccines— booster campaign initially and are rolling vaccines at _ booster campaign initially and are rolling vaccines at the _ booster campaign initially and are rolling vaccines at the children, . rolling vaccines at the children, what _ rolling vaccines at the children, what you — rolling vaccines at the children, what you say— rolling vaccines at the children, what you say to _ rolling vaccines at the children, what you say to critics - rolling vaccines at the children, what you say to critics who - rolling vaccines at the children, what you say to critics who sayi rolling vaccines at the children, i what you say to critics who say the w what you say to critics who say the jcvi acts _ what you say to critics who say the jcvi acts too — what you say to critics who say the jcvi acts too slowly _ what you say to critics who say the jcvi acts too slowly until— what you say to critics who say the jcvi acts too slowly until the - jcvi acts too slowly until the moment— jcvi acts too slowly until the moment it _ jcvi acts too slowly until the moment it is _ jcvi acts too slowly until the moment it is forced - jcvi acts too slowly until the moment it is forced to- jcvi acts too slowly until thel moment it is forced to speed jcvi acts too slowly until the - moment it is forced to speed up? and pregnant— moment it is forced to speed up? and pregnant women— moment it is forced to speed up? and pregnant women have _ moment it is forced to speed up? and pregnant women have often _ moment it is forced to speed up? and pregnant women have often felt - pregnant women have often felt confused — pregnant women have often felt confused and _ pregnant women have often felt confused and left _ pregnant women have often felt confused and left out _ pregnant women have often felt confused and left out of- pregnant women have often felt confused and left out of the - pregnant women have often felt. confused and left out of the advice, is there _ confused and left out of the advice, is there any, — confused and left out of the advice, is there any, does _ confused and left out of the advice, is there any, does all— confused and left out of the advice, is there any, does all your - confused and left out of the advice, is there any, does all your advice i is there any, does all your advice from _ is there any, does all your advice from today— is there any, does all your advice from today apply— is there any, does all your advice from today apply equally - is there any, does all your advice from today apply equally to - is there any, does all your advice - from today apply equally to pregnant women _ from today apply equally to pregnant women or— from today apply equally to pregnant women or is— from today apply equally to pregnant women or is there _ from today apply equally to pregnant women or is there anything - from today apply equally to pregnant women or is there anything specific i women or is there anything specific for them _ women or is there anything specific for them to— women or is there anything specific for them to be _ women or is there anything specific for them to be aware _ women or is there anything specific
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for them to be aware of? _ women or is there anything specific for them to be aware of?— women or is there anything specific for them to be aware of? maybe if i start with the _ for them to be aware of? maybe if i start with the second _ for them to be aware of? maybe if i start with the second question - for them to be aware of? maybe if i start with the second question first| start with the second question first and pregnant women, all the advice we describe a price to pregnant women — we describe a price to pregnant women. as regards the speed of that advice _ women. as regards the speed of that advice - _ women. as regards the speed of that advice — applies to pregnant women. it's advice — applies to pregnant women. it's a _ advice — applies to pregnant women. it's a time _ advice — applies to pregnant women. it's a time to — advice — applies to pregnant women. it's a time to move quickly and there _ it's a time to move quickly and there is— it's a time to move quickly and there is a — it's a time to move quickly and there is a time to move more cautiously _ there is a time to move more cautiously. you may remember when the vaccine _ cautiously. you may remember when the vaccine programme was first launched — the vaccine programme was first launched last year, jcvi moved swiftly, — launched last year, jcvi moved swiftly, and over the summer months, when _ swiftly, and over the summer months, when we _ swiftly, and over the summer months, when we had _ swiftly, and over the summer months, when we had time to move at the same pace as— when we had time to move at the same pace as data _ when we had time to move at the same pace as data was emerging, we felt it was— pace as data was emerging, we felt it was right, if you will, to shorten— it was right, if you will, to shorten our stride so that we did not outpace the emerging data. that meant _ not outpace the emerging data. that meant we _ not outpace the emerging data. that meant we could be as careful as possible — meant we could be as careful as possible given the circumstances. but when — possible given the circumstances. but when circumstances change and there _ but when circumstances change and there is— but when circumstances change and there is a _ but when circumstances change and there is a need for swifter
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decision—making, then we will act more _ decision—making, then we will act more quickly. there will be critics who will— more quickly. there will be critics who will always argue one way or the other, _ who will always argue one way or the other, that _ who will always argue one way or the other, that we are going either too fast or— other, that we are going either too fast or too— other, that we are going either too fast or too slow at different times, but i _ fast or too slow at different times, but i would — fast or too slow at different times, but i would suggest that going quickly— but i would suggest that going quickly all the time is not always the best— quickly all the time is not always the best and going slowly all the time isn't — the best and going slowly all the time isn't always the best either. we have — time isn't always the best either. we have to — time isn't always the best either. we have to make some judgment as to when to— we have to make some judgment as to when to go— we have to make some judgment as to when to go faster and when to go slower, _ when to go faster and when to go slower, given that there is always uncertainty in the evidence, and we are always — uncertainty in the evidence, and we are always trying to keep abreast of the data _ are always trying to keep abreast of the data as — are always trying to keep abreast of the data as much as possible. thank ou. that the data as much as possible. thank you. that concludes _ the data as much as possible. thank you. that concludes the _ the data as much as possible. thank you. that concludes the briefing. - the data as much as possible. ’ttaftaz you. that concludes the briefing. it is onwards and upwards... studio: quite a lot to ta ke take in in that a0 minutes of briefing about the booster roll—out programme, and all adults aged between 18 and 39 are to get a
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booster, and boosters have already been offered to those older, but people who are immunosuppressant will get a fourth dose and children aged 12—15 will be offered a second dose and any third doses will be offered just three months after the second dose which is halving the period of time it had been previously. many mutations of the omicron variant, some of them are new, but we are not to panic because there is confidence that the current vaccines that are available to offer great effect in preventing disease and preventing infection. more on that in the afternoon but now we can hear from the health secretary sajid javid in the house of commons. i would like to make a statement on the omicron variant and the steps we are taking to keep our country safe. we have always known that a worrying
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new variant could be a threat to the progress we have made as a nation. we are entering the winter in a strong position thanks to the decisions we made in the summer and the defences we have built. our vaccination programme has been moving at a blistering pace and this weekend we reached the milestone of 17 million boosters across the uk. this means that even though cases have been rising, hospital admissions have fallen a further 11% in the past week, and deaths have fallen by 17%. butjust as the vaccination programme has shifted the odds in our favour, vaccination programme has shifted the odds in ourfavour, a vaccination programme has shifted the odds in our favour, a worrying new variant has always had the opportunity to shift them back. last week i was alerted to what is now known as the omicron variant and now designated a variant of concerned by the world health organization. we are learning more about this new variant all the time. but the latest indication is that it spreads very
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rapidly. it may impact the effectiveness of one of our major treatments for covid—19, and as the chief medical officer said this weekend, there is a reasonable chance that our current vaccines may be impacted. i can update the house that there has now been five confirmed cases in england and also six confirmed cases in scotland. we expect cases to rise over the coming days. the new variant has also been spreading across the world. confirmed cases have been reported in many countries, including austria, belgium, the czech republic, denmark, germany, italy, the netherlands and portugal. in this race between the vaccines and the virus, the new variant may have given the virus extra legs. our strategy is to buy ourselves time and to strengthen our defences,
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while our world leading scientists learn more about this potential threat. on friday i updated the house about the measures we have put in place, including out within hours we have placed six countries in southern africa on the travel read list and today i would like to update the house on a more balanced unfortunate steps that we are taking an first measures at the border, to slow the incursion of the variant from abroad. on saturday in line with the updated advice from the uk have security agency, reacted quickly to add and few other countries to the travel red list, angola, mozambique, malawi and zambia. this means anyone who is not a uk or irish national or resident, who has been in any of these countries over the previous ten days, will be refused entry, and those who are allowed entry must
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isolate in a government approved facility for ten days. beyond this red list we are going further to put in place a proportionate testing regime for arrivals from across the world. we will require anyone who enters the uk to take a pcr test by the end of their second day after they arrive, and to self isolate until they receive a negative result. the regulations for this have been laid before the house today and will come into effect at florian tomorrow. second, we have announced measures to slow the spread of the virus in the uk — aam tomorrow. we are making changes to our rules on self isolation for contacts in england to curb the major threat from this new variant so close contacts of anyone who tests positive with a suspected case of the omicron must self isolate for ten days regardless of whether they have been vaccinated or not. face
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coverings will also be made compulsory in shops and on public transport in england, unless an individual has a medical exemption. the regulations for self isolation and face coverings have been laid before the house today and will come into force at aam tomorrow but i can confirm that there will be a debate and vote on these measures to give the house the opportunity to have its say and to perform a valuable scrutiny. the leader of the house will be setting out more details shortly and will be reviewing all of these measures that i have set out today after three weeks to see whether they are still necessary. third, we are strengthening the defences we have built against the virus, and we are already in a stronger position than we were when we faced the delta variant. we have a much greater capacity for testing, and an enhanced ability for sequencing, and the collective protection that is offered by 11a million jabs protection that is offered by 11a
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millionjabs in protection that is offered by 11a million jabs in arms and protection that is offered by 11a millionjabs in arms and i would like to update the house on our vaccination programme as well. our covid—19 vaccination programme has been a national success story, and we have delivered more booster doses than anywhere else in europe and we have given top up jabs to over one in three people over the age of 18 across the whole living in mental top i would like to pay to be to the nhs, volunteers and the armed forces for anyone involved in this life—saving work. the vaccine remains the best defence against the virus in whatever form remains the best defence against the virus in whateverform it remains the best defence against the virus in whatever form it attacks us and there's a lot we don't know about how the vaccine response to this new variant — response. but although they may be less effective, it is highly unlikely they will have no effectiveness at all against serious disease. it is really important that we get as many gaps
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in arms as possible. over the next few weeks we will already planning to do 6 million boosterjabs in england alone. but against this backdrop of this new variant, we want to go further and faster. i asked the jcvi, want to go further and faster. i asked thejcvi, the independent expert advisors on vaccinations to urgently review how we can expand the programme and whether we should reduce the gap between second doses and boosters. thejcvi published its advice in the last hour. first, it advised that the minimum dose intervalfor advised that the minimum dose interval for booster jabs advised that the minimum dose interval for boosterjabs should be halved from six months down to three months. second, that the booster programme should be expanded to include all remaining adults aged 18 and above. third, that these boosters should be offered by age group in a descending order to protect those who are most
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vulnerable to the virus. priority will be given to older adults and people over 16 who are at risk. fourth, that's a really immunosuppressed people aged 16 or above who have received three primary doses should now also be offered a booster dose. finally, that children aged between 12 and 15 should be given a second dose 12 weeks from the first dose. i have accepted this advice in full. with this new variant on the offensive, these measures will protect more people and do it more quickly and make us better protected as a nation. it represents a huge step up for the vaccination programme, almost doubling the number of people who will be able to get a booster dose to protect themselves and their loved ones. i note that we are asking more from nhs colleagues who have already given so much throughout this crisis but i know that they will be up to the task.
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the nhs will be calling people forward at the appropriate time so that those who are most vulnerable be prioritised. i will be setting out more details of how we are putting this advice into action in the coming days. ourfight against this virus is a global effort and so i would like to update the house on the part that the uk is playing. we are holding the presidency of the g7 and earlier today i convened a meeting to coordinate the international response. we were unanimous in our praise for the leadership shown by south africa who were so open and transparent about this new variant. we were resolute in our commitment to working closely with each other, the world health organization, and of course you wider international community to tackle this common threat. our experience of fighting this virus has shown us that it is better to
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act decisively which is why we are building our defences and putting these measures in place without delay. scientists are working at speed at home and abroad to determine whether this variant is more dangerous and i can assure the house that if it emerges that this variant is no more dangerous than the delta variant, we won't keep measures in place for a day longer than necessary. covid—19 is not going away and so we have to keep seeing — we are likely to seek new variants emerge, so if we want to live with the virus for the long term we must follow the evidence and acted a responsible way if they variant has the potential thwart our progress. and as we do this, we are taking a well view looking notjust at the impact of these measures, of the virus, but the impact to the economy, to education, and
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non—word—macro health like mental health and i'm confident that these responses are balanced and proportionate to the threat that we face. this year our nation has come so far down the road of recovery. but we always knew that there would be bumps in the road. but this is not a time to waver, it is a time to be vigilant and to think about what each and every one of us can do to slow the spread of this new variant. getting a jab when the time comes, following the rules we have put in place and getting a rapid regular test. if we all come together once again, we can keep this virus at bay and protect the progress that we have made. i commend this statement to the house. have made. i commend this statement to the house-— have made. i commend this statement to the house— |- to the house. shadow minister. i would like _ to the house. shadow minister. i would like to _ to the house. shadow minister. i would like to start _ to the house. shadow minister. i would like to start by _ to the house. shadow minister. i would like to start by sending - to the house. shadow minister. ij would like to start by sending my best wishes to the shadow secretary
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of state _ best wishes to the shadow secretary of state who cannot be here as he is currently _ of state who cannot be here as he is currently off — of state who cannot be here as he is currently off with covid and we all hope _ currently off with covid and we all hope he _ currently off with covid and we all hope he gets better soon. i would like to _ hope he gets better soon. i would like to thank the secretary of state for advance sight of his statement. this variant — for advance sight of his statement. this variant is a wake—up call. the pandemic— this variant is a wake—up call. the pandemic is— this variant is a wake—up call. the pandemic is not over. we need to act with speed _ pandemic is not over. we need to act with speed to bolster our defences, to keep _ with speed to bolster our defences, to keep the virus at bay, and it is also _ to keep the virus at bay, and it is also an— to keep the virus at bay, and it is also an important reminder that no one is— also an important reminder that no one is safe — also an important reminder that no one is safe until all of us are safe — one is safe until all of us are safe. ministers have not met the commitments that were made this summer— commitments that were made this summer at— commitments that were made this summer at the commitments that were made this summerat the g7 commitments that were made this summer at the g7 to get the vaccine rolled _ summer at the g7 to get the vaccine rolled out— summer at the g7 to get the vaccine rolled out to — summer at the g7 to get the vaccine rolled out to other parts of the globe — rolled out to other parts of the globe so _ rolled out to other parts of the globe, so what update can be secretary of state give on the government's global commitments? given— government's global commitments? given that _ government's global commitments? given that omicron is already here, what _ given that omicron is already here, what we _ given that omicron is already here, what we do — given that omicron is already here, what we do at home truly matters. there _ what we do at home truly matters. there are — what we do at home truly matters. there are measures we can put in place _ there are measures we can put in place right— there are measures we can put in place right now to keep infections down _ place right now to keep infections down and — place right now to keep infections down and make sure the country has the best— down and make sure the country has the best possible protection. can he
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set out _ the best possible protection. can he set out the — the best possible protection. can he set out the rationale for not introducing predeparture testing? surely— introducing predeparture testing? surely this would be an effective way of— surely this would be an effective way of preventing people travelling with covid into our country? we support— with covid into our country? we support the decision to introduce masks _ support the decision to introduce masks on — support the decision to introduce masks on public transport and in shops, _ masks on public transport and in shops, but— masks on public transport and in shops, but we believe this should never— shops, but we believe this should never have — shops, but we believe this should never have been abandoned in the first place — never have been abandoned in the first place. keeping masks in place would _ first place. keeping masks in place would always have been our plan. will the _ would always have been our plan. will the secretary of state extended the use _ will the secretary of state extended the use of— will the secretary of state extended the use of masks to hospitality and other— the use of masks to hospitality and other settings? 0r the use of masks to hospitality and other settings? or does covid not spread _ other settings? or does covid not spread in — other settings? or does covid not spread in pubs? what is the plan to enforce _ spread in pubs? what is the plan to enforce mask wearing? shop workers have given _ enforce mask wearing? shop workers have given so much during the last 20 months — have given so much during the last 20 months alongside the emergency services, _ 20 months alongside the emergency services, asking shop workers to enforce — services, asking shop workers to enforce mask wearing is yet another pressure _ enforce mask wearing is yet another pressure that they do not need and do not _ pressure that they do not need and do not deserve. if masks had been
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mandatory— do not deserve. if masks had been mandatory it would have been harder fought _ mandatory it would have been harder fought this _ mandatory it would have been harder fought this new variant to spread. a global— fought this new variant to spread. a global study published in the british— global study published in the british medical magazine said face mask— british medical magazine said face mask wearing can keep spread down by ”p mask wearing can keep spread down by up to 53%~ _ mask wearing can keep spread down by up to 53%. the flip—flopping is affecting — up to 53%. the flip—flopping is affecting schools and colleges and universities, so can be secretary of state _ universities, so can be secretary of state confirmed the new requirements across _ state confirmed the new requirements across all— state confirmed the new requirements across all education settings? and, the prime _ across all education settings? and, the prime minister is not the best person— the prime minister is not the best person to — the prime minister is not the best person to tell people to wear masks when _ person to tell people to wear masks when he _ person to tell people to wear masks when he can't even be bothered to wear— when he can't even be bothered to wear one _ when he can't even be bothered to wear one himself when he goes into a hospital— wear one himself when he goes into a hospital full _ wear one himself when he goes into a hospital full of vulnerable patients, and so can i ask the secretary— patients, and so can i ask the secretary of state, when conservative backbenchers will start wearing _ conservative backbenchers will start wearing their masks? can the secretary— wearing their masks? can the secretary of state update the house and when _ secretary of state update the house and when he expects there to be a decision— and when he expects there to be a decision on— and when he expects there to be a decision on vaccinations for younger children? _
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decision on vaccinations for younger children? as— decision on vaccinations for younger children? as the government has fallen— children? as the government has fallen far— children? as the government has fallen far short of its own target to offer— fallen far short of its own target to offer all 12—15 —year—olds the vaccine — to offer all 12—15 —year—olds the vaccine by— to offer all 12—15 —year—olds the vaccine by october half term, can he say what _ vaccine by october half term, can he say what action will be taken to speed _ say what action will be taken to speed up— say what action will be taken to speed up vaccine rolled out? our nhs have done _ speed up vaccine rolled out? our nhs have done us proud and have done a fantastic— have done us proud and have done a fantasticjob— have done us proud and have done a fantasticjob to deliver the vaccine _ fantasticjob to deliver the vaccine, offering first, second and third _ vaccine, offering first, second and third and — vaccine, offering first, second and third and boosterjabs all at the same _ third and boosterjabs all at the same time as treating patients suffering from covid and trying to recover _ suffering from covid and trying to recover elective procedures. iwould like to— recover elective procedures. iwould like to take — recover elective procedures. iwould like to take this time to thank everyone _ like to take this time to thank everyone who works in the nhs and care sector~ — everyone who works in the nhs and care sector. we are putting even more — care sector. we are putting even more demands on them at the moment, and the _ more demands on them at the moment, and the nhs _ more demands on them at the moment, and the nhs has stepped up to the challenge and it is a shame that this government simply hasn't done that _ this government simply hasn't done that. vaccine rates amongst those with mental illnesses are low and mortality— with mental illnesses are low and mortality rates high. the government needs— mortality rates high. the government needs to _ mortality rates high. the government needs to stop webb and isaac mental health— needs to stop webb and isaac mental health and _ needs to stop webb and isaac mental health and must recognise that good
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clear documentation is so important in a crisis _ clear documentation is so important in a crisis - — clear documentation is so important in a crisis — needs to stop weapon icing _ in a crisis — needs to stop weapon icing mental— in a crisis — needs to stop weapon icing mental health. i have mentioned time and time again, but the government must acknowledge the trauma _ the government must acknowledge the trauma for— the government must acknowledge the trauma for people with severe covid, lon- trauma for people with severe covid, long covid _ trauma for people with severe covid, long covid and nhs staff, so where is their— long covid and nhs staff, so where is their plan? labour has been clear throughout— is their plan? labour has been clear throughout the pandemic that proper sick pay— throughout the pandemic that proper sick pay will help people to isolate _ sick pay will help people to isolate. the government has chosen to ignore _ isolate. the government has chosen to ignore us — isolate. the government has chosen to ignore us time and time again so i to ignore us time and time again so tasked. _ to ignore us time and time again so i asked, what support will be available _ i asked, what support will be available to people who need to self isolate? _ available to people who need to self isolate? isn't this the time to finally— isolate? isn't this the time to finally fix _ isolate? isn't this the time to finally fix sick pay? i would also appreciate it if the secretary of state _ appreciate it if the secretary of state could update the house on the new antivirals and how they will be utilised _ new antivirals and how they will be utilised. and why are the government not already— utilised. and why are the government not already giving antibody test to the immunocompromised? the situation we find _ the immunocompromised? the situation we find ourselves in was entirely predictable. yet again this
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government have shown they are incapable — government have shown they are incapable of protecting our communities, protecting the nhs and saving _ communities, protecting the nhs and saving lives. communities, protecting the nhs and savin: lives. , . ., , ., , ., saving lives. secretary of state. thank you- _ saving lives. secretary of state. thank you. can _ saving lives. secretary of state. thank you. can i _ saving lives. secretary of state. thank you. can i also _ saving lives. secretary of state. thank you. can i also extend i saving lives. secretary of state. | thank you. can i also extend my saving lives. secretary of state. - thank you. can i also extend my best wishes to the shadow self hate terry and wish him a speedy recovery. — shadow health secretary and wish him a speedy recovery for the i think the honourable lady has misjudged the honourable lady has misjudged the tone of the house. this is a very serious matter. i think the whole country would be looking for all members of this house to work together and to support the nation and surely she isn't blaming the uk government for the emergence of this new variant? maybe she was just re—auditioning for the reshuffle thatis re—auditioning for the reshuffle that is going on in her party right
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now, but let me answer the questions. she asked about international donations and the uk is leading the world in international donations, quite rightly so. it is right that is treated as a priority and we would like to see other countries step up as well and the prime minister made as well and the prime minister made a pledge a few months back of 100 million donations byjune 2022 and 80% of those through covax of which we are big supporters and 20% bilaterally and so far we have donated over 20 million more than most, and many other countries, and covax, which we helped found and support, has donated i believe some 537 million doses to 1aa different countries. the rules, she asked about the rules on travel and mask, i would say this, i have addressed that and i do believe they are
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proportionate and it is a balanced response. on the vaccine rolled out we have just set out a huge expansion of the vaccine rolled up programme and it is a shame that the honourable lady could not welcome that vaccine roll out and i will set out more details in coming days on exactly how we intend to meet the requirement to vaccinate more. on antivirals, we are one of the few countries that have procured two leading antivirals and our regulator was the first in the world to approve one of those antivirals and i'm pleased with the over 700,000 courses we have citizens across the uk but of course given the emergence this new variant we will be reviewing that and seeing if more needs to be done.— reviewing that and seeing if more i needs to be done._ the needs to be done. jeremy hunt. the late donald — needs to be done. jeremy hunt. the late donald rumsfeld _ needs to be done. jeremy hunt. the late donald rumsfeld coined - needs to be done. jeremy hunt. the late donald rumsfeld coined the - late donald rumsfeld coined the phrase _ late donald rumsfeld coined the phrase are known unknowns and that is what _ phrase are known unknowns and that is what we _ phrase are known unknowns and that is what we face with the new omicron
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virus so _ is what we face with the new omicron virus so the _ is what we face with the new omicron virus so the secretary of state is right _ virus so the secretary of state is right to — virus so the secretary of state is right to take sensible and proportionate measures to buy time while _ proportionate measures to buy time while we _ proportionate measures to buy time while we are waiting to understand how dangerous this new variant can be, how dangerous this new variant can be but _ how dangerous this new variant can be, but does he not agree that the fact we _ be, but does he not agree that the fact we are — be, but does he not agree that the fact we are facing this danger is also a _ fact we are facing this danger is also a failure of the western countries _ also a failure of the western countries to make sure that vaccines are distributed adequately around the world? whilst i recognise the enormous — the world? whilst i recognise the enormous contribution the uk has made _ enormous contribution the uk has made through covax and the development of the astrazeneca vaccine — development of the astrazeneca vaccine and so on, is it not a moral and practical— vaccine and so on, is it not a moral and practical failure that richer countries — and practical failure that richer countries have managed to vaccinate 60% of— countries have managed to vaccinate 60% of their populations when for poorer— 60% of their populations when for poorer countries it isjust 3%? can poorer countries it is 'ust 3%? can i thank my — poorer countries it is 'ust 3%? can i thank my right _ poorer countries it isjust 3%? can i thank my right honourable poorer countries it isjust 3%? tiaft i thank my right honourable friend for his support and i do agree with his words. it is important that all rich countries do everything they can to support vaccines and a
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donation of vaccines to the developing countries. i set out earlier what the uk has done and we can be proud of that but we do need other countries to step up. any g7 meeting chaired earlier today with health ministers, we all agreed of the importance of this. and about redoubling efforts to make sure all commitments are made. thank you, mr speaker. can i thank the secretary of state for advance sight of his statement and add my own thanks to the work the nhs does and it continues to do in all parts of these islands to keep us all healthy and safe. the emergence of omicron, including the six cases we have seen including the six cases we have seen in scotland, along with evidence of community transmission shows this is absolutely no time to be complacent. but for all the measures that are being taken now at the border, dated pcr testing because of the incubation period risks missing a
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number of these cases passing through the border. its, number of these cases passing through the border.— number of these cases passing through the border. a more effective a- roach, through the border. a more effective approach. surely. — through the border. a more effective approach, surely, would _ through the border. a more effective approach, surely, would be - approach, surely, would be introducing day eight pcr testing along with eight days of isolation and surely it would be better to do that now then be bounced into that position by that's further down the line. secondly, mr speaker, the secretary of state issues a call for all of us to work together, which i'm sure we would all wish to be able to do but i wonder if he shares my disappointment that when the first ministers of scotland and wales today called for a cobra meeting to be convened, it appeared to be dismissed out of hand already. i wonder, will the secretary of state prevail upon the prime minister to call, attend and convene an urgent cobra meeting involving all the four nations so that people might be persuaded to stay on top of this development as we would all be expected. with the secretary of state agree with the opposition front brand in the select kitty and
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myself that this emergence of this variant shows that none of us are safe until all of us are safe —— select committee. however much is being done in the uk has done to date, more still needs to be done in order to achieve is close to 100% global vaccination as is possible. that not only includes any vaccination programmes we are in, but involves increasing global vaccine production as well as overcoming the barriers that patented law might place in the way of achieving that. mr patented law might place in the way of achieving that.— of achieving that. mr speaker, can i first turned — of achieving that. mr speaker, can i first turned to _ of achieving that. mr speaker, can i first turned to the _ of achieving that. mr speaker, can i first turned to the honourable - first turned to the honourable gentleman's question around the data are testing. we do believe the data testing —— day two testing. he knows it will apply to all incoming rivals into the uk and the individual concerned would have to self—isolate until they get a negative test result and i think that is the right response. in terms of meetings and
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uk nations working together, i think that has been one of the successes of any uk response to this pandemic, the way that nations across the uk have worked together, especially on vaccines, testing, surveillance and antivirals, and it shows we are stronger together. sir antivirals, and it shows we are stronger together.— stronger together. sir andrew pollard who — stronger together. sir andrew pollard who developed - stronger together. sir andrew pollard who developed the - stronger together. sir andrew - pollard who developed the oxford vaccine predicted to my select committee injune that new variants would escape the vaccines are by being more infectious, the protection against severe this should continue. will my right honourable friend avoid taking any panic measures if we see a rise in infections during the weeks ahead, as seems inevitable, and concentrate instead on the vaccines effectiveness against severe illness and hospitalisation?—
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effectiveness against severe illness| and hospitalisation?_ my and hospitalisation? hear, hear! my riaht and hospitalisation? hear, hear! my right honourable _ and hospitalisation? hear, hear! my right honourable friend _ and hospitalisation? hear, hear! my right honourable friend is _ right honourable friend is absolutely right. we have already, as i refer... even with the dominant dealt of 18th at the moment, we have seen some rises in infections, —— delta variant. we have seen falls in death rates too. the reason for that is the power of the vaccines, especially our booster programme, the largest in europe. my right honourable friend is absolutely right that what matters as we look ahead around this new variant is what matters more than anything is hospitalisations. this that is where we will leave the house of commons for now with the health secretary sajid javid answering questions about the omicron coronavirus variant. the uk now has 11 confirmed cases of the new variant omicron with five in england and six in scotland. as efforts increase to combat the spread of the virus, the government has just announced changes to the uk's vaccination
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programme — all people aged 18 to 39 will now be offered a booster vaccine. those aged a0 and over are already eligible for this jab. the gap between second dose and booster will be reduced to three months — down from six—months currently. young people aged 12 to 15 will be offered a second dose of the pfizer—biontech covid—19 vaccine, no sooner than 12 weeks after their first dose. and severely immunosuppressed people should be offered a fourth dose no sooner than three months after completing their primary course of three doses. it's not yet clear how effective vaccines will be against the new omicron variant, but scientists think they will still protect against severe disease. and from tomorrow, the wearing of face masks is set to be compulsory in shops and on public transport, while pcr tests will be brought back in for travellers returning to the uk. in a downing street press conference in the past hour, england's deputy chief medical officer professorjonathan van—tam said there were many
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things that we don't know yet about omicron, but that it was the number of mutations on the variant which made it worrying. it's always been the case that at some point — we've always said it — we are going to get a variant that gives us heightened concern. we are at that moment with omicron. it is the new kid on the block for now, and i think it's true to say that scientists around the world, notjust in the uk, unfortunately agree that this one is of increased concern. professor wei shen lim, chair of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation, said the booster vaccine improves the body's immune response to covid, giving it a "step up" from the first two doses, and hopefully that would help to mitigate any differences or mutations on the omicron variant. viruses that develop variants and that are different compared
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to the original type virus increase the likelihood of a mismatch between the vaccine on the one hand and the variant on the other hand. the larger the mismatch between vaccine and variant, the greater the likelihood that the level of protection provided by the vaccine will be lowered. one way of reducing the impact of this mismatch between vaccine and variant is to increase the strength of the immune response provided by the current vaccine. in other words, if we can raise at the level of the immune response generated by the vaccine, that higher level of immune response will reach out and provide extra protection to mismatched variants. meanwhile, health secretary sajid javid has been speaking in the house of commons in the past few minutes. we're learning more about this new variant all the time. but the latest indication is that it
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spreads very rapidly. it may impact the effectiveness of one of our major for covid—19, ronapreve. and as the chief medical officer said this weekend, there is a reasonable chance that our current vaccines may be impacted. i can update the house that there have now been five confirmed cases in england and also six confirmed cases in scotland. and we expect cases to rise over the coming days. the new variant has also been spreading across the world. confirmed cases have been reported in many countries, including austria, belgium, the czech republic, denmark, germany, italy, the netherlands, and portugal. in this race between the vaccines and the virus, the new variant may have given the virus extra legs.
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sajid javid speaking a short time ago in the house of commons. our health correspondent nick trigglejoins me now. just recap if you would, there is a lot to take on, just recap what has been announced and why now? tt is lot to take on, just recap what has been announced and why now? it is a sirnificant been announced and why now? it is a significant change _ been announced and why now? it is a significant change to _ been announced and why now? it is a significant change to the _ been announced and why now? tt 3 a. significant change to the booster programme. as we have been hearing, there is a concern this new variant may have the ability to evade some of those initial defences built up by the vaccination programme and boosters are considered very important because they significantly increase the immune response and counter some of that ability. if it proves to be the case, and it is far from proven yet, that there is a new variant can evade that immune response, so what they have announced is all the ratings are to be eligible and offered —— over 18s are to be offered a booster. the minimum gap between the second dose and at the booster is to be shortened from six months to three months and 12—15 —year—olds are to
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be offered a second dose three months after their first dose. currently, they were only being offered one do so far so that bring them in line with 16, 17—year—olds and the immune suppressed will be offered a fourth dose to boost their indian response. there is concern there is a new variant —— their immune response. there is concern this may trigger a new wave, this new variant does and how can the nhs cope with this as they are trying to deliver millions of doses in the next few weeks anyway? these doses are only of any sector in people's arms as the nhs is being told to increase the rate it is giving boosters, they have been doing around 2.5 million boosters a week on average and at that rate it would take three months to vaccinate, boost all those who are eligible. so they are looking and meeting this
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afternoon, nhs bosses, to find out how they can speed that up. one of the problems in some of the mass vaccination clinics the uk use early on in the vaccination programme have now closed, about 50 mass vaccination centres have closed. some gps have had to be pulled back to do flu jabs and day—to—day work so they think they're looking at in particular is extending the opening hours of the current vaccination centres into the evening, late at night. there was some talk of offering vaccinations round the clock during the night, although when they try that previously, there was not huge uptake. i think we will hear this evening, if not, tomorrow, how the nhs will deliver less. thank ou ve how the nhs will deliver less. thank you very much, _ how the nhs will deliver less. thank you very much, nick. _ how the nhs will deliver less. thank you very much, nick. this _ how the nhs will deliver less. thank you very much, nick. this -- - how the nhs will deliver less. thank you very much, nick. this -- will. you very much, nick. this —— will deliver this. and in about 15 minutes time, we'll be putting your questions about the omicron variant to the experts. join us for your questions answered with health correspondent laura foster, and consultant virologist,
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dr chris smith, just after a.30pm here on bbc news. as we've been hearing, six cases of the omicron coronavirus variant have now been identified in scotland. first minister nicola sturgeon said she's expecting there to be more cases, and she stressed that everyone needs to continue taking precautions. firstly, get vaccinated. it is the single most important thing we can do to protect ourselves and each other. secondly, test for covid regularly. as i said, we will be increasing testing in areas where the new variant has been identified, but for all of us, whenever we are, even if we are feeling fine, regular lateral flow testing is a really important way of finding out if we might have the virus. let's talk to our correspondent in scotland, nick eardley. a disproportionate number of the cases in scotland so far.- a disproportionate number of the cases in scotland so far. there are six cases were _ cases in scotland so far. there are six cases were confirmed - cases in scotland so far. there are six cases were confirmed this - six cases were confirmed this morning, for in at the strathclyde area, a couple in glasgow —— four in the strathclyde area. one thing
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weddings are merely scottish government as a couple of the cases are linked to people who have not travelled abroad —— one thing worrying some in the scottish government. it seems community transmission is under way in scotland. there are big questions about the impact of the new variant, whether it makes people more ill, whether it makes people more ill, whether it makes people more ill, whether it can evade at the vaccine, but certainly the message from nicola sturgeon in that briefing this morning and the snp conference address this afternoon was about caution and following the rules that are in place here already and have beenin are in place here already and have been in place for some time and working from home where possible. and urging people to keep going with that. we are hearing last a5 minutes the government will accept that advice —— scottish government will
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accept that advice from the jcvi and are drawing up plans at the moment. we do not know exactly when people under a0 will get stuck —— start getting your boosters in scotland but that will be starting soon. the government _ but that will be starting soon. the government has rejected nicola sturgeon's call for pcr tests, so a different approach to this. this sturgeon's call for pcr tests, so a different approach to this.- different approach to this. this is a letter that _ different approach to this. this is a letter that nicola _ different approach to this. this is a letter that nicola sturgeon - different approach to this. this is a letter that nicola sturgeon and | a letter that nicola sturgeon and mark drakeford wrote to boris johnson, that the rules that you have to self—isolate and get a pcr introduced over the weekend, they are slightly worried it is not going far enough because they do not know how long this new variant might incubate for, whether a positive case would definitely shop on the day two. nicola sturgeon and mark drakeford day two. nicola sturgeon and mark dra keford were day two. nicola sturgeon and mark
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drakeford were suggesting a dh test, meaning people would have to isolate for at least eight days but downing street are not on board with that at all —— day eight. it does not look like it is going to happen. there was some concern in the travel industry that the impact that would have and at the moment, the argument downing street is making as it is not proportionate to the risk of the new variant was up slightly differently views in edinburgh and cardiff. this is all overshadowing the snp conference taking place. the reason i am here as well as a political correspond it to cover that. nicola sturgeon gave her address to the virtual snp conference this afternoon, a lot of it rewritten to cover what is going on with the new variant and those warnings about caution. a couple of other things are worth flagging up, though, because they are really important. one is about a devolved benefit called at the scottish child payment which goes to about 100,000 people under the age of six at the moment. it will be doubled from april, it is a benefit the scottish
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government set up to support families. at the moment it is £10 a week, it will go up to £20 a week from april, something the snp had promised at the scottish election last year, but want to bring it on quite rapidly. that was announced by nicola sturgeon this afternoon. the other thing, and a question we always talk about after an snp conference is what is going on with a scottish independence? the snp argue they have a very strong mandate for another referendum after they won the election back in may, nicola sturgeon said this afternoon she was going to initiate the process to allow another independence referendum in 2023. basically, that means she will take forward some of the parliamentary manoeuvres that in theory could allow another referendum at the end of 2023. got to say, that is a lot easier said than done. we are still not sure how nicola sturgeon intends to deliver it because the uk government continues to say, we are not going to agree to one. it is
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quite possible the scottish parliament will pass legislation anyway, that will end up in the supreme court with the legal battle. nicola sturgeon is still talking about that referendum in 2023. i have got to say, though, it is not far from have got to say, though, it is not farfrom certain it is going to happen and a lot of people even with a nicola sturgeon's party who are unconvinced that is likely. this thank you very much, nick ardley and glasgow. —— nick eardley in glasgow. from tomorrow, face coverings will become mandatory once more in england in retail outlets but hospitality settings will be exempt from the changes. to get reaction on this let's talk to doug russell, health and safety officer for the usdaw union which represents shop, distributive and allied workers. what is your view of the reintroduction of these measures? brute reintroduction of these measures? - think it is essential, and we think it was wrong to get rid of regulations to require them in shops in england as they did injuly. the
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reason as it is one of the most important ways of making sure you can provide protection to other people in that situation. you may not know your infected and at risk of passing on the infection to others but if you're wearing a face covering, that goes along way to stopping you from spreading it around. ., ., , ., , around. how hard it is to put back into -la around. how hard it is to put back into play something _ around. how hard it is to put back into play something people - around. how hard it is to put back into play something people had i into play something people had thought they had had to give up? that is going to be the problem, isn't it? we thought it was wrong to remove it in the first place, as i say, but bring it back will be more difficult, particularly when the government itself has not led by example. they left it as suggestion it was a good idea to wear a face covering in those situations but left it as a matter of individual choice and demonstrated their own individual choice was not to wear face coverings and that has left a very unpleasant situation because it means when a staff in retail start trying to remind people again they should now be wearing face coverings, it will lead to more flexion for argument and more violence, unfortunately, get some retail workers. tell violence, unfortunately, get some retail workers.— retail workers. tell us about that
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then. retail workers. tell us about that then- this _ retail workers. tell us about that then. this what _ retail workers. tell us about that then. this what sort _ retail workers. tell us about that then. this what sort of— retail workers. tell us about that | then. this what sort of conditions and attitudes are your members having to work under? tt and attitudes are your members having to work under?— and attitudes are your members having to work under? it has to be said the vast _ having to work under? it has to be said the vast majority _ having to work under? it has to be said the vast majority of— having to work under? it has to be said the vast majority of the - said the vast majority of the public, when it was required to wear face coverings, where very good about it and still are in scotland and wales where the regulations were never removed. it is definitely a minority of people who think the rules don't apply to them and they are causing problems in stores. levels of violence shop workers face doubled during the pandemic and it is often reminding people of the roles they interface to protect themselves and other customers as well. ., ., , ., themselves and other customers as well. ., ., , , ., ., well. how are your members meant to enforce these — well. how are your members meant to enforce these rules, _ well. how are your members meant to enforce these rules, then _ well. how are your members meant to enforce these rules, then cuts - well. how are your members meant to enforce these rules, then cuts they - enforce these rules, then cuts they can't enforce it, that is the point. they do not have any enforcement powers and the situation, the best they can do is remind people what they can do is remind people what the rules are an do it as politely as possible. the trouble is that for that minority, it seems to be a triggerfor them to that minority, it seems to be a trigger for them to become at least verbally abusive, but even physically violent. one in ten shop
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workers have been assaulted because of reminding people that they have to take precautions. t of reminding people that they have to take precautions.— to take precautions. i quickly had the olice to take precautions. i quickly had the police been _ to take precautions. i quickly had the police been to _ to take precautions. i quickly had the police been to respond - to take precautions. i quickly had the police been to respond when| to take precautions. i quickly had - the police been to respond when your members have faced assault? == the police been to respond when your members have faced assault? -- how ruickl ? it members have faced assault? -- how quickly? it has _ members have faced assault? -- how quickly? it has been _ members have faced assault? -- how quickly? it has been patchy. - members have faced assault? -- how quickly? it has been patchy. when - members have faced assault? -- how quickly? it has been patchy. when it i quickly? it has been patchy. when it has been serious, usually quite good but the levels of intimidation and verbal abuse, 90% of shop workers have been abused in the last 12 months because of the pandemic and it has a daily occurrence but it is very difficult for the police to respond to that kind of thing. when you talk to shop owners about it, any recent survey, nearly half said they would not bother to report it because they do not think it would make any difference, it is almost as if they have given up on the system to look after them.— to look after them. doug russell from the union _ to look after them. doug russell from the union usdaw, - to look after them. doug russell from the union usdaw, thank. to look after them. doug russell. from the union usdaw, thank you to look after them. doug russell- from the union usdaw, thank you for your time today. the commons standards committee
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is calling for mps to be at two o'clock we got this report chris brian's committee, the standards committee of mps, and this is a report, about the rules that govern the behaviour of mps, that has been going on for about a year, it has been revisited in the light of recent headlines involving the former cabinet minister owen paterson and the sleaze allegations flying around at westminster but it predates the headlines of the last
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few weeks. and a couple of the suggestions coming out from the committee, as far as changes that might happen, they won't happen straightaway, it would be at least easter by the time this package of measures is looked at, and then presented to parliament, and parliament decides what it wants to do. here is chris bryant talking about what his committee are setting out. .,, about what his committee are setting out. , ,., ., , out. the most important thing is that we want _ out. the most important thing is that we want to _ out. the most important thing is that we want to tighten - out. the most important thing is that we want to tighten up - out. the most important thing is that we want to tighten up the l out. the most important thing is . that we want to tighten up the rules on conflict—of—interest and it has always _ on conflict—of—interest and it has always been one for mps to engage in paid lobby, _ always been one for mps to engage in paid lobby, which is what owen paterson — paid lobby, which is what owen paterson was found guilty of, but we now want _ paterson was found guilty of, but we now want to — paterson was found guilty of, but we now want to make it even clearer that no _ now want to make it even clearer that no mp — now want to make it even clearer that no mp can take anyjob which involves— that no mp can take anyjob which involves any kind of political or parliamentary advice, strategising, or consultancy. on top of that we want _ or consultancy. on top of that we want to— or consultancy. on top of that we want to make sure that every mp who does have _ want to make sure that every mp who does have any kind of outside interest— does have any kind of outside interest as a contract, i would pad some _ interest as a contract, i would pad some didn't, and that contract must specify— some didn't, and that contract must specify things they are doing and
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thinks _ specify things they are doing and thinks they are banned from doing including _ thinks they are banned from doing including any kind of advising people — including any kind of advising people on how to get their way around — people on how to get their way around the political system — owen paterson _ around the political system — owen paterson didn't. that around the political system - owen paterson didn't.— paterson didn't. that is the plan as far as changing _ paterson didn't. that is the plan as far as changing the _ paterson didn't. that is the plan as far as changing the rules _ paterson didn't. that is the plan as far as changing the rules is - far as changing the rules is concerned. the rise of the last couple of weeks leave the impression, play into the stereotype of mps having their snouts in the trough and it really, really irritates so many mps who were brought into this game at westminster for noble reasons to try and make the world a better place via which ever means and outlooks and visions of the world they have and visions of the world they have and they see these cases looking like they personify everyone here and, in many cases, are keen to see rules that are that bit tighter. some might be agreed that work they were doted on the side up until now will not be possible in the future —— they were able to do. will not be possible in the future -- they were able to do.-
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will not be possible in the future -- they were able to do. thank you very much- — -- they were able to do. thank you very much. let's _ -- they were able to do. thank you very much. let's talk _ -- they were able to do. thank you very much. let's talk about - -- they were able to do. thank you very much. let's talk about any - very much. let's talk about any reshuffle. what has changed on the front bench? so much has been grown with covered man, does not really got to look on. tt with covered man, does not really got to look on— got to look on. it has not really happened _ got to look on. it has not really happened yet _ got to look on. it has not really happened yet as far _ got to look on. it has not really happened yet as far as - got to look on. it has not really happened yet as far as proper i happened yet as far as proper announcements —— so much been going on with covid. we know there has been a switch as far as the shadow welsh secretary is concerned and a shadow culture but we have not got news as far as the big gigs are concerned, potentially in your shadow home secretary, for instance, but what we have had is a transparent, a very direct insight into the tensions between sir keir starmer and angela rayner, a directly elected by the membership deputy leader. that is one post keir starmer does not have direct control over. i was at the speech on standards that angela rayner was giving this morning and while she was getting at, we got wind that there is a reshuffle was happening and when we put questions to her afterwards, she said, she did not know the details of it, she did not
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know the details of it, she did not know the details of it, she did not know the timing of it. it later emerged she had spoken to sir keir starmer this morning having done a round of interviews and breakfast programme this morning denying any knowledge of an imminent reshuffle. there is no doubt there is tension, angen there is no doubt there is tension, anger, irritation within the deputy leader's offers and the later's office towards one another. that much has been confirmed today already —— leader's office. we do not know the main beef of what this reshuffle will add up to.— reshuffle will add up to. chris, thank you- _ reshuffle will add up to. chris, thank you. we _ reshuffle will add up to. chris, thank you. we will _ reshuffle will add up to. chris, thank you. we will wait - reshuffle will add up to. chris, thank you. we will wait to - reshuffle will add up to. chris, | thank you. we will wait to hear reshuffle will add up to. chris, - thank you. we will wait to hear more later. four teenagers have beenjailed for life for killing the 15—year—old schoolboy, keon lincoln, in birmingham injanuary. the four, aged between 1a and 18, have been given minimum terms of 16 to 19 years. ben godfrey reports it was a barbaric and senseless attack. keon lincoln was stabbed from behind and shot, just metres from home. the gunfire was heard
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by his own mother, charmaine. my first instinct was, "where is my son?" those are the first words i said, where is my son? and then to figure out what has happened and the reasons why. it wasn't established in court whether keon's life was taken during a gang dispute but cctv pointed to a premeditated and brazen attack on the schoolboy in the middle of the afternoon — a group, all under18, hunting down a victim. i think the fact that we have got youngsters of that age going around carrying weapons, using firearms, it's an absolutely terrible state of affairs. tahjgeem breakenridge and michael ugochukwu were convicted of murder, jailed for life with a minimum of 19 years. today in court the judge lifted reporting restrictions to allow the naming of the gunman. he was 1a—year—old yussuf mustapha. he will serve at least 16 years. another 16—year—old boy who can't be
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named received 17 years, while18—year—old kieron donaldson, who supplied weapons, receives a 12—yearjail term. i can only hope that the convictions offer some sort of solace for keon's family, but to put the message out there amongst the community, we will investigate these matters and we will find those who are responsible and we will convict them. the motive for the attack is still not clear and the chaos of that january afternoon has only brought sadness, reflection and more confusion for keon's family and friends. the crime that was committed on keon is heinous, as i said, just diabolical, and we just really want to put an end to this. we want this to be one of those springboards that we can use that can start bringing some questions to our community and getting some answers. the gunman, yussuf mustapha, lied about his whereabouts that day,
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claiming he had been on an online school lesson during lockdown. keon's killers covered their faces in hoods. they felt untouchable as they inflicted eight knife wounds inside 30 seconds. keon had an unbelievable laugh, his mothersaid. he was a loving child with a jolly spirit. ben godfrey, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear good afternoon, everybody. we have had a cold day but lots of sunshine across kent. as the sun is setting, there will be an early frost but this is the real story over the next few hours. quite a lot of cloud spilling and across western scotland, closing the day with double figures and a mild air is going to wind over through the night tonight. quite a lot of cloud spilling its way south and east and eventually we will see cloud pushing into axis and kent, showery rain and
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damp, misty start, relatively mild. temperature setting at ten or 11 degrees, much milder than we had this morning. frost—free first thing. cloudy, damp, murky for many. showers up into the far north—west through the morning and then we will see some heavy persistent rain gradually nudging towards northern ireland and western scotland by the end of the afternoon. as we run through the afternoon, the cloud it should then break, allowing for some brightness to develop across the east of the pennines. generally lighter winds, east of the pennines. generally lighterwinds, but east of the pennines. generally lighter winds, but we will start to see those winds strengthen as at that rain arrives. the temperatures are staying on a mild side now with the top temperatures of 12 or 13 celsius. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: covid boosterjabs will be offered to everyone over the age of 18 to help fight
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the new variant, omicron. the gap between the second and third dose is being halved from six to three months. children aged 12 to 15 can now receive a second dose of the covid vaccine. and people with immunosuppression are now eligible for a fourth dose. it is frankly never more vital, the booster campaign has never been more vital than at this point in time. two further cases of the omicron variant have been discovered in london— bringing the total cases of the variant now to 11 across the uk. more than 60,000 homes in scotland and the north—east of england remain without power after storm arwen. the commons standards committee is calling for mps to be banned from providing paid parliamentary advice. its report follows recent concerns about lobbying and second jobs. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon.
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ralf rangick has said he is "excited to be joining manchester united and focused on making this a successful season." the club confirmed the german as interim boss for the next six months. the german takes over from ole gunnar solskjaer, who was sacked last week after the defeat to watford. michael carrick has been in caretaker charge since. rangnick has left his role as head of sports and development at russian club lokomotiv moscow to take up thejob. in a statement he added... northern ireland women host the home leg of their world cup qualifier with north macedonia tonight — the visitors traveling to belfast following their 11—0 hammering last week.
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can northern ireland repeat that performance? but today some news from the england camp, ahead of their qualifier against latvia tomorrow. nikita parris has left the squad. apparently so the arsenal forward can take a "a few days' rest", according to the fa, after what they describe as a "busy 1a months of domestic and international football". england boss sarina wiegman says it's not an issue. nikita has had such a workload in the last from — couple of years, from liverpool to england, hardly any rest, so we had a chat with the medical staff and after the game we decided it was good for her to have a few days off. our squad is fit, everyone can play tomorrow, so it was an option to give her some days
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off. wales are also in action tomorrow. they have a tough task as they take on top seeds france away. but wales coach gemma grainger says it's an opportunity for her side to test themselves against one of the worlds best these are the games i want to coach, these are the games where you really get to see the progress you are making, there are no easy games in international football but this is different because they are one of the best in the world so we have huge respect for them but what a huge respect for them but what a huge opportunity to be able to go there and see where we are at. manchester city midfielder caroline weir has been nominated for fifa's 2021 puskas award for the second year running. the scotland international is on an 11—player shortlist for the world governing body's goal of the year, for her effort while playing for city in last season's derby against manchester united. she makes the list along with former spurs forward erik lamela and manchester city
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winger riyad mahrez. england captainjoe root said he has spoken to his former yorkshire team mate azeem rafiq and they plan to meet up after the ashes tour in australia. rafiq has said he thinks the english game is "institutionally racist" and he was hurt that root couldn't "recall" any instances of racism occuring. we exchanged a couple of messages quite recently and hopefully when we finish this tour we will get the opportunity to sit down and talk about this whole situation, about how we can move the game forward and, as i mentioned in my statement, as well, along with talking to azeem, i wanted to speak to lord patel at the club and those dialogues have started as well. i think it's important that we keep finding ways of bettering the sport, finding ways how we can individually affect things for the better
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and make a real change in this. kell brook says he's going to send amir khan into retirement after their long—awaited clash was finally confirmed. after years of failed negotiations, the long—term rivals have finally agreed to the all—british showdown on the 19th of february at the ao arena in manchester. brook hasn't fought since being stopped in the fourth round by terence crawford a year ago, while khan won a points decision over australia's billy dib injanuary. seven time champion ronnie o'sullivan is through to the last 16 of snooker�*s uk championship. he beat long time rival mark king 6—3 at the barbican — making a century and five 50+ breaks in another excellent performance. he'll face noppon saengkham or stuart bingham in the next round. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the uk now has 11 confirmed
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cases of the new variant omicron with five in england and six in scotland. as efforts increase to combat the spread of the virus, the government has just announced changes to the uk's vaccination programme: all people aged 18 to 39 will now be offered a booster vaccine. those aged a0 and over are already eligible for this jab. the gap between second dose and booster will be reduced to three months — down from six—months currently. young people aged 12 to 15 will be offered a second dose of the pfizer/biontech covid—19 vaccine, no sooner than 12 weeks after their first dose. severely immunosuppressed people should be offered a fourth dose no sooner than three months after completing their primary course of three doses. it's not yet clear how effective vaccines will be against the new omicron variant — but scientists think they will still protect against severe disease. and from tomorrow, the wearing of face masks is set to be compulsory
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in shops and on public transport, while pcr tests will be brought back in for travellers returning to the uk. now on bbc news, your questions answered on the new coronavirus variant. with me is our health correspondent laura foster and i'm alsojoined by dr chris smith, consultant virologist at addenbrooke's hospital. thanks forjoining us. a lot of thanks for 'oining us. a lot of questions — thanks forjoining us. a lot of questions coming _ thanks forjoining us. a lot of questions coming in. - thanks forjoining us. a lot of questions coming in. this - thanks forjoining us. a lot of questions coming in. this is i thanks forjoining us. a lot of. questions coming in. this is the first question, from andrew, is there positive evidence that mask wearing actually makes a useful difference?— wearing actually makes a useful difference? , ., ., , , , , difference? the short answer is yes. the lonter difference? the short answer is yes. the longer answer, _ difference? the short answer is yes. the longer answer, throughout - difference? the short answer is yes. the longer answer, throughout the i the longer answer, throughout the pandemic we have become more aware of how the virus spreads through the air and the of how the virus spreads through the airand the main of how the virus spreads through the air and the main area where it does
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this is indoors. the scientific evidence has found that covering your face, evidence has found that covering yourface, largely evidence has found that covering your face, largely protects the people you are with so you spreading it to others, also growing evidence that it can help you protect yourself, as well. there is a psychological element, as well, if you see someone wearing a mask it acts as a social reminder that you should take caution and keep your distance. the virus is still around. for many of these reasons government is saying this is why they bring it back in, to protect people. people thoutht back in, to protect people. people thought they _ back in, to protect people. people thought they were _ back in, to protect people. people thought they were afraid - back in, to protect people. people thought they were afraid not - back in, to protect people. people thought they were afraid not to i back in, to protect people. people i thought they were afraid not to wear them more often but it is a reversal of policy question up definitely in england, although the rules have always been tighter in england, although the rules have always been tighte— always been tighter in other nations, and _ always been tighter in other nations, and in _ always been tighter in other nations, and in scotland - always been tighter in other| nations, and in scotland you always been tighter in other - nations, and in scotland you will see lots of people wearing masks in bars and even nightclubs, but bringing it more in line, it is now putting the emphasis on it is time to wear masks again, because of the news about the new variant. let’s
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news about the new variant. let's talk about the _ news about the new variant. let's talk about the omicron _ news about the new variant. let's talk about the omicron variant. david says, surely if the omicron variant is less fatal than the delta variant, as a south african doctor has said, but more contagious, it is likely to replace the delta variant and could actually be good news? possibly. we have got to be careful about _ possibly. we have got to be careful about extrapolating initial observational data from one part of the world _ observational data from one part of the world which is a very different part of— the world which is a very different part of the — the world which is a very different part of the world to our part of the world _ part of the world to our part of the world in— part of the world to our part of the world. in south africa vaccination rates _ world. in south africa vaccination rates are — world. in south africa vaccination rates are much lower so it could be that we _ rates are much lower so it could be that we are — rates are much lower so it could be that we are in better shape but the average _ that we are in better shape but the average age of a victim who is catching — average age of a victim who is catching coronavirus in south africa is significantly lower than the topography that we have got in the uk. topography that we have got in the uk - _ topography that we have got in the uk. — demographics we have got. they are basing _ uk. — demographics we have got. they are basing the cases they are seeing on younger— are basing the cases they are seeing on younger people but we don't know what will— on younger people but we don't know what will happen if older people catch _ what will happen if older people catch it — what will happen if older people catch it but that could be mitigated by the _
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catch it but that could be mitigated by the fact that we have got a really — by the fact that we have got a really high vaccine uptake and boost uptake _ really high vaccine uptake and boost uptake in— really high vaccine uptake and boost uptake in our older population and we are _ uptake in our older population and we are pretty confident that the boosters — we are pretty confident that the boosters and the vaccines will work really _ boosters and the vaccines will work really well — boosters and the vaccines will work really well against the variant so we think— really well against the variant so we think we are in good shape, but that is— we think we are in good shape, but that is no— we think we are in good shape, but that is no replacement for doing the experiments and making the observations for real and what happens _ observations for real and what ha- ens. ., ., observations for real and what ha- ens. ., ~' ,, , observations for real and what ha- ens. ., ,, , . observations for real and what hat-ens. ., ,, , . observations for real and what hat-ens. ., ~ , . ., happens. thank you very much was not paul ask them — happens. thank you very much was not paul ask them at _ happens. thank you very much was not paul ask them at will _ happens. thank you very much was not paul ask them at will vaccines - paul ask them at will vaccines modified to work against omicron have to undergo testing before general use?— have to undergo testing before general use? they will undergo testin t general use? they will undergo testing but _ general use? they will undergo testing but it _ general use? they will undergo testing but it won't _ general use? they will undergo testing but it won't be - general use? they will undergo testing but it won't be to - general use? they will undergo testing but it won't be to the i general use? they will undergo i testing but it won't be to the same extent that the first vaccines were tested because we are talking about weeks rather than starting from scratch. — talking about tweaks. because there is not such a big difference they don't have to go through all the steps, but they
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won't cut corners and they will still be in charge of regulating it and making sure it is safe before making any recommendation to the goal about whether they should roll it out and whether they — recommendation to thejcvi and whether and how they should roll it out. the m h r eight have been looking at this all along, continuing to evaluate the safety and continuing to justify and continuing to look at whether they are justified continuing to look at whether they arejustified in continuing to look at whether they are justified in giving continuing to look at whether they arejustified in giving out continuing to look at whether they are justified in giving out further, so they were involved in the decision today about extending the booster programme, so the tweaking for omicron is onlyjust been started and looked at so we are quite a way off from having it tweaked, if indeed a tweaked vaccine is needed for omicron. tt tweaked, if indeed a tweaked vaccine is needed for omicron.— is needed for omicron. if there is some tweaking — is needed for omicron. if there is some tweaking to _ is needed for omicron. if there is some tweaking to be _ is needed for omicron. if there is some tweaking to be done, - is needed for omicron. if there is| some tweaking to be done, chris, is needed for omicron. if there is - some tweaking to be done, chris, i'm sure that's a better technical term
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for that, which you can advise us on, but that might put people off getting their boosters, thinking this will not be the best booster for them and they should wait until the adjusted version is available? t the adjusted version is available? i quite like the word tweaking! it gets my seal of approval. actually, we are protecting people really very effectively and in fact 95% of the time, with vaccines that we are in fact deriving from the parent of the delta strain which is now accounting for the vast majority of cases, not just in the uk but around the world, so variants are still responding nicely and very well against vaccines that were made against viruses that we saw two years ago. the current evidence we have and our instincts are telling us, that this new variant will be defended against by the vaccines, at least in terms of protecting people from severe disease and that is what we want to do. we accept there will always be cases but what the vaccines have
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done is stop those cases converting into consequences, people in hospital and losing their lives, and we think the same is likely to be true with this new variant. you may get cases because of it and it may cause more transmission, but we don't think it will translate into more people in hospital thank goodness. tote more people in hospitalthank goodness-— more people in hospitalthank toodness. ~ ., ., , ., goodness. we have to remember that of all the many _ goodness. we have to remember that of all the many cases _ goodness. we have to remember that of all the many cases we _ goodness. we have to remember that of all the many cases we are - goodness. we have to remember that of all the many cases we are seeing i of all the many cases we are seeing each day, the vast majority are not omicron at the moment. that each day, the vast majority are not omicron at the moment.— omicron at the moment. that is ritht. omicron at the moment. that is right- the _ omicron at the moment. that is right. the omicron _ omicron at the moment. that is right. the omicron variant - omicron at the moment. that is right. the omicron variant has i omicron at the moment. that is i right. the omicron variant has only just emerged and whilst it has caused thousands of cases that they know about in south africa and southern africa as a territory, we are now detecting cases in many other geographies and in the same way that when the virus first emerged from china over two years ago, we detected a handful of cases but by then it was everywhere and similarly with the alpha variant and then the delta variant which came from india, very quickly it was everywhere all over the world so
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there is an element of slamming the stable door shut after the horse has bolted and that is why the south african president said it is a nonsense to put blockades on all the flight routes because actually this thing is already off and about. enhanced screening of travellers is probably a good idea but actually stopping the flight routes is probably a bit late.- probably a bit late. zach in southampton _ probably a bit late. zach in southampton says, - probably a bit late. zach in southampton says, given i probably a bit late. zach in i southampton says, given that probably a bit late. zach in _ southampton says, given that lateral flow and pcr tests rely on recognising specific rna protein sequences, are the current tests are effective at detecting the highly mutated omicron variant? could lateral flow test be more likely to come back negative because they are not necessarily up to date with the sequencing of omicron? the not necessarily up to date with the sequencing of omicron?— not necessarily up to date with the sequencing of omicron? the pcr test we do looks — sequencing of omicron? the pcr test we do looks for— sequencing of omicron? the pcr test we do looks for the _ sequencing of omicron? the pcr test we do looks for the genetic _ sequencing of omicron? the pcr test we do looks for the genetic material i we do looks for the genetic material of the _ we do looks for the genetic material of the virus — we do looks for the genetic material of the virus and the world health organization has issued reassuring information today to say that the
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pcr tests — information today to say that the pcr tests that are being conducted will still— pcr tests that are being conducted will still work against this omicron variant— will still work against this omicron variant and — will still work against this omicron variant and they will recognise it because — variant and they will recognise it because we are looking in those tests— because we are looking in those tests for— because we are looking in those tests for a — because we are looking in those tests for a part of that virus which is different — tests for a part of that virus which is different to the part which has mutated — is different to the part which has mutated in the omicron variant and because _ mutated in the omicron variant and because the part we are looking for has not _ because the part we are looking for has not changed, the pcr test remains — has not changed, the pcr test remains robust. the lateral flow test works — remains robust. the lateral flow test works differently and they don't _ test works differently and they don't look for the genetic material of the _ don't look for the genetic material of the virus, they are looking for the outer— of the virus, they are looking for the outer coat and part of the inner coat called — the outer coat and part of the inner coat called the nuclear capsid which makes _ coat called the nuclear capsid which makes the — coat called the nuclear capsid which makes the physical virus particle, it is not— makes the physical virus particle, it is not the — makes the physical virus particle, it is not the genetic material but the virus — it is not the genetic material but the virus itself, and those have not changed. _ the virus itself, and those have not changed. in— the virus itself, and those have not changed, in the same way the genetic information— changed, in the same way the genetic information has not changed in this particular— information has not changed in this particular variant and therefore we are comfortable that the lateral flow test should also continue to perform — flow test should also continue to perform and to detect this new variant— perform and to detect this new variant alongside the existing delta variant _ variant alongside the existing delta variant. , ., ~ ., .,
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variant. there will be work going on to make sure _ variant. there will be work going on to make sure the _ variant. there will be work going on to make sure the sequencing - variant. there will be work going on to make sure the sequencing is i to make sure the sequencing is accurate? ~ to make sure the sequencing is accurate?— to make sure the sequencing is accurate? ~ , . ., accurate? when we first detect a vafied, accurate? when we first detect a varied. what _ accurate? when we first detect a varied, what scientists _ accurate? when we first detect a varied, what scientists do - accurate? when we first detect a varied, what scientists do it i accurate? when we first detect a varied, what scientists do it herej varied, what scientists do it here and in _ varied, what scientists do it here and in many countries, they will put and in many countries, they will put a line _ and in many countries, they will put a line up— and in many countries, they will put a line up with the genetic code of the virus — a line up with the genetic code of the virus alongside other viruses that we — the virus alongside other viruses that we have detected in the past and they— that we have detected in the past and they will ask if these are the same _ and they will ask if these are the same and — and they will ask if these are the same and if not, where are they different? — same and if not, where are they different? you can see in the genetic— different? you can see in the genetic code where there are differences and you can say then where _ differences and you can say then where in — differences and you can say then where in the structure of the virus there _ where in the structure of the virus there will— where in the structure of the virus there will be differences because you can — there will be differences because you can see where in the code of the differences _ you can see where in the code of the differences are and what bit of the virus _ differences are and what bit of the virus those — differences are and what bit of the virus those differences relate to or what _ virus those differences relate to or what hit _ virus those differences relate to or what hit of — virus those differences relate to or what bit of the virus is going to be affected _ what bit of the virus is going to be affected and we know the areas that are not— affected and we know the areas that are not affected in the omicron variant— are not affected in the omicron variant are _ are not affected in the omicron variant are not those areas which are represented in our tests which is why— are represented in our tests which is why we — are represented in our tests which is why we can confidently say the tests _ is why we can confidently say the tests should perform under these circumstances and detect omicron as well as— circumstances and detect omicron as well as the _ circumstances and detect omicron as well as the existing variants with a virus. circumstances and detect omicron as well as the existing variants with a virus. questions circumstances and detect omicron as well as the existing variants with a virus. ,, , ., , ., circumstances and detect omicron as well as the existing variants with a virus. ,, , ., , ., ., ,., circumstances and detect omicron as well as the existing variants with a virus. ,, , ., , ., ., ,., .,. virus. questions now about face coverings- _ virus. questions now about face coverings. dave _ virus. questions now about face coverings. dave says, _ virus. questions now about face coverings. dave says, besides i
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coverings. dave says, besides mandatory mask wearing in public transport and shops, would it not have been sensible to include hospitality?— have been sensible to include hos-itali ? hospitality? the government said the reason why they _ hospitality? the government said the reason why they haven't _ hospitality? the government said the reason why they haven't said - hospitality? the government said the reason why they haven't said you i reason why they haven't said you need to wear a mask in hospitality is because when you go to a restaurant or a pub the main activity is eating and drinking and you can't wear a mask while doing those activities and they said the reason they are brimming into shops and public transport is because those are indoor settings — bringing it. where you are not usually eating and drinking and therefore you can take the action to cover your face and protect others but also to protect yourself. the and protect others but also to protect yourself.— and protect others but also to trotect ourself. ., , ., protect yourself. the other question is from alexander, _ protect yourself. the other question is from alexander, we _ protect yourself. the other question is from alexander, we need - protect yourself. the other question is from alexander, we need a - protect yourself. the other question | is from alexander, we need a crystal ball, will wearing face coverings apply when you are not seated in restaurants and where this about christmas? tt restaurants and where this about christmas?— restaurants and where this about christmas? . ., , ., christmas? it comes under the large bracket about _ christmas? it comes under the large bracket about things _ christmas? it comes under the large bracket about things we _ christmas? it comes under the large bracket about things we don't - christmas? it comes under the large bracket about things we don't knowl bracket about things we don't know
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yet. those are not the rules at the moment but scientists would agree that actually if you can wear a mask that actually if you can wear a mask that would be very courteous to people you are in the bar and restaurant with, for the reasons we have discussed, but they are not the rules in england and they are different rules in other nations. as for closures over christmas, we can't possibly say, but that will be something the government will be trying to avoid. fsine something the government will be trying to avoid-— trying to avoid. one of the key messages _ trying to avoid. one of the key messages i — trying to avoid. one of the key messages i took _ trying to avoid. one of the key messages i took from - trying to avoid. one of the key messages i took from the i trying to avoid. one of the key. messages i took from the press conference was, professorjonathan van—tam saying, nobody should be panicking, even though we are asking everyone to follow the rules that are being reintroduced in some cases, and just exercise caution. the phrase was don't panic but don't ignore the weather forecast. a bit of weather does not always hurt people but covid really can. that is the warning, be cautious, they are
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extending the vaccine booster programme, and doing it in various ways, and there will be a lot of things happening in the next few weeks that will look at omicron and that will dictate, whatever comes from that, how the next six months goes. from that, how the next six months toes. , ., . , , goes. chris, i noticed because i have a specific— goes. chris, i noticed because i have a specific interest - goes. chris, i noticed because i have a specific interest in i goes. chris, i noticed because i have a specific interest in this, | have a specific interest in this, that 16 and 17—year—olds were not mentioned in the data briefing. they have been mostly vaccinated once, if they have come forward, and will be encouraged are assumed to have a second dose, but when? the gaps between the second and the booster dose has been hard, so what about gaps between other doses? the dose has been hard, so what about gaps between other doses?- dose has been hard, so what about gaps between other doses? the 16 and 17-year-olds — gaps between other doses? the 16 and 17-year-olds were _ gaps between other doses? the 16 and 17-year-olds were called _ gaps between other doses? the 16 and 17-year-olds were called forward i 17—year—olds were called forward recently — 17—year—olds were called forward recently for their second doses when the age _ recently for their second doses when the age of— recently for their second doses when the age of boosting was brought down to 40 and _ the age of boosting was brought down to 40 and i_ the age of boosting was brought down to a0 and i think because that will be just— to a0 and i think because that will be just beginning for that age group there is— be just beginning for that age group there is no— be just beginning for that age group there is no grounds for saying we
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are now— there is no grounds for saying we are now going to give extra doses or posters— are now going to give extra doses or posters because we are going to embark— posters because we are going to embark on a second dose for that group _ embark on a second dose for that group as— embark on a second dose for that group as well as for the younger kids who — group as well as for the younger kids who are over age 11 — or boosters _ kids who are over age 11 — or boosters |t— kids who are over age 11 - or boosters-— boosters. it is always worth inquiring — boosters. it is always worth inquiring if— boosters. it is always worth inquiring if they _ boosters. it is always worth inquiring if they have - boosters. it is always worth inquiring if they have had i boosters. it is always worth i inquiring if they have had the first dose and there has been a gap that has elapsed. dose and there has been a gap that has elapsed-— dose and there has been a gap that has elapsed._ kevin - dose and there has been a gap that. has elapsed._ kevin says, has elapsed. absolutely. kevin says, wh is has elapsed. absolutely. kevin says, why is there — has elapsed. absolutely. kevin says, why is there no _ has elapsed. absolutely. kevin says, why is there no mention _ has elapsed. absolutely. kevin says, why is there no mention of— has elapsed. absolutely. kevin says, why is there no mention of when - has elapsed. absolutely. kevin says, why is there no mention of when the| why is there no mention of when the measures come into force? i have a long weekend but to come to the uk in a couple of weeks and if i can't go out for a family meal that has been booked, if i have to self isolate, can i still stay with my family? isolate, can i still stay with my famil ? , ., isolate, can i still stay with my famil ? h, , family? the rules about people travellin: family? the rules about people travelling from _ family? the rules about people travelling from outside - family? the rules about people travelling from outside the - family? the rules about people travelling from outside the uk| family? the rules about people - travelling from outside the uk come into effect tomorrow morning and looking at his question, he is coming for a long weekend and he will have to come in and self isolate and then he has to take a pcr test before the end of the second day. self isolate means don't have contact with anyone, so whether he can stay with his family will be
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“p he can stay with his family will be up to whether there is somewhere at the family house that they could safely stay and given that he is due to visit his elderly mother and we know the elderly are more susceptible to covid—i9, that is probably something he would want to avoid. again, the results of a pcr test, they aim to have the results within 2a hours but it could take longer. pretty soon the four days of his weekender over and he has to back home. it is very much a conversation to be had with the family but if in doubt, keep away from those you love and keep away from those you love and keep away from other people as well. the travel industry _ from other people as well. the travel industry say, please don't cancel for the sake of having to isolate for a couple of days because they have just got started again. yes, and there will be people who will say, it is still worth it because they have not seen their loved ones in a long time, and it is an important time of year, but the man epidemiological and scientific point of view, travel, but stay safe
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— but from a. you must stay safe while also adhering to the legal restrictions.— restrictions. thanks for those questions _ restrictions. thanks for those questions and _ restrictions. thanks for those questions and also _ restrictions. thanks for those questions and also thanks - restrictions. thanks for those questions and also thanks to | restrictions. thanks for those - questions and also thanks to both of you. tens of thousands of people have spent another night without power as temperatures dropped to as low as minus six in some parts of the uk. yellow ice warnings remain in place for much of scotland, england and wales, with some schools closed and rail services cancelled as luxmy gopal reports. the impact of storm arwen continues. snow, ice and gusts of up to ioomph caused severe damage, with thousands of people facing a fourth day without power. worst hit is the north—east of scotland, where a major incident was declared.
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your viewers will remember beast from the east in 2018. this is three times worse than that and probably some of the worst conditions we've seen for the electricity network, certainly, in about 15 years. hundreds of thousands of homes across the country were without electricity for much of the weekend. it's been tough. we've got a couple of kids, one nine, one six, so it's been quite hard work. luckily my father—in—law lives about half a mile down the road, so we've been able to camp out down at his and have a few cups of tea and things like that. but, yeah, a bit of a nightmare not having any lights and no heating. it's been freezing and i've got two young kids, so we've had nothingl to do and nowhere to go. it's been really cold and awful. it's warned pockets of aberdeenshire could potentially be without power until wednesday. vaccination clinics in the area have been cancelled today and schools are closed today and tomorrow. northern powergrid said north—east england's network experienced its worst damage
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in 20 years. following heavy snowfall, more than 60 customers and an oasis tribute band have been trapped at a pub in the yorkshire dales since friday night, when the only road in and out was blocked. to be honest, they've been absolutely lovely. and the cliche i've been saying is they came as strangers and a lot of them are leaving as friends. and we are talking about a reunion next year. last night was the coldest of this season so far. temperatures fell as low as around minus nine celsius, recorded in cumbria. gritters were out in the early hours. it's been the busiest weekend so far of the season. the road temperatures got down to minus four degrees last night. our drivers have been out this morning since four o'clock treating the network, the roads and the cycleways and the footways across the city of york. the gritters are back after what's
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been a busy morning. in fact, for many teams, it was the busiest weekend of the season so far, as a result of the drop in temperatures and the conditions brought by storm arwen. while the worst of the storm has passed, authorities in aberdeenshire say it's left worse damage than first feared — and recovery will take longer than expected. luxmy gopal, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. quite a dramatic change through the night tonight, getting very mild in comparison to the nightjust passed, at least with clear skies we did see some beautiful sunshine and this was kent a few hours ago, absolutely glorious. cole, temperatures are struggling to climb above 3—4 but further north he is the change on its way — cold. the mild air is starting to push in from the atlantic and it is really tracking
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in between these weather fronts which are moving across and that is bringing in this westerly flow, the milder source but also a lot of cloud and a damp scenario as we go through the night. that means it is pushing the blue colours and the cold air out of the way and the cloud will be thick enough for a spot of dress places and misty and murky and also some showers — a spot of drizzle in places. this morning we had —9 in the lake district but tomorrow morning we will see io—ii so quite a change. it will be cloudy and damp going into the morning but as we go to the afternoon, areas to the east of the pennines might brighten up a touch, and at the same time out to the west into northern ireland and western scotland, rain arrives, some of it heavily accompanied by gusty winds. temperatures on the mild side with the exception of the northern isles, staying in the cold air. then we have a spell of wet and windy
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weather for tuesday night into thursday, and we could see some gusty conditions — wednesday. the wind direction changing back to a northerly, so as we go through wednesday, once again it is going to get noticeably colder. a spot of sharp showers in northern ireland and northwestern england down into the midlands, showers coming in off the midlands, showers coming in off the north sea will turn increasingly wintry into the afternoon, around 3-4 wintry into the afternoon, around 3—4 is the high but we mightjust scrape the double digits through wednesday afternoon. as the front clears away will see this little ridge of high pressure building for thursday so cold and frosty starts to thursday morning, thursday will be dry wood sunshine before another speu be dry wood sunshine before another spell of wet and windy weather arriving, so it will be quite changeable this week, but if you want a little bit more in the way of sunshine but a cool story, thursday is the one, and then on friday milder but wetter weather threatens. take care.
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this is bbc news. iam i am clive myrie. the headlines: covid boosterjabs will be offered to all adults over the age of 18, to combat the omicron variant, and the gap between second and third jabs is to be reduced. children aged 12 to 15 can get a second covid jab, while the clinically vulnerable will be offered a fourth. scientific advisers say the new measures are crucial, while more data about omicron is gathered. it may be that the vaccines that we have at the moment may be less good than against the current circulating delta variant. a total of 11 cases of the new variant have now been discovered in the uk, with the health secretary saying the government's tighter covid rules buy time.
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if it emerges that this variant is no more dangerous than the delta variant, then we won't keep measures in place

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