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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 29, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines. the new omicron covid variant — the government sets out details of its measures to control the spread. face masks must be worn in shops and on public transport in england from tomorrow. an expansion of the boosterjabs programme to all adults is likely to be approved thousands are still without power after the damage caused by storm arwen — the police in scotland warn the disruption could last for days. the boom in buying now and paying later. more than 17 million uk customers have now used the payment option — double the number pre—pandemic. but are the regulations tight enough?
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i take a look. one of formula one's true greats — tributes are paid to team owner sir frank williams who's died at the age of 79. lewis hamilton said his legacy will live on for ever. a will live on for ever. bitterly cold start. last night the a bitterly cold start. last night the coldest of the season so far so watch out for frost, icy stretches also. all the details right here. it's monday, november the 29th. our main story. efforts to combat the spread of the new omicron coronavirus variant will be stepped up by the government today. it's expected a major expansion of the covid boosterjab programme will be announced later, before stricter measures including mandatory face coverings in shops and on public transport in england come into force tomorrow. three cases of the variant have been detected in the uk so far with officials warning it's "very likely" that more will be
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discovered in the coming days. charlotte gallagher reports. this new variant was only reported to the world health organisation last wednesday. but its impact is already being felt here. three omicron cases have been detected so far. in nottingham, brentwood in essex, and central london. all three people had recently travelled to southern africa. targeted testing is now being carried out in those locations. officials say it is imperative people come forward. what this new variant is showing us is that it is really important people get a pcr test — that is one of those tests you either have to book or order online, if you have any sort of symptoms. the uk health security agency says it is very likely more cases of the omicron variant will be found. i think we will detect more cases in the coming days and we are investigating suspected cases at the moment.
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that is anyone who is positive who has returned from southern african countries over the last number of weeks. we are chasing down those individuals and their contacts and asking them to isolate if they are within ten days, and also retesting a number of contacts, as well. that is extremely important in order to slow the spread in our communities. concerns about this new variant has led the government to introduce new measures. from tomorrow, it will be compulsory to wear a face mask in shops and on public transport in england, bringing the nation into line with the rest of britain. scotland and northern ireland also require masks in pubs and restaurants. english schools are also advised that staff and pupils in year seven and above should wear masks in communal areas. in scotland, masks are worn in secondary school classrooms, as well. i think lots of school and college leaders would say we have had mask wearing in public spaces, we have done that either on the advice of local public health or because of the buildings that we have got and the lack of ventilation.
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so no big change for them. i think others will say, well, if this is the price we need to pay to try to keep education as normal as possible, then let's do that. people entering the uk will have to take pcr tests and isolate until they receive a negative result. and experts are looking at extending vaccine boosters to all over 185. much is still unknown about the omicron variant and it is unclear how big a threat it poses. but as those risks are studied, experts say vaccines remain crucial. let's speak to chief political correspondent adam fleming. adam, this is a fast—moving situation. what are we expecting today? we will probably get a statement in parliament from the health secretary, who will update us on the situation and what the government is doing. after a flurry of activity
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over the weekend like the last minute press conference by the prime minister, i think we are in for a couple of days of waiting to see what the progress of the variant is across the uk, because there will be more cases. we are waiting for an update on the science because a lot of concerns about omicron are theoretical rather than based on things that have happened in the real world. we are also waiting for whether there will be a change on the roll—out of the bicester programme because the government has asked the jc vi at programme because the government has asked thejc vi at expanding the programme to younger ages and also whether the gap between your second and new dose can be moved so more people can get into the system. and we are waiting to see the new restrictions the government announced over the weekend which will come in on tuesday, in the early hours of tuesday. we have not seen them written down as a piece of legislation yet which means we are
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waiting to get the political reaction to that because i can imagine some conservative mps will be worried this is the start of more restrictions coming our way. we will get an update from the health secretary mid—afternoon. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon will urge people to pull together over the winter months to prevent the spread of the omicron variant later. in an address to her party's online conference, the snp leader will say the pandemic continues to be her main focus — despite pressure from activists to secure another independence referendum. she'll urge the public to redouble their efforts to maximise the chances of a more normal christmas. tens of thousands of people have spent another night without power as temperatures dropped as low as minus six in some parts of the uk. yellow ice warnings remain in place for much of scotland, england and wales this morning with some schools closed and rail services cancelled. louisa pilbeam has more. people across parts of scotland,
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wales and northern england have spent their third night without power as temperatures drop to their lowest seen so far this season. scottish authorities declared a major incident after more than 40,000 were left without power, forcing the closure of schools and vaccine centres. your viewers will remember the beast from the east in 2018. this is three times worse than that and probably some of the worst conditions we have seen for the electricity network, certainly, in about 15 years. hot food, drinks and bottled water have been supplied to many of those affected, with vulnerable residents also offered temporary accommodation. it has been tough, we have a couple of kids, one is nine, one is six. my father—in—law lives down the road so
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we have been able to camp out with him. it's been freezing. i have two young kids. so we have had nothing to do and nowhere to go. it has been really cold and awful. elsewhere, a met office warning for ice remains in place across much of the uk this morning, with drivers urged to plan ahead for their journeys. it comes as the effects of storm arwen continue to disrupt parts of the rail network after gale force winds brought down trees and power lines, claiming the lives of three people. more than 60 customers have been trapped at this pub in the yorkshire dales since friday night, when heavy snowfall blocked the only road in and out of the area. with milder temperatures on the horizon, many will hope a big thaw follows the big freeze. our reporter luxmy gopal is at a gritting depot in york.
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iimagine it i imagine it will be a busy morning. how are you? good morning. there is activity behind us. i am at a cold and frosty york city council depot. this is positively balmy compared to conditions the team put up with overnight as you know how freezing it has been. one of the gritters has returned and off—loaded and will be washed. it is one of eight out overnight. the team here say it has been the busiest week of the season. it was busy due to the drop in temperatures with most parts seen below zero overnight but that has been compounded by the effects of stephen—macro. and reports people are still feeling the effects of the storm with thousands in the uk still without power. what is going on here
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reflects the picture of what is happening across the country. to give an example, the eight gritters that went out overnight, they cover 360 miles of road networks and cycleways. this weekend, in york alone, they treated 1800 miles of road and cycleways. that is because that will continue because there is ice. and it says it will continue to make travel treacherous and said they should plan ahead forjourneys because an ice warning remains in place until ten o'clock this morning. a 14—year—old boy will appear in court today charged with the murder of 12—year—old ava white in liverpool. she was stabbed in the city centre on thursday whilst out with her friends to see the christmas lights being switched on. three other boys, aged between 13
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and 15, were also arrested and have now been bailed. sex offenderjeffrey epstein — goes on trial today in new york. the british publishing heiress has been accused of trafficking four unnamed minors and grooming and recruiting them for her former lover to abuse in the late �*90s and early 20005. she's been in a new yorkjail since her arrest injuly 2020 and has pleaded not guilty to all charges. labour is calling for an overhaul of the system regulating ministers�* conduct — accusing the prime minister of failing to enforce the current rules. in a speech later, the party's deputy leader angela rayner will call for a ban on paid work relating to a minister's job for at least five years after leaving government. it comes as the commons standards committee is due to publish its own review of the mps�* code of conduct. the government has said it is committed to reinforcing high standards. barbados is to become the world's newest republic when the island nation formally
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removes the queen as its head of state. prince charles has arrived for the ceremony, which will take place just after midnight tonight on the 55th anniversary of the country's independence from britain. i think it is slightly warmer there. minus four outside it says here. sarah can tell us all about it. good morning. certainly cold. last night was the coldest of the season so far and we had temperatures in cumbria at -8.4 and we had temperatures in cumbria at “8.4 degrees. it will turn gradually milder today because we have cloud and rain working in from the north so temperatures will be on the north so temperatures will be on the up eventually but for many, watch out for icy conditions. this is where we had rain and a bit of
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snow, mainly north west scotland, down the east coast of england. but they are falling on subzero surfaces so we have warnings for ice in parts of scotland, england and wales. cloud pushing in from the north—west. some rain in scotland and northern ireland and northern england. double figures towards the north—west. turning breezy in scotland this afternoon. outbreaks of rain. cloudy conditions. but it will fall as rain at this stage with milder air moving in. will fall as rain at this stage with milderair moving in. northern ireland and northern england damp and cloudy. further south and east you will see the best of clearer skies lasting through today. it will not be as cold tonight as last night but this morning watch out for not be as cold tonight as last night but this morning watch out for icy stretches. thanks. the busiest shopping weekend of the year has come to an end with millions spent on the high
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street and online. lots of that cash will be have been using so—called buy now, pay later providers. nina, what do we know? handy for some people but we are asking if they are well regulated. we've spoken about buy now, pay later on the programme before but it turns out there's been a massive growth in the use of these services during the pandemic. that is likely to have continued with the black friday weekend. buy now, pay later. it does exactly what it says on the tin. you choose a product — say a nice pair of trainers. you pay straightaway, then a company like klarna, clearpay or laybuy pays the shop, and you owe the payment company. but you don't have to pay up straightaway. you can delay the payment or divide the cost into instalments. it's often interest—free or cheaper than a credit card, but if payments aren't made on time, then you can end up with expensive fees. for lots of people this is a really useful way of managing money,
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and it can allow you to return unwanted items without having to wait ages for a refund. but some campaigners are worried it encourages spending and could end up with people getting into debt. that's because, at the moment, the market is not yet regulated in the same way as things like credit cards. the government has launched a consultation on new rules. that closes next month but actual changes could still be a year or so away. in the meantime, more and more people are using buy now pay later. the bbc has learned there are more than 17 million buy—now—pay—later customers in the uk — that's doubled during the pandemic. chinelo is one of them. she started using it to buy clothes and now wants to offer the same service to customers of her cake decorating courses. it was pretty straightforward. i got a text message letting me know when i needed to pay and they send you reminders. we started to come out of
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lockdown, and it became clear i could start to offer cake decorating masterclasses again. those tickets start from 350. i would like to give customers flexibility so they do not have to pay all of it upfront. so it can be helpful— have to pay all of it upfront. so it can be helpfulfor_ have to pay all of it upfront. so it can be helpful for customers and can be helpfulfor customers and retailers but not everyone is happy we are waiting for regulation. citizens advice say one in ten of us are planning to use buy now, pay later for their christmas shopping. they're worried about people spending more than they can afford. which consumer group say customers are being bombarded with these services. they say they've investigated and found not all retailers are giving the right information about the risks. 62 of the 111 retailers we looked at offered _ 62 of the 111 retailers we looked at offered one by now pay later scheme and we _ offered one by now pay later scheme and we found a retailer offering six schemes_ and we found a retailer offering six schemes which can confuse a customer checking _ schemes which can confuse a customer checking out _ schemes which can confuse a customer checking out. if they are not provided _ checking out. if they are not provided with good information to
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understand which one they should use and if— understand which one they should use and if they— understand which one they should use and if they should use them at all and if they should use them at all and what — and if they should use them at all and what are the consequences if things— and what are the consequences if things go— and what are the consequences if things go wrong. the treasury told us some people find these services a helpful way to manage their finances, so any regulation had to be balanced. they also pointed out these products already had to keep to rules around to rules around adverts. we'd love to hear from you on this one. have you used it more in the pandemic? have you got yourself into bother because a small print. it can be handy, thinking i want that, i will stagger payments without interest, but if at that point your finances change and you cannot make the payment to the penalties can be more severe than if you bought it on credit in the first place. always worth reading the small print. be aware of it because it is not regulated yet in the same way. let's take a look at today's papers. the front pages are dominated by the latest developments surrounding
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the omicron coronavirus variant. the guardian says the booster vaccination scheme could be significantly expanded as a result. the daily telegraph says mps are warning the new variant will lead to "chaos" in schools because close contacts of those who test positive — including children — will be required to self—isolate for 10 days. "the fight to save christmas" is the headline in the mirror — the paper says doctors want policies surrounding face masks to be expanded to other settings, such as pubs and restaurants. finally, the star has the story about dozens of punters trapped in a pub in the yorkshire dales for a third night following a 5ft blizzard. "mine's a snowball" is the headline. and we'll be speaking to the pub�*s managerjust before 8 o'clock. five feet. could you make it out of five feet of snow. you will need a shovel. have you got some of that... shaky stuff. that will not fix five
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feet of snow. i have something on the inside. shall i show it to you? i don't normally like to do this, but... what am i being accused of? it is about you. it is nonsense, i'm afraid. this is in the papers this morning. fans claiming a fix over bbc�*s dan walker. it says breakfast hope dan walker survived another week. what? shalli hope dan walker survived another week. what? shall i throw the paper again, are you ready? you can throw it if you want. i'm just having a lovely time. i don't get the fix stuff. i am thankful for support and we are enjoying dancing. know stuff like that gets written based on three four comments... it is tweets. it is lovely people care about the programme. genuinely, i get thousands of messages every
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day from people enjoying it and having a nice time. one thing that not annoyingly, disappointingly, people accuse me of even using gary speed's tribute last week to try to gain support for strictly. i know people enjoy the show but don't be daft. there is a liner that crosses that line. when the male celebrity gets the rumba there are alarm bells everywhere because it is probably the toughest. but nadia is a two—time world champion and brilliant at the rumba. i said i have a ridiculously busy week... you had a lot on. i knew she wanted to do it well because it is her favourite dance. i gave it everything. shall we have a reminder of performances from saturday?
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music: make me feel byjanelle monae music: you light up my life by whitney houston # moonlight, starlight... music: desperado by the eagles.
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and when you did... i said well done. it was gorgeous. it was so gorgeous. and you just felt so relaxing. i don't know what you're talking about. cheering where have you been hiding your hips? never knew you had it in you. on a monday i say i don't think i can do this. when we did the charleston i was saying i am not sure i could swivel. but she is a brilliant teacher. we have to mention tilly, who went out. she has had a brilliant time. so fun to watch. i think people enjoyed him losing his shirt. it
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came off, only attacked by two buttons. it just fell off? she buttons. itjust fell off? she is an amazing young woman. up until this programme started i think she said she had worn heels twice in her life and now she is dancing in heels. she is gutted now she has to catch up on university work she has avoided the past ten weeks but she is lovely. what i have enjoyed about getting to know her a bit and chatting each week is that every time she has been in the dance off, she has a lovely big smile on herface and in the dance off, she has a lovely big smile on her face and always dances about 20% better in the dance. she has always been, i love this, i have had a lovely time, i willjust go for it. she is lovely. and also have to mention kai and ajay. they were amazing. the most ridiculously brilliant dance. there is a room next door where you
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get to warm up on the friday before doing the camera block. i watched it for the first time and was open—mouthed. i am for the first time and was open—mouthed. iam not for the first time and was open—mouthed. i am not a judge, for the first time and was open—mouthed. iam notajudge, but i said give yourselves a0. it was incredible. it was so good to watch. dancing on the table in heels. they are amazing. and personally, about the fix then, i am not even voting for myself, i vote for rose. she is amazing. everything she does is amazing. and remind yourself, she cannot hear it. i remember being in the room when i think i watched her dance the tango. it was electric. we get a sense on television how good she is but when you are in the room and you realise everyone keeps quiet, so she can feel the rhythm of the music through the floor, that is how you know how
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special it is. and they started the show on saturday, they were brilliant. the other thing i was going to mention. a lot of people said why did nadiya look so happy. the reason why, the years of planning. she has always wanted to dance that routine. she always wanted to play the piano and also to dance in red backless dress on strictly. she got the opportunity to do it to the dance she loves more than anything else. and she gets to teach a numpty like me. what is it about the rumba so hard? when you dance it, the counting is this four, one, two, three, and a long four. you have to move all the time but you cannot step on the one, you have to step on the four, one,
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two, three. and this dance is slower than the normal rumba, so you have to keep moving all the time and then hit the beats in the music. you are dancing to the piano in the background. oh, my goodness. i loved the challenge. i love the technique. she loves it because she said every single moment, every movement, every look in a rumba counts. so good. and when you are dancing with a double world champion... it is such a privilege. i am glad she enjoyed it so much. we are proud of you. you are doing brilliantly. for someone who has not danced a step. quarterfinal next week. i cannot think about that. it has been lovely. i am enjoying it. time for the news where you are.
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good morning, i'm sonja jessup. westminster council says it's working closely with the uk health security agency to help identify close contacts of a person who tested positive for the omicron covid variant in the borough. it was confirmed last night that a third case of the variant linked to travel to southern africa had been detected in someone who had stayed in westminster but is no longer in britain. meanwhile a couple from tooting are asking the prime minister to rethink the plan to charge travellers for hotel quarantine following the ban on flights from south africa. owen hancock and emily mennie were visiting family in south africa for the first time in two years but will now have to quarantine because of restrictions over the new covid variant. they face a bill of nearly £a,000. if we could have come home earlier, we would have made that choice. if we would have known that south africa would have gone on to the red list, we could have made the choice not to go. butjust overnight, we've had this cost imposed on us.
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and to us, that's what comes across as unfair, unreasonable, and probably unacceptable as well. a memorial service to remember a police officer killed while on duty in south london will take place in westminster later. sergeant matt ratana died after being shot by a man who'd been brought into croydon police station for questioning in september last year. let's take a look at the travel now. a few problems on the tube this morning. the central line is not running between west ruislip and ruislip gardens due to signalfailure. is to signal failure. now severe delays. minor delays is now severe delays. minor delays in the district line and the dlr, jubilee and metropolitan line. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. temperatures are set to go up and down quite dramatically
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across the capital over the next couple of days or so. tomorrow is looking very mild, and then it will turn colder as we head through the rest of the week once more. today it is another chilly one, temperatures just below freezing to start the morning. some icy stretches out there as well on the roads and the pavements so watch out for those, particularly where we saw the rain, sleet and snow full towards the west last night. also some early mist and fog patches, they will lift and clear as we head through the morning. blue sky and sunshine, a very pretty day of weather but still feeling very cold out there. top temperatures only four or five celsius later this afternoon, with just a light breeze. as we head through this evening and overnight, it will be cold and frosty at first under clear skies. then we will see a warm front sinks southwards and eastwards, that is going to introduce some more cloud. possibly some outbreaks of light patchy rain and drizzle, more of a westerly wind and certainly some milder air. temperatures rising into the start of the day tomorrow to between six and eight celsius. so tomorrow a much milder feeling day, with plenty of cloud, again a few spits and spots of light
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patchy rain possible. a westerly wind and highs of 12 celsius. i'm back in half an hour. lots more over on our website at the usual address. now it's back to dan and sally, bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. coming up on breakfast this morning. with the omicron variant on the rise and new rules on facemasks and travel on the way in england, we'll ask an expert who advises ministers whether we should all be getting our booster jabs more quickly. "a true giant of the sport". as the world of formula 1 pays tribute to frank williams, we'll speak to former driver and team owner eddiejordan. hard not to sing along to this!
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an oasis tribute band are amongst those who've spent a third night snowed in at britain's highest pub. we'll chat to the manager to see how they're getting on. a good back catalogue to get through, you could think are quite a few hours! if through, you could think are quite a few hours! , ., . through, you could think are quite a few hours! i. ., , ., few hours! if you are snowed in with an oasis tribute _ few hours! if you are snowed in with an oasis tribute band, _ few hours! if you are snowed in with an oasis tribute band, you _ few hours! if you are snowed in with an oasis tribute band, you could - an oasis tribute band, you could have tended to keep you going. —— you could sing for quite a few hours. �* , ~ , you could sing for quite a few hours. 3 ~' ,,, you could sing for quite a few hours. �*, ~ , , ., ., hours. let's keep you up-to-date with some _ hours. let's keep you up-to-date with some of _ hours. let's keep you up-to-date with some of the _ hours. let's keep you up-to-date with some of the other— hours. let's keep you up-to-date with some of the other main - hours. let's keep you up-to-date i with some of the other main stories. face coverings will be made compulsory in shops and on public transport in england from tomorrow — but pubs and restaurants will remain exempt. the changes are part of new measures aimed to slow the spread of the new covid—19 variant, known as omicron. our reporter andy gill has been finding out how shoppers and retailers feel about the rules. the new rules come in response to the omicron variant of covid. at a health centre in brentwood in essex, some thoughts on what it might mean for how we go about our live. i'm not too worried, because obviously i have had both myjabs and stuff already. and i've already had covid so it's
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one of those things that i'm not too worried. we had to deal with other outbreaks of different variants, and so, we've managed that so far, this will be another one. i i think we just need to wait a fewl more weeks to find out exactly how transmissible it is, l and then kind of deal with it from there. from tomorrow, the new variant means you will have to wear a mask in shops unless you're exempt. liverpool one is one of the busiest shopping centres in the country. 170 shops and 35 restaurants, attracting millions of visitors every year. among christmas shoppers here, a lot of support for the return of compulsory mask wearing, but some dissent as well. i think we've got to the point where we've just got to move on now and live with it. i have no problem with it, you know, keeps me safe, keeps everyone else safe. so, you know, otherwise it'sjust going to go on and on. it's a joke. they're completely taking - over our personal space and it should be our own decision. not really got a problem with it, to be honest. it's not a big ask, is it? not a big deal, no. people are still dying of it so wearing a mask,
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it's not much to ask, is it, really? here at liverpool one, they say the city's post lockdown recovery has been stronger than many other places both in terms of turnover and footfall. they say that mask wearing is a small price to pay to protect people while not hampering that recovery. i think that we've come a very, very long way. i think that performance is exceptionally strong and the announcement with regard to face masks feels like the sensible move. if and one which means everybody can pay a very small price to try and keep life operating as normal as it has been more recently. masks are back on public transport as well. one bus company boss says it won't be easy to get some passengers to put them back on. a little disappointing that the government are just singling out public transport and retail and not hospitality as well. it makes it that much more difficult to enforce. rather than being the normal, it's just in certain areas. but clearly we will
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support this action. we will support our drivers and we will be encouraging, as we have been throughout, actually, we will still be encouraging customers to wear face coverings when they board our buses. whatever happens this christmas, it looks like masks are one thing that are here to stay. andy gill, bbc news, liverpool. we're joined now by drjonathan harte, a gp in nottingham where one of the omicron cases has been detected. . good morning to you. great to see you. let's start with nottingham. is there any particular changes, things being brought in because of the case discovered in your area? h0. discovered in your area? no, nottingham _ discovered in your area? no, nottingham i _ discovered in your area? no, nottingham i think— discovered in your area? iifr, nottingham i think it's following the same national guidance that is coming into play tomorrow as you have just reported on. coming into play tomorrow as you havejust reported on. ijust think that all citizens, we just need to follow the guidance, even before the
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mask wearing becomes compulsory, we know that it is vastly reducing the risk of british —— transition between people so it is a sensible move. —— transmission before people. i know a lot of people will be asking advice, what are you saying to people who are concerned? we are sa in: , to people who are concerned? we are sa inc, be to people who are concerned? we are saying, be sensible, _ to people who are concerned? we are saying, be sensible, follow _ to people who are concerned? we are saying, be sensible, follow the - saying, be sensible, follow the advice. so, hands, face space is still valid, where face coverings, we asked people to where face coverings when they come into surgery, and we wear them as well. public transport and public spaces makes sense and i think people should use common sense and wear them wherever they can. we are encouraging people to take up the invitation of the booster vaccines or start a vaccination programme when it comes. it's starting to get
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into winter, cold and flu viruses, notjust into winter, cold and flu viruses, not just their macro into winter, cold and flu viruses, notjust their macro viruses, we know that covid symptoms mimic cold and flu. it's hard to tell what is covid and what is a normal flu virus. my message is, it is safer for all, especially for our elderly and frail citizens, to assume it might be covid if you start to get a flu or cold symptoms. get a test, lateral flow or pcr test, where a face covering, wash your hands. socially distance from friends and colleagues when you can and be sensible. ., ., ., , sensible. you mentioned masks, we are seeinu sensible. you mentioned masks, we are seeing the _ sensible. you mentioned masks, we are seeing the mandatory _ sensible. you mentioned masks, we are seeing the mandatory return - sensible. you mentioned masks, we are seeing the mandatory return of. are seeing the mandatory return of face coverings on public transport and in shops. would you say to your patients, just aware of face covering —— just to wear a face covering —— just to wear a face covering wherever you go? i covering -- just to wear a face covering wherever you go? i would commit such _ covering wherever you go? i would commit such a _ covering wherever you go? i would commit such a simple _ covering wherever you go? i would commit such a simple thing - covering wherever you go? i would commit such a simple thing to - covering wherever you go? i would commit such a simple thing to do, | commit such a simple thing to do, not a great ask. we are seeing a lot of people ending up in hospital,
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from covid and from other viruses. it doesn't just from covid and from other viruses. it doesn'tjust reduce the transmission of covid, it reduces cold and flu as well. it is significant thing to do and it helps others. you help to protect other people when you wear a mask. that will start to catch transmission and reduce the risk of this new variant spreading fast. . i reduce the risk of this new variant spreading fast-— spreading fast. . i know it is interesting _ spreading fast. . i know it is interesting that _ spreading fast. . i know it is interesting that you - spreading fast. . i know it is interesting that you say - spreading fast. . i know it is- interesting that you say protecting other people, lots of people will be concerned about, should we be visiting elderly relatives, and in that situation, how careful should we be? should we be working from home if we are able to do that? the visitin: home if we are able to do that? tie: visiting relatives home if we are able to do that? t'te: visiting relatives is home if we are able to do that? tte: visiting relatives is very important. ourfrail older important. our frail older relatives, people important. ourfrail older relatives, people with long—term health conditions, are the most out of it. even if they had been double jabbed or triple jab, you can still get covid. the good news is if you
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have been vaccinated, the illness tends to be a lot milder. we see from the reporting that i am aware of, that quite a number of the current cases are people who have had vaccinations. so we cannot assume that you are safe once you are vaccinated. because the symptoms of covid can be very mild and seem like a cold or no symptoms at all, i think if you are going to see some relatives, particularly coming up to the festive period, what i would do is do a lateral flow test before you go. look at how you ventilate rooms. it is -3 go. look at how you ventilate rooms. it is —3 outside in nottingham so you cannot meet outdoors, but sensible, don't spend as long with them as you might have done, wear a face covering if you feel that that is appropriate. because if you both wear a face covering, the risk of passing james is hugely reduced. —— passing james is hugely reduced. —— passing germans.
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—— passing germs. working from home is tricky, i appreciate that is not always possible for everybody in different working environment and industries, they have different problems. if you can and your employer allows it, i would consider it, seriously. maybe have a blended approach of not going into the office quite so often and rotating it around if that is a feasible proposition. it around if that is a feasible proposition-— it around if that is a feasible ro osition. . , i. ., it around if that is a feasible --roosition. . , ., ., proposition. finally, you mention to the booster— proposition. finally, you mention to the booster programme, _ proposition. finally, you mention to the booster programme, how - proposition. finally, you mention to - the booster programme, how important is it that people take up their chance to get a booster and should the booster programme be completely extended to more people? t’m the booster programme be completely extended to more people?— extended to more people? i'm sure it will be, in time. _ extended to more people? i'm sure it will be, in time. how— extended to more people? i'm sure it will be, in time. how quickly - extended to more people? i'm sure it will be, in time. how quickly we - extended to more people? i'm sure it will be, in time. how quickly we are l will be, in time. how quickly we are able to do that, there is an issue around capacity. as you know, general practice is leading the booster programme but we are absolutely snowed under with normal work, catch up from the pandemic over the last 18 months. we are trying to vaccinate people as fast as we can. but i think it will be
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extended. i would suggest that people go on to ring 119, go on to the nhs website, find out where their local clinics now. a lot of places are what using —— doing walking services and you do not need to book. if you are six months after your second vaccine, you can get a third one. i know thejcvi are looking to bring that back and shorten the gap. but we need to follow the cohorts who are eligible and boost as many people as possible. the message is that that is not the only way to handle this. it will not be a panacea. we need to look at all the other messages including face mask wearing, social distancing and hand washing. the combination approach will give us the best approach of beating this. thank you forjoining us, doctor jonathan harte. a memorial service will be held
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in westminster later to remember the life of metropolitan police officer matt ratana who was shot dead while on duty in a custody centre last year. speaking ahead of the service, sergeant ratana's colleagues remember him as a unique, larger than life man who loved rugby and motorbikes, and could talk to anyone. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford has been to meet some of them. matt ratana. officer, rugby player, friend. being remembered today by some of the colleagues who knew him best. it's not how matt ratana died that made him a hero, it's how matt ratana lived. he was at ease with himself. he had a natural kind of confidence that just sort of showed, you trusted him straight away. we miss you, we honour you,
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we won't forget you. today, there will be a much bigger memorial in central london, as his force gathers to celebrate his life. there is still those people that when you open the door and walk in a custody suite or the office, you think, today is going to be a good one. and matt was top of the list of those people, the person i always thought, this is great, going to spend a shift with matt. some of those remembering matt ratana today were friends outside work as well. including some who he persuaded to go with him to germany by motorbike. there is only ever going to be one matt ratana, no one is ever going to replace him. he was just a force of nature who would get things done, he inspired people to go that extra yard, he inspired people to push themselves. matt ratana died in a shooting inside the police custody centre in croydon where he worked. a man has been charged with murder. but his colleagues prefer to recall the outstanding officer they worked with whilst policing difficult parts of london. his best asset as a police officer
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was his ability to talk to people. the friendliness and relatableness with him. he would always find a common ground. and to win them over that way, rather than needing to use any legal framework or an escalation of force. i think there's a lot of people who still, and i'm one of them, who are just confused, about him not being there any more. it doesn't make a lot of sense that someone like that there any more. it doesn't make a lot of sense that someone like that isn't there any more. if you worked with. matt, you felt safe. i i can't quite put it into words, i he had the ability to make police i officers and the publicjust feel. safe purely by his presence there. it was almost like you could define the average police officer, - you could never define the average matt ratana — there was just a total difference. if the world was full - of matt ratanas, the world would be a better place. he is a tragic loss to the service. that was our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford speaking to some of sergeant matt ratana's colleagues. we'll get the forecast
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with sarah in a moment, but let's have a look at some of the photos you've sent in of this weekend's wintery weather. this is the scene in ramsbottom where temperatures have dipped to minus five overnight. there have been snowy scenes across manchester all weekend as well, these were taken in the didsbury area of the city. elsewhere this is the scene in derbyshire. thanks for your pictures, keep them coming. i don't know whether that is manchester... oh, they go, that is derbyshire. thank you for the pictures. i know it causes a bit of disruption. it pictures. i know it causes a bit of dismption-_ pictures. i know it causes a bit of. disruption._ you disruption. it does cause havoc. you miaht be disruption. it does cause havoc. you might be waking _ disruption. it does cause havoc. you might be waking up _ disruption. it does cause havoc. you might be waking up and _ disruption. it does cause havoc. you might be waking up and trying - disruption. it does cause havoc. you might be waking up and trying to - might be waking up and trying to find out if the school is close to what you are going to do, but there is something beautiful about a snowy scene. we is something beautiful about a snowy scene. ~ . p, scene. we are alive with the greaters _ scene. we are alive with the greaters out _ scene. we are alive with the greaters out this _ scene. we are alive with the greaters out this morning. l
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scene. we are alive with the l greaters out this morning. -- scene. we are alive with the - greaters out this morning. -- we are greaters out this morning. —— we are out with the gritters. greaters out this morning. -- we are out with the gritters.— out with the gritters. always entertaining _ out with the gritters. always entertaining to _ out with the gritters. always entertaining to find - out with the gritters. always entertaining to find out - out with the gritters. always entertaining to find out their names. the one that was itsy—bitsy... i will come to it later on! let's get the weather first with sarah. good morning. it was very cold last night, many people waking up to scenes like this, this is didsbury, we have still got some snow lying around. the coldest night of the season so far, so temperatures got down to —8.7 degrees in cumbria, very cold, but quite widely sub zero start to the day. certainly some ice and frost around, some of us still have some snow. in the south, things will remain quite cold and dry today but from the north, rain arriving and with the rain, milder air as well. there is a warm front moving its way in from the north today. on
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the leading edge there is some sleet and snow over higher ground. ahead of it, ice is an issue across eastern scotland, much of england into east of wales. some slippery surfaces. the cloud is working south and east through the day, clearest for longest in eastern england. temperatures only around four or five degrees but in the milder air, with the oubig is a patchy rain, 10 degrees for glasgow. into the evening hours, the cloud will continue its progress across the uk, with some more cloud around and patchy outbreaks of rain, it will be breezy. not as cold as last night. chile towards the northern isles but for most of us by this time tomorrow, we are looking at temperatures of five to 11 degrees. a different feel to the weather tomorrow. a milder day, quite a few isobars on the map so a breezy day. quite a lot of cloud. outbreaks of rain for scotland, northern ireland
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and northern england, a few splashes working further south. brighter spells across southern and eastern england. more persistent rain across northern ireland and western scotland later on. tomorrow, 11 to 13 degrees. you will notice the strength of the breeze. we will have 30 to a0 mph in the north—west. wet and windy weather through tuesday, overnight into wednesday as the low pressure shifts its way into the uk. once it does so it will open the doors to the cold northerly air so we will see the northerly developing. more wintry showers to scotland on wednesday. most of the showers will be falling as rain across the east coast, west coast also seeing some scattered showers. temperatures back into single figures in the north, holding on to double figures further south. towards the end of the week, after the milder day on wednesday, more
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cold again as we head through thursday. then a wet and windy a picture into friday. a little bit up and down through the week. so, changeable! yes, summarised that! i so, changeable! yes, summarised that! i enjoyed _ so, changeable! yes, summarised that! i enjoyed sarah _ so, changeable! yes, summarised that! i enjoyed sarah being - so, changeable! yes, summarised that! i enjoyed sarah being far- so, changeable! yes, summarised i that! i enjoyed sarah being far more in depth rather than your one word! i was briefing to the point. cannot see much wrong, changeable. you cover all of— see much wrong, changeable. you cover all of your _ see much wrong, changeable. gm. cover all of your bases! let's have john with the sport, reflecting on the life of one of the formula 1 greats. the life of one of the formula 1 areats. , ., the life of one of the formula 1 treats. , ., , , the life of one of the formula 1 areats. , ., , , ., ,, the life of one of the formula 1 reats. , , ., ,, . ., , greats. john -- yes, frank williams who died yesterday. _ greats. john -- yes, frank williams who died yesterday. he _ greats. john -- yes, frank williams who died yesterday. he shaped - greats. john -- yes, frank williams who died yesterday. he shaped the | who died yesterday. he shaped the industry he worked in. a personal recollection, growing up his team, the williams team, he built it from the williams team, he built it from the ground up. it was really formula 1 and he had to deal with so many personal tragedies but also so much success with his team through the 80s and success with his team through the 805 and 905. ye5, frank williams, who'd death
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at 79 was announced yesterday, seven driver5 titles, and nine constructors titles for the team named after him. sir frank had stepped down from the board in 2012 although remained in place before 5tepping away from f1 in 2020. there were highs — the titles and the really tough times — the car accident that left him paralysed and the death of ayrton senna eight years later in 199a, whilst driving for williams. tribute5 coming from across the sport and beyond. current world champion lewis hamilton described him as one of the kindest people he'd ever met, saying his legacy would live damon hill — who won the world championship in 1996 driving a williams — said his former boss wa5 "determination and tenacity personified". who was part of the team after that terrible crash. while formula 1 said williams would forever be part of the sport and that his legacy i5 "immeasurable". we had great times together. i once ran out of petrol
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near silverstone, and it was he who stopped and gave me a lift to get some petrol and he never forgave me for it. so we had lots of fun together. he didn't approve of the stewart tartan trousers, and he said that "of course, i would never wear those". i said, "if we won a grand prix, frank, would you wear the trou5er5?" "of course, because you'll never win a grand prix, a stewart grand prix". well, we did win a grand prix and frank had to wear the tartan trousers. he was a friend to the end. we will be hearing from some of those who knew him best, from eddie jordan, later on. and a former driver, david coulthard will be joining us. no cristiano ronaldo in the starting line up yesterday, manchester united though e5cape stamford bridge with a draw. read into that what you will. united taking the lead throuthadon sancho who capitalised on this mistake.
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butjorginho made up for it converting a penalty which means its two games unbeaten for michael carrick and united who are preparing for new interim manager ralf rangnick to come in. we'll see a few of these snowy picture5. manchester city overcoming the conditions to beat west ham at the etihad. ikay gundogan with one of their two goals in a two one win. some conditions can't be overcome. you may have seen this yesterday. sean dyche emerging at turf moor before kick off in his shirt. he's made of 5turdy stuff. that is like a winter walk! that 5now though couldn't be cleared with the game with tottenham called off hours before kick off. so spare a thought for this spurs fan who travelled all the way from dallas, to london, to burnley. 31 hours fuelled by coffee only to get there and find the game's been called off. spurs captain harry kane though intervened inviting ken
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to a home game, hopefully on a warmer day. there was a little more success north of the border a5 giovanni van bronckhorst�*s first league game in charge of rangers ended in victory. the scottish premiership leaders 3—1 winner5 over livingston, fashion sakala leaping highest for their third. callum mcgregor�*s bizarre winner earned celtic a 2—1victory over aberdeen at parkhead. who move up into second a points behind rangers. saracens have reclaimed second place in the premiership after a 25—1a win over 1a—man sale yesterday afternoon. billy vunipola celebrated his comeback from injury by creating the try that broke sale's resi5tance. the bulldozing number eight showed no ill—effect from the knee injury that has kept him out for four weeks setting up sean maitland. that made it 18—0 and after that there was no way back for sale.
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great britain will play germany in the davis cup quarter—final on tuesday, after coming from behind to beat the czech republic 2—1. dan evan5 lost the opening 5ingle5 match, cameron norrie won his. so it all came down to the doubles. and the british pair ofjoe salisbury and neal skup5ki came through in straight sets, beating jiri ve5ely and toma5 machac 6—a 6—2. and look who was back playing her first match on british 5oil since winning the us open. emma raducanu playing in an exhibtion event at london's royal albert hall. the match wasn't the brit's only test of the day. the ball boy got involved as he stepped in beating her at the net for that crucial break point in what has been a monumental year. it is pretty surreal. i mean, i remember my birthday last year, i was at home, i think it was one of the lockdown5 or if not, i was just at home. i didn't really, i wasn't playing and it's pretty amazing how everything changed in one year. so itju5t shows, keep plugging away at your own work, and not looking around and staying
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focused, and anything can happen. she will not be home for much longer. the middle east beckons over christmas where she will prepare for chri5tmas where she will prepare for the australian open. back christmas where she will prepare for the australian open.— the australian open. back on the road again- _ the australian open. back on the road again. what _ the australian open. back on the road again. what a _ the australian open. back on the road again. what a brilliant - the australian open. back on the road again. what a brilliant year| road again. what a brilliant year she has had- — road again. what a brilliant year she has had. she _ road again. what a brilliant year she has had. she got _ road again. what a brilliant year she has had. she got such - road again. what a brilliant year she has had. she got such a - road again. what a brilliant year l she has had. she got such a warm rece tion she has had. she got such a warm reception yesterday, _ she has had. she got such a warm reception yesterday, i _ she has had. she got such a warm reception yesterday, i bet - she has had. she got such a warm reception yesterday, i bet she - she has had. she got such a warm l reception yesterday, i bet she loved it. ., ., ., , reception yesterday, i bet she loved it. you might want to stay for this. i don't it. you might want to stay for this. i don't think— it. you might want to stay for this. i don't think you _ it. you might want to stay for this. i don't think you can _ it. you might want to stay for this. i don't think you can cast - it. you might want to stay for this. i don't think you can cast your- it. you might want to stay for this. | i don't think you can cast your mind back to the 705! ads, i don't think you can cast your mind back to the 70s!— back to the 70s! a bit before my time! some _ back to the 70s! a bit before my time! some others _ back to the 70s! a bit before my time! some others can! - cast your mind back to the 705. t—rex on top of the pops, the sweeney on the telly, kids on raleigh choppers... i had to get a grifter because it was much heavier than a chopper. you could not dojump5 on was much heavier than a chopper. you could not do jumps on a grifter because it was so heavy. all of my mates were doing big jump5 because it was so heavy. all of my mates were doing big jumps and i was just like that... it is mates were doing big “umps and i was just like that. . ._ just like that... it is character building- _ just like that... it is character building- i — just like that... it is character building. i did _ just like that... it is character building. i did have _ just like that... it is character| building. i did have subbuteo. just like that... it is character- building. i did have subbuteo. now we are talking! _ building. i did have subbuteo. now we are talking! i _ building. i did have subbuteo. now we are talking! i tell _ building. i did have subbuteo. now we are talking! i tell you _ building. i did have subbuteo. now we are talking! i tell you you - we are talking! i tell you you should stay! _ that's right — tiny footballers
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you "flicked to kick", on a felt pitch laid out on your vile carpet! well, guess what? it's making a comeback. mike liggin5 reports. match of the day theme. good evening, and welcome to haverhill rovers table football club for tonight's big match. paris st germain versus19705 west ham. jerry harrington i519705 west ham, and his 5onjoe i5 paris st germain. or, psg for short. whistle blows. 19705 west ham to kick off, and bobby moore involved right from the start. takes me back to when i was 12. no stress, no strain, you walked in the door, you're just playing a game that you loved when you were a kid. it's great to meet different people. it's a great game, you know? hopefully we can take it
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to the younger generation now, get them involved as well. this is table football, a development of subbuteo, the game many of us knew as kids. the equipment is more advanced, no more crawling around the living room carpet getting sore knees, and the rules are more detailed. i wouldn't say it's a rebirth of the game, it's definitely something which has been brought back to the fore. it never died, it was like almost underground so to speak for many years. in the shadow of fifa. the game is growing, boosted in part by lockdown. haverhill rovers have taken part in a national league. is it all old blokes? well, no. 12—year—old ruby from wales is one of the country'd top young players. back at haverhill, sam curti5 is at the club for the first time. the attraction is, for me, it's mental, probably. it's something to test your mind a little bit. i don't want to play chess, i don't want to play draft5, i don't want to play fifa and throw my controller
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at the screen. so i get to have a go at something that's a little bit like chess, but better. it's not geeky, definitely not geeky, i wouldn't think so anyway. my wife might say different! so, table football is making a comeback. no such luck forjerry and his 19705 west ham. whistle blows. psg, already 1—0 up, have got a penalty. this could 5eal victory for them. great excitement. psg win the big match 2—0. mike liggins, bbc news. huge drama! west ham beaten by psg, who would have — huge drama! west ham beaten by psg, who would have thought! _ huge drama! west ham beaten by psg, who would have thought! i _ huge drama! west ham beaten by psg, who would have thought! i love - who would have thought! i love subbuteo- _ who would have thought! i love subbuteo- i _ who would have thought! i love subbuteo. i would _ who would have thought! i love subbuteo. i would never- who would have thought! i love subbuteo. i would never get i who would have thought! i love subbuteo. i would never get at| who would have thought! i love i subbuteo. i would never get at it, who would have thought! i love - subbuteo. i would never get at it, i had to make to a very good. t was had to make to a very good. i was rubbish, used _ had to make to a very good. i was rubbish, used to _ had to make to a very good. i was rubbish, used to play _ had to make to a very good. i was rubbish, used to play with - had to make to a very good. i was rubbish, used to play with my - rubbish, used to play with my brother and i was terrible at it. t brother and i was terrible at it. i enjoyed below football. with a big 5traw. enjoyed below football. with a big straw. ~ ., ., ,
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja je55up. westminster council says it's working closely with the uk health security agency to help identify close contacts of a person who tested positive for the omicron covid variant in the borough. it was confirmed last night that a third case of the variant linked to travel to southern africa had been detected in someone who had stayed in westminster but is no longer in britain. meanwhile, a couple from tooting are asking the prime minister to rethink the plan to charge travellers for hotel quarantine following the ban on flights from south africa. owen hancock and emily mennie were visiting family in south africa for the first time in two years but will now have to quarantine because of restrictions over the new covid variant. they face a bill of nearly £a,000. if we could have come home earlier,
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we would have made that choice. if we would have known that south africa would have gone on to the red list, we could have made the choice not to go. butjust overnight, we've had this cost imposed on us. and to us, that's what comes across as unfair, unreasonable, and probably unacceptable as well. rail unions and politicians are warning that public transport will "grind to a halt" without a long—term financial plan. an emergency funding deal between the government and transport for london expires in a couple of weeks. a government spokesperson said it's shown commitment to supporting london's transport and will continue talks. let's take a look at the travel now. a few problems on the tube this morning. it does keep changing. minor delays on the district line between earls court and ealing broadway. not enough trains running. metropolitan line also has minor delays.
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time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. temperatures are set to go up and down quite dramatically across the capital over the next couple of days or so. tomorrow is looking very mild, and then it will turn colder as we head through the rest of the week once more. today it is another chilly one, temperatures just below freezing to start the morning. some icy stretches out there as well on the roads and the pavements so watch out for those, particularly where we saw the rain, sleet and snow full towards the west last night. also some early mist and fog patches, they will lift and clear as we head through the morning. blue sky and sunshine, a very pretty day of weather but still feeling very cold out there. top temperatures only four or five celsius later this afternoon, with just a light breeze. as we head through this evening and overnight, it will be cold and frosty at first under clear skies. then we will see a warm front sinks southwards and eastwards, that is going to introduce some more cloud. possibly some outbreaks of light patchy rain and drizzle, more of a westerly wind and certainly some milder air. temperatures rising into the start
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of the day tomorrow to between six and eight celsius. so tomorrow a much milder feeling day, with plenty of cloud, again a few spits and spots of light patchy rain possible. a westerly wind and highs of 12 celsius. i'm back in half an hour. lots more over on our website at the usual address. including on the memorial to the police officer killed on duty last year. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. the new omicron covid variant — the government sets out details of measures to control the spread. face masks must be worn in shops and on public transport in england from tomorrow an expansion of the boosterjabs programme to all adults is likely to be approved. thousands are still without power after the damage caused by storm arwen — the police in scotland warn the disruption could last for days. a5 customers spend a third
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night trapped in the uk's highest pub by the snow, we'll find out how they are passing the time. one of formula one's true greats. tributes are paid to team owner sir frank williams, who's died at the age of 79. lewis hamilton said his legacy will live on for ever. last will live on for ever. night was the coldest night of the last night was the coldest night of the season so far with temperatures at -8.7 the season so far with temperatures at —8.7 degrees in cumbria. some icy stretches this morning, but things will gradually turn milder. more details in about ten minutes. it's monday, november the 29th. efforts to combat the spread of the new omicron coronavirus variant will be stepped up by the government today. it's expected a major expansion of the covid boosterjab programme will be announced later, before stricter measures including mandatory face coverings in shops and on public transport in england come into force tomorrow. three cases of the variant have been
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detected in the uk so far, with officials warning it's likely that more will be discovered in the coming days. charlotte gallagher reports. this new variant was only reported to the world health organisation last wednesday. but its impact is already being felt here. three omicron cases have been detected so far — in nottingham, brentwood in essex, and central london. all three people had recently travelled to southern africa. targeted testing is now being carried out in those locations. officials say it is imperative people come forward. what this new variant is showing us is that it is really important people get a pcr test — that is one of those tests you either have to book or order online, if you have any sort of symptoms. the uk health security agency says it is very likely more cases of the omicron variant will be found. i think we will detect more cases in the coming days.
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we are investigating suspected cases at the moment. that is anyone who is positive who has returned from southern african countries over the last number of weeks. we are chasing down those individuals and their contacts and asking them to isolate if they are within ten days, and also retesting a number of contacts, as well. that is extremely important in order to slow the spread in our communities. concern about this new variant has led the government to introduce new measures. from tomorrow, it will be compulsory to wear a face mask in shops and on public transport in england, bringing the nation into line with the rest of britain. scotland and northern ireland also require masks in pubs and restaurants. english schools are also advised that staff and pupils in year 7 and above should wear masks in communal areas. in scotland, masks are worn in secondary school classrooms, as well. i think lots of school and college leaders would say we have had mask wearing in public spaces, we have done that either on the advice of local public health or because of the buildings
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that we have got and the lack of ventilation. so no big change for them. i think others will say, well, if this is the price we need to pay to try to keep education as normal as possible, then let's do that. people entering the uk will have to take pcr tests and isolate until they receive a negative result. and experts are looking at extending vaccine boosters to all over—18s. much is still unknown about the omicron variant and it is unclear how big a threat it poses. but as those risks are studied, experts say vaccines remain crucial. let's speak to chief political correspondent adam fleming. good morning. a fast moving situation and the government announcing things each day. tide situation and the government announcing things each day. we had the big announcements _ announcing things each day. we had the big announcements about - announcing things each day. we had the big announcements about how l announcing things each day. we had l the big announcements about how the government will tackle the risk from the new variant over the weekend and
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it will now be about implementing those things. the first thing we might get is the advisory committee who gives advice to the government on vaccinations, we expect them to announce an extension of the eligibility for boosterjab so that younger people will enter the system and it looks like the gap between when you got the last vaccine and get your booster might be shrunk so it speeds up. i think we will have a statement from the health secretary in parliament giving us an update. then i think we will see black—and—white legislation to introduce the new interventions announced by the government over the weekend and that will be an opportunity to take the political temperature. already light grumbling from conservative mp5 but very light at the moment, and it looks like parliament will get a vote on the measures, but not until after they have come in. then i think there will be a wait, maybe a
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nerve—racking wait, as science catches up with the new variant, because a lot of concern is based on theory rather than things happening in the real world. i think people will watch closely to see how moore transmissible this variant is, what effect vaccines have on it, and also our fair different symptoms or is it more severe, or perhaps less severe than some of the variants we have become used to? after the initial excitement and drama over the weekend it will be about introducing changes and seeing what effect they have and how this variant behaves in the real world. police in the netherlands have arrested a couple who fled a quarantine hotel in amsterdam after one of them tested positive for covid after flying in from south africa. they boarded a flight for spain but were arrested before take—off. what
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more can you tell us? tt is more can you tell us? it is inconceivable, _ more can you tell us? it is inconceivable, this - more can you tell us? it is inconceivable, this kind i more can you tell us? it is inconceivable, this kind ofj inconceivable, this kind of behaviour. this couple were in quarantine in isolation in a designated hotel not far from the airport and managed to escape and go as far as boarding a flight before being detained. they were handed over to the health authorities and could be prosecuted because violating quarantine is a criminal offence here. we saw a letter slipped under the door of one of these passengers. they are told they are in quarantine but that will become mandatory forced isolation if they try to violate it. they are being tested again today to work out what kind of variant they are carrying and whether it is omicron. the dutch health minister warned that passengers who have tested positive for omicron after arriving here may be the tip of the iceberg. he also said it is inconceivable to think the virus could be stopped at
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the borders. there are special testing at this airport because flights continue to arrive from south africa. and they are trying to stop the virus from creeping out into society. this is a major transport hub with passengers coming in and out across europe. and the uk. this new variant, the emergence of it has highlighted sensitivities and how difficult it is to stop the virus in its tracks. i am wearing a mask because in the netherlands already they are mandatory inside public places and on public transport. tens of thousands of people have spent another night without power as temperatures dropped as low as minus six in some parts of the uk. yellow ice warnings remain in place for much of scotland, england and wales this morning with some schools closed and rail services cancelled. louisa pilbeam has more.
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people across parts of scotland, wales and northern england have spent their third night without power as temperatures drop to their lowest seen so far this season. scottish authorities declared a major incident after more than a0,000 were left without power, forcing the closure of schools and vaccine centres. your viewers will remember the beast from the east in 2018. this is three times worse than that and probably some of the worst conditions we have seen for the electricity network, certainly, in about 15 years. hot food, drinks and bottled water have been supplied to many of those affected, with vulnerable residents also offered temporary accommodation. it's been tough. we have a couple of kids — one is nine, one is six. it has been hard work. luckily, my father—in—law lives half a mile down the road, so we have been able to camp out down at his and have a few cups of tea
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and things like that. but, a bit of a nightmare not having any lights and no heating. it's been freezing. i have two young kids. so we have had nothing to do and nowhere to go. it has been really cold and awful. elsewhere, a met office warning for ice remains in place across much of the uk this morning, with drivers urged to plan ahead for theirjourneys. it comes as the effects of storm arwen continue to disrupt parts of the rail network after gale force winds brought down trees and power lines, claiming the lives of three people. more than 60 customers have been trapped at this pub in the yorkshire dales since friday night, when heavy snowfall blocked the only road in and out of the area. with milder temperatures on the horizon, many will hope a big thaw follows the big freeze. a 1a—year—old boy will appear in court today charged
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with the murder of 12—year—old ava white in liverpool. she was stabbed in the city centre on thursday whilst out with her friends to see the christmas lights being switched on. three other boys, aged between 13 and 15, were also arrested and have now been bailed. care bosses are warning of a rapidly deteriorating situation for older and disabled people this winter. new research suggests nearly a00,000 people are on social care waiting lists, with more than 150,000 yet to receive an overdue review of their care plan. the association of directors of adult services, which carried out the survey, says the entire sector is in crisis. our workforce is leaving. leaving because they don't feel valued, leaving because they believe they can earn better wages in retail and hospitality. we are also seeing local authorities having to intervene when care homes and home—care providers are no longer able to continue with their business. so we are having to intervene
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and protect those individuals for whom providers are no longer possible. barbados is to become the world's newest republic when the island nation formally removes the queen as its head of state later. prince charles has arrived for the ceremony, which will take place just after midnight tonight — on the 55th anniversary of the country's independence from britain. the weather is always important but today particularly for people who face serious disruption and some people snowed in in parts of the uk. sarah is with us and can tell us what is happening. good morning. after storm arwen things are quieter, certainly not as windy as it was at the weekend but still bitterly cold. the cold is causing problems this morning. last night was the coldest of the year so far with temperatures as low as —8.7 in
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cumbria. we keep cold conditions particularly in the south but rain moving in with the north and with that things will turn milder. we have had rain and sleet and hill snow in north—western scotland and wintry showers down the east and west coast. a5 things turn milder from the north—west, we have icy stretches in scotland, parts of england and wales. we have sunshine around in southern and eastern parts this morning and we will keep it into the afternoon. elsewhere, cloudy skies and outbreaks of light rain but turning milderfrom the north—west. this afternoon, outbreaks of rain across parts of scotland. it will not be snow at this stage. northern ireland and northern england, an afternoon of cloud and outbreaks of rain. further south, staying dry with more cloud filtering from west to east in the
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evening hours. tonight we are all in milder air and evening hours. tonight we are all in milderairand it evening hours. tonight we are all in milder air and it will not be as cold and frosty this time tomorrow but watch out for icy stretches this morning. let's return to our top story. as we've been hearing, the government is tightening rules in england aimed at combatting the new omicron coronavirus variant. labour doesn't think the measures go far enough. let's speak now to the party's deputy leader, angela rayner. good morning, nice to speak to you. what are your thoughts on the government's action with regards to omicron and what should they be doing instead? the omicron and what should they be doing instead?— omicron and what should they be doing instead? omicron and what should they be doint instead? ., ., ., doing instead? the government had to swiftl , doing instead? the government had to swiftly. which — doing instead? the government had to swiftly. which is _ doing instead? the government had to swiftly, which is right, _ doing instead? the government had to swiftly, which is right, but _ doing instead? the government had to swiftly, which is right, but there - swiftly, which is right, but there is ambiguity around what the government are saying. i have been clear, and it is important. if people have to self isolate, go off sick, they should be given sick pay, a crucial thing to do to ensure everybody can do the right thing and
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to protect people from this new variant. the booster should be given as quickly as possible. we said five months and hopefully that will happen, and we should have ventilation in schools and people should wear masks, including the prime minister when he visits public spaces indoors. we need to roll out... the g7 was clear on the commitment to rolling out vaccines across the globe and we have not met those targets. there is no point in vaccinating britain if the rest of the world is not given vaccines as well and we need to make sure that happens quickly. the well and we need to make sure that happens quickly-— happens quickly. the issue of returning _ happens quickly. the issue of returning to _ happens quickly. the issue of returning to working - happens quickly. the issue of returning to working from - happens quickly. the issue of i returning to working from home happens quickly. the issue of - returning to working from home is interesting. this would have an impact on businesses, city centres. what do you say to those affected by that this morning? tide what do you say to those affected by that this morning?— that this morning? we have said --eole that this morning? we have said people should — that this morning? we have said people should be _ that this morning? we have said people should be encouraged i that this morning? we have said people should be encouraged to | that this morning? we have said - people should be encouraged to work from home where possible and i outlined labour's plans for the future of work which includes flexible working. employees have been flexible in the pandemic and we
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think working from home is one way people can combat the virus and to give them a better work— life balance. we encourage people to work from home and think the government should use that more. itruihat from home and think the government should use that more.— should use that more. what do the labour party _ should use that more. what do the labour party think _ should use that more. what do the labour party think about _ should use that more. what do the labour party think about using - should use that more. what do the j labour party think about using face masks in bars and restaurants? tide masks in bars and restaurants? we think we masks in bars and restaurants? - think we should encourage people to wear masks in indoors, mixing indoors as much as possible and we recommend people wear masks when they are out and about, especially if you move around venues, and we think that is the right thing to do. the prime minister has undermined those messages in recent weeks but wearing a mask and support people in stopping the virus from being able to spread as quickly. ads, stopping the virus from being able to spread as quickly. $1!th stopping the virus from being able to spread as quickly.— stopping the virus from being able to spread as quickly. a lot has been said about omicron _ to spread as quickly. a lot has been said about omicron but _ to spread as quickly. a lot has been said about omicron but we - to spread as quickly. a lot has been said about omicron but we do - to spread as quickly. a lot has been said about omicron but we do not l said about omicron but we do not know much about the variant so far and some evidence from south africa suggests symptoms are mild, from
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southern africa. is it better to wait for evidence or put those things in place now? tt is things in place now? it is important. _ things in place now? it is important, we _ things in place now? it is important, we have - things in place now? it is important, we have seenj things in place now? it is i important, we have seen in things in place now? tt 3 important, we have seen in the past 18 months it is important to act swiftly so we encourage the government and the right they have taken steps. we do not want to end “p taken steps. we do not want to end up in a situation where the country has to be on lockdown. we should be vaccinating, making sure people wear face went out in indoor venues, when mixing, and we should have a testing system that works and we should give people sick bay so they can self isolate when they need to. tide people sick bay so they can self isolate when they need to. we will seak isolate when they need to. we will s - eak to isolate when they need to. we will speak to the _ isolate when they need to. we will speak to the government - isolate when they need to. we will speak to the government in - isolate when they need to. we will speak to the government in about| isolate when they need to. we will. speak to the government in about 12 minutes. we will put some of those points to them. another issue which i know you are talking about later, calling for a ban on lobbying jobs and a watchdog to investigate standards. but later today, the commons committee on standards will publish their review into that current code of conduct around mp5. is it worth waiting to see what that
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says before you speak about what you would change? the says before you speak about what you would change?— would change? the standards commission _ would change? the standards commission report, _ would change? the standards commission report, i - would change? the standards commission report, i have - would change? the standards| commission report, i have not would change? the standards - commission report, i have not seen the content, but that is around all mp5. the integrity and ethics committee is around ministers and laws and we have seen ministers and lords have broken the ministerial code and the prime minister vetoes it. this will be a fundamental change that means the independent commission on integrity and ethics will have powers to sanction ministers who break the ministerial code. it is important we clean up the act because under this prime minister we have seen the code has been disregarded and we cannot have those undermining public standards. people have to have trust in ministers doing the job they are there to do, which is to protect the british electorate and their interest and not their own. the committee _ interest and not their own. the committee said _ interest and not their own. the committee said the process should be simple and transparent and have teeth to penalise those who break the rules so surely it is worth
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waiting to see what those changes would be. fiur waiting to see what those changes would be. , ., would be. our new integrity and ethics commission _ would be. our new integrity and ethics commission that - would be. our new integrity and ethics commission that looks i would be. our new integrity and ethics commission that looks at| ethics commission that looks at ministerial codes, which is different to the mp5 commission, will be given more teeth and will take away the prime minister's right to veto. at the moment the prime minister decides if there is an investigation and whether he will follow recommendations, whether a minister has broken the code or not. we think the independent commission should be able to put binding sanctions which means if you break the code, there will be consequences. in any otherjob that people do, they have standards, they have to follow the rules and if they do not, they have consequences and we need that for ministers as well. what are your thoughts on mp5 taking jobs once they have left public office and using their knowledge and expertise forjob site that once they have stopped? tide
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expertise forjob site that once they have stopped?— expertise forjob site that once the have sto ed? ~ ., ., , they have stopped? we do not believe mps should be — they have stopped? we do not believe mps should be able _ they have stopped? we do not believe mps should be able to _ they have stopped? we do not believe mps should be able to use _ they have stopped? we do not believe mps should be able to use the - mp5 should be able to use the contacts they have in order to lobby ministers. we said there should be a ban on that for five years. if you look at what happened with the former prime minister david cameron, they have used contacts within their own party in order to get government contacts for their mates, that they have been paid for. we do not believe that is correct. it is not about their knowledge but the opportunity to whatsapp and eight they have known a long time to give companies that use the lobbyist to get a fast track up the food chain so they can get lucrative contracts of public money. people should get contracts based on competence to do the job and to get value for money for taxpayers. the job and to get value for money for taxpayers-_ as we've been hearing, tens thousands of people remain without power across parts of scotland and northern england this morning after gale force winds from storm arwen brought down power
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lines. there's a yellow warning for ice in place for much of the uk, our reporter luxmy gopal is at a gritting depot in york or us this morning. good morning. the coldest night of the season so far has been busy for gritting teams across the country and no different at york city council's depot. this is the last vehicle to return after being out treating the roads and cycleways in york. this is the depot where rock salt comes from. a mountain of 3000 tonnes, some of it distributed already. i am joined tonnes, some of it distributed already. iam joined by tonnes, some of it distributed already. i am joined by andy davies, the operations manager. haifa already. i am joined by andy davies, the operations manager.— already. i am joined by andy davies, the operations manager. how busy has it been? incredibly _ the operations manager. how busy has it been? incredibly busy _ the operations manager. how busy has it been? incredibly busy this _ the operations manager. how busy has it been? incredibly busy this week i it been? incredibly busy this week but compounded by the weekend, with
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hi-h but compounded by the weekend, with high wind _ but compounded by the weekend, with high wind and low temperatures. how much of a high wind and low temperatures. timer much of a difference have conditions of storm arwen made? sport much of a difference have conditions of storm arwen made?— much of a difference have conditions of storm arwen made? apart from the wind, temperatures _ of storm arwen made? apart from the wind, temperatures have _ of storm arwen made? apart from the wind, temperatures have dropped i wind, temperatures have dropped dramatically and gritters have been out all _ dramatically and gritters have been out all week and several times over the weekend. out all week and several times over the weekend-— out all week and several times over the weekend. what sort of coverage does our the weekend. what sort of coverage does your team _ the weekend. what sort of coverage does your team manage? _ the weekend. what sort of coverage does your team manage? we - the weekend. what sort of coverage does your team manage? we have i the weekend. what sort of coverage i does your team manage? we have eight critters and does your team manage? we have eight gritters and every _ does your team manage? we have eight gritters and every time _ does your team manage? we have eight gritters and every time they _ does your team manage? we have eight gritters and every time they go - does your team manage? we have eight gritters and every time they go out i gritters and every time they go out they cover— gritters and every time they go out they cover 360 miles of the network. the temperature, what did it get you in your? the temperature, what did it get you in our? , ., , . , in your? road temperatures, which is what we are — in your? road temperatures, which is what we are interested _ in your? road temperatures, which is what we are interested in, _ in your? road temperatures, which is what we are interested in, it - in your? road temperatures, which is what we are interested in, it got i in your? road temperatures, which is what we are interested in, it got as i what we are interested in, it got as low as— what we are interested in, it got as low as minus— what we are interested in, it got as low as minus four last night. it is not 'ust low as minus four last night. it is rrot just raids _ low as minus four last night. it is not just raids you _ low as minus four last night. tt 3 not just raids you treat, cycleways, notjust raids you treat, cycleways, as well. you have a smaller vehicle for cycleways. as well. you have a smaller vehicle for cycleways-— for cycleways. yes we have a small tractor and — for cycleways. yes we have a small tractor and we _ for cycleways. yes we have a small tractor and we put _ for cycleways. yes we have a small tractor and we put them _ for cycleways. yes we have a small tractor and we put them on - for cycleways. yes we have a small i tractor and we put them on cycleways that we _ tractor and we put them on cycleways that we have in york and we treat
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them _ that we have in york and we treat them with— that we have in york and we treat them with a — that we have in york and we treat them with a mixture of salt and sometimes brine solution. your teams have been out — sometimes brine solution. your teams have been out since _ sometimes brine solution. your teams have been out since the _ sometimes brine solution. your teams have been out since the early - sometimes brine solution. your teams have been out since the early hours, l have been out since the early hours, what is next? do you expect it to be as bad tonight? tag. what is next? do you expect it to be as bad tonight?— as bad tonight? no, we expect it to be mild tonight. — as bad tonight? no, we expect it to be mild tonight, which _ as bad tonight? no, we expect it to be mild tonight, which is _ as bad tonight? no, we expect it to be mild tonight, which is good, i be mild tonight, which is good, because — be mild tonight, which is good, because it _ be mild tonight, which is good, because it gives the team a break. they— because it gives the team a break. they have — because it gives the team a break. they have worked hard this weekend. it is they have worked hard this weekend. it is nice _ they have worked hard this weekend. it is nice to _ they have worked hard this weekend. it is nice to have hopefully a quiet night~ _ it is nice to have hopefully a quiet nitht. ., ., .. it is nice to have hopefully a quiet nitht. ., ., ., night. looking further ahead, how much of the _ night. looking further ahead, how much of the winter _ night. looking further ahead, how much of the winter will _ night. looking further ahead, how much of the winter will this - night. looking further ahead, how much of the winter will this 3000| much of the winter will this 3000 tonne mountain cover over the coming weeks? i know it depends on the forecasts. tote weeks? i know it depends on the forecasts. ~ ., , . ., , forecasts. we would expect to use all of this rock _ forecasts. we would expect to use all of this rock salt _ forecasts. we would expect to use all of this rock salt behind - forecasts. we would expect to use all of this rock salt behind us i forecasts. we would expect to use all of this rock salt behind us and l all of this rock salt behind us and probably— all of this rock salt behind us and probably have to replenish the shed once during the season. we typically io once during the season. we typically go through— once during the season. we typically go through a minimum of 6000 tonnes of sait— go through a minimum of 6000 tonnes of salt in— go through a minimum of 6000 tonnes of salt in york alone. the go through a minimum of 6000 tonnes of salt in york alone.— of salt in york alone. the gritters have done _ of salt in york alone. the gritters have done for— of salt in york alone. the gritters have done for the _ of salt in york alone. the gritters have done for the night _ of salt in york alone. the gritters have done for the night so - of salt in york alone. the gritters have done for the night so far i of salt in york alone. the gritters| have done for the night so far but the conditions from storm arwen still affect people with thousands still affect people with thousands still without power, and a met
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office ice morning in place until 10am. . 10am. thanks. en'oyed getting the lowdown on — 10am. thanks. en'oyed getting the lowdown on the i 10am. thanks. enjoyed getting the lowdown on the gritting. _ lowdown on the gritting. you like a gritter? i do. we'll have the full forecast in half an hour but first let's look at your brilliant photos. ian sent us this from longbridge in the west midlands. this is brian's photo of his garden in dumfries where it's currently minus three degrees. peter sent this image of winter hill near bolton. and this is the scene on the hills over bury near manchester. i know it is causing disruption for lots of people this morning but we will keep you up—to—date with all of the latest information on the weather overnight and what to look forward to the rest of the week. we can bring you some other news. ghislaine maxwell —
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a close associate of the convicted sex offenderjeffrey epstein — goes on trial today in new york. the british publishing heiress has been accused of trafficking four unnamed minors and grooming and recruiting them for her former lover to abuse in the late �*905 and early 20005. she's been in a new yorkjail since her arrest injuly 2020 and has pleaded not guilty to all charges. nada tawfik reports. ghislaine maxwell and jeffrey epstein attracted friends in high places, increasing the intrigue around the duo. his death in 2019 under unusual circumstances only raised more questions, leaving behind a dark cloud of mystery. the fallen heiress's trial may yet provide the most explicit details to date. in this indictment, ghislaine maxwell is charged with sex trafficking and recruiting and grooming four under age girls for epstein to abuse, from 199a—200a. the jury here in new york will have to decide whether she is being made a scapegoat for epstein,
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or if she was his chief enabler. that included sexualised massages. these sexualised massages developed into sexual encounters for which maxwell, in some instances, was present and participated. she has pleaded not guilty. legal experts say this is one of the most high—profile cases to try a woman for allegedly facilitating a sex trafficking operation. whereas she had enormous power, she had enormous resources, what we are going to see is that, in contrast, the other victims did not have that. and so she is really a difficult person to engender sympathy for and i think that will be a real challenge for the defence in this case. ghislaine maxwell's life before she met epstein was very different, but not without its own drama. she was the youngest child of the late disgraced newspaper baron robert maxwell. part of her appeal to epstein was her circle of rich and famous friends, including prince andrew. her trial comes at a very
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inconvenient time for the royal as he fights off his own separate civil lawsuit by one of epstein's most outspoken accusers, virginia guiffre. ghislaine tells me that i have to do for andrew what i do forjeffrey. and that made me sick. ijust did not expect it from royalty. she said epstein and ghislaine maxwell forced her to have sex with the duke of york when she was just 17, in london, new york, and the us virgin islands. prince andrew has previously denied all of the allegations. but his attempts to put the scandal behind him have so farfailed. ian maxwell says at least one sibling will be present every day of his sister's trial. it is impossible for me to think that she would have been engaged in these really horrendous charges that she is now facing. it does not stack up in any single way. all those people who do not
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know her, but have some regard for the system ofjustice that operates in the united states, they should suspend theirjudgment. her case is expected to last six weeks, after which herfate is in the hands of the jury. much more coming up on the programme. and we will keep you up—to—date on conditions on the roads. a lot of disruption. time now to get the news where you are. good morning, i'm sonja je55up. westminster council says it's working closely with the uk health security agency to help identify close contacts of a person who tested positive for the omicron covid variant in the borough. it was confirmed last night that a third case of the variant linked to travel to southern africa had been detected in someone who had
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stayed in westminster but is no longer in britain. meanwhile, a couple from tooting are asking the prime minister to rethink the plan to charge travellers for hotel quarantine following the ban on flights from south africa. owen hancock and emily mennie were visiting family in south africa for the first time in two years but will now have to quarantine because of restrictions over the new covid variant. they face a bill of nearly £a,000. if we could have come home earlier, we would have made that choice. if we would have known that south africa would have gone on to the red list, we could have made the choice not to go. butjust overnight, we've had this cost imposed on us. and to us, that's what comes across as unfair, unreasonable, and probably unacceptable as well. a memorial service to remember a police officer killed while on duty in south london will take place in westminster later. sergeant matt ratana died after being shot by a man who'd been brought into croydon police station
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for questioning in september last year. commissioner dame cressida dick will accompany his partner on the way to the service as officers lined the route. let's take a look at the travel now. most of the tube running normally now. a few web trains on the metropolitan line. —— if trains on the metropolitan line. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. temperatures are set to go up and down quite dramatically across the capital over the next couple of days or so. tomorrow is looking very mild, and then it will turn colder as we head through the rest of the week once more. today it is another chilly one, temperatures just below freezing to start the morning. some icy stretches out there as well on the roads and the pavements so watch out for those, particularly where we saw the rain, sleet and snow full towards the west last night. also some early mist and fog patches, they will lift and clear
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as we head through the morning. blue sky and sunshine, a very pretty day of weather but still feeling very cold out there. top temperatures only four or five celsius later this afternoon, with just a light breeze. as we head through this evening and overnight, it will be cold and frosty at first under clear skies. then we will see a warm front sinks southwards and eastwards, that is going to introduce some more cloud. possibly some outbreaks of light patchy rain and drizzle, more of a westerly wind and certainly some milder air. temperatures rising into the start of the day tomorrow to between six and eight celsius. so tomorrow a much milder feeling day, with plenty of cloud, again a few spits and spots of light patchy rain possible. a westerly wind and highs of 12 celsius. i'm back in an hour. lots more over on our website at the usual address. now it's back to dan and sally, bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. face coverings will be made compulsory in shops and on public transport in england from tomorrow but pubs and restaurants will remain exempt. the changes are part of new measures aimed to slow the spread of the new covid—19 variant, known as omicron. three cases have been detected in the uk so far. let's speak to the health minister, edward argar. good morning. great to see this morning. let's start with the basic question, what is being done to stop the further spread of the new variant in uk? we the further spread of the new variant in uk?— the further spread of the new variant in uk? ~ , ., variant in uk? we took swift action and proportionate _ variant in uk? we took swift action and proportionate action, - variant in uk? we took swift action and proportionate action, we i and proportionate action, we believe, last week, it was identified in south africa and genomic sequence at a new variant on tuesday. on thursday, my boss sajid javid set out the clear steps we would take in terms of travel restrictions on what you are seeing now are exactly as you said in your introduction, mask wearing becoming
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compulsory in shops and public transport. they are proportionate and balanced weathers which will hopefully buy us time by slowing down the seeding and spreading of this new variant to give us time to understand exactly how it behaves, if this is more transmissible or more dangerous and how it interacts with the vaccine. we hope to understand that within the next few weeks a lot more clearly. interesting you have gone for shops and public transport but not compulsory mask wearing in pubs and restaurant, why is that? portia; compulsory mask wearing in pubs and restaurant, why is that?— restaurant, why is that? partly in the nature _ restaurant, why is that? partly in the nature of— restaurant, why is that? partly in the nature of pubs _ restaurant, why is that? partly in the nature of pubs and _ restaurant, why is that? partly in i the nature of pubs and restaurantss and hospitality venues, people are eating and drinking, you may go to a bar to get a drink eating and drinking, you may go to a barto geta drink and eating and drinking, you may go to a bar to get a drink and then you sip a drink back to the table where you are sitting. it's about a proportionate balance. i came down on the train yesterday and it was crowded. the even before this i have been wearing my mask on the train
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but you saw how people were in very close proximity but also as we have been discussing in this programme, for almost two years since i have been coming on when i was first interviewed about the pandemic, you are in close proximity to the same people for a prolonged period of time, over15 people for a prolonged period of time, over 15 minutes. that's why in those settings, we have struck the right balance in terms of shops and crowded public transport. to be clear, crowded public transport. to be clear. your _ crowded public transport. to be clear, your advice _ crowded public transport. to be clear, your advice is _ crowded public transport. to be clear, your advice is in - crowded public transport. to be clear, your advice is in a - crowded public transport. to be l clear, your advice is in a situation where people are in close contact for many other people in public spaces, they should be wearing a mask? t spaces, they should be wearing a mask? .. spaces, they should be wearing a mask? ~' ,. , , , spaces, they should be wearing a mask? ~' ,. ,, , . mask? i think we discussed this a month ago _ mask? i think we discussed this a month ago and — mask? i think we discussed this a month ago and we _ mask? i think we discussed this a month ago and we talked - mask? i think we discussed this a month ago and we talked about l mask? i think we discussed this a l month ago and we talked about the guidance, and the advice, rather thanit guidance, and the advice, rather than it being compulsory, in a crowded public space with lots of people you don't know, for a prolonged period when you are not sitting at a table eating or drinking, then people will make that judgment. that's what i tend to do on trains, i will fully do that and always do that because it's compulsory now and will be from
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tuesday. people should make those judgment calls. alongside that, the key thing which i would encourage people to do in terms of behaviour is to get to those boosterjabs as soon as they are eligible. we have seen that really does push the protection right back up over 90% again for the vast majority of people. that is the other key behavioural step we can take when we are eligible. t behavioural step we can take when we are elitible. . . ., , , ., are eligible. i am curious, why not tubs? are eligible. i am curious, why not pubs? you — are eligible. i am curious, why not pubs? you talk — are eligible. i am curious, why not pubs? you talk about _ are eligible. i am curious, why not pubs? you talk about crowded i are eligible. i am curious, why not i pubs? you talk about crowded public spaces, why not pubs? tt’s pubs? you talk about crowded public spaces, why not pubs?— spaces, why not pubs? it's in the nature of the _ spaces, why not pubs? it's in the nature of the venue. _ spaces, why not pubs? it's in the nature of the venue. in _ spaces, why not pubs? it's in the nature of the venue. in a - spaces, why not pubs? it's in the nature of the venue. in a pub, i spaces, why not pubs? it's in the. nature of the venue. in a pub, you are drinking. you can't do that if you are wearing a mask. in restaurants, you are seated at a table, to give your order, you stay at your table with your group who you are there with. similarly in pubs, even when you are standing up rather than sitting down, you are drinking. so it's in the nature of the hospitality industry. so we think this is a proportionate and reasonable way to put in a
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precaution to give us that time to better understand variant by slowing down seeding and the spreading of it. we have three confirmed cases in this country. i have to be honest with you and your viewers, i would expect to see that rise in the coming days. we expect to see that rise in the coming days-— expect to see that rise in the coming days. expect to see that rise in the comint da s. . ., , ,, ., , ., coming days. we are seeking to slow that down. 0k, _ coming days. we are seeking to slow that down. ok, we _ coming days. we are seeking to slow that down. ok, we have _ coming days. we are seeking to slow that down. ok, we have established | that down. ok, we have established in crowded public spaces, you would choose to wear a face covering. will you telling the prime minister to do the same thing? t’m you telling the prime minister to do the same thing?— you telling the prime minister to do the same thing? i'm sure i boss the prime minister _ the same thing? i'm sure i boss the prime minister will _ the same thing? i'm sure i boss the prime minister will follow _ the same thing? i'm sure i boss the prime minister will follow the i the same thing? i'm sure i boss the prime minister will follow the rules | prime minister will follow the rules when he is on public transport and in shops and i'm sure he will do that —— i'm sure, my boss, the prime minister. the on the compulsion, it is about personal decisions, people will take their own view. 50 is about personal decisions, people will take their own view.— will take their own view. so for exam - le will take their own view. so for example in _ will take their own view. so for example in hospitals _ will take their own view. so for example in hospitals to - will take their own view. so for example in hospitals to come i will take their own view. so for| example in hospitals to come if will take their own view. so for - example in hospitals to come if the prime minister visited another hospital? i prime minister visited another hosital? . , , ., , hospital? i have visited hospitals in recent months _ hospital? i have visited hospitals in recent months and _ hospital? i have visited hospitals in recent months and won - hospital? i have visited hospitals in recent months and won a - hospital? i have visited hospitals in recent months and won a face | in recent months and won a face mask... ~ , �*
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mask... the prime minister didn't. i'm sure the _ mask... the prime minister didn't. i'm sure the prime _ mask... the prime minister didn't. i'm sure the prime minister - mask... the prime minister didn't. i'm sure the prime minister will. i'm sure the prime minister will also heed the guidance on what he is asked to do by hospital staff and others. ., ., , ., asked to do by hospital staff and others. ., ., ,, _, ., asked to do by hospital staff and others. ., ., ., , others. how do you encourage people at this point — others. how do you encourage people at this point to _ others. how do you encourage people at this point to take _ others. how do you encourage people at this point to take up _ others. how do you encourage people at this point to take up the _ others. how do you encourage people at this point to take up the offer- at this point to take up the offer of the booster, and how effective will these boosters be when we don't know that much about the new variant? , , , ., ,., variant? the single biggest reason wh --eole variant? the single biggest reason why people should _ variant? the single biggest reason why people should have _ variant? the single biggest reason why people should have the - variant? the single biggest reason | why people should have the booster jab is because we are already seeing, with 17.6 million done, those people who have had the boosterjab, after the two weeks for it to take effect, boosted to back up it to take effect, boosted to back up to 90% protection against the variance we know about. that in and of itself makes it worth doing. in terms of the new variant, we don't know how it will react with the vaccine, i'm hopeful it will still be highly effective but we need to take the time to see how it works. it still provides a very significant degree of protection. that is why even when we face a challenging new
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variant, we are nowhere near when we —— where we wear when the last new variant came in last year. we are in a much better place. i would also say it is important for people if they are eligible for a free one, or to pay for it, theirflu jab, i am due to have my tomorrow. that is a small behavioural step, we can make that change to help protect ourselves and others in the case of flu. we know getting covid and flew together is potentially pretty unpleasant. we together is potentially pretty unpleasant-— together is potentially pretty unleasant. . ~ ., ., unpleasant. we had angela rayner on the programme _ unpleasant. we had angela rayner on the programme and _ unpleasant. we had angela rayner on the programme and she _ unpleasant. we had angela rayner on the programme and she said - unpleasant. we had angela rayner on the programme and she said that - the programme and she said that people who have to isolate should be getting sick pay guaranteed, should we expect that the absolute —— allowance? we we expect that the absolute -- allowance?— we expect that the absolute -- allowance? ~ ., ., , , allowance? we have got the support in ace for allowance? we have got the support in pace for peeple — allowance? we have got the support in pace for people who _ allowance? we have got the support in pace for people who are _ allowance? we have got the support in pace for people who are told - allowance? we have got the support in pace for people who are told they | in pace for people who are told they have to isolate, the £500 payment from test and trace. we are hopeful this will be reviewed in three
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weeks, i'm hopefulat this will be reviewed in three weeks, i'm hopeful at that time come, when we understand how better this variant works, i hope we will have good news on that score that the vaccines are effective and we will not have to leave these changes in place any longer than necessary. while we wait for the three week review, the regime we have in place to support people is the best one or the most effective. we to support people is the best one or the most effective.— the most effective. we have had uuidance the most effective. we have had guidance for— the most effective. we have had guidance for pupils _ the most effective. we have had guidance for pupils aged - the most effective. we have had guidance for pupils aged year i the most effective. we have had i guidance for pupils aged year seven and above to start wearing face coverings in communal areas. is that enough? should the government be doing more on ventilation in schools and providing more units and more assistance in that way? ml and providing more units and more assistance in that way?— and providing more units and more assistance in that way? all of these thin . s are assistance in that way? all of these things are important. _ assistance in that way? all of these things are important. in _ assistance in that way? all of these things are important. in terms - assistance in that way? all of these things are important. in terms of i things are important. in terms of masks for year seven and upward, students in communal areas, i think thatis students in communal areas, i think that is a proportionate and measured response. as we have sensed since sajid javid announced that new variant last thursday it was very open with the british people about that, accepting we did not know much about it but we wanted to tell
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people what we did know, i think we have been measured in our response. it is keep calm, it is time for cool heads, and while we look at this and understand this, hopefully as i say we will get some good news about how it reacts and how it plays into the vaccine programme. that step in schools is a small but measured step just to help reduce the risk of transmission and buy us some time by slowing down the seeding and the spread of this new variant. what slowing down the seeding and the spread of this new variant. what is the advice on _ spread of this new variant. what is the advice on ventilation _ spread of this new variant. what is the advice on ventilation in - the advice on ventilation in schools? we know it is freezing cold at the moment, for teachers today, what is the advice going in? ventilation is an important way of tackling the spread of the disease, particularly tackling the build—up of a disease where you have a lot of people in a room. the advice remains that where you can, you should open windows and have air circulating. head teachers and teachers, both my parents were teachers before they
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retired, and i was a school governor for many years, teachers and head teachers will make theirjudgment based on the guidance and the advice that they are given. we are clear that they are given. we are clear that where you can, open windows and fresh air circulating does help. it reduces the risk of infection because it clears the air of those particles that are hovering in it. i particles that are hovering in it. i know we are talking a lot, a lot of the front pages of the papers are saying, we have got to save christmas, here we are again in a similar position to last christmas. lots of talk about how this christmas might not be particularly good and not the christmas we were hoping for. i'm curious to know, in the next couple of weeks, lots of schools and colleges will be putting on christmas performances and a place with nativity plays, with parents and grandparents going in to watch their children perform, sing, perhaps a not particularly well ventilated spaces, what is your advice to schools about that? we
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have not advice to schools about that? - have not told schools to cancel things like that. head teachers will make their own judgments, they know their schools and their premises. they know their parents and pupils. we are not telling people to cancel events like that. we are saying people should be sensible. people will make a judgment on wearing masks. when i came down before coming down to westminster over the weekend, i took a lateral flow test. people should be making those sensible steps, i suspect you and your team did as well, those steps we have got used to taking to help keep ourselves and others safe while enabling us to continue to enjoy seeing people and a return to events. i rememberwhen seeing people and a return to events. i remember when i was in the school nativity play, i was pretty hopeless in it but it was a big part of the school year so i hope these —— | of the school year so i hope these —— i think these events are in for the young people who have had a rough time over the last couple of years. rough time over the last couple of ears. ., , , rough time over the last couple of ears. . , , ., years. -- at these events are important — years. -- at these events are important for — years. -- at these events are important for young - years. -- at these events are important for young people. | years. -- at these events are i important for young people. you years. -- at these events are - important for young people. you have stopped short of issuing advice for
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people to work from home or requiring vaccine passport in england. what is the point that we have to get to before we stepped in and introduce those measures? how bad does it have to be for that to happen? i bad does it have to be for that to ha en? , , happen? i remember being interviewed about a month — happen? i remember being interviewed about a month or— happen? i remember being interviewed about a month or so _ happen? i remember being interviewed about a month or so ago _ happen? i remember being interviewed about a month or so ago about - happen? i remember being interviewed about a month or so ago about your- about a month or so ago about your pro —— on your programme about the so—called and being pushed while we were not doing it now, i was clear saying, i do like it was necessary to go into plan b. infection numbers —— | to go into plan b. infection numbers —— i do not think it was necessary. infection numbers have come down and the hospitalisation rates have come down in the last month and i think we took the right response not to move to plan b. we do not see a need to do so now. we have put in place a small number of measures swiftly and proportionately to help slow down this new variant and the risk of transmission while we understand it with the compulsory mask wearing on public transport or in shops. but we do not see that there is a need at
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this time for other measures such as working from home. we this time for other measures such as working from home.— working from home. we are seeing this new variant _ working from home. we are seeing this new variant coming _ working from home. we are seeing this new variant coming in - working from home. we are seeing this new variant coming in and - working from home. we are seeing this new variant coming in and it i this new variant coming in and it seems to have come from south africa. isn't it the case that new variants will continue to emerge unless the world is vaccinated? should britain be committing to helping to do that? you should britain be committing to helping to do that?— helping to do that? you are absolutely _ helping to do that? you are absolutely right, _ helping to do that? you are absolutely right, it - helping to do that? you are absolutely right, it is - helping to do that? you are absolutely right, it is a - helping to do that? you are absolutely right, it is a line| helping to do that? you are| absolutely right, it is a line i have used over the past year and a half that no one is safe until we are all safe. in south africa, my understanding from comets from the south african government is that there is not a shortage of vaccine capacity or supply in south africa where this new variant is identified thanks to their inner —— amazing genomic sequencing programme and they were fantastic and exemplary giving the world the information they needed. in your broader point, we do need to support vaccine in other countries around the world. we are the second biggest donor of vaccines to the vaccine programme
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which is the biggest in the world, we have delivered so far a bit over 10%, we have been on course by the end of the month to have delivered over one third of that with the other two thirds scheduled to be delivered in the course of next spring. i am confident we will meet at target and i think it's the right thing for us to be doing.- thing for us to be doing. edward araar, thing for us to be doing. edward argar. health — thing for us to be doing. edward argar, health minister, - thing for us to be doing. edward argar, health minister, thank. thing for us to be doing. edward i argar, health minister, thank you. john is here talking about one of the big stories, so many beautiful tributes. yes, we will speak to eddiejordan in a moment to reflect on the life and career of frank williams, so much success when you consider the golden era in the 80s and 90s where we have the williams team that was built on the ground upwards. ayrton
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senna, who tragically died, but also alain prost, he shaped the careers of so many formula 1 drivers. reflecting on the incredible life of sir frank williams following his death at the age of 79 with the team named after him, which he established back in 1977. he only stepped away from the sport last year. he enjoyed unrivalled success in the �*805 and �*90s, seven drivers titles, nine constructors titles but then of course there was the personal tragedy — the car accident that left him paralysed in 1986 and then the death this of ayrton senna eight years later whilst driving for williams. some of the tributes this morning coming from the current world champion lewis hamilton described him as one of the kindest people he'd ever met, saying his legacy would live on forever. damon hill — who won the world championship in 1996 driving a williams — said his former boss was "determination and tenacity personified". while formula 1 said williams would for ever be part of the sport and that his legacy is "immeasurable". someone else who knew frank well is eddiejordan who pitted hisjordan team against the dominant williams cars
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many times in the 905. hejoins us from london this morning. great to speak to you. good morning. give us your— great to speak to you. good morning. give us your thoughts _ great to speak to you. good morning. give us your thoughts on _ great to speak to you. good morning. give us your thoughts on his - great to speak to you. good morning. give us your thoughts on his career i give us your thoughts on his career and his life. and the impact he had on the spot. and his life. and the impact he had on the spot-— on the spot. well, it's hard to describe the _ on the spot. well, it's hard to describe the impact _ on the spot. well, it's hard to describe the impact he - on the spot. well, it's hard to describe the impact he did - on the spot. well, it's hard to i describe the impact he did have, on the spot. well, it's hard to - describe the impact he did have, it was immense. as damon hill said, the tenacity, he was so focused. everything was about his team. you totally believe in his team, he believed he could ring them to greatness from very early days. as you rightly say, seven different world title drivers. because that could never happen again, it was staggering. lewis who was part of the tribute, you see how great he has put that team at mercedes is just focused on, or appears to be
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focused on one driver. but frank was such a tough operator. damon had won the championship and he sacked him. he had no problem with doing things like that because he only wanted to do better for himself and like that because he only wanted to do betterfor himself and his like that because he only wanted to do better for himself and his team and his sponsors are never in a attached m. so he was —— and everyone attached to him. so he was very single single—minded price —— he was very single—minded. i grew igrew up i grew up driving with alanjones, but i think the nigel mansell era, the whole britishness, sir frank williams was british personified. everything about him, he had the flag, he was first up, and everything about britain in sport, that's what he wanted to bring forward so alongside his own team he was very determined. but the mansell era, then followed by damon, a great
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british champion, and thenjack villeneuve after that. and then gerard piquet and himself fought a lot, but they had a lot in common because they were very determined people. to be a wild champion and work with frank williams, you had to be a special kind of person —— world champion. be a special kind of person -- world chamion. �* be a special kind of person -- world champion-— champion. and then there was the tra . ed in champion. and then there was the tragedy in 1994. — champion. and then there was the tragedy in 1994, the _ champion. and then there was the tragedy in 1994, the tragic- champion. and then there was the tragedy in 1994, the tragic death l champion. and then there was the | tragedy in 1994, the tragic death of ayrton senna, not long after having joined the williams team. give us a sense of the impact that had on frank williams's life. i sense of the impact that had on frank williams's life.— frank williams's life. i think it had a massive _ frank williams's life. i think it had a massive impact. - frank williams's life. i think it had a massive impact. i'm - frank williams's life. i think itj had a massive impact. i'm not frank williams's life. i think it - had a massive impact. i'm not even fully sure he ever recovered from it. as indeed a lot of people associated with that team, or even, i was there that day competing, we had a huge accident. it was a very black day in formula 1 history because there had been a death the day before and we had never seen anything like it before. the
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outpouring and the cry particularly for ayrton senna, because well champion, devoted to his sport, —— world champion, he was a god in brazil and it affected frank because he felt, to have anybody die in a car of yours is a shocking thing to happen. and i know with the designer of the car in particular, it is still very raw moment, even though it was years ago. i'm not sure frank ever really had the same swagger all the way he operated, he never had the way he operated, he never had the same smile after that. it had a huge impact. he the same smile after that. it had a huge impact-— huge impact. he was obviously devoted to _ huge impact. he was obviously devoted to the _ huge impact. he was obviously devoted to the sport, - huge impact. he was obviously devoted to the sport, we - huge impact. he was obviously devoted to the sport, we talk | huge impact. he was obviously - devoted to the sport, we talk about his career starting with williams in the 705, only stepped back from the sport last year. you think about the money and the finance involved in formula 1 now. i guess that the likes of sir frank and yourself, setting up a team from the ground up, the likes of which i imagine we
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will never really see again, will we? it will never really see again, will we? ., , will never really see again, will we? . , , . ., , will never really see again, will we? it has become very corporate. of course, we? it has become very corporate. of course. you — we? it has become very corporate. of course. you now _ we? it has become very corporate. of course, you now have _ we? it has become very corporate. of course, you now have chief— course, you now have chief executives running teams for groups and sponsors and manufacturers, and probably in my way, sadly, i am one of those old guys looking back, frank was such... you cannot imagine what a tough competitor he was. but he also made in my opinion one mistake, he took himself and ron dennis took on bernie ecclestone in a fight to control the formula. there is only ever going to be one winner and we all know why, it was by the extent because he is such a genius in many —— bernie ecclestone because he is such a genius in many extents. but frank still stood up to bernie and he was one of the few people who could have an impact on how formula 1, what we see now, not just the teams but the structure and how popular it is, frank williams brought a lot to formula 1. i cannot
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tell you how much because it was just vast. he touched everybody. he was a remarkable man, particularly when you think that he was the longest ever paraplegic in terms of age, the way he looked after himself and his controls and his body, and what he was given was a very tough chore. but he never shied away from it, he was resilient and such a tough operator. you never wanted to have a fight with frank without knowing exactly what you wanted to do. ., , knowing exactly what you wanted to do. . , ., ., knowing exactly what you wanted to do. . , ., ,, ., , do. really good to get your thoughts this morning. _ do. really good to get your thoughts this morning, eddie _ do. really good to get your thoughts this morning, eddie jordan, - do. really good to get your thoughts this morning, eddie jordan, former l this morning, eddiejordan, former formula 1 team boss. thank you for speaking to us here today. fascinating.— speaking to us here today. fascinatinu. ., , ., fascinating. you get those intimate stories. fascinating. you get those intimate stories- you — fascinating. you get those intimate stories. you get _ fascinating. you get those intimate stories. you get an _ fascinating. you get those intimate stories. you get an insight - fascinating. you get those intimate stories. you get an insight into - fascinating. you get those intimate stories. you get an insight into the | stories. you get an insight into the erson stories. you get an insight into the person and — stories. you get an insight into the person and the _ stories. you get an insight into the person and the character. - stories. you get an insight into the person and the character. you - stories. you get an insight into the | person and the character. you read so much about the success and followed him through the years, but to hear their stories, and the personality was, managing those big
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names, the big drivers that brought that success and their relationships. he that success and their relationships.- that success and their relationshi s. , , , relationships. he 'ust inspired eve one relationships. he 'ust inspired everyone around _ relationships. he just inspired everyone around him. - relationships. he just inspired everyone around him. we - relationships. he just inspired everyone around him. we willj relationships. he just inspired - everyone around him. we will speak to david cole _ everyone around him. we will speak to david cole -- _ everyone around him. we will speak to david cole -- david _ everyone around him. we will speak to david cole -- david coulthard - to david cole —— david coulthard just after 8:30am. to david cole -- david coulthard just after 8:30am.— to david cole -- david coulthard just after 8:30am. last night brought us the coldest night of the season so far, it fell to -8.7 night of the season so far, it fell to —8.7 degrees in cumbria. a cold start today, icy stretches, staying cold and dry in the south but rain moving in from the north. with the arrival of the rain, milder air working in. in the last few hours we have seen some rain, sleet and hail snow across parts of scotland, the east coast of england and the irish sea coast. a few spots of rain and sleet, once for ice across part of scotland, england and wales over the next few hours. you will keep the blue sky and the sunshine to much of east anglia and the south—east.
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elsewhere it will be a cloudy picture with some splashes of rain in northern england and western scotland. double figures in the temperatures by the afternoon in scotland, outbreaks of rain as opposed to sleet or snow we have seenin opposed to sleet or snow we have seen in the past 24 hours. northern ireland and northern england, patchy outbreaks of rain. largely dry it to the south of that, more cloudy skies working in from the west. not as clad as last night, more cloud around and some outbreaks of patchy rain. also turning quite breezy across the north west. by this time tomorrow, temperatures between five and 11 degrees. a spell of wet and windy weather through tuesday night into wednesday. you can see the isobars on the map, it will be blustery with some rain around. a milder day on tuesday. it does not last very long, at the time we get a wednesday things were turning colder once again. thank you. you know when it's those
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sometimes. — thank you. you know when it's those sometimes, and _ thank you. you know when it's those sometimes, and you _ thank you. you know when it's those sometimes, and you say, _ thank you. you know when it's those sometimes, and you say, wouldn't i thank you. you know when it's those sometimes, and you say, wouldn't it| sometimes, and you say, wouldn't it be nice to be snowed in? but then you think, what is the reality night? you think, what is the reality niuht? ., , ., you think, what is the reality niuht? ., , w , you think, what is the reality niuht? ., , ., . , ., night? not sure, a chilly. -- not sure, actually. _ more than 60 customers have spent a third night trapped at "britain's highest pub" in the yorkshire dales, following heavy snowfall brought by storm arwen. an 0asis tribute band are amongst those snowed in at the tan hill inn and they've been leading others in a sing—a—long to keep spirits up. i have been to that pub, the food is amazing! nicola townsend is the pub's manager, and shejoins us now. you are by a roaring fire, so you have not run out of word! what is —— of logs! have not run out of word! what is -- of lots! ~ ., , have not run out of word! what is -- of loas!~ ., , ,, have not run out of word! what is -- of los! ~ ., , ~ ., of logs! what is it like? no, we will not run _ of logs! what is it like? no, we will not run out, _ of logs! what is it like? no, we will not run out, we _ of logs! what is it like? no, we will not run out, we had - of logs! what is it like? no, we will not run out, we had a - of logs! what is it like? no, we will not run out, we had a big l will not run out, we had a big delivery— will not run out, we had a big delivery of— will not run out, we had a big delivery of logs last week so that was fortunate. it has been a really good _ was fortunate. it has been a really good experience. all of our guests
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have just _ good experience. all of our guests have just been wonderful. so we have been incredibly lucky that they are very supportive and understanding and patient. the staff are working [on- and patient. the staff are working long hours. — and patient. the staff are working long hours, getting a bit tired. so the customers have helped, they have been washing up, collecting glasses, washing _ been washing up, collecting glasses, washing glasses, clearing tables. they have — washing glasses, clearing tables. they have been great. talk washing glasses, clearing tables. they have been great.— they have been great. talk us throu~h they have been great. talk us through the — they have been great. talk us through the situation, - they have been great. talk us through the situation, where. they have been great. talk us| through the situation, where is everybody sleeping? i know everyone is helping, but how is everyone getting along? is the bar open all the time? i getting along? is the bar open all the time? . , getting along? is the bar open all the time? ., , ., , the time? i have been opening the bar later in — the time? i have been opening the bar later in the _ the time? i have been opening the bar later in the afternoon, - the time? i have been opening the bar later in the afternoon, rather l bar later in the afternoon, rather than _ bar later in the afternoon, rather than the — bar later in the afternoon, rather than the first thing, simply because we are _ than the first thing, simply because we are waiting each morning to get an update — we are waiting each morning to get an update from highways. it's more important _ an update from highways. it's more important to keep people safe and make _ important to keep people safe and make sure — important to keep people safe and make sure that when they could get the green _ make sure that when they could get the green light to go, they are able to go— the green light to go, they are able to go and _ the green light to go, they are able to go and not be held back because they have _ to go and not be held back because they have had some alcohol. i have been _ they have had some alcohol. i have been serving it later on in the day,
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not with— been serving it later on in the day, not with breakfast! and been serving it later on in the day, not with breakfast!— not with breakfast! and tell us about the oasis _ not with breakfast! and tell us about the oasis tribute - not with breakfast! and tell us about the oasis tribute band. i not with breakfast! and tell us i about the oasis tribute band. are they doing little cakes every now and again? —— they doing a little gig? and again? -- they doing a little m ? , and again? -- they doing a little ... 7 , ., and again? -- they doing a little gig? they did a great gig on friday niuht which gig? they did a great gig on friday night which is _ gig? they did a great gig on friday night which is what _ gig? they did a great gig on friday night which is what most - gig? they did a great gig on friday night which is what most people i gig? they did a great gig on friday i night which is what most people were here for— night which is what most people were here for anyway. that went down really _ here for anyway. that went down really welt — here for anyway. that went down really well. that is the second time they have _ really well. that is the second time they have played for us. they have been _ they have played for us. they have been chilling out, they have probably enjoyed a little bit of downtime. they have been getting their guitars out and doing a bit of acoustic— their guitars out and doing a bit of acoustic in — their guitars out and doing a bit of acoustic in the different rooms that we have _ acoustic in the different rooms that we have here. and everyone hasjust enjoyed _ we have here. and everyone hasjust enjoyed it _ we have here. and everyone hasjust enjoyed it. they have all been joining — enjoyed it. they have all been joining in— enjoyed it. they have all been joining in and singing along. it has been _ joining in and singing along. it has been good — joining in and singing along. it has been aood. ., ., joining in and singing along. it has been ood. ., ., ., joining in and singing along. it has been good-— been good. nicola, what are the --rosect been good. nicola, what are the prospect of _ been good. nicola, what are the prospect of you _ been good. nicola, what are the prospect of you getting - been good. nicola, what are the prospect of you getting out - been good. nicola, what are the prospect of you getting out of. been good. nicola, what are the. prospect of you getting out of the pub any time soon?— prospect of you getting out of the pub any time soon? well, i have not not a da pub any time soon? well, i have not got a day off — pub any time soon? well, i have not got a day off until — pub any time soon? well, i have not got a day off until wednesday - pub any time soon? well, i have not got a day off until wednesday so - pub any time soon? well, i have not got a day off until wednesday so i i got a day off until wednesday so i have no— got a day off until wednesday so i have no choice! i will be staying around — have no choice! i will be staying around for — have no choice! i will be staying around for a few more days. highways
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should _ around for a few more days. highways should give _ around for a few more days. highways should give us an update shortly about _ should give us an update shortly about whether the plough can come through— about whether the plough can come through this morning for us. the road _ through this morning for us. the road was — through this morning for us. the road was closed because the plough could _ road was closed because the plough could not— road was closed because the plough could not get through because there had been _ could not get through because there had been a — could not get through because there had been a power line down so that he did _ had been a power line down so that he did things a little bit. —— that hindered — he did things a little bit. —— that hindered things. hopefully they will -et hindered things. hopefully they will get through today and there will be an update — get through today and there will be an update on the condition of the roads _ an update on the condition of the roads it — an update on the condition of the roads it is — an update on the condition of the roads. it is quite icy, it is very cold _ roads. it is quite icy, it is very cold out — roads. it is quite icy, it is very cold out there. last night, it was bitterly— cold out there. last night, it was bitterly cold and the roads were icy. bitterly cold and the roads were icy~ but — bitterly cold and the roads were icy. but hopefully with a bit of luck— icy. but hopefully with a bit of luck and — icy. but hopefully with a bit of luck and a _ icy. but hopefully with a bit of luck and a bit of grit today, we should — luck and a bit of grit today, we should be _ luck and a bit of grit today, we should be letting some people go home _ should be letting some people go home i _ should be letting some people go home. ., , , ., should be letting some people go home. .,, i. ., ., home. i hope you get out of there soon, home. i hope you get out of there soon. thank _ home. i hope you get out of there soon, thank you _ home. i hope you get out of there soon, thank you for _ home. i hope you get out of there soon, thank you for talking - home. i hope you get out of there soon, thank you for talking to - home. i hope you get out of there soon, thank you for talking to us. | soon, thank you for talking to us. it is day for now?— it is day for now? yes, this is day four, so hopefully _ it is day for now? yes, this is day four, so hopefully it— it is day for now? yes, this is day four, so hopefully it will- it is day for now? yes, this is day four, so hopefully it will not - it is day for now? yes, this is day four, so hopefully it will not be i four, so hopefully it will not be night _ four, so hopefully it will not be night four! it four, so hopefully it will not be night four!— four, so hopefully it will not be nirhtfour! , ~ ., , ., night four! it is like an episode of bi: night four! it is like an episode of big brother! _ night four! it is like an episode of big brother! to _ night four! it is like an episode of big brother! to be _ night four! it is like an episode of big brother! to be honest, - night four! it is like an episode of big brother! to be honest, they| night four! it is like an episode of - big brother! to be honest, they have been absolutely _ big brother! to be honest, they have
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been absolutely lovely. _ big brother! to be honest, they have been absolutely lovely. the - big brother! to be honest, they have been absolutely lovely. the cliche . big brother! to be honest, they have been absolutely lovely. the cliche i l been absolutely lovely. the cliche i have been— been absolutely lovely. the cliche i have been saying is, they came as strangers— have been saying is, they came as strangers and a lot of them are leaving — strangers and a lot of them are leaving as _ strangers and a lot of them are leaving as friends and talking about a reunion _ leaving as friends and talking about a reunion next year.— a reunion next year. thank you for 'oinin: us a reunion next year. thank you for joining us in _ a reunion next year. thank you for joining us in the _ a reunion next year. thank you for joining us in the diary _ a reunion next year. thank you for joining us in the diary room! - a reunion next year. thank you for joining us in the diary room! we i joining us in the diary room! we will see you a little bit later on, have a good day.— will see you a little bit later on, have a good day. lovely and cosy with the fire. _ have a good day. lovely and cosy with the fire, looks _ have a good day. lovely and cosy with the fire, looks gorgeous. - have a good day. lovely and cosy| with the fire, looks gorgeous. i'm in! let's with the fire, looks gorgeous. i'm in! let's get _ with the fire, looks gorgeous. i'm in! let's get to — with the fire, looks gorgeous. i'm in! let's get to that reunion next year! stay with us, headlines coming up. time now to get the news where you are.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. 0ur headlines. the new omicron covid variant. as six more cases are identified in scotland, measures are set out to control the spread. face masks must be worn in shops and on public transport in england from tomorrow. an expansion of the boosterjabs programme to all adults is likely to be approved. thousands are still without power after the damage caused by storm arwen — the police in scotland warn the disruption could last for days. the boom in buying now and paying later. more than 17 million uk customers have now used the payment option — double the number pre—pandemic. but are the regulations tight enough? i take a look. one of formula 0ne's true greats. tributes are paid to team owner sir frank williams, who has died at the age of 79. lewis hamilton said his legacy
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will live on for ever. storm arwen is behind us so a quieter day weather wise but after the coldest night of the season last night we have ice in many places. all the details in about ten minutes. it's monday, november the 29th. efforts to combat the spread of the new omicron coronavirus variant will be stepped up by ministers today. in the last few minutes, it's been confirmed that there are six new cases of the variant in scotland. it's expected a major expansion of the covid boosterjab programme will be announced later. from today, pupils at secondary schools in england are being strongly advised to wear face coverings in communal areas. in scotland, masks are worn in secondary school classrooms as well. face coverings will once again become compulsory in shops and on public transport in england from tomorrow. in scotland, wales and northern ireland they're already mandatory on public transport
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and in many indoor areas. there will also be tougher rules on travel. from tomorrow, everyone entering britain will have to take a pcr test within two days, and must self—isolate until they test negative. and all those who've been in contact with someone who has the omicron variant will also have to self—isolate for 10 days, regardless of whether they've been vaccinated. let's speak now to chief political correspondent adam fleming. this is a fast—moving situation. we hear news now of new cases in scotland. ~ ., ., i. we hear news now of new cases in scotland. ~ ., ., , ., scotland. what more can you tell us? four cases uncovered _ scotland. what more can you tell us? four cases uncovered in _ scotland. what more can you tell us? four cases uncovered in lanarkshire l four cases uncovered in lanarkshire and two in the glasgow and clyde region, meaning six overall added to the three uncovered in england at the three uncovered in england at the weekend which means the number of cases of the new variant has travelled but from a low number two still quite a low number. scientists say it is going to happen now some cases are in the uk. ministers accept there will be more over the
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coming days. the scottish health minister said local public health team support the individuals who have been diagnosed and enhanced contact tracing will go on. they will look at whether the cases are linked to each other and whether the cases have links to travel from southern africa, where this variant was first identified, or is it now circulating naturally within the uk? again, something the scientists say is likely to happen over the next days. in terms of the government response, you laid out some of the measures unveiled. they come in in england from four o'clock tomorrow morning. today we are awaiting perhaps new advice from the jc vi. they advise the government on vaccination and we expect them to increase eligibility for the booster jab so more people flow into the system. we expect a reduction in the
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gap between when people had a second dose and the booster. again so that more vaccines can be done more quickly. as the health minister explained, there will be science going on to check how well the existing vaccines perform against this new variant. in existing vaccines perform against this new variant.— this new variant. in terms of the new variant. _ this new variant. in terms of the new variant, we _ this new variant. in terms of the new variant, we do _ this new variant. in terms of the new variant, we do not - this new variant. in terms of the new variant, we do not know- this new variant. in terms of the | new variant, we do not know how this new variant. in terms of the i new variant, we do not know how it will react _ new variant, we do not know how it will react with the vaccine. i am will react with the vaccine. ! am hopeful— will react with the vaccine. i am hopeful the vaccine will still be highly— hopeful the vaccine will still be highly effective, but we need to take time to see how it works, but it still— take time to see how it works, but it still provides a significant degree _ it still provides a significant degree of protection which is why as we face _ degree of protection which is why as we face a _ degree of protection which is why as we face a challenging new variant, we face a challenging new variant, we are _ we face a challenging new variant, we are nowhere near where we are in the last— we are nowhere near where we are in the last new — we are nowhere near where we are in the last new variant came in last year— the last new variant came in last year or— the last new variant came in last year or during this year. we are in a much _ year or during this year. we are in a much better place. in year or during this year. we are in a much better place.— year or during this year. we are in a much better place. in terms of the olitics, a much better place. in terms of the politics. that — a much better place. in terms of the politics, that will _ a much better place. in terms of the politics, that will get _ a much better place. in terms of the politics, that will get going - a much better place. in terms of the politics, that will get going today i politics, that will get going today because the health secretary will do a statement in parliament after lunch and then we expect to see in black—and—white the legislation that implements the new measures announced over the weekend and that
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will be an opportunity to see how the opposition parties and also has some conservative backbenchers react. we have a clue about what labour thinks about this from their deputy leader who said may be the government should look at the work from home message again. we've said that people should be encouraged to work from home where possible and, in fact, i outlined labour's plans for the future of work, which included more flexible working. we have seen employees have been incredibly flexible throughout this pandemic and we think that working from home is one of the tools people can use in order to combat the virus but also to give people better work—life balance, as well. so we encourage people to work from home and think the government should be using that more, as well. the government saying there is no need for people to start working from home any more than they are at the moment. i think ministers will have a nervous wait because it will take a couple of weeks for scientists to get a handle on what this variant could do.—
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scientists to get a handle on what this variant could do. we'll have more on that in a few minutes. now let's take a look at some of the morning's other news. tens of thousands of people have spent another night without power as temperatures dropped as low as minus six in some parts of the uk. yellow ice warnings remain in place for much of scotland, england and wales this morning with some schools closed and rail services cancelled. our reporter luxmy gopal is at a gritting depot in york it has been a busy morning? good morning, it has. really busy. you cannot see but over there, you might be able to hear the power washing of vehicles that have been out gritting since the early hours. our day is sort of starting and they are just finishing up and it is the same picture for teams across the uk. the team here say it has been their busiest weekend of the season so far and that is notjust because temperatures have been at their lowest, overnight the lowest of the
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season so far, but also as a result of the impact of storm arwen that brought wind, rain and snow, and that impact is felt still with thousands still without power. scotland declared a major incident as a result of the tens of thousands of homes without power. as i said, they are still waiting for them to come on in a lot of parts of the uk. we can get an update now from one of the people from the energy networks association. we the people from the energy networks association. ~ ., ,. , , association. we are describing this in some areas _ association. we are describing this in some areas as _ association. we are describing this in some areas as 25 _ association. we are describing this in some areas as 25 days _ association. we are describing this in some areas as 25 days of i association. we are describing this in some areas as 25 days of falls i association. we are describing this in some areas as 25 days of falls in 2hour— in some areas as 25 days of falls in 24-hour is, — in some areas as 25 days of falls in 24—hour is, that is the scale. viewers _ 24—hour is, that is the scale. viewers will remember the beast from the east _ viewers will remember the beast from the east in _ viewers will remember the beast from the east in 2018. this is three times— the east in 2018. this is three times worse than that and probably some _ times worse than that and probably some of— times worse than that and probably some of the worst conditions we have seen for— some of the worst conditions we have seen for the _ some of the worst conditions we have seen for the electricity network in 15 years — 15 years. that was ross easton 15 years. — that was ross easton giving a
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rs years — that was ross easton giving a sense of the severity of the situation and with the power out in many places it had an impact on schools with closures and some vaccine clinic closures, as well. the impact continues because there is still a met office yellow ice morning for parts of the uk, in place until 10am this morning and the met office said icy conditions will continue. it will be potentially treacherous for drivers this morning and they ask people to take care and plan journeys. people to take care and plan journeys-— a 14—year—old boy will appear in court today charged with the murder of 12—year—old ava white in liverpool. she was stabbed in the city centre on thursday whilst out with her friends to see the christmas lights being switched on. three other boys, aged between 13 and 15, were also arrested and have now been bailed. the trial begins in new york today of ghislaine maxwell, who was a close associate of the convicted sex offenderjeffrey epstein. the british publishing heiress has been accused of trafficking four unnamed minors and grooming
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and recruiting them for her former lover to abuse. she's been in a new yorkjail since her arrest injuly 2020 and has pleaded not guilty to all charges. care bosses are warning of a rapidly deteriorating situation for older and disabled people this winter. new research suggests nearly 400,000 people are on social care waiting lists, with more than 150,000 yet to receive an overdue review of their care plan. the association of directors of adult services, which carried out the survey, says the enitre sector is in crisis. barbados is to become the world's newest republic when the island nation formally removes the queen as its head of state later. prince charles has arrived for the ceremony, which will take place just after midnight tonight on the 55th anniversary of the country's independence from britain. we know there has been a complicated weather picture. a lot to do. people
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without power. sarah can give us an update. good morning. storm arwen is now behind us and we have lost the strong wind and most of the rain and snow. what we are left with is a bitterly cold morning. this is the picture in buckinghamshire this morning. last night was the coldest of the season so far with temperatures as low as -8.7 so far with temperatures as low as —8.7 in cumbria. today it is icy to start. we have rain working in from the north bringing milder air, so gradually things will warm up in the north—west but we have warnings for icy conditions in parts of scotland, england and wales in the next few hours. rain works in from scotland and northern ireland and parts of england. further south—east, and northern ireland and parts of england. furthersouth—east, clear, england. further south—east, clear, cold, england. furthersouth—east, clear, cold, bright conditions. we can look
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at this afternoon. more cloud in scotland with outbreaks of rain. in northern ireland and much of northern england things are turning down but certainly milder in the afternoon. further south, down but certainly milder in the afternoon. furthersouth, most places drive through the day. clear skies holding on for longest in the far south and east. overnight, turning milder. not as cold and frosty this time tomorrow but watch out for icy stretches over the next few hours. in response to the new omicron variant of coronavirus, thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation has been tasked with reviewing whether boosters should be extended to everyone over 18. it'll also consider whether second doses should be offered to 12— to 15—year—olds, and whether the waiting time before a booster jab could be reduced. we're joined now by professor anthony harnden, deputy chair of the jcvi. where shall we start? shall we start
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with boosters, what is the plan? we are with boosters, what is the plan? - are reviewing the evidence. there are reviewing the evidence. there are two macro strategies essentially to this variant. either we raise immunity in the population or we find a matched vaccine and it will be awhile before we can get a matched vaccine so it is sensible to increase immunity in the population, which would be done by encouraging those not vaccinated so far to get vaccinated. that is imperative. but also to ensure we boost the most vulnerable in order and give them the boosters. everybody will be offered a booster but we want to make sure it is done in sensible order, so those who are most vulnerable from this infection can be boosted and their natural immunity levels can go up. who be boosted and their natural immunity levels can go up. who is currently eligible _ immunity levels can go up. who is currently eligible for _
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immunity levels can go up. who is currently eligible for the _ immunity levels can go up. who is currently eligible for the booster? | currently eligible for the booster? at the moment, anybody over 40 is eligible for a booster provided they had... there is a six—month gap between the end of their primary course, the second dose, and the booster dose. we need to accelerate that programme. the things we will look outs will be reducing the dose interval and increasing the age range. i cannot help emphasise that the most important thing is to get vulnerable members of the community that have not had their booster and they are eligible, boosted. and a small fraction of the community not vaccinated vaccinated. we do not know quite what the transmission advantage of this variant is over delta but if it has a significant transmission advantage and there is some form of vaccine, it is important we get immunity levels in the population hi. the
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important we get immunity levels in the population hi.— the population hi. the 12-17 year olds being _ the population hi. the 12-17 year olds being offered _ the population hi. the 12-17 year olds being offered the _ the population hi. the 12-17 year olds being offered the first i the population hi. the 12-17 year olds being offered the first dose| the population hi. the 12-17 year i olds being offered the first dose of the vaccine, the timing of the second dose there will be confirmed later. can you explain the thinking about potentially moving that window forward? we about potentially moving that window forward? ~ ., about potentially moving that window forward? . ., ., , about potentially moving that window forward? e ., ., , , forward? we have advised the second dose at 12 weeks _ forward? we have advised the second dose at 12 weeks for _ forward? we have advised the second dose at 12 weeks for 16-17 _ forward? we have advised the second dose at 12 weeks for 16-17 year i forward? we have advised the second dose at 12 weeks for 16-17 year olds i dose at 12 weeks for 16—17 year olds and a first dose for 12—15 year olds. the 16—17 year olds is at 12 weeks. there is an argument to bring that down further. possibly eight weeks, as we did before when the delta came in for the wider population. we will be looking at that and we'll be looking at whether to give a second dose to 12—15 year olds. to give a second dose to 12-15 year olds. ~ . ., , ., to give a second dose to 12-15 year olds. ~ _, , ., ., ., ., olds. when it comes to a variant like omicron, _ olds. when it comes to a variant like omicron, which _ olds. when it comes to a variant like omicron, which has - olds. when it comes to a variant like omicron, which has caused | like omicron, which has caused interest and concern. is it a case... i am trying to work out time
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frames. it might be needed, a new separate jab for are very like that? how long might that take and when would we know if that is necessary? you are right. if omicron turns out to have vaccine escape, and we do not know that, although the mutations are worrying, and turns out to have a transmission advantage, it would be sensible to have a new vaccine. the pfizer and moderna —— moderna are easy to treat. they might be able to get a vaccine within 100 treat. they might be able to get a vaccine within100 days. but this is dependent on a speedy approval system. there are lots of things to think about. i think within three months we could potentially get a
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variant vaccine if needed but we do not know that yet. i variant vaccine if needed but we do not know that yet.— not know that yet. i suppose there is a broader _ not know that yet. i suppose there is a broader ethical— not know that yet. i suppose there is a broader ethical question i not know that yet. i suppose there is a broader ethical question about prioritising booster vaccines in the uk when there are plenty of countries struggling with the first vaccination. where'd sit on that issue? ~ ., ., vaccination. where'd sit on that issue? s ., ., �* , vaccination. where'd sit on that issue? ~ ., ., a ., issue? we need to do both. as a member of— issue? we need to do both. as a member of the _ issue? we need to do both. as a member of the jcvi _ issue? we need to do both. as a member of the jcvi my - issue? we need to do both. as a member of the jcvi my main i member of thejcvi my main consideration is the uk and i advise on the uk population. we have these variants popping up all over the world. it shows we need to get the world. it shows we need to get the world vaccinated. the uk is quite a big donor to the kovacs scheme of vaccination so there is a plentiful supply —— covax system. some countries, access to vaccines is difficult and there is vaccine hesitancy so we need to tackle these issues, getting the supply to the developing world, promoting access
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so that people get that supply, and promoting confidence in those vaccines. it promoting confidence in those vaccines. , , ., vaccines. it will be interesting to ret our vaccines. it will be interesting to get your view — vaccines. it will be interesting to get your view on _ vaccines. it will be interesting to get your view on i _ vaccines. it will be interesting to get your view on i think - vaccines. it will be interesting to get your view on i think six i vaccines. it will be interesting to j get your view on i think six more cases in scotland and this morning. how concerned are you that what we are seeing with omicron will have an impact, talking about facemasks being made compulsory on transport. that this will have a impact around christmas? it that this will have a impact around christmas? , ., , that this will have a impact around christmas?— christmas? it will be inevitable we will see more _ christmas? it will be inevitable we will see more cases _ christmas? it will be inevitable we will see more cases stop - christmas? it will be inevitable we will see more cases stop the i christmas? it will be inevitable we will see more cases stop the key l will see more cases stop the key question is whether this virus has a transmission advantage over delta, the prevalent virus at the moment. vaccines can do heavy lifting but they cannot do all the lifting and social distancing measures, wearing face masks, distancing, ventilation, which is difficult overwinter, i know, but ventilation. and measures like that are important, as well. we will see more of these measures and i know the government have announced
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facemasks in public transport already. that may be extended. we will have to wait to see whether this omicron virus takes a big hold in this country and how big a problem it is. it is a worrying development. i do not think there is need for everyone to panic. what they do need to do is get vaccinated.— they do need to do is get vaccinated. ., , ., with face masks being made compulsory in shops and on public transport in england from tomorrow — reporter andy gill has been finding out how shoppers and retailers feel about the changes. the new rules come in response to the omicron variant of covid. at a health centre in brentwood in essex, some thoughts on what it might mean for how we go about our lives. i'm not too worried, because obviously i have had both myjabs and stuff already. and i've already had covid,
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so it's one of those things that i'm not too worried. we had to deal with other outbreaks of different variants, and so, we've managed that so far, this will be another one. i i think we just need to wait a fewl more weeks to find out exactly how transmissible it is, i and then kind of deal with it from there. from tomorrow, the new variant means you will have to wear a mask in shops unless you're exempt. liverpool one is one of the busiest shopping centres in the country. 170 shops and 35 restaurants, attracting millions of visitors every year. among christmas shoppers here, a lot of support for the return of compulsory mask wearing, but some dissent as well. i think we've got to the point where we've just got to move on now and live with it. i have no problem with it, you know, keeps me safe, keeps everyone else safe. so, you know, otherwise it'sjust going to go on and on. it's a joke. they're completely taking i over our personal space and it should be our own decision. not really got a problem with it, to be honest. it's not a big ask, is it? not a big deal, no. people are still dying of it so wearing a mask, it's not much to ask,
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is it, really? here at liverpool one, they say the city's post lockdown recovery has been stronger than many other places both in terms of turnover and footfall. they say that mask wearing is a small price to pay to protect people while not hampering that recovery. i think that we've come a very, very long way. i think that performance is exceptionally strong and the announcement with regard to face masks feels like a sensible move. and one which means everybody can pay a very small price to try and keep life operating as normal as it has been more recently. masks are back on public transport as well. one bus company boss says it won't be easy to get some passengers to put them back on. a little disappointing that the government are just singling out public transport and retail and not hospitality as well. it makes it that much more difficult to enforce. rather than being the norm, it's just in certain areas. but clearly we will
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support this action. we will support our drivers and we will be encouraging, as we have been throughout, actually, we will still be encouraging customers to wear face coverings when they board our buses. whatever happens this christmas, it looks like masks are one thing that are here to stay. andy gill, bbc news, liverpool. we're joined now by professor tom solomon, director of uk's emerging infections research unit. good morning. iwant good morning. i want to start with news from scotland this morning with six more cases. that cannot be a surprise, surely that is bound to happen? it surprise, surely that is bound to ha en? , surprise, surely that is bound to hauen? , ., ., ,, happen? it is bound to happen we will see more _ happen? it is bound to happen we will see more cases _ happen? it is bound to happen we will see more cases in _ happen? it is bound to happen we will see more cases in this - happen? it is bound to happen we | will see more cases in this country and in europe. we have seen in the pandemic it is hard to stop viruses spreading, but what we are trying to do is slow the spread while we get more information about what it means to have this virus in the country.
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you were listening to what the professor said about where we are with regards to boosters and mask wearing. he touched on that interesting issue about vaccinations here, boosters here, and where we are in terms of levels around the rest of the world. it is that ethical, moral balance. there is so much that needs to be done. it is much that needs to be done. it is not 'ust much that needs to be done. it is not just ethical _ much that needs to be done. lit 3 notjust ethical and moral, it is common sense for protection of this country. if you only care about protection of this country, you want the rest of the world to be protected because these variants emerge where there is a unrestricted passage of the virus so it makes sense to ensure that as well as boosting people to protect them in the uk, we get the rest of the world vaccinated. this is a wake—up call. we have had a year to do this and we have not achieved it. taste we have had a year to do this and we have not achieved it.— have not achieved it. we have the health minister _ have not achieved it. we have the health minister on _ have not achieved it. we have the health minister on almost - have not achieved it. we have the health minister on almost an i have not achieved it. we have the | health minister on almost an hour ago and he said that britain is doing well with the covax system.
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offering vaccines to the rest of the world. �* ., ., world. are we doing enough? the covax initiative _ world. are we doing enough? the covax initiative was _ world. are we doing enough? the covax initiative was agreed i world. are we doing enough? the covax initiative was agreed earlyl world. are we doing enough? the| covax initiative was agreed early in the pandemic in the world agreed that as well as vaccinating in their own countries we would contribute to a pot to get poorer countries vaccinated. although we are making a useful contribution, we are not contributing as a country as much as we said we would. at the moment 3% of lower income countries have the population... 3% of people in those countries, compared to 60% in the rest of the world so we have to do more. ., ,., ., ., more. how important are the next da s in more. how important are the next days in terms _ more. how important are the next days in terms of— more. how important are the next days in terms of determining i more. how important are the next days in terms of determining the l days in terms of determining the symptoms, are they mild, which is some of the evidence we are getting from southern africa, and how resistant this is to vaccines? the critical question _ resistant this is to vaccines? tue: critical question is resistant this is to vaccines? t'ta: critical question is how resistant this is to vaccines? tta: critical question is how easy resistant this is to vaccines? t'ta: critical question is how easy it passes between people and it looks like it passes more easily than the delta variant, and secondly does it cause more severe disease? it is too
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early to say that yet. and does the vaccine protects against the new variant? this variant has a lot of changes in the spike protein, 30, and most of our antibodies are attacking the spike protein so if that has changed, our antibodies might not give as much protection and that is the critical question we do not know and it will take some weeks to work that out. we do not know and it will take some weeks to work that out.— weeks to work that out. we were talkinr weeks to work that out. we were talking about _ weeks to work that out. we were talking about adjusting _ weeks to work that out. we were talking about adjusting the i weeks to work that out. we were talking about adjusting the type | weeks to work that out. we were l talking about adjusting the type of vaccination. how challenging is that for scientists? haste vaccination. how challenging is that for scientists?— for scientists? we have never been in this situation _ for scientists? we have never been in this situation before. _ for scientists? we have never been in this situation before. normally, | in this situation before. normally, we make the flu vaccine every year but that is different technology. we have this mrna technology, a different way of making vaccines, and the people who have made these vaccines think they can tweak it and make new ones in about three months. it is a better situation than we would have been in without this type of vaccine. haste
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would have been in without this type of vaccine. ~ ., would have been in without this type of vaccine. . ., ., , ., of vaccine. we will have to see. you can see governments _ of vaccine. we will have to see. you can see governments around i of vaccine. we will have to see. you can see governments around the i of vaccine. we will have to see. you i can see governments around the world are learning quickly. you can tell the level of concern by how quickly measures have been announced compared to what we have seen in the past. t compared to what we have seen in the ast. ~ , compared to what we have seen in the ast, ~' , , ., , ., past. i think it is partly... that is true but _ past. i think it is partly... that is true but if _ past. i think it is partly... that is true but if you _ past. i think it is partly... that is true but if you do _ past. i think it is partly... that is true but if you do not i past. i think it is partly... that is true but if you do not act i is true but if you do not act quickly you pay the price. so with the new variant we have 30 changes in the spike protein and there is a suggestion it is transmitted more easily. if we are lucky it will turn out to be transmitted more easily but not causing more severe disease and the vaccine protects against it and the vaccine protects against it and then we can breathe a sigh of relief. untilwe and then we can breathe a sigh of relief. until we know that we have to take extra precautions. if it turns out the vaccine does not give as much protection, and it will not completely escape from vaccine protection, but it is about degrees. that is why it is important to get a booster and why the jc vi will probably announce that any adults can get a booster now and probably
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increase vaccination in children. the new measures, mandatory facemasks on public transport and in shops, does that go far enough? t shops, does that go far enough? i think it does at the moment. i shops, does that go far enough? t think it does at the moment. i think we should have done that through the summer. i think it was a mistake to stop doing that. summer. i think it was a mistake to stop doing that-— stop doing that. obviously i am talkinr stop doing that. obviously i am talking about _ stop doing that. obviously i am talking about england. - stop doing that. obviously i am talking about england. i - stop doing that. obviously i am talking about england. i think. stop doing that. obviously i am | talking about england. i think in scotland and — talking about england. i think in scotland and wales _ talking about england. i think in scotland and wales they - talking about england. i think in scotland and wales they carried j talking about england. i think in i scotland and wales they carried on with some of that. i think at the moment it goes far enough because it does not impact on the economy. sensible things that will buy us time. if it turns out this virus does cause increased hospitalisation, and again we are at risk of hospitals over spilling, unfortunately we might have to bring in some of the other social distancing measures. the in some of the other social distancing measures. in some of the other social distancinr measures. . s, . ., distancing measures. the concern of many people — distancing measures. the concern of many people watching, _ distancing measures. the concern of many people watching, we - distancing measures. the concern of many people watching, we had i distancing measures. the concern of many people watching, we had a - many people watching, we had a christmas to remember and to forget last year. people were looking forward to something more normal as the prime minister said on this programme. the prime minister said on this programme-—
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the prime minister said on this programme. the prime minister said on this rouramme. ~ ., , ., ., programme. and that could be a tough ill to programme. and that could be a tough pill to swallow — programme. and that could be a tough pill to swallow. that _ programme. and that could be a tough pill to swallow. that is _ programme. and that could be a tough pill to swallow. that is the _ programme. and that could be a tough pill to swallow. that is the worry. - pill to swallow. that is the worry. it is risky to make predictions. and if one does one often ends up being wrong. i would if one does one often ends up being wrong. iwould be if one does one often ends up being wrong. i would be surprised if we end up in as bad a situation as last christmas, because we had no vaccination last christmas. we might not have the complete freedom we hoped for, but we are buying our turkey this week, put it like that. that will put a smile on some faces. enjoy your turkey. that is properly organised. i am a little bit behind. plenty coming up. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. westminster council says it's working closely with the uk health security agency to help identify close contacts of a person who tested positive for the omicron covid variant in the borough.
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it was confirmed last night that a third case of the variant linked to travel to southern africa had been detected in someone who had stayed in westminster but is no longer in britain. meanwhile, a couple from tooting are asking the prime minister to rethink the plan to charge travellers for hotel quarantine following the ban on flights from south africa. owen hancock and emily mennie were visiting family in south africa for the first time in two years but will now have to quarantine because of restrictions over the new covid variant. they face a bill of nearly £a,000. if we could have come home earlier, we would have made that choice. if we would have known that south africa would have gone on to the red list, we could have made the choice not to go. butjust overnight, we've had this cost imposed on us. and to us, that's what comes across as unfair, unreasonable, and probably unacceptable as well. a memorial service to remember a police officer killed while on duty in south london will take place in westminster later.
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sergeant matt ratana died after being shot by a man who'd been brought into croydon police station for questioning in september last year. commissioner dame cressida dick will accompany his partner on the way to the service as officers lined the route. you can hear more you can hear more on you can hear more on that memorial in a few minutes. let's take a look at the travel now. jude now seems to be running normally. you can get regular travel updates on the bbc local radio stations. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. temperatures are set to go up and down quite dramatically across the capital over the next couple of days or so. tomorrow is looking very mild, and then it will turn colder as we head through the rest of the week once more. today it is another chilly one, temperatures just below freezing to start the morning. some icy stretches out there as well on the roads and the pavements so watch out for those, particularly where we saw the rain, sleet and snow fall towards the west last night. also some early mist and fog
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patches, they will lift and clear as we head through the morning. blue sky and sunshine, a very pretty day of weather but still feeling very cold out there. top temperatures only four or five celsius later this afternoon, with just a light breeze. as we head through this evening and overnight, it will be cold and frosty at first under clear skies. then we will see a warm front sinks southwards and eastwards, that is going to introduce some more cloud. possibly some outbreaks of light patchy rain and drizzle, more of a westerly wind and certainly some milder air. temperatures rising into the start of the day tomorrow to between six and eight celsius. so tomorrow a much milder feeling day, with plenty of cloud, again a few spits and spots of light patchy rain possible. a westerly wind and highs of 12 celsius. i'm back in half an hour. lots more over on our website at the usual address.
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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. it is 8:32am. itjust turned over, i had to be precise! morning live is on bbc one after breakfast. let's find out what sarah and gethin have in store. he is so fascinated by time! he is a dancer now. _ he is so fascinated by time! he is a dancer now. it _ he is so fascinated by time! he is a dancer now, it is _ he is so fascinated by time! he is a dancer now, it is all— he is so fascinated by time! he is a dancer now, it is all about - he is so fascinated by time! he is a dancer now, it is all about time. i dancer now, it is all about time. the footwork was so precise. coming up on morning live. every year, more than 30,000 people have a cardiac arrest when they're not in a hospital and sadly nine out of ten don't make it. but using one of these machines during the vital moments after it happens can be life—saving. we discover how a database of defibrillators could help you quickly find one in an emergency. and, with 40% more people suffering from norovirus in england this year compared to last, dr xand explains how to protect yourself against stomach bugs
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and why antibacterial hand wash plus, he has all the latest on the new covid variant. we know him as our resident vet but did you know drjames greenwood actually started his tv career on the bbc's great pottery throw down? you might recognise the presenter of the show! _ you might recognise the presenter of the show! she you might recognise the presenter of the show! ,, , ., the show! she looks younger there, annoyingly! — today, we're reuniting him and sara, as he shows us why you don't need state of the art kit to get crafty, as you can pot from home simply by using your oven. also coming up. he's one of the world's most recognisable male models. david gandy tells us why he's putting on his walking boots in an effort to get more men talking about mental health. it's the perfect way to kick—start your monday morning, janette will be teaching us the jive inspired by karim and amy's performance from back in 2019. that will be a quick start to the monday! — that will be a quick start to the monday! but in all seriousness, he is through—
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monday! but in all seriousness, he is through to the quarters! congratulations, dan, brilliant effort. i don't need a jive, i don't know what this week's jhye —— dance is but give me some tips on that! keep watching, it all helps! a memorial service will be held in westminster later to remember the life of metropolitan police officer matt ratana who was shot dead while on duty in a custody centre last year. speaking ahead of the service, sergeant ratana's colleagues remember him as a unique, larger than life man who loved rugby and motorbikes, and could talk to anyone. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford has been to meet some of them. matt ratana. police officer, rugby player, friend. being remembered today by some of the colleagues who knew him best. it's not how matt ratana died that made him a hero, it's how matt ratana lived. he was at ease with himself. he had a natural kind of confidence that just sort of showed, you trusted him straight away. people couldn't help but like him, even if they were anti—police, - they would love matt ratana.
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his funeral was last year while the pandemic was still raging. we miss you, we honour you, we won't forget you. today, there will be a much bigger memorial in central london, as his force gathers to celebrate his life. there is still those people that when you open the door and walk in a custody suite or the office, you think, today is going to be a good one. and matt was top of the list of those people, the person i always thought, this is great, going to spend a shift with matt. some of those remembering matt ratana today were friends outside work as well. including some who he persuaded to go with him to germany by motorbike. there is only ever going to be one matt ratana, no one is ever going to replace him. he was just a force of nature who would get things done, he inspired people to go that extra yard, he inspired people to push themselves. matt ratana died in a shooting inside the police custody centre in croydon where he worked. a man has been charged with murder.
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but his colleagues prefer to recall the outstanding officer they worked with whilst policing difficult parts of london. his best asset as a police officer was his ability to talk to people. the friendliness and relatableness with him. he would always find a common ground. and to win them over that way, rather than needing to use any legal framework or an escalation of force. i think there's a lot of people who still, and i'm one of them, who are just confused, about him not being there any more. it doesn't make a lot of sense that someone like that isn't there any more. if you worked with. matt, you felt safe. i i can't quite put it into words, i he had the ability to make police i officers and the publicjust feel. safe purely by his presence there. it was almost like you could define the average police officer, - you could never define the average mall ratana — there was just a total difference. if the world was full - of matt ratanas, the world would be a better place. he is a tragic loss to the service.
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that was our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford speaking to some of sergeant matt ratana's colleagues. john is back with us this morning. some lovely tribute to sir frank williams. what has been clear talking to eddiejordan in the last hour is how big an impact he had not only on those who worked with but everybody in the sport. yes. only on those who worked with but everybody in the sport. yes, shading the careers — everybody in the sport. yes, shading the careers of _ everybody in the sport. yes, shading the careers of so _ everybody in the sport. yes, shading the careers of so many _ everybody in the sport. yes, shading the careers of so many drivers - everybody in the sport. yes, shading the careers of so many drivers when | the careers of so many drivers when you consider there were seven world titles by different drivers which is very different in many ways to what you see today. a legacy that will last forever, the words from those who run formula one as they and other constructors and drivers remember one of the defining figures in the sport, sir frank williams who's died at the age of 79. he won seven drivers titles and 9 constructors championships at the helm of the team that bears his name. let's have a quick look back. seven wins for frank williams' team.
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up to the chequered flag and past it goes alanjones. i've had a wonderful life. i wouldn't change anything, truthfully. mansell finishes, and he is world champion. and damon hill wins the japanese grand prix. and i've got to stop because i've got a lump in my throat. a very exciting business. i think it would be better if there was something to worry about, it can be quite healthy, actually. i wouldn't spoil it at all, it's been very good to me. let's speak now to david
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coulthard, now a television pundit of course but a former williams driver. good morning. good morning. give us a sense of what _ good morning. good morning. give us a sense of what type _ good morning. good morning. give us a sense of what type of _ good morning. good morning. give us a sense of what type of person - good morning. good morning. give us a sense of what type of person he - a sense of what type of person he was, the character he was, speaking to eddiejordan earlier, he said he was a tough negotiator. i to eddie jordan earlier, he said he was a tough negotiator.— was a tough negotiator. i guess it de-ends was a tough negotiator. i guess it depends on _ was a tough negotiator. i guess it depends on what _ was a tough negotiator. i guess it depends on what side _ was a tough negotiator. i guess it depends on what side of- was a tough negotiator. i guess it depends on what side of the - was a tough negotiator. i guess it| depends on what side of the fence you are sitting on. eddie was a competitor in a rival team, so i don't doubt he was a tough negotiator. from my point of view, he was the man who gave me my opportunity to become a professional racing driver. i never truly believed that i could be a grand prix driver until frank gave me the opportunity as a test driver, and at that time the team is partnered with an engine manufacturer from that time the team is partnered with an engine manufacturerfrom france and he was under pressure to put a young frenchman in the car but he had an affinity to scotland, thankfully. he studied in dumfries which is where he was —— where i was born. as a proud brit, he quite liked the idea of running his team
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his way. i'm tremendously grateful and indebted to him. i didn't find him a hard negotiate at all, i thought he had a wicked sense of humour and he has a very straightforward person to deal with. you don't overcome the sorts of vivacity he had in life and in business and have that sort of success until —— the sort of adversity he had in life and unless you have a steely britishness. it was difficult for the team and the sport after the death of ayrton senna who who was waiting for williams at the time. we stepped into his seat. give us a sense of how tough it was for you to follow in the footsteps of ayrton senna at a very difficult time for the sport. it was a very horrible period, 94, we had lost a ratzenberger on the saturday sadly, and ayrton was killed on the sunday. there was a lot of speculation in the following couple of weeks as he would
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ultimately drive that car. and i assumed, because i never reached out to the team even though i was driver and i had been fora to the team even though i was driver and i had been for a few years, i thought it would be an experienced driver with grand prix races under their belt but in typical frank style, he made his own decision. the fact that ayrton had been very supportive of me in winter testing and had had a private conversation with frank and said, in his words, that i had potentialfor the with frank and said, in his words, that i had potential for the future, i was given that opportunity. not to make light of the tragedy of this moment, and of course the tragedy of 1994, but to give you an insight into frank williams, when i was announced on the thursday at the spanish grand prix in 1994, when he was asked by the media why he had chosen me, he beamed that big smile that he had and said, because i had a pretty girlfriend. nothing to do with driving talent. it was his naughty sense of humour he wanted to
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shock the media with.— shock the media with. handling the bi driver shock the media with. handling the big driver personalities _ shock the media with. handling the big driver personalities is _ big driver personalities is something which helped him shape the team and his successor. if you think about the number of different formula i winners, seven winners for williams during that golden period in the 80s and 90s, very different today when you consider the success that lewis hamilton is having at mercedes, teams seem to back one driver and there is continual success. very different from your time at williams. i success. very different from your time at williams.— time at williams. i think actually what that does _ time at williams. i think actually what that does is _ time at williams. i think actually what that does is remind - time at williams. i think actually what that does is remind me - time at williams. i think actually what that does is remind me of. what that does is remind me of frank, the businessman, inasmuch as no individual driver was bigger than the team. when i was test driver, i worked with nigel mansell and alain prost and in the last few years of ayrton? life. three champions all able to perform at a high level but frank would never allow a driver to
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dictate the direction of the team. it reminds me of a documentary i watched once about alex ferguson where he said, there was no one bigger in the club than the manager. and i thought, particularly following football, i thought he was going to say there is no one bigger in the club than the league goals —— league goal—scorer. his point being, the manager loses control of the dressing room and he loses control of the club. and frank never lost control of his team. it is of the club. and frank never lost control of his team.— of the club. and frank never lost control of his team. it is a shame that williams _ control of his team. it is a shame that williams were _ control of his team. it is a shame that williams were never - control of his team. it is a shame that williams were never really i control of his team. it is a shame i that williams were never really able to get back to those highs of the '805 to get back to those highs of the '80s and 90s. we saw the williams family stepped back from the team in recent years. he was there till the very end, if you think about how early it started for him and his career and he only stopped it to step back last year. he was so passionate about the port. give us a sense of the legacy he leaves. the ultimate sense of the legacy he leaves. ira: ultimate ultrafine air, the reason that the team struggled —— ultimate entrepreneur, the reason that the team struggled is his reluctance to
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set out to a major manufacturer which many other teams did. he wanted to remain independent and that got him great success for a long period. iwould not look that got him great success for a long period. i would not look at the drought of wins over the last period, i still think there is great affection for the williams team and every thing they stand for. formula i is about human endeavour, about engineering success, about the will of people to come together to work towards a common goal. with his partnership with patrick head, who was a technical director for many years, they brought up young designers like adrian who, his leadership makes him one of the most successful designers in the history of the sport. i think the legacy about frank is his belief in british talent, his belief in youth, if you are good enough, you are old enough. he always that and invested in it. greatest to speak to you this morning. does migrate my speak to.
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there was an interesting story, he was making calls from a local phone box in the early days of the team because he could not afford the phone bill. that illustrates the determination to take the team from the very bottom. you determination to take the team from the very bottom-— the very bottom. you have to go to the very bottom. you have to go to the bottom — the very bottom. you have to go to the bottom to _ the very bottom. you have to go to the bottom to work _ the very bottom. you have to go to the bottom to work your— the very bottom. you have to go to the bottom to work your way - the very bottom. you have to go to the bottom to work your way back. the very bottom. you have to go to i the bottom to work your way back up. thank you, john. the busiest shopping weekend of the year has come to an end with millions spent on the high street and online. did you buy anything over the weekend? far did you buy anything over the weekend?— did you buy anything over the weekend? ., , _ ., weekend? far too busy. have you started? no. _ weekend? far too busy. have you started? no, do— weekend? far too busy. have you started? no, do not— weekend? far too busy. have you started? no, do not mention - weekend? far too busy. have you started? no, do not mention the | weekend? far too busy. have you | started? no, do not mention the c word! i don't _ started? no, do not mention the c word! i don't mean _ started? no, do not mention the c word! i don't mean cash! - lots of that cash will be have been using so—called "buy now, pay later" providers. nina, what do we know? we've spoken about the growth of this before. you choose a product, a company like klarna, clearpay or layby buys it on your behalf, you then pay them back. especially as it's interest free, cheaper than a credit card,
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and you can pay in installments. we all got a lot more savvy paying online over lockdown, so it isn't suprising that the number of customers doubled to about 17 million. we spoke with chinelo, she's used it as a shopper but also keen to use it for customers with her cake decorating business. it was pretty straightforward. i got a text message letting me know when i needed to pay. and they send you reminders. as we started to come out of lockdown, it became clear that i could start to offer our cake decorating masterclasses again. those tickets tend to start from about 350. i would like to give my customers that flexibility so that they don't have to pay all of it upfront. so what's the problem — it sounds great? it has worked for lots of people but it isn't regulated in the same way as credit cards. before they buy this product on your behalf, they
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don't have to check your credit rate. so they don't know if you have beenin rate. so they don't know if you have been in trouble with debt collection in the past. there are two sides to this. mark got in touch when we talked about it earlier and said, why should the owners be on the businesses? we all have a duty to take responsibility for our own finances. heathersays, take responsibility for our own finances. heather says, she regularly uses buy now pay later, but because she cannot afford to buy the product out right but you can buy it and send it back if you don't like it without the money leaving your account. so it can be handy. but consumer groups like which and citizens advice, like we have seen with social media, regulation is catching up with the growth in the market. there might be out of control people with their finances and there is nothing in place to protect them. the treasury says they are looking into it, a consultation is in place, but it could be a couple of years. people could be finding themselves in real trouble. the advice is to look at whether you will be able to pay it back long
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term. it is not always as good as you will think. ibe term. it is not always as good as you will think.— term. it is not always as good as you will think._ and . term. it is not always as good as i you will think._ and read you will think. be it from. and read the small print. _ you will think. be it from. and read the small print. being _ you will think. be it from. and read the small print. being informed i you will think. be it from. and read the small print. being informed is i the small print. being informed is very important- — the small print. being informed is very important. particularly i the small print. being informed is very important. particularly in i the small print. being informed is very important. particularly in all| very important. particularly in all things like the weather. good morning. it is very cold this morning. last night fought as the coldest night of the season so far. this is the picture in cumbria, and elsewhere in cumbria, to —— temperatures of minus nine degrees nearly last night. gradually turning welder through the day today because cloud and rain is approaching from the north. —— gradually turning milder. slippery surfaces today on untreated surfaces, icy patches. there is a warm front moving in from the north, a bit of sleet and snow on the leading edge, but really
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turning back to rain. icy stretches to contend with on central and eastern parts of england and scotland into wales. cloudy skies for most areas as we head into the afternoon. and she went to scotland, northern ireland and northern england. east —— patchy rain in scotland, northern ireland and northern england. the blue skies in the east of england, four or five degrees, north—west, double figures. this evening with the milder air and patchy outbreaks of rain it will work across the uk, becoming brazier. by this time tomorrow morning, it will not be as cold and frosty as this morning. five to 10 degrees tomorrow. a different feeling day. the cold front will bring some persistent rain later in the day to scotland and northern ireland but before that gets there, some patchy and light drizzly rain for many areas. driest towards the south where there will be sunshine breaking through at times. top ten
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which is much milder than the past few days. i! or 12 degrees in the south. chile in the northern isles, there could be more snow for lerwick. —— chilly in the northern isles. three tuesday night, the more persistent rain works across the uk, a spell of wet and windy weather into the early hours of wednesday morning. through wednesday, the more brief mild spell gets cleared away and we open the door for northerly winds. more sleet and snow showers on wednesday across parts of scotland. further south, on wednesday across parts of scotland. furthersouth, many rain showers. a bit of sunshine in between. things will turn colder again. up and down with a tippet is the next few days but do watch out this morning for those icy stretches. thank you, talk to you again just after 9am. in a new bbc drama series, a man accused of murder pleads his innocence by offering the jury a window into his life.
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i like it already! we love the drama. "you don't know me" follows the story of hero, played by samuel adewunmi, whose life is changed after he meets sophie wilde's character, kyra. let's take a look. they are just over there, they are listening! we did a good cell there! let's see a bit of it first. sorry, what? i said, what, as in what are you looking at me for? sorry, i thought i recognised you. oh, yeah. yeah, couldn't place you. as it turns out i probably don't know you. she got off after two more stops. and after that, i checked the same time every day. it took me a week to run into her again.
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now, it sounds like i was stalking her, but to be fair sometimes i had to get that bus anyway. it was more like i was hoping. i know where i know you from. where? this bus last week. funny. don't know, though. maybe not. this other girl was reading a different book. it was skinnier. what? like a more slender body. is that how you judge a book? by how much it weighs? no, you judge a book by its cover. everyone knows that. samuel adewunmi and sophie wildejoin us now. good morning to you. lovely to have you on the programme. goad
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good morning to you. lovely to have you on the programme. good morning! i know ou you on the programme. good morning! i know you cannot _ you on the programme. good morning! i know you cannot give _ you on the programme. good morning! i know you cannot give too _ you on the programme. good morning! i know you cannot give too much i i know you cannot give too much away, but tell us about your character and how the story develops from that point. i character and how the story develops from that point.— from that point. i am going to say what ou from that point. i am going to say what you guys _ from that point. i am going to say what you guys are _ from that point. i am going to say what you guys are said! _ from that point. i am going to say what you guys are said! he - from that point. i am going to say what you guys are said! he is i from that point. i am going to say what you guys are said! he is a i what you guys are said! he is a young — what you guys are said! he is a young man _ what you guys are said! he is a young man who has chosen to represent _ young man who has chosen to represent himself for his closing speech— represent himself for his closing speech in— represent himself for his closing speech in court. and when we meet him, _ speech in court. and when we meet him. he's _ speech in court. and when we meet him. he's on — speech in court. and when we meet him, he's on trial for murder. and then— him, he's on trial for murder. and then he _ him, he's on trial for murder. and then he tells— him, he's on trial for murder. and then he tells this compelling story of how— then he tells this compelling story of how he — then he tells this compelling story of how he ended up in place that we find him. _ of how he ended up in place that we find him, which is all to do with this beautiful woman here, cold kyra. _ this beautiful woman here, cold kyra, sophie's character. —— called kyra _ kyra, sophie's character. —— called kyra how— kyra, sophie's character. —— called kyra. how love has let him into these _ kyra. how love has let him into these treacherous path that we watch through _ these treacherous path that we watch through the show. and these treacherous path that we watch through the show.— through the show. and that relationship _ through the show. and that relationship is _ through the show. and that relationship is key. - through the show. and that relationship is key. we i through the show. and that relationship is key. we can | through the show. and that i relationship is key. we can see through the show. and that - relationship is key. we can see from the little bit that we have seen there, there is amazing chemistry between the two of you. you have to get that bit right, that slight cheekiness right, which you do, you must get on brilliantly. i cheekiness right, which you do, you must get on brilliantly.— must get on brilliantly. i love him! i absolutely _ must get on brilliantly. i love him! i absolutely love _ must get on brilliantly. i love him! i absolutely love him! _ must get on brilliantly. i love him! i absolutely love him! did - must get on brilliantly. i love him! i absolutely love him! did you i must get on brilliantly. i love him! | i absolutely love him! did you know each other before? _
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i absolutely love him! did you know each other before? no, _ i absolutely love him! did you know each other before? no, no. - i absolutely love him! did you know each other before? no, no. i'm i i absolutely love him! did you know each other before? no, no. i'm notj each other before? no, no. i'm not sure if you — each other before? no, no. i'm not sure if you can _ each other before? no, no. i'm not sure if you can tell, _ each other before? no, no. i'm not sure if you can tell, she _ each other before? no, no. i'm not sure if you can tell, she is - sure if you can tell, she is australian.— sure if you can tell, she is australian. ., ., , ., ., in australian. what does that mean? it 'ust means australian. what does that mean? it just means we _ australian. what does that mean? it just means we hadn't _ australian. what does that mean? it just means we hadn't met! - australian. what does that mean? it just means we hadn't met! before i australian. what does that mean? it. just means we hadn't met! before the show brought us together which was lovely _ show brought us together which was lovel . ., ., i. show brought us together which was lovel . ., ., ~ ., ., lovely. how do you know you are auoin to lovely. how do you know you are going to have — lovely. how do you know you are going to have that _ lovely. how do you know you are going to have that special - going to have that special connection? i going to have that special connection?— going to have that special connection? ~ , ., ., �* ., , connection? i think you don't really know, it connection? i think you don't really know. it is — connection? i think you don't really know. it isiust _ connection? i think you don't really know, it isjust a _ connection? i think you don't really know, it isjust a chance. _ connection? i think you don't really know, it isjust a chance. it's i know, it isjust a chance. it's really— know, it isjust a chance. it's really lovely when you actually meet someone _ really lovely when you actually meet someone that you really get along with. _ someone that you really get along with. and — someone that you really get along with, and it's easy and fun. and did it ha en with, and it's easy and fun. and did it happen from _ with, and it's easy and fun. and did it happen from minute _ with, and it's easy and fun. and did it happen from minute one - with, and it's easy and fun. and did it happen from minute one in i with, and it's easy and fun. and did it happen from minute one in the l it happen from minute one in the cutting room?— cutting room? yeah, we had the chemistry _ cutting room? yeah, we had the chemistry reads _ cutting room? yeah, we had the chemistry reads and _ cutting room? yeah, we had the chemistry reads and a _ cutting room? yeah, we had the chemistry reads and a lot - cutting room? yeah, we had the chemistry reads and a lot of- cutting room? yeah, we had the i chemistry reads and a lot of super talented actresses walked through the door. and there was something about the way we connected and the way that we did the scene. i guess the casting saw the same thing on our directors of the same thing and thought, this is the match that he wanted. i think we got very lucky with safety. wanted. i think we got very lucky with safety-— with safety. from the bits i have seen, it is slightly _ with safety. from the bits i have seen, it is slightly driving - with safety. from the bits i have seen, it is slightly driving me i with safety. from the bits i have i seen, it is slightly driving me mad because i still don't know who to believe. that's the key to it, that
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suspense is it's ok. for believe. that's the key to it, that suspense is it's ok.— believe. that's the key to it, that suspense is it's ok. for sure. we are trying — suspense is it's ok. for sure. we are trying to _ suspense is it's ok. for sure. we are trying to bring _ suspense is it's ok. for sure. we are trying to bring the _ suspense is it's ok. for sure. we | are trying to bring the audience in and include them as almost like the 13thjuror, as it were, to decide themselves whether or not they believe the lead character's story. because you mentioned, sophie, that love element, there is love and family and really interesting themes that developed over the course of it. ., , . ., , ., it. love is the crux of the show, i think. it manifests _ it. love is the crux of the show, i think. it manifests itself - it. love is the crux of the show, i think. it manifests itself in i it. love is the crux of the show, i think. it manifests itself in the i think. it manifests itself in the familial— think. it manifests itself in the familial love and romantic love, your— familial love and romantic love, your lovely _ familial love and romantic love, your lovely friends, love is very much _ your lovely friends, love is very much the catalyst for so much of the progression— much the catalyst for so much of the progression of the plot.— progression of the plot. agreed. he aarees! i progression of the plot. agreed. he agrees! i love _ progression of the plot. agreed. he agrees! i love it! _ progression of the plot. agreed. he agrees! i love it! a _ progression of the plot. agreed. he agrees! i love it! a lot _ progression of the plot. agreed. he agrees! i love it! a lot of _ progression of the plot. agreed. he agrees! i love it! a lot of love i agrees! i love it! a lot of love around this _ agrees! i love it! a lot of love around this morning. - agrees! i love it! a lot of love around this morning. one - agrees! i love it! a lot of love around this morning. one ofl agrees! i love it! a lot of love i around this morning. one of the things— around this morning. one of the things he — around this morning. one of the things he wanted _ around this morning. one of the things he wanted to _ around this morning. one of the things he wanted to talk - around this morning. one of the things he wanted to talk about l around this morning. one of the| things he wanted to talk about is how we — things he wanted to talk about is how we all— things he wanted to talk about is how we all make _ things he wanted to talk about is how we all make judgments - things he wanted to talk about is. how we all make judgments about people. _ how we all make judgments about pe0ple. and — how we all make judgments about pe0ple. and had _ how we all make judgments about people, and had to _ how we all make judgments about people, and had to slightly- how we all make judgments about people, and had to slightly step . people, and had to slightly step away _ people, and had to slightly step away from — people, and had to slightly step away from that, _ people, and had to slightly step away from that, and _ people, and had to slightly step away from that, and how - people, and had to slightly step . away from that, and how important that is_ away from that, and how important that is for— away from that, and how important that is for you — away from that, and how important that is for you in _ away from that, and how important that is for you in taking _ away from that, and how important that is for you in taking on - away from that, and how important that is for you in taking on the - that is for you in taking on the role, — that is for you in taking on the
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role, that— that is for you in taking on the role, that we _ that is for you in taking on the role, that we don't _ that is for you in taking on the role, that we don't know- that is for you in taking on the| role, that we don't know about that is for you in taking on the - role, that we don't know about this character— role, that we don't know about this character and — role, that we don't know about this character and we _ role, that we don't know about this character and we cannot _ role, that we don't know about this character and we cannot judge - role, that we don't know about this character and we cannotjudge it. role, that we don't know about this character and we cannotjudge it by looking _ character and we cannotjudge it by looking at— character and we cannotjudge it by looking at him _ character and we cannot 'udge it by looking at hint character and we cannot 'udge it by looking at him. yeah, i think again, it's art looking at him. yeah, i think again, it's part of — looking at him. yeah, i think again, it's part of what _ looking at him. yeah, i think again, it's part of what is _ looking at him. yeah, i think again, it's part of what is so _ looking at him. yeah, i think again, it's part of what is so important - it's part of what is so important are the basis of the show and what is the most important themes, the trial —— try to notjudge the book by the cover. it's very easy to put our own bias or idea about him just by looking at him, but when we hear his story, we connect more to his humanity and i think that's beautiful.— humanity and i think that's beautiful. �*, ., ., ., beautiful. let's have another look at a clip from _ beautiful. let's have another look at a clip from a _ beautiful. let's have another look at a clip from a programme, - beautiful. let's have another look at a clip from a programme, this| beautiful. let's have another lookl at a clip from a programme, this is where hero is talking to his family after kyra goes worried. it where hero is talking to his family after kyra goes worried.— after kyra goes worried. if you are worried, after kyra goes worried. if you are worried. call— after kyra goes worried. if you are worried, call the _ after kyra goes worried. if you are worried, call the police. _ after kyra goes worried. if you are worried, call the police. and - after kyra goes worried. if you are worried, call the police. and say l worried, call the police. and say what? what is said to us. who else can you call. what? what is said to us. who else can you call-— can you call. she has only got two friends. what _ can you call. she has only got two friends. what are _ can you call. she has only got two friends. what are you _ can you call. she has only got two friends. what are you doing? - can you call. she has only got twoj friends. what are you doing? how life is the two _ friends. what are you doing? how life is the two of _ friends. what are you doing? how life is the two of us, _ friends. what are you doing? how life is the two of us, she - friends. what are you doing? how life is the two of us, she hasn't i life is the two of us, she hasn't even _ life is the two of us, she hasn't even got — life is the two of us, she hasn't even got family. so life is the two of us, she hasn't even got family.— life is the two of us, she hasn't even got family. so go and see the friends, even got family. so go and see the friends. so — even got family. so go and see the friends. so to _ even got family. so go and see the friends, go to the _ even got family. so go and see the friends, go to the hospital - even got family. so go and see the
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friends, go to the hospital and - even got family. so go and see the friends, go to the hospital and the | friends, go to the hospital and the police _ friends, go to the hospital and the police if_ friends, go to the hospital and the police. if you — friends, go to the hospital and the police. if you don't _ friends, go to the hospital and the police. if you don't want _ friends, go to the hospital and the police. if you don't want to, - friends, go to the hospital and the police. if you don't want to, if - friends, go to the hospital and the police. if you don't want to, if you| police. if you don't want to, if you can't _ police. if you don't want to, if you can't be _ police. if you don't want to, if you can't be bothered, _ police. if you don't want to, if you can't be bothered, i— police. if you don't want to, if you can't be bothered, i will— police. if you don't want to, if you can't be bothered, i will do - police. if you don't want to, if you can't be bothered, i will do it. - you talked about family and love, sophie. you can see how important family is in all of this. how do you prepare for a drama like this, with so many threads and so many loose ends to tie up, how do you as an actor prepare for something like this? do you look at real cases, real—life scenarios? i this? do you look at real cases, real-life scenarios?— this? do you look at real cases, real-life scenarios? i think what is so wonderful _ real-life scenarios? i think what is so wonderful about _ real-life scenarios? i think what is so wonderful about this _ real-life scenarios? i think what is so wonderful about this is - real-life scenarios? i think what is so wonderful about this is the - so wonderful about this is the writer is so brilliant, it's actually quite easy as an actor to get into the world because it's laid out for you so well. but i think definitelyjust out for you so well. but i think definitely just trying to out for you so well. but i think definitelyjust trying to immerse yourself as much as you can, watching things, reading things, yeah, getting in the world. and watching things, reading things, yeah, getting in the world. and what about mastering _ yeah, getting in the world. and what about mastering the _
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yeah, getting in the world. and what about mastering the accent? - yeah, getting in the world. and whatj about mastering the accent? samuel mentioned you are australian. haste mentioned you are australian. have i? i hoe mentioned you are australian. have i? i hope i — mentioned you are australian. have i? i hope i have! _ mentioned you are australian. have i? i hope i have! i— mentioned you are australian. have i? i hope i have! i sincerely- mentioned you are australian. h—e: i? i hope i have! i sincerely hope! i? i hope i have! isincerely hope! the accent is amazing. i know you are an actorand the accent is amazing. i know you are an actor and it's yourjob but does it come easy for you? some people do struggle. i does it come easy for you? some people do struggle.— people do struggle. i had a really wonderful dialect _ people do struggle. i had a really wonderful dialect coach - people do struggle. i had a really wonderful dialect coach on - people do struggle. i had a really wonderful dialect coach on this. i people do struggle. i had a really i wonderful dialect coach on this. we worked for maybe a month before we started shooting to the whole process. it was intense! i hope i nailed it! did process. it was intense! i hope i nailed it! , , ., process. it was intense! i hope i nailed it! , ., ., , process. it was intense! i hope i nailedit! ., ., nailed it! did you have a phrase or a word that _ nailed it! did you have a phrase or a word that you — nailed it! did you have a phrase or a word that you kept _ nailed it! did you have a phrase or a word that you kept struggling i a word that you kept struggling with? what kicks you off if you need to get back into it? do you have a trigger point? i to get back into it? do you have a trigger point?— trigger point? i don't know... i feel like sam _ trigger point? i don't know... i feel like sam jesse _ trigger point? i don't know... i feel like sam jesse to - trigger point? i don't know... i feel like sam jesse to tease i trigger point? i don't know... i | feel like sam jesse to tease me trigger point? i don't know... i i feel like sam jesse to tease me all feel like sam jesse to tease me all the time. —— used to tease me. i would try my really poor australian acceht _ would try my really poor australian accent and — would try my really poor australian accent and keep us all there! you need to film _ accent and keep us all there! m. need to film something in australia to put on the accent! you need to film something in australia to put on the accent!— need to film something in australia to put on the accent! you don't want to put on the accent! you don't want to see that! — to put on the accent! you don't want to see that! great _ to put on the accent! you don't want to see that! great to _ to put on the accent! you don't want to see that! great to talk _ to put on the accent! you don't want to see that! great to talk to - to put on the accent! you don't want to see that! great to talk to you. i to see that! great to talk to you.
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before we _ to see that! great to talk to you. before we let _ to see that! great to talk to you. before we let you _ to see that! great to talk to you. before we let you go, _ to see that! great to talk to you. before we let you go, the - to see that! great to talk to you. i before we let you go, the character hero, _ before we let you go, the character hero, do _ before we let you go, the character hero, do we — before we let you go, the character hero, do we ever— before we let you go, the character hero, do we ever find _ before we let you go, the character hero, do we ever find another- before we let you go, the character| hero, do we ever find another name for him? _ hero, do we ever find another name for him? i— hero, do we ever find another name for him? ~ , ~' ., hero, do we ever find another name for him? ,, , ,, ., ., for him? i think it is kind of an interesting _ for him? i think it is kind of an interesting name. _ for him? i think it is kind of an interesting name. it's- for him? i think it is kind of an interesting name. it's really i for him? i think it is kind of an i interesting name. it's really about the audience deciding, his name isn't _ the audience deciding, his name isn't hero, — the audience deciding, his name isn't hero, we never actually hear his nanre. — isn't hero, we never actually hear his nanre. is— isn't hero, we never actually hear his name, is he a hero or a villain? maybe _ his name, is he a hero or a villain? maybe he — his name, is he a hero or a villain? maybe he is — his name, is he a hero or a villain? maybe he is meant to represent a group _ maybe he is meant to represent a group of— maybe he is meant to represent a group of people that look like in that we — group of people that look like in that we throw our stereotypes or ideas _ that we throw our stereotypes or ideas on — that we throw our stereotypes or ideas on to. it's down to the audience _ ideas on to. it's down to the audience whether or not they believe him. it�*s— audience whether or not they believe him. �*, ., , him. it's fascinating. it starts next week. — him. it's fascinating. it starts next week, sunday. - him. it's fascinating. it starts next week, sunday. it - him. it's fascinating. it starts next week, sunday. it starts| him. it's fascinating. it starts i next week, sunday. it starts on bbc one this coming sunday. you are watching bbc breakfast.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. more cases of the omicron variant of coronavirus, in scotland, six cases of the new variant have been identified, bringing a total of nine cases in the uk as a whole. approval is expected to be given for all adults to have covid booster jabs to try to protect people from the new variant. we're already seeing, with 17.6 million boosters already done, we're seeing those people who've had that booster, after the two weeks for it to take effect, boosted back up to over 90%. masks are back at secondary schools in england and they are to become mandatory again in shops and on public transport from tomorrow. with the government and scientists due to say more later today about
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the new variant of covid — what measures do you think should be in place?

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