Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 27, 2021 6:00am-10:01am GMT

6:00 am
good morning. welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: the united states and australia join the list of countries banning flights from southern africa after confirmation of a worrying new variant of coronavirus. a man is killed in northern ireland as storm arwen hits northern parts of the uk with winds of nearly 100 mph. there are still some very strong winds out there this morning. a mix of rain, sleet and snow falling as well. the weather will slowly calm down through this weekend, but it is going to stay cold. ex england captain michael vaughan
6:01 am
speaks to this programme about the racism scandal that has engulfed cricket. it follows racism allegations by former yorkshire player azeem rafiq. i played for yorkshire county cricket club for 18 years, and if in any way, shape or form cricket club for 18 years, and if in any way, shape orform i am responsible for any of his hurt, i apologise for that. broadway legend stephen sondheim, who was behind some of theatre�*s best known musicals including west side story, has died at the age of 91. it is saturday 27 november. our top story: the united states and australia have become the latest in a growing list of countries to impose travel restrictions on people arriving from across southern africa. it comes amid mounting concern about a new variant of coronavirus which has been named omicron
6:02 am
by the world health organization. scientists fear it could pose an increased risk of re—infection and current vaccines may be less effective. our health correspondent dominic hughes has more. this covid variant now has a name, omicron, according to the world health organization, which met in geneva last night to discuss the threat posed by this mutation of the coronavirus. the who had advised against travel bans, stressing instead that the measures we are also familiar with, hand hygiene, masks and social distancing, are more important than ever. what masks and social distancing, are more important than ever. what is really important — more important than ever. what is really important as _ more important than ever. what is really important as an _ more important than ever. what is really important as an individual i more important than ever. what is really important as an individual is| really important as an individual is to lower your exposure. these proven public health measures have never been more important — distancing, wearing a mask, making sure it is over your nose and mouth, with clean hands, making sure you avoid crowded spaces, being in rooms where there is good ventilation, and when it is your turn, is good ventilation, and when it is yourturn, get is good ventilation, and when it is your turn, get vaccinated. is good ventilation, and when it is yourturn, get vaccinated. but your turn, get vaccinated. but governments _
6:03 am
yourturn, get vaccinated. but governments around the world have taken a different view. you as is just one of dozens of countries to have imposed bans on southern african countries where cases have been identified. the united states, singapore, japan, israel and kenya are among those who have either imposed bands and restrictions on travellers or are considering them. we are going to be cautious, make sure there is no travel to and from south africa and six other countries in that region, except for american citizens who are able to come back. the who has described omicron as a variant of concern. it is the most mutated version of the virus yet, scientists identifying 50 mutations overall. more than 30 on the routine, the target of most vaccines, and on the part of the virus that makes first contact with our body's cells, there are ten mutations compared to just two for the delta variant. irate mutations compared to 'ust two for the delta varianth the delta variant. we do not know
6:04 am
whether prior _ the delta variant. we do not know whether prior infection _ the delta variant. we do not know whether prior infection and - the delta variant. we do not know whether prior infection and prior l whether prior infection and prior vaccination will protect from severe disease such as hospitalisation. we don't yet know whether the increased cases that they are seeing in south africa will stabilise over time. but it is highly concerning the rapid rate of increase in cases associated with this variant. mil rate of increase in cases associated with this variant.— with this variant. all this comes as euro -e is with this variant. all this comes as europe is facing — with this variant. all this comes as europe is facing a _ with this variant. all this comes as europe is facing a fresh _ with this variant. all this comes as europe is facing a fresh wave - with this variant. all this comes as europe is facing a fresh wave of i europe is facing a fresh wave of covid infection still linked to the delta variant. in the netherlands, france restrictions will come into force tomorrow. venue such as bars, cafes, museums and cinemas will have to close from five p.m.. but as so often through the course of this pandemic, decisions are clouded by uncertainty. exactly how u ncerta i nty. exactly how transmissible uncertainty. exactly how transmissible this new variant is, whether it will make people sick, the impact on existing treatments and how effective vaccines will be against it are all unknowns. it is likely to be some weeks before the answers to those questions become clear. the former england cricket captain michael vaughan has spoken publicly for the first time since being accused of racism by his yorkshire
6:05 am
teammate azeem rafiq. speaking to bbc breakfast before the england and wales cricket board released a new action plan to tackle racism and discrimination, he apologised for any hurt he may have caused. michael vaughan leaving england to the ashes in 2005. now he is fighting for his reputation after being accused by three asian players of making racist comment ahead of the game for yorkshire. to of making racist comment ahead of the game for yorkshire.— of making racist comment ahead of the game for yorkshire. to many of ou lot, the game for yorkshire. to many of you lot. we — the game for yorkshire. to many of you lot. we need — the game for yorkshire. to many of you lot, we need to _ the game for yorkshire. to many of you lot, we need to do _ the game for yorkshire. to many of you lot, we need to do something l you lot, we need to do something about it. do you in any way remember or recognise those words? i don't. my or recognise those words? i don't. my recollection from that day — as i have said, i was a yorkshire player for 18 years. i was the first player to sign for that club that was not born in the county, so for 18 years we have gone from me being the first to sign for the club, for such intent or could to be the first overseas, two players being able to sign from other clubs. and it was my
6:06 am
last few games, and ijust remember it clearly that i was proud as punch that we had four asian players representing yorkshire county cricket club. it representing yorkshire county cricket club.— representing yorkshire county cricket club. ~ ., cricket club. it was azeem rafiq, the yorkshire _ cricket club. it was azeem rafiq, the yorkshire whistleblower, - cricket club. it was azeem rafiq, | the yorkshire whistleblower, who made the initial allegation. he has said that michael vaughan might not remember the alleged remarks because they didn't mean anything to him. that hurts. that hurts, because i've always felt that every single team that i've been involved in, the biggest praise that i ever got as the england captain for six years was that i was the kind of person that really galvanise the group, got the team working together as one. i always felt that i was the person in the dressing room that really wanted everyone to feel included.— everyone to feel included. michael, ou said everyone to feel included. michael, you said you _ everyone to feel included. michael, you said you wanted _ everyone to feel included. michael, you said you wanted to _ everyone to feel included. michael, you said you wanted to sit - everyone to feel included. michael, you said you wanted to sit down - everyone to feel included. michael, | you said you wanted to sit down with azeem and hear his story. the chances that he could be watching you this morning. he could be watching this now. what would be your message to him? i’m
6:07 am
watching this now. what would be your message to him?— watching this now. what would be your message to him? i'm sorry for the hurt that _ your message to him? i'm sorry for the hurt that he _ your message to him? i'm sorry for the hurt that he has _ your message to him? i'm sorry for the hurt that he has gone _ your message to him? i'm sorry for the hurt that he has gone through. | the hurt that he has gone through. yorkshire county cricket club, i believe, is me. it has been my life. whether i am a player or not, i am a senior ex—player and ex— england captain, and i believe that once you have played for yorkshire, you are always a yorkshire player. i'm sorry for all the hurt that he has gone through. hopefully — time, i don't think, can ever be a healer in the situation he has gone through, but hopefully time can be aware of us making sure that yorkshire county cricket club never goes through this situation again and never puts themselves in a position of denial that they treated a player so badly. vaughan says he wants to work with azeem rafiq to repair the damage done to cricket. he also says he regrets and is embarrassed by several posts he made on social media between 2010 and 2018, insisting he would not post them now. i insisting he would not post them now. ., ., ~' insisting he would not post them now. ., ., " . " insisting he would not post them now. . ~ ., , insisting he would not post them now. ., , ' insisting he would not post them
6:08 am
now. ma, y' , ., now. i look back on my 12 years on social media. _ now. i look back on my 12 years on social media, i— now. i look back on my 12 years on social media, i regret _ now. i look back on my 12 years on social media, i regret many - now. i look back on my 12 years on | social media, i regret many tweets. i regret the tweets that you have just read out. i apologise deeply to anyone that i have offended with those tweets.— those tweets. since retirement, michael vaughan _ those tweets. since retirement, michael vaughan has _ those tweets. since retirement, michael vaughan has covered i those tweets. since retirement, - michael vaughan has covered cricket for the bbc radio, but earlier this week it was revealed that he has been stood down from his role at the ashes in australia this winter. yes. ashes in australia this winter. yes, i won't be ashes in australia this winter. yes, iwon't be doing — ashes in australia this winter. yes, i won't be doing the _ ashes in australia this winter. ya: i won't be doing the ashes, which ashes in australia this winter. 123 i won't be doing the ashes, which i understand. in editorial at the minute, the story is all about azeem rafiq and racism in the game of cricket. i get that. ijust hope, in time, i get the chance to come back and the one thing that i have loved more than anything since i retired is talking cricket. i love being on test match special and hopefully in time i will get the chance to do it again. time i will get the chance to do it aaain. ~ : :, time i will get the chance to do it aaain. a ., ., ., �*, , ., ., again. michael vaughan's hopes for a return to the — again. michael vaughan's hopes for a return to the airwaves _ again. michael vaughan's hopes for a return to the airwaves rest _ again. michael vaughan's hopes for a return to the airwaves rest with - again. michael vaughan's hopes for a return to the airwaves rest with his i return to the airwaves rest with his employers. it is hoped that he will have a role in helping to the damage done to cricket by this racism scandal. we put the comments made
6:09 am
by michael vaughan in that interview to azeem rafiq's team, but they didn't wish to comment. the east coast of the uk has been hit by winds of almost 100 mph overnight, caused by storm arwen. amber and yellow weather warnings remain in place, with more strong winds and further travel disruption expected. tens of thousands of people are waking up this morning without power. louisa pilbeam has the latest. storm arwen moved in from the east, hitting aberdeenshire with huge waves. gusts of more than 90 mph and snow. in county antrim in northern ireland, a man was killed when a tree struck his car. read warnings signalling danger to life are rare. this the first in almost two years, so treacherous were the conditions on the roads that police scotland
6:10 am
told people in red warning areas not told people in red warning areas not to drive. :, told people in red warning areas not to drive. ., , , ., , to drive. you can barely stand up. storm chaser— to drive. you can barely stand up. storm chaser sean _ to drive. you can barely stand up. storm chaser sean filmed - to drive. you can barely stand up. storm chaser sean filmed this - to drive. you can barely stand up. storm chaser sean filmed this for| storm chaser sean filmed this for his social media channels. that is brutal. his social media channels. that is brutal- this _ his social media channels. that is brutal. this is _ his social media channels. that is brutal. this is portobello - his social media channels. that is brutal. this is portobello beach i his social media channels. that is| brutal. this is portobello beach in edinburgh. i have never in all my life seen a storm like this.- life seen a storm like this. train services suffered _ life seen a storm like this. train services suffered major- life seen a storm like this. train services suffered major disruption. lner, which runs routes from king's cross to aberdeen and inverness said on friday evening its trains would not be going beyond newcastle, and they advised customers not to travel until monday, with weekend tickets are valid until wednesday. mr; are valid untilwednesday. my friends are valid until wednesday. ij�*i friends and are valid until wednesday. ii; friends and i got on this train at elgin at 3:30pm yesterday afternoon on friday. we have been parked at huntly station since about a:30pm. it is now 5am, so i have been on the
6:11 am
train about 14 hours. and neither of us know the train crew have any idea when we are likely to get off. overnight on the 62, junctions 21 and 22 were closed after more than 120 hgv got stuck in the snow. in north—east scotland an amber warning remains in place, and in south—east england and wales. i remains in place, and in south-east england and wales.— england and wales. i want to get home and wrap _ england and wales. i want to get home and wrap up. _ england and wales. i want to get home and wrap up. it _ england and wales. i want to get home and wrap up. it is - england and wales. i want to get home and wrap up. it is going i england and wales. i want to get home and wrap up. it is going to | england and wales. i want to get. home and wrap up. it is going to get worse. home and wrap up. it is going to get worse- the — home and wrap up. it is going to get worse. the electrics _ home and wrap up. it is going to get worse. the electrics are _ home and wrap up. it is going to get worse. the electrics are going - home and wrap up. it is going to get worse. the electrics are going to - worse. the electrics are going to lo, worse. the electrics are going to go, i— worse. the electrics are going to go. i know— worse. the electrics are going to go, i know that.— worse. the electrics are going to go, i know that. and storm arwen even affected _ go, i know that. and storm arwen even affected itv's _ go, i know that. and storm arwen even affected itv's i _ go, i know that. and storm arwen even affected itv's i am _ go, i know that. and storm arwen even affected itv's i am a - go, i know that. and storm arwen l even affected itv's i am a celebrity show in north wales.— show in north wales. because of storm arwen. — show in north wales. because of storm arwen, for _ show in north wales. because of storm arwen, for the _ show in north wales. because of storm arwen, for the first - show in north wales. because of storm arwen, for the first time | show in north wales. because of. storm arwen, for the first time ever we are not coming to you live. ila. we are not coming to you live. no, this show was _ we are not coming to you live. no, this show was recorded earlier this evening _ this show was recorded earlier this evening because weather conditions are forecast to get worse. with further weather _ are forecast to get worse. in further weather warnings in are forecast to get worse. ii further weather warnings in place across the uk today, more disruption is likely. an amber weather warning remains in place for the north—east of england.
6:12 am
our reporter alison freeman is in whitely bay for us. iam i am looking at what you're wearing and clearly it is pretty blowy. tell us about conditions there. charlie, the north-east _ us about conditions there. charlie, the north-east coast _ us about conditions there. charlie, the north-east coast has _ us about conditions there. charlie, the north-east coast has taken - us about conditions there. charlie, l the north-east coast has taken quite the north—east coast has taken quite a battering overnight. there is still plenty of wind and driving rain. we know that the met office actually said that the highest wind gust was 98 mph, that was just a little bit further up the coast at alnwick. we know it is causing a lot of disruption. even on my very short drive to where we are this morning at whitley bay. i have seen a temporary traffic light knocked over ljy temporary traffic light knocked over by the wind as well as bins, municipal bins, the heavy ones, blown over. and also barriers from roadworks knocked down as well. the big problem we have in the north—east is 55,000 homes without power, according to northern power grid. they said they can expect power not to be restored until later
6:13 am
today. that is mainly across durham, northumberland and north yorkshire. lner are telling people not to travel at all on their services between scotland and london, which obviously go through newcastle, and locally the metro got called off at 10pm last night, again not expected to get back until at least 9am this morning. so those warnings are in place until 10am this morning. thank ou ve place until 10am this morning. thank you very much. _ place until 10am this morning. thank you very much. and _ place until 10am this morning. thank you very much, and we _ place until 10am this morning. thank you very much, and we will - place until 10am this morning. thank you very much, and we will keep - place until 10am this morning. thank you very much, and we will keep you right across all the implications for the weather across the whole of the uk a little later on this morning. one of musical theatre's most revered composers and lyricists, stephen sondheim, has died at the age of 91. in a career that spanned more than six decades he created some of broadway's best known musicals, including sweeney todd and passion, and wrote the lyrics for west side story. daniela relph has been looking back at his life. # isn't it bliss? # don't you approve?
6:14 am
# one who keeps tearing around, one who can't move... send in the clowns, from the musical a little night music. # send in the clowns... it was stephen sondheim's only hit song — remarkably, because this was the man who revolutionised the american musical. as a young man he learned his trade from oscar hammerstein, the lyricist who wrote shows like oklahoma and the sound of music. sondheim, too, started by doing the words, notably for leonard bernstein's music in west side story. # i like to be in america! # ok by me in america! soon he was writing his own music as well. # for a small fee in america... most of the shows that followed were hits. and then in 1970 he came up with a new idea —
6:15 am
a musical that didn't follow an obvious plot. # phone rings, door chimes, in comes company... company was a series of vignettes featuring a dozen central characters. no two sondheim musicals were the same. i don't want to get bored writing and, you know, it's — when you hit a chord that you've hit before, or a technique of using a song that you've done before — or when i do, i get very nervous. and i think "i've written that, i mustn't do that again." somebody will catch me up on it, so to speak. it's as if somebody's saying, "wait a minute — you did that in that show." into the woods was based on fairy stories like jack and the beanstalk. sondheim's music was rhythmically complicated and harmonically sophisticated. # we've no time to sit and dither. # while her withers wither with her. # and no—one keeps a cow for a friend... that is one of my favourite things about _ that is one of my favourite things about us— that is one of my favourite things about us on— that is one of my favourite things about us on musical, is the material is some _ about us on musical, is the material is some of— about us on musical, is the material is some of the most complex series of notes _
6:16 am
is some of the most complex series of notes that are put together, so you feel_ of notes that are put together, so you feel such a sense of accomplishment when you finally get to — accomplishment when you finally get to - when _ accomplishment when you finally get to — when you have arrived at a place _ to — when you have arrived at a place where _ to — when you have arrived at a place where you realise i have got it, i place where you realise i have got it. i have — place where you realise i have got it, i have figured out how to send comics— it, i have figured out how to send comics think there's a sondheim lyric and — comics think there's a sondheim lyric and sing this beautiful phrase that he _ lyric and sing this beautiful phrase that he wrote. it lyric and sing this beautiful phrase that he wrote. iii lyric and sing this beautiful phrase that he wrote.— that he wrote. # i thought that ou'd that he wrote. # i thought that you'd want _ that he wrote. # i thought that you'd want what _ that he wrote. # i thought that you'd want what i _ that he wrote. # i thought that you'd want what i want, - that he wrote. # i thought that you'd want what i want, sorry, | that he wrote. # i thought that i you'd want what i want, sorry, my dearm _ you'd want what i want, sorry, my dear... :, you'd want what i want, sorry, my dear... ., , you'd want what i want, sorry, my dear... :, , :, , stephen sondheim produced some of the most sophisticated and thoughtful musicals ever written. # quick, send in the clowns. # don't bother, they're here. i never tire of hearing that song. we will speak to a number of people who sung some of the songs he created over the years. many people
6:17 am
have given their careers as well, having sung some of those songs on stage. we will. the other thing we really need to talk about and you need to be careful, particularly you are in the north of the uk, it is very windy, and damage has been caused as well and people are being warned to just be safe and be cautious. good morning, ben. good morning, ben. good morning. it is one of those mornings, yes. you're absolutely right, take a lot of care if you have to travel. talk about those really rough conditions in the north of the uk. not only the north of the uk. recently we recorded a win dust of 91 miles an hour in south devon. lochhead, county down, 87 miles an hour, plenty of other places not too far behind. that is because of the area of low pressure and we have a squeeze of really strong wind affecting part of eastern scotland, north—east england and running into part of wales and the south—west. it is where we still have ample
6:18 am
warnings in force from the met office of cross eastern part of scotland into the far north—east of england and the coast of wales and south—west england, particularly down around cornwall. still the potential for wind gusts of 60 to 17 miles an hour. a mixture of rain, sleet and snow falling across the uk. that was the scene in brad. —— bradford. showers running into part of north—east scotland. many are falling as a snow to quite low levels. a lot going on, very windy to start off the day. this band of rain and snow working east across england into the afternoon. bright skies following into wales and western part of england. northern ireland and scotland will have leaks orsunny ireland and scotland will have leaks or sunny showers. these are the wind gusts we are expecting, not as windy for some of the expose areas. those
6:19 am
are the top temperatures, but factor in the strength of the wind, it will feel quite a lot colder than that. this evening and tonight we will see the rain and sleet and snow edging eastwards, so over higher ground there could be some further snow falling. cloud and patchy rain, but clear skies and light winds that will allow temperatures to really drop away. part of north—west england, may be down to minus seven celsius. frost and ice potentially tomorrow morning. tomorrow looks like a brighter day at least, some good spells of sunshine though we will these snowfall lightly moving across parts of scotland. wintry showers for a time in eastern england, more cloud laterfor northern ireland, wales in the far south—west the wind will be a little lighter, it will still feel cold. as we head into the start of the new week, things will turn a bit milder. temperatures could get back into
6:20 am
double digits for a time. it is a pretty changeable week of weather, some outbreaks of rain at time. take care. some very windy weather out there and also a mix of rain, sleet and snow rolling across many parts of the uk. back to you. thank you very much. we will catch up thank you very much. we will catch up in half—an—hour. now, it's time for click with spencer kelly and lara lewington. are you ready for today's teaser? go on, then! right, what does this penguin, this building in iceland, a huge digital artwork and this slamming basketball block all have in common? ah, our most loyal viewers might know! yes, they will.
6:21 am
they've all turned up in our attempts to explain the blockchain — the buzzword of the decade, the thing that every business needs. does it really? no, but go with me. and the thing that's currently burning through more electricity than the country of argentina as people use blockchain technology to try and get rich on cryptocurrency. so, the blockchain is a way of storing ownership records. it can prove that you own a bitcoin, a house or even a video clip. that proof is a unique token that is non—changeable, non—fungible — it's a non—fungible token, or nft. personally, i've always been sceptical of whether nfts are a sensible idea, but there are plenty of people who've bought into them, literally. ownership rights for some digital artworks have gone for millions of dollars, and collins dictionary has just made nft its word of the year. and just last week, a new development — a group of people got together and tried to crowdfund enough
6:22 am
money to buy a printed copy of the us constitution at auction. they were outbid despite claiming to raise $40 million. but had they been successful, each of the thousands of contributors would've had the right to vote on what happened to the historic document next. so they could vote to put it on public display. oooh! they could vote to sell it on, or anything in between. yes, and whatever they voted to do would have been handled by a decentralised autonomous organisation - a dao. but what on earth does that mean? a dao is similar in some ways to some of these financial flash mobs or crowdsourcing activities, where you get a bunch of people coming together, they put some money into something to buy an asset. the difference is that in one of those activities, there are people who are recognise — recognisably running the show and are in
6:23 am
charge of thinking it through. in a dao, we are defining it all upfront and then we're letting it run its own course. and this idea can be used for anything. a group of people have got together on the internet to raise funds for a dao to buy this area of woodland in wiltshire, in the south of england, and they can decide how it's managed. so a dao is a way of setting up an organisation that is — that uses the blockchain to sort of manage membership and let people organise around a particular cause or project. the treedao is this project to buy a woodland and then let the local community sort of take control of that woodland and vote on what happens to it, using the blockchain, using smart contracts. smart contracts, they sort of run automatically, so instead of having to appoint a treasurer and a secretary, people can use their membership tokens to vote on things. it's about being able to determine that you hold a vote in the governance of the forest, so you can determine, you know, what's allowed to happen here and you can vote on, you know, making sure it
6:24 am
doesn't get turned into firewood. i've been fascinated by the technology and how daos is a new way of organising people around projects and i wanted to see what you could do in terms of — like, there are daos that, you know, just live on the blockchain and don't interface with the real world, and i really wanted to see what you could do, whether a dao could own a real—world asset like a forest, and so this was sort of an experiment to see how this sort of new blockchain technology could interface with the real world. and i was just very lucky that, you know, i sent out a tweet on monday morning and we'd raised 100 f — which at the time was about £100,000 — by thursday morning, and then we had to go and find a forest to buy, so we actually raised the money before we — before we started looking for a forest. yeah, a dao could be used for — for anything. it could be used for organising around a particular cause, or you could buy a football team or you could use it to advocate for a particular change in the law. it — like, i think daos are gonna be a new way of people organising for sort of any — any reason, really. anyone can buy into the forest by purchasing an nft.
6:25 am
it'll come with the gps co—ordinates of an exact spot in the woodland. but if people who live locally buy in, it also means that they have a say in an area that they use and love. i mean, one of the — one of the joys of the internet has always been that you can raise your hand and find people like you, wherever they are in the world. you know, tisbury�*s catchment area's like 6,000 people. the advantage of this is that we can reach to anybody as far as you like who wants to protect woodlands. yeah, as you walk around the, you know, the woodland, as an owner, you know, it — it's subtle, but a really important, you know, feeling. like, it feels like it's ours and i think the exciting thing is we can now bring that sense of �*ourness' to other people — anyone who becomes an nftree holder. we've been waiting for this for 20 years and, you know, here it is. like anything to do with crypto and blockchain, there is a huge buyer beware to getting involved. some initiatives are legitimate, but others are scams, and sometimes, it can be very hard to tell the difference. treedao says that what it's
6:26 am
doing shows how this new way of running things could be used responsibly and effectively. but it's early days for these ideas, so what daos really end up being used for could surprise us all. now, do you remember yourfirst mobile phone? oh, the nostalgia and the battery life! well, now, over 2,000 old models have been put in a mobile phone museum for safekeeping. and although it is generally an online venue, chris fox went to its glitzy london launch this week. i'm here at the launch of the mobile phone museum in london, a collection of more than 2,000 unique mobile phones from history, and i'm here with the curator, ben wood. you're gonna to take me down a little trip on memory lane. i'd love to show you all 2,120 phones, but what we're gonna do today is pick a few out, and we've got some collections that we've curated for the museum tonight, and the first one is
6:27 am
what we consider one of the ugliest phones in the collection. oh, ok! wow. whoever designed this will be upset! oh, not this! laughs now, i think i knew people at school who had this and it looks very cool, but just totally impractical to text on. so this is the nokia 7600. it was nokia's first commercial 3g phone and, as you said, it was at the time when texting was very popular and i guess there was an idea that you could text using your thumbs down the side, but it was counter—intuitive. but look at it — i mean, it's not really a thing of beauty. other phones in the ugly collection include the ntt personal, which won a design award back in 1995, but due to its shape is now known as �*the toilet seat phone'. and this is the i—kid�*s sf from 2006, which has rabbit ears to make it appeal to children. 0h! gasps wait, is this...?
6:28 am
is this from tomorrow never dies? it is! ah! i love this! and this must open up into... gasps i remember this — you can drag yourfinger across and drive the car. also, we have the fingerprint scanner here, so you may remember in the film that was done. also, there was a magical screwdriver that you could use to open a safe. is it also do the, "recall, three, send"? the piece de resistance, which is very difficult to make in a model... yeah! the taser! both laugh other movie phones in the collection include the nokia 8110 banana phone from the matrix, nokia's first slider phone. the version in the movie was spring—loaded but the real one, you had to open by hand. and this white sony ericsson is another bond phone — this one owned by vesper lynd in casino royale. i want to show you a phone which was the phone which the first mobile phone call in the uk was made on.
6:29 am
this is the vodafone vt1. a phone call was made onjanuary1, 1985. so the numbers are on here... yep! ..and then you... hello? just check out the weight. oh — oh, wow, ok. so where do i put the apps? oh, you might struggle with the apps on that one! this was my favourite category because there were so many world firsts, like the ibm simon, blending computer—style features with a phone. it's widely considered one of the first smartphones of a sort — although it wasn't branded as one in 1993. sharp's j—phone from the year 2000 is considered by the museum to be the first full—camera phone. terribly low resolution by today's standards, but it sold out in two weeks injapan. it had a mirror on the back for taking selfies. first android looked very different from today's phones with a full physical keyboard, but in many ways, the first iphone doesn't look that different from today's devices. and this was the first
6:30 am
pocketable phone from 1986, at a time when mobiles were typically still bricks. its designer, nils martensson, was one of the special guests i met at the museum. we had commissioned stanford research in america to forecast how many cellular telephones there would be in america year 2000. and they came back with the expensive report and said, "we think that there may be as many as 30,000 in america "by year 2000." and i think had they said 30 million, they would have been a little off the mark, even with that figure. everyone's going to know this one. we're on bestsellers. is it going to be the 3310? let's see. there it is, yep. old and trusty.
6:31 am
trusty and hardy. 3310. controversial, i actually think the 3210 looks better. that's the one i had and i never upgraded because i thought the other one looked — like, this looked cheaper somehow. but... but a phenomenal commercial success — 126 million phones sold, the equivalent of the japanese population. every single person would have one. it's iconic. and do you know what? it's the one phone, when i take it to the museum and show people, everyone knows the 3310. and that's it for the short version of the programme. the full—length show can be found on iplayer. and throughout the week, you can keep up with the team on social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter — @bbcclick. thanks for watching. bye—bye.
6:32 am
hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. lets talk to mike. michael vaughan has been talking to dan on this programme in light of the racism allegations made by azeem rafiq. yes, indeed. the former england cricket captain michael vaughan has apologised for any hurt he may have caused, his yorkshire teammate azeem rafiq. commenting publically, for the first time since being accused of racism, he spoke to bbc breakfast before the england and wales cricket board released its new action plan, to tackle racism and discrimination. michael, you said you listen to the dcms hearing where azeem rafiq spoke
6:33 am
for some time. can i ask you to press play on that and watch what he said about you? it press play on that and watch what he said about you?— said about you? it was a long time auo. said about you? it was a long time ago- michael— said about you? it was a long time ago. michael mottram _ said about you? it was a long time ago. michael mottram not- said about you? it was a long time i ago. michael mottram not remember it, as i said earlier, because it might not mean anything to him, but three of us remember it. i spoke to one at length about this, and michael used his platform of the daily telegraph to try and discredit before even anything had been spoken about, was again... he clearly had a snippet of my statement. i about, was again. .. he clearly had a snippet of my statement.— snippet of my statement. i mean, there are two _ snippet of my statement. i mean, there are two specific _ snippet of my statement. i mean, there are two specific allegations | there are two specific allegations on that. let's deal with the last one first, the daily telegraph article. do you regret writing that? i don't. but i will say that i think that the whole of this situation, i think many will regret, and i regret many things about it. 15 december was the first time, 2020, that i got
6:34 am
given a statement with these allegations, 11 years on from the game itself, and that hurt me deeply. it hurt me deeply to think that a player didn't feel that i was inclusive towards them in a team environment. i always felt that in my time playing the game, as a player and now as a broadcaster, for 30 years i have always felt that i have that person that includes everybody. have that person that includes everybody-— have that person that includes eve bod . ., ., , everybody. the other thing he raised was that he said you _ everybody. the other thing he raised was that he said you probably - everybody. the other thing he raised was that he said you probably don't i was that he said you probably don't remember making the comment because it doesn't mean anything to you, which is almost as damaging as the allegation of the comment itself. yes, that hurts. that hurts, because i've always felt that every single team that i've been involved in — the biggest praise i ever got as the england captain for six years was that i was the kind of person that really galvanised the group, got the team working together as one. i
6:35 am
always felt that i was the person in the dressing room that really wanted everyone to feel included. you the dressing room that really wanted everyone to feel included.— everyone to feel included. you say ou want everyone to feel included. you say you want to _ everyone to feel included. you say you want to prove _ everyone to feel included. you say you want to prove that _ everyone to feel included. you say you want to prove that you - everyone to feel included. you say you want to prove that you are - everyone to feel included. you say you want to prove that you are notj you want to prove that you are not that person. i know this is uncomfortable, i am going to read something that you have put on social media in the past, and i would love to get your reaction to them, because people, ithink, are adding these together and say to make saying you might say you're not that person but this might suggest otherwise. there are old tweets of yours that have been doing the rounds in the last few weeks. from 2010, you said not many english people live in london. i need to learn a new language. and you also said why when you ring 118118 are all the people who answer foreign? can't make heads or tails of what they are saying, annoying. and finally, in response to the actor and presenter adil ray, you suggested that it might be appropriate for the cricket at moeen ali to go around asking was limbs he doesn't know if they are terrorists in between test matches. this is the quote. if it is going to help our future, kids' future and environment
6:36 am
become a safer place, then you said that should happen. those are your words, those are your tweets, those out how you have chosen to portray yourself online. is that how you are? i yourself online. is that how you are? :, :, ~ yourself online. is that how you are? . ~' yourself online. is that how you are? . ,, ., yourself online. is that how you are? ., , yourself online. is that how you are? ., y' , .,, yourself online. is that how you are? ,.,'., y' , ., are? i look back on my 12 years on social media. _ are? i look back on my 12 years on social media, i— are? i look back on my 12 years on social media, i regret _ are? i look back on my 12 years on social media, i regret many - are? i look back on my 12 years on. social media, i regret many tweets. i regret the tweets that you have just read out. i apologise deeply to anyone that i offended with those tweets. ~ ., anyone that i offended with those tweets. ~ :, , :, anyone that i offended with those tweets. ~ ., ., , tweets. would you not send those now? absolutely _ tweets. would you not send those now? absolutely not, _ tweets. would you not send those now? absolutely not, absolutely l tweets. would you not send those i now? absolutely not, absolutely not. times have moved _ now? absolutely not, absolutely not. times have moved on, _ now? absolutely not, absolutely not. times have moved on, and _ now? absolutely not, absolutely not. times have moved on, and i - now? absolutely not, absolutely not. times have moved on, and i regret . times have moved on, and i regret those tweets. i regret many things i have done in my life. i regret things i have done this week. you know, we all make mistakes, and in my life i have made quite a few mistakes on twitter. i apologise for that, but i can't suddenly get rid of it. that's happened. you know, i hope people realise and know me, and i think sometimes through social media people can presume who you are and interpret who you are because of and interpret who you are because of a tweet or two. i know who i am, and i hope the people who are around me who are close to me know exactly who
6:37 am
i am. , who are close to me know exactly who iam. , i am. does it embarrass you when you read them back? _ i am. does it embarrass you when you read them back? yes. _ i am. does it embarrass you when you read them back? yes. and _ i am. does it embarrass you when you read them back? yes. and you - i am. does it embarrass you when you read them back? yes. and you think. read them back? yes. and you think ou are a read them back? 1213 and you think you are a different person read them back? i2; and you think you are a different person now. absolutely. we put the comments made by michael vaughan in that interview to azeem rafiq's team, but they didn't wish to comment. we also spoke to michael vaughan about his time at yorkshire county cricket club and being dropped from the ashes coverage. you can watch the full interview at 8:30am this morning here on breakfast, and it will be available after the programme on the bbc webpage, which can be found at bbc.co.uk/breakfast. onto football, and wales kept alive their hopes of qualifying for their first women's world cup by thrashing greece 5—0. they dominated in llanelli. keri holland scored twice as they secured all three points. wales remain second in their group, two points behind france, the team they play next week. abi harrison salvaged a point for scotland with a late equaliser in a 1—1 draw with ukraine at hampden. the scots are second in their group,
6:38 am
two points behind spain, who they visit on tuesday. only one of scotland or wales can now make it to next year's men's world cup in qatar. the draw for the play—off semifinals gave scotland home advantage against ukraine. wales will also be at home. they will play austria. and if scotland and wales win those matches, they'll play each other in the final in cardiff, which means only one of them would go to the world cup. the play—offs are in march next year. if we got wales in the final, it would be a battle of britain. one of the countries is not going to make it, so it is a tough game. they are having a good moment, but we are having a good moment, but we are having a good moment, but we are having a good moment ourselves. if we meet in the final of the cup, think that would be a fantastic occasion. eddie howe will be in the newcastle dugout for the first time today after returning a negative covid test. his new club visit arsenal in premier league's lunchtime kick—off.
6:39 am
newcastle are bottom, but there were encouraging signs for the club's new owners in last week's 3—3 draw with brentford. obviously there are some changes happening there. you can see the momentum that is building is different. you see the last game that they played, as well, and you see some different things. new manager, new coaching staff. i admire eddie for what he has done in the leg. his style of play and coaching has done well as well. i am sure they will be fully prepared. there was agony for bath in rugby union's premiership as they were just four minutes away from their first win of the season, 16—13 up against exeter. imagine the tension here — a scrum almost on the bath line. the clock was ticking down with fans on the edge of their seats. 16—13 up, until — oh—oh. england's sam simmonds went over for exeter and they went on to win it 23—16, and it's now eight defeats in a row for bath this season. elsewhere, northampton beat bristol and gloucester won at wasps. and in the united rugby championship, connaught cantered
6:40 am
to a comfortable a6—18 win over ospreys. some great movement and quick thinking gave substitute conor fitzgerald room for their final try. a special venue for a special homecoming, and emma raducanu's first home match since her historic us open victory will be broadcast on the bbc tomorrow. it will be live from the royal albert hall when the 19—year—old plays elena—gabriela ruse of romania in an exhibition match. the top billing is in recognition of her star status since her incredible run at the us open in september, when she came through qualifying to win her first grand slam title. she was the first british woman to do so for 44 years. coverage starts at five minutes to midday on the bbc iplayer, the red button and the bbc sport website. i know who will be tuning in, her new coach. but he will not be there. he will start working with her when they start properly training for the new season next month. ibshd they start properly training for the new season next month.— they start properly training for the
6:41 am
new season next month. and the venue is the r0 al new season next month. and the venue is the royal albert _ new season next month. and the venue is the royal albert hall. _ is the royal albert hall. extraordinary.— is the royal albert hall. extraordina . ., , ., extraordinary. normally reserved for the likes of concerts _ extraordinary. normally reserved for the likes of concerts and _ extraordinary. normally reserved for the likes of concerts and rock - the likes of concerts and rock stars. let's have a look at the newspapers and some of the front pages. the daily telegraph leads with england's chief medical officer, chris whitty, saying that the delta variant of coronavirus remains of greater concern to the uk than the new omicron variant. keep calm and don't let new covid ruin xmas is the advice from the daily mail, which quotes experts who say the existing vaccines will protect people from this new variant. the times features a picture of maryam nuri mohamed amin and her fiance. she became the first victim to be named after this week's mass drowning in the english channel. the headline says that the uk has warned france that it must get back to the negotiating table to prevent more lives being lost. and on the back pages, many, like the mirror, focus on ralf rangnick who is expected to replace
6:42 am
ole gunnar solskjaer as interim boss at manchester united. lots of speculation about that one. and you have a picture of a bird. yes, so this picture. this is the belted kingfisher, which i will be honest, i have never heard of. i have heard of kingfisher before, i have heard of kingfisher before, i have not heard of the belted kingfisher. they would be a reason for that, kingfisher. they would be a reason forthat, because kingfisher. they would be a reason for that, because as you can see in the headline, only the fourth time it has been seen in the uk in the century. birdwatchers apparently were left shaking with excitement after it was spotted. we understand people have been in the river ribble trying to catch a glimpse of the bird. normally native to florida, so this is on a reserve in preston in lancashire. do you know how with birds, what i love about this image here is when you see a picture of a bird it imbues them with a character. because it has the spiky hair, it feels like it is kind of a
6:43 am
character. i hair, it feels like it is kind of a character-— hair, it feels like it is kind of a character.- their - hair, it feels like it is kind of a i character.- their plumage character. i get it. their plumage denotes something _ character. i get it. their plumage denotes something about - character. i get it. their plumage denotes something about who i character. i get it. their plumage l denotes something about who they are, anyway. fight! denotes something about who they are. anyway-— denotes something about who they are, anyway. denotes something about who they are,an a. ~ ., , ., are, anyway. and i am bringing you a seaull, are, anyway. and i am bringing you a seagull, which... _ are, anyway. and i am bringing you a seagull, which... but— are, anyway. and i am bringing you a seagull, which... but this _ are, anyway. and i am bringing you a seagull, which... but this bird - are, anyway. and i am bringing you a seagull, which... but this bird has. seagull, which... but this bird has onl been seagull, which... but this bird has only been seen — seagull, which... but this bird has only been seen four _ seagull, which... but this bird has only been seen four times - seagull, which... but this bird has only been seen four times in - seagull, which... but this bird has only been seen four times in the l only been seen four times in the century, and you have a seagull. but this bird is 32 years old. how - century, and you have a seagull. but this bird is 32 years old. how do - this bird is 32 years old. how do ou this bird is 32 years old. how do you know _ this bird is 32 years old. how do you know that? _ this bird is 32 years old. how do you know that? it _ this bird is 32 years old. how do you know that? it is _ this bird is 32 years old. how do you know that? it is thought - this bird is 32 years old. how do you know that? it is thought to l this bird is 32 years old. how do l you know that? it is thought to be the world's _ you know that? it is thought to be the world's oldest. _ you know that? it is thought to be the world's oldest. there - you know that? it is thought to be the world's oldest. there is - you know that? it is thought to be the world's oldest. there is a - you know that? it is thought to be the world's oldest. there is a tag | the world's oldest. there is a tag on its leg, and when you enter the code into a database and a student spotted him, when he entered the code into the database from the tag, it was first tagged as an adult in october 1990, so bonner�*s early as 1989, the year the berlin wall came down. a, , , , 1989, the year the berlin wall came down. , , , ., ., 1989, the year the berlin wall came down. , , ., ., ., 1989, the year the berlin wall came down. i, ., ., ., ., down. maybe they put an old tag on its le. do down. maybe they put an old tag on its leg. do seagulls _ down. maybe they put an old tag on its leg. do seagulls live _ down. maybe they put an old tag on its leg. do seagulls live that - down. maybe they put an old tag on its leg. do seagulls live that long? i its leg. do seagulls live that long? i have no idea.— i have no idea. there is the question — i have no idea. there is the question for _ i have no idea. there is the
6:44 am
question for you. _ i have no idea. there is the question for you. good - i have no idea. there is the - question for you. good morning at home. question for you. good morning at home- there _ question for you. good morning at home. there is _ question for you. good morning at home. there is a _ question for you. good morning at home. there is a lot _ question for you. good morning at home. there is a lot going - question for you. good morning at home. there is a lot going on - question for you. good morning at home. there is a lot going on with the weather as you will no doubt have heard. there is some exceptionally strong wind overnight, gusts of 98 miles an hour at brisley wood in northumberland. plenty of other places not far behind. gary had is in south devon, 91 miles an hour, the strongest gust we have recorded here. it is this storm and a squeeze a strong wind at the moment running through south—east scotland, north—east england and parts of wales and the south—west as areas where we still have met amber warnings in force across parts of northern and eastern scotland and north—east coast of england and around the coast of wales and cornwall as well. the potentialfor gusts quite widely but maybe a little stronger in places. it is not only the wind. we have had snow falling across parts of the uk. that
6:45 am
was sheffield earlier. the white in late a mixture of sleet and snow. blue is rain and we have lots of showers running in across parts of north—east scotland. many of these wintry to quite low levels. a lot for us to get through with the weather today. a band of rain, sleet and snow working east across england. could see some down to low levels at times. writer skies from the west. a mix of sunny spells and wintry showers. the wind will slowly ease many northern and western areas through the day but it stays blustery across eastern parts and temperatures at the very best between three, seven, maybe eight degrees in the far south—west but factoring in the strength of the wind it will feel really cold out there. this evening and tonight, some wintry showers, rain, sleet and snow across england. more sleet and snow across england. more sleet and snow into north—west england, but in between a slice of clear skies,
6:46 am
lighter awareness, temperatures will plummet as be as low as —7 in some parts of north—west england. into tomorrow, some wintry showers for eastern coast of england, this area of snowfall sliding east across scotland, some cloud and patchy rain into northern ireland, wales and the south—west later full in between, into northern ireland, wales and the south—west laterfull in between, a lot of sunshine, wins lighter than they will be doing today. despite that it will still feel cold with top tablet is between two and seven degrees. many will see another frosty night on sunday night. into the start of the new week, temperatures will climb again, back up temperatures will climb again, back up into double digits for many of us at least for a time. some rain at times but it shouldn't be quite as stormy as it has been over recent hours. back to you. thank you very much. now, it's time for the film review with mark kermode and jane hill.
6:47 am
hello, and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. what have you been watching? a proper mixed bag. we have a shepherd, which is an eerie british chiller. we have house of guuci, which is the new film by ridley scott. and pirates where we party like it's 1999. shepherd — tell me more. here is the thing. you don't like horrorfilms and it's not a horrorfilm, it's a chiller. there is a distinction. it's an atmospheric chiller and i'm trying to talk you into it. this is a story about a young man who is suffering from grief, he lost his wife and is filled with guilt, and decides to take a position on a remote scottish island as the shepherd, only him on the island, a very small rundown house,
6:48 am
his dog and a lighthouse which looks worrying decrepit. he is dropped off on the island by kate dickie in sinister style. here's a clip. so, you're just leaving now? it's not my place here. when will you be back? i'll be back next tuesday with supplies. _ anything else you need, you let me know. - 0k. you've got some sheep to find. best get to it, mr black. - you'll not be short of chores here, that's for sure. - i nearly forgot... you'll be needing this — a journal. keep it safe. good luck. something's haunting you, mr black — i can see it. -
6:49 am
i hope you get the chance to confront it. _ i am not messing with her. wow! kate dickie... she is brilliant. brilliant in everything, and every movie she is in, she gives 110%, and she is terrific, and as you saw from that scene, a fantastically expressive face and a way of saying loads while saying very little and the way in which even talking quietly she can make something sound really significant and important. here's the thing about this film — we've seen films in which people are alone on islands and left of their own devices, they start seeing things, are they real, are they in their mind, is it natural or supernatural
6:50 am
and we've seen it before. but this is doing it very well and, firstly, has great performances, as you saw their and there is a really good score and sound design which are intertwined so that the music and sound of the land, there are sheep sounds and didgeridoo sounds, and then we hear things and you think, "is it a string or the sound of the wind?" and it all gives the film real texture. and i mean it when i say, it is a horror film, but it is on the creepier edge of things. it's to do with atmosphere, a sense of dread. i say this to you because i know you are not a horrorfan, but i do think there is so much in this you would enjoy, not least kate dickie's terrific performance, and it's not a big budget british film and has a real atmosphere about it, so i think it's worth checking out. lots of people will love that and will see even watching that clip, it's beautiful to look out. on the way it captures the loneliness of the terrain. and you do look at it and you think you are on the island and you can imagine what the isolation is like because that for me is a particular horror,
6:51 am
that idea of of being completely isolated and alone — i'm a social creature. which leads us nicely into... house of gucci — i'm dying to hear what you think of it. lady garner as the wife and became part of the gucci clan and became involved in a great high—profile scandal, which i won't spoil for anyone who doesn't know about it, and an extraordinary cast and lady gaga is good at giving us a character who is properly three—dimensional and the press called at the end, she has this very brash and garish exterior, but we get to see at her as a rounded character and we have adam driver who is very low—key and keeps everything under wraps and we havejeremy irons, who is kind of vampiric and we have al pacino, who was very al pacino. everybody, incidentally, speak english with an italian actor because that's the way the movie has chosen to go, and then you have jarryd leto,
6:52 am
and he is paulo, and his performance is nothing short of ridiculous. there is a weird thing. you've seen the trailer forthis, right? so over the top. i thought, what is going on here? the really odd thing is the film is nothing like as camp as the trailer suggests, for better or worse and i'm a big fan of that. and this has a serious story to it and some very good performances to some great design, and then leto who is just doing that thing about — "awards, judges, look, i am acting, i am doing this ridiculous voice" and he does this voice, which is like somebody singing, and can you just be in the movie with the rest of the cast? there are things in there that i enjoyed and i think lady gaga is great and she will get an awards nomination. it is the most showy performance
6:53 am
and utterly ludicrous. that is intriguing on so many levels. new year's eve, 1999. remember that? three friends who were acceptable and one of them has now gone to college and wants to say, look, our pirate radio days are behind us. but there is another who says, what we need to do is go to a big y2k party because there is a girl i want to kiss when it comes to midnight, plans for midnight in 1999. here's a clip. anything could happen after that, i wouldn't care. this isn't just any new year — it's the new year! anyone who's anyone is gonna be there! and i'm gonna be there. we're gonna be there! look, whatever happens with sophie, i'm starting the year 2000 twice as flipping nice with my best mates. you want the same thing, right? i know you're not asking me,
6:54 am
but for what it's worth, i do _ i want things to be nice — twice. you do too, innit, cap? perhaps. i'm in. cheering yes! i love films about friendship. isit...? that is exactly what it's about, and here's the really nice thing about it. there is a certain type of streetwise british movie that often falls into kind of drugs and gangs, cliches, but this doesn't do that. what it is is exactly what you just said — it is a film about friendship, and there's a whole nostalgia thing going on in, and there is a tamagotchi and music from the period and a funnyjoke about simply red, and a lot of that period detail, but at the heart of it is the timeless thing about three friends who have been together for a long time who are at that point when nothing is going to be the same after this and entering a new period
6:55 am
and everything will change, and you can look back to things like american graffiti as a precursor of that, and it doesn't matter when they are set — i mean, the nostalgia thing is lovely, but what you care about is, do you like the people as agreed, and the colour palette of the film, the blues and reds, very saturated so it has a very bright look to it. the humour is very funny, the performances are nice and it's kind of low—key in a way that is a nice surprise. there's a couple of very funny set pieces, a set piece that takes place in a takeaway food place, but has one of the bestjokes i've seen in the film this year. so i thought it was quite charming and what i liked was exactly what you said — it is about friendship and it manages to make you believe in those characters as friends, even when everything else going on around them is a little bit ridiculous and a little bit caricatured, you do believe in the friendship group and i like that.
6:56 am
anyway, it's got pirates and i enjoyed it very much. really looking forward to that. good! and best out — i'm very sad i haven't seen it yet because i haven't seen it yet. here is the thing with petite maman, it's kind of fairytale fantasy about a young girl who meets another girl who looks weirdly like her. and her life seems to mirror that of her mother. and to say anything else would to over explain, but its feet are in the soil and on the ground, but it has got a fairytale element to it and its 72 or 73 minutes long and has more truth and integrity and inciting it than of the features i've seen this year and i think the last one. it was so beautiful to look, everything about it was so beautifully put together. i think she puts a foot wrong, so my ambition is a film
6:57 am
starring kate dickie — that's would tick all the boxes. so that is best out. and on streaming? and adam driver who we saw in house of gucci, which is annette, the sparks musical which has been out in the cinemas and was written by sparks, the pop group, and we had this conversation before, you won't a huge fan of sparks. i don't know them, sorry. it's a musical in which one of the main characters is played by a puppet, and that sounds like, ok, that's quirky and odd and strange for the sake of being quirky and odd and strange but it isn't, but what it is is it is moving and it's engrossing and adam driver is terrific in it and it played at the cannes film festival and surprised everyone by being so accomplished and reminds you that sparks with the most
6:58 am
cinematic pop groups and it's been in the cinema and has come exclusively to mubi in your home work next week is to watch this and petite maman, and if you can get up the courage, go and see shepherd. i've got a week a busy week. it's a chiller. a quick thought about adam driver because i feel like he is everywhere. nothing against him, but he is everywhere. here is the interesting thing about him. he's a very malleable actor, so he can play completely different roles like he was in that musical we just saw and in each one of them he plays different characters, and again, sorry to keep going on to this, it brings me back to kate dickie who you can see on minute in green night and she is the queen, and you could watch the films is not realise you are watching the same actor and that, for me, is the definition of a great actor. thank you for being with us at the kate dickie fan club here. unashamedly. and enjoy your cinema going whatever you choose to see. i got a busy week. see you next time. thanks for being with us.
6:59 am
bye— bye. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: the united states and australia join the list of countries banning flights from southern africa after confirmation of a worrying new variant of coronavirus. a man is killed in northern ireland as storm arwen hits northern parts of the uk with winds of nearly 100 mph. there are still some very strong winds out there this morning, a mix of rain, sleet and snow falling as well. the weather will slowly calm down through this weekend, but it is going to stay cold. ex england captain michael vaughan speaks to this programme about the racism scandal that has engulfed cricket. it follows allegations by former yorkshire player azeem rafiq.
7:00 am
i played for yorkshire county cricket club for 18 years, and if in any way, shape orform i'm responsible for any of his hurt, i apologise for that. broadway legend stephen sondheim, who was behind some of theatre's best known musicals including west side story, has died at the age of 91. it is saturday 27 november. the united states and australia have become the latest in a growing list of countries to impose travel restrictions on people arriving from across southern africa. it comes amid mounting concern about a new variant of coronavirus which has been named omicron by the world health organization. scientists fear it could pose an increased risk of re—infection
7:01 am
and current vaccines may be less effective. our health correspondent dominic hughes has more. covid variant b.1.1.529 now has a name, omicron, according to the world health organization, which met in geneva last night to discuss the threat posed by this mutation of the coronavirus. the who had advised against travel bans, stressing instead that the measures we are all so familiar with — hand hygiene, masks and social distancing — are more important than ever. what's really important as an individual is to lower your exposure. these proven public health measures have never been more important — distancing, wearing of a mask, making sure that it's over your nose and mouth, with clean hands, making sure you avoid crowded spaces, be in rooms where there's good ventilation, and when it's your turn, get vaccinated. but governments around the world have taken a different view. the uk isjust one a number of countries to have imposed bans on southern african countries
7:02 am
where cases have been identified. the united states, the eu, singapore, israel, japan, and kenya are among those who have either imposed bans and restrictions on travellers or are considering them. i've decided that we're going to be cautious and make sure there's no travel to and from south africa and six other countries in that region, except for american citizens, who are able to come back. the who has described omicron as a variant of concern. it is the most mutated version of the virus yet, scientists identifying 50 mutations overall, more than 30 are on the spike protein, the target of most vaccines. and on the part of the virus that makes first contact with our body's cells, there are ten mutations compared to just two for the delta variant. we do not know whether prior infection and prior vaccination will protect from severe disease such as hospitalisation.
7:03 am
we don't yet know whether the increased cases that they're seeing in south africa will stabilise over time. but it is highly concerning the rapid rate of increase in cases associated with this variant. all this comes as europe is facing a fresh wave of covid infections still linked to the delta variant. in the netherlands, fresh restrictions will come into force tomorrow. venue such as bars, cafes, museums and cinemas will have to close from 5:00pm. but, as so often through the course of this pandemic, decisions are clouded by uncertainty. exactly how transmissible this new variant is, whether it will make people sicker, the impact on existing treatments and how effective vaccines will be against it are all unknowns. it is likely to be some weeks before the answers to those questions become clear. our political correspondent jonathan blake joins us now from our london newsroom. the from our london newsroom. government needs to concerned
7:04 am
the government needs to show it is concerned about this, there will be questions about the impact of this variant, and if it spreads, how it will affect our lives.— variant, and if it spreads, how it will affect our lives. good morning, there is genuine _ will affect our lives. good morning, there is genuine worry _ will affect our lives. good morning, there is genuine worry from - will affect our lives. good morning, there is genuine worry from the - there is genuine worry from the government, and you heard that reflect that in what sajid javid said to mps yesterday. he said it was causing huge international concern and potentially represents a substantial risk to public health. as we have heard, it may well be more easily transmissible. it may be resistant to the vaccines that are in place at the moment, and it may also not be quite as effective — other treatments for coronavirus may not be quite as effective against it, and that is why we have seen the government acting relatively quickly so far to impose the travel bans in southern african countries that you have heard aboutjust now. there may well be more countries added to that list, but there is a certain amount of criticism of that strategy because the variant is expected to show up in the uk as it has in other
7:05 am
european countries already. so what else may have government do? it is worth reminding ourselves perhaps at this point of the government's plan b, which announced earlier on in the year, which it may move to if there is unsustainable pressure, as the government puts it, on the nhs. that will involve possibly making facemasks compulsory, encouraging more people to work from home and making covid passports mandatory. the on that, the government has always insisted there are no plans to introduce any lockdowns in england and the other governments around the uk have said similar. but of course, that is never ruled out. jonathan, thank you very much. we will keep a close eye on it. the former england cricket captain michael vaughan has spoken publicly for the first time since being accused of racism by his yorkshire team—mate azeem rafiq. speaking to bbc breakfast before the england and wales cricket board released a new action plan to tackle racism and discrimination, he apologised for any hurt he may have caused. michael vaughan leading england
7:06 am
to the ashes in 2005. now he is fighting for his reputation after being accused by three asian players of making a racist comment ahead of a game for yorkshire. "too many of you lot, we need to do something about it." do you in any way remember or recognise those words? i don't. my recollection from that day — as i've said, i was a yorkshire player for 18 years. i was the first player to sign for that club that was not born in the county, so in 18 years we've gone from me being the first to sign for the club, for sachin tendulkar to be the first from overseas, to players being able to sign from other clubs. and it was my last few games, and ijust remember it clearly that i was proud as punch that we had four asian players representing yorkshire county cricket club. it was azeem rafiq, the yorkshire whistleblower, who made the initial allegation.
7:07 am
he has said that michael vaughan might not remember the alleged remarks because they didn't mean anything to him. that hurts. that hurts, because i've always felt that every single team that i've been involved in — the biggest praise i ever got as the england captain for six years was that i was the kind of person that really galvanised the group, got the team working together as one. i always felt that i was the person in the dressing room that really wanted everyone to feel included. michael, you said you wanted to sit down with azeem and hear his story. the chances are he could be watching you this morning. he could be watching this now. what would be your message to him? i'm sorry for the hurt that he's gone through. yorkshire county cricket club, i believe, is me. you know, it's been my life.
7:08 am
whether i'm a player or not, i'm a senior ex—player and ex england captain, and i believe that once you've played for yorkshire you're always a yorkshire player. i'm sorry for all the hurt that he's gone through. hopefully — time, i don't think, can ever be a healer in the situation he's gone through. but hopefully time can be a way of us making sure that yorkshire county cricket club never goes through this situation again and never puts themselves in a position of denial that they treated a player so badly. vaughan says he wants to work with azeem rafiq to repair the damage done to cricket. he also says he regrets and is embarrassed by several posts he made on social media between 2010 and 2018, insisting he would not post them now. when i look back on my 12 years on social media, i regret many tweets. i regret the tweets that you've just read out. i apologise deeply to anyone that i offended with those tweets. since retirement, michael vaughan has covered cricket for bbc radio, but earlier this week
7:09 am
it was revealed that he has been stood down from his role at the ashes in australia this winter. yeah, i won't be doing the ashes, which i understand. editorial at the minute, the story is all about azeem rafiq and racism in the game of cricket. i get that. ijust hope, in time, i get that chance to come back, and the one thing that i've loved more than anything since i retired is talking cricket. i love being on test match special, and hopefully in time i'll get that chance to do it again. michael vaughan's hopes for a return to the airwaves rest with his employers. it is his hope that he will have a role in helping to repair the damage done to cricket by this racism scandal. we put the comments made by michael vaughan in that interview to azeem rafiq, but there has been no comment so far. northern parts of the uk have been hit by winds of almost 100mph overnight caused by storm arwen. amber and yellow weather warnings remain in place with more strong winds and further travel disruption expected. tens of thousands of
7:10 am
people are waking up this morning without power. louisa pilbeam has the latest. storm arwen moved in from the east, hitting aberdeenshire with huge waves, gusts of more than 90mph and snow. in county antrim in northern ireland, a man was killed when a tree struck his car. red warnings signalling danger to life are rare, this the first in almost two years. so treacherous were the conditions on the roads that police scotland told people in red warning areas not to drive. you can barely stand up. storm chaser sean filmed this for his social media channels. that is brutal. this is portobello beach in edinburgh. i have never in all my life
7:11 am
seen a storm like this. train services suffered major disruption. lner, which runs routes from london's kings cross to aberdeen and inverness, said on friday evening its trains would not be going beyond newcastle. and they advised customers not to travel until monday, with weekend tickets valid until wednesday. so my friends and i got on this train at elgin at about 3:30pm yesterday afternoon, on friday. we've been parked at huntly station since about 4:30pm, and it's now 5:00am, so i've been on the train about 14 hours. and neither us nor the train crew have any idea when we're likely to get off it. overnight on the m62, junctions 21 and 22 were closed after more than 120 hgvs got stuck in the snow. in north—east scotland an amber warning remains in place, and in south—west england and wales.
7:12 am
i want to get home and wrap up and not come out. it's going to get worse. the electrics are going to go, i know that. and storm arwen even affected itv's i'm a celebrity show in north wales. because of storm arwen, for the first time ever we're not coming to you live. no, this show was recorded earlier this evening because weather conditions are forecast to get worse. with further weather warnings in place across the uk today, more disruption is likely. an amber weather warning remains in place for the north—east of england. let's speak to alison freeman who's in whitley bay. of course, still dark so we're trying to get a sense of what the weather is like for you there. tell us. , , , , ., , us. yes, these gusts are still re us. yes, these gusts are still pretty powerful- _ us. yes, these gusts are still pretty powerful. i _ us. yes, these gusts are still pretty powerful. i am - us. yes, these gusts are still pretty powerful. i am being l us. yes, these gusts are still - pretty powerful. i am being buffeted around here quite a lot and the wind is sending the rain horizontally. it is sending the rain horizontally. it is like pins against us, but on our
7:13 am
very short drive—in this morning, we noticed that there were a lot of problems on the roads, branches in the street, large, heavy municipal bins which have been thrown around, barriers down. i saw a temporary traffic light that had been blown into the road as well, so the roads are looking a bit of a mess. it is obviously notjust are looking a bit of a mess. it is obviously not just the are looking a bit of a mess. it is obviously notjust the roads. we know that the train operator lner is asking people not to travel this weekend. there is so much disruption being caused by the debris on the system there. more locally, the tyne & wear metro closed early last night at ten p.m.. the operator there is saying that it is unlikely they will be opening again before 9am this morning. they have had pictures on social media of staff out dealing with fallen trees and checking the tracks, et cetera. another big problem is power outages. northern power grid has been reporting that around 55,000 houses are without power across county durham and northumberland, and they are saying again it is likely to go on further into the day until power is restored
7:14 am
because of the problems with fixing issues. but as you said earlier, those warnings are expected to remain in place until around 9am or 10am this morning.— 10am this morning. thank you very much, 10am this morning. thank you very much. and — 10am this morning. thank you very much, and worth _ 10am this morning. thank you very much, and worth saying _ 10am this morning. thank you very much, and worth saying this - 10am this morning. thank you very i much, and worth saying this morning, i know a lot of you will be waking up i know a lot of you will be waking up this morning, it is still dark and you look out into the gardens and you look out into the gardens and it might be a bit of a mess. we are hearing anecdotal reports of people coming to work here in the north—west and saying they have seen trees down. something has happened, if it has crossed your path this morning, let us see the pictures. i know some places have had quite a lot of snow this morning. we saw quite a lot of it on the motorway. send the pictures in and we will try to get a better sense of what the picture is. to get a better sense of what the icture is. : ,:, to get a better sense of what the icture is. ~ ,., i. ., to get a better sense of what the icture is. ~ i. ., ., ., ,, picture is. also, if you are awake this morning. — picture is. also, if you are awake this morning, perhaps _ picture is. also, if you are awake this morning, perhaps you - picture is. also, if you are awake this morning, perhaps you are i picture is. also, if you are awake i this morning, perhaps you are just this morning, perhaps you arejust really tired, because a lot of people didn't sleep well because it was so noisy in the north of the uk. i will point out that if people aren't awake this morning then i am not really addressing them. i did not really addressing them. i did not say that. _ not really addressing them. i did not say that, as _ not really addressing them. i did not say that, as a _ not really addressing them. i did not say that, as a lot _ not really addressing them. i did not say that, as a lot of - not really addressing them. i c c not say that, as a lot of people won't be awake yet, didn't i?
7:15 am
here's ben with a look at this morning's weather. we have had those really strong winds, confirmation of a gust of 98 miles an hour. storm, the area of low pressure, a swathe of strong winds across eastern scotland, wales, south—west, those are the areas we still have this amber warning on the met office, gusts of 65 miles an hour or more, and the south—west of england as well. not only windy, you mentioned the snow. it certainly is lying in some places. that was sheffield. reports of 13 centimetres of snow. this is the radar picture, it is a bit of a rain, sleet and snow mess. it is not all snow.
7:16 am
rain, sleet and snow mess. it is not allsnow. some rain, sleet and snow mess. it is not all snow. some sleet mixing in as well and rain at low levels. that will continue across parts of england today. the showers pushing in across northern scotland will be wintry to quite low levels. northern ireland is wintry showers as well. more in the way of sunshine in western parts of the uk as we go through the day. for those so badly affected so far, the wind will ease. it is pretty blustery as you can see. winds are picking up in the afternoon across parts of east anglia and the south—east. these are the highest temperatures we can expect, three to seven degrees. a factor in the strength of the wind it will feel really cold out there. tonight this rain sleet and hill snow will continue across eastern areas of england, cloud and rain and snow into north—west scotland. in between, a slice of clear skies allowing it to get really cold, maybe —7 in some parts of england. ice could be a problem tomorrow morning. still some wintry weather
7:17 am
in eastern part of england by time, slow moving across parts of scotland. cloud and rain later. in between, some decent spells of sunshine. the wind lighter than they are today but it will still feel cold with temperatures stuck in single digits. at least calming down a little bit. �* ., . «i single digits. at least calming down a little bit. 1, . «i ., i. single digits. at least calming down a little bit. . «i ., i. ., «i single digits. at least calming down a little bit. ., ., «i a little bit. back to you. thank you very much- — a little bit. back to you. thank you very much- see — a little bit. back to you. thank you very much. see you _ a little bit. back to you. thank you very much. see you later on. - an increasing number of countries havejoined the uk in imposing travel restrictions on people arriving from southern africa amid growing concern over a new coronavirus variant, which the world health organization has named omicron. we'rejoined now by calum semple, professor of outbreak medicine at the university of liverpool who also sits on the government's sage advisory committee. good morning. very good to see you here this morning. i think it is always useful with you, and you are very good at this, with starting with the basics. tell us what we know about this new variant. this new variant _
7:18 am
know about this new variant. this new variant has _ know about this new variant. ti 3 new variant has lots of mutations. these mutations have been seen before in other variants, but what is different as we are seeing them together in this one new virus, and thatis together in this one new virus, and that is what is causing some concern. the virus appears to be transmitting faster and better than other strains, and that is what is really causing concern. it is not so much that it is causing different disease or causing more deaths or affecting different people, it is just that it is running faster. tau just that it is running faster. you use the word _ just that it is running faster. you use the word appears to be. science is all about evidence. where is the lion between appears to be and saying this is what it will do? this is alwa s saying this is what it will do? this is always a _ saying this is what it will do? ti 3 is always a challenge. it is very early days. we have only known about for a few weeks so it is very hard to know how it will behave the large. so far, the evidence is that it is not causing a different spectrum of disease or more deaths, and that is really important. but we do know that viruses mutate to become better at transmitting and
7:19 am
then they can overtake the other viruses. the problem this may present for us is that this virus might evade some of the vaccines. but it probably won't evade people that have had roosters or two proper doses. so the take—home message for this is if you have not had your booster, go and get it now because the vaccine is so good, it currently covers about 95% of people from severe disease. so even if this new variant is not quite as good a fit, it is still probably going to cover 85 to 90% of people so it is not a 85 to 9096 of people so it is not a disaster. :, 85 to 9096 of people so it is not a disaster. ., ., ., ,., ., ., ., disaster. you are also good at explaining _ disaster. you are also good at explaining science _ disaster. you are also good at explaining science and - disaster. you are also good at explaining science and an - disaster. you are also good at i explaining science and an easy, digestible way. one of the mutations on this, so that people can understand the concern over whether this vaccine we have will attack this vaccine we have will attack this or defend us against his new variant, is about spiked proteins. but is washed, the spiky bits of what we are seeing here, that is what we are seeing here, that is what the vaccine attacks, isn't it
7:20 am
too much the vaccine gets you to make antibodies, and the antibodies coat the spike, making that key sticky and it stops the key fitting into the cellular lock and also makes the spikes sticky so the cells in the system can grab the virus, process it and kill it. the mutations have been seen in this new variant. so the concern is that the vaccines we have at the moment can't make it as sticky or they are more resistant? : , make it as sticky or they are more resistant? ., , i ., resistant? that is right. although there are about _ resistant? that is right. although there are about 20 _ resistant? that is right. although there are about 20 or _ resistant? that is right. although there are about 20 or so - there are about 20 or so mutations, other bits of the virus remain the same and we can still target them with parts of the vaccine. some parts of the vaccine will still target other parts of the surface of the virus. , , ., ., ._ the virus. this is the natural way viruses behave, _ the virus. this is the natural way viruses behave, isn't _ the virus. this is the natural way viruses behave, isn't it? - the virus. this is the natural way viruses behave, isn't it? every . viruses behave, isn't it? every month or every three months we are talking about a mutation that may well become a new variant. how long
7:21 am
do we have to keep being worried about this?— do we have to keep being worried about this? , , ., , ., about this? yes, it is always going to keep worrying. _ about this? yes, it is always going to keep worrying, but _ about this? yes, it is always going to keep worrying, but how- about this? yes, it is always going to keep worrying, but how long i to keep worrying, but how long should people be worried? the worrying aspect should diminish over time as we improve our immunity through immunisation. so there should be left to worry and anxiety. this is not a disaster and the headlines from some of my colleagues say this is horrendous i think i be overstating the situation here. immunity from the vaccination is still likely to reject you from severe disease. you might get a sniffle or headache or feel the cold, but your chance of coming to hospital or intensive care are sadly —— or savvy dying are greatly diminished by the vaccine and still will be going into the future. i won't get you to comment on the travel bands because they are government decisions, can you allude to the conversation people have, which is some people will say it is not here yet, the new variant, not here in the uk. a handful of cases is somewhere else a long way away.
7:22 am
other people are saying to come down harder and put the bands on and we can contain it. what is the evidence about the idea that if there is a new variant somewhere, we can stop it going elsewhere? like new variant somewhere, we can stop it going elsewhere?— it going elsewhere? like all these decisions, there _ it going elsewhere? like all these decisions, there is _ it going elsewhere? like all these decisions, there is nuance - it going elsewhere? like all these decisions, there is nuance and - decisions, there is nuance and subtlety. if you can slow the virus coming into your country, it gives you more time for your booster campaign to get ahead of it also gives the scientists longer to understand more about the virus in case there is anything we really should be worrying about. there doesn't seem to be at the moment from what we know about this virus. sadly, it is also inevitable that the virus will get here by hook or by crook because about a third to 40% of people will be completely asymptomatic and people can transmit the virus globally without even knowing they have got it. eventually it will come here, but that doesn't mean we shouldn't do everything we can to slow it down while we carry on vaccinating people. in can to slow it down while we carry on vaccinating people.— can to slow it down while we carry on vaccinating people. in terms of slowin it on vaccinating people. in terms of slowing it down, _ on vaccinating people. in terms of slowing it down, you _ on vaccinating people. in terms of slowing it down, you made - on vaccinating people. in terms of slowing it down, you made it - on vaccinating people. in terms of| slowing it down, you made it clear some of your peers have made
7:23 am
comments that you think are alarmist to a certain extent. with that in mind, though, and the idea of needing to slow this down, should be more measures implemented or referred back to, kind of refer to two, that we once had, social distancing again, wearing face coverings, working from home? where are you on that? ibis a coverings, working from home? where are you on that?— are you on that? as a healthcare professional. — are you on that? as a healthcare professional, you _ are you on that? as a healthcare professional, you won't - are you on that? as a healthcare professional, you won't be - are you on that? as a healthcare - professional, you won't be surprised that i am an advocate of face, hand washing and wearing a mask. i feel particularly uncomfortable on public transport. i took a train journey to hold. only one in 50 people were wearing a face mask and this was a fairly enclosed environment —— hull. i am proud fairly enclosed environment —— hull. iam proud mask fairly enclosed environment —— hull. i am proud mask in the shops and public transport. the i am proud mask in the shops and public transport.— public transport. the latest fi u ures, public transport. the latest figures. the _ public transport. the latest figures, the daily _ public transport. the latest figures, the daily rate - public transport. the latest figures, the daily rate of i public transport. the latest - figures, the daily rate of 50,000 barrier was crossed yesterday. is that kind of... there are
7:24 am
predictions about how things go. is this in line with what your advisors and your group were expecting at this point? it and your group were expecting at this oint? , , i . ., this point? it is very difficult for me to comment _ this point? it is very difficult for me to comment on _ this point? it is very difficult for me to comment on advice - this point? it is very difficult for me to comment on advice in i this point? it is very difficult for - me to comment on advice in committee and we can't go there, but essentially, the pandemic is running quite hot in terms of case numbers in the uk, but surprisingly, we have got farfewer hospital in the uk, but surprisingly, we have got far fewer hospital admissions and deaths than we had before, and thatis and deaths than we had before, and that is probably because the vaccines actually do the job with said they would do. the vaccines work, we are protecting people from severe disease but we are not stopping transmission within the community. we still have quite high levels and in parts of the country at the moment, articulate the north—east, possibly the north—west, we are starting to say and uptake. there is a reduction in school children, it is levelling off amongst schoolchildren at them. professor, always good to have you here. thank you very much.- professor, always good to have you here. thank you very much. thank you for having me- — every week, presenter ros atkins
7:25 am
takes an in—depth look at one of the issues in the news. this week, he looks at how the uk government is tackling migration in small boats across the english channel. the english channel is one of the biggest shipping lanes, and boats have crossed it to reach the uk. they set off close to la in northern france, their destination is kent in england, 40 kilometres away. —— hull. this is a perilousjourney. 27 people drowned me calais, and this was borisjohnson puzzlement response. it was boris johnson puzzlement resonse. , : was boris johnson puzzlement response-— was boris johnson puzzlement resonse. , ., ., , response. it is an appalling thing have suffered. _ response. it is an appalling thing have suffered. but _ response. it is an appalling thing have suffered. but i _ response. it is an appalling thing have suffered. but i want - response. it is an appalling thing have suffered. but i want to - response. it is an appalling thing have suffered. but i want to say| have suffered. but i want to say that this disaster underscores how dangerous it is across the in this way. dangerous it is across the in this wa . , ., dangerous it is across the in this
7:26 am
wa. , way. president macron has said... other dangers _ way. president macron has said... other dangers of _ way. president macron has said... other dangers of these _ way. president macron has said... other dangers of these crossingsi other dangers of these crossings have long been known, and yet, for some, the risks are still worth taking. these are people getting on boats in france's week. we know the number of crossings has gone up sharply this year to over 25,000 so far. earlierthis sharply this year to over 25,000 so far. earlier this month a new record was that when over 1100 people across the channel on a single day. the uk government has readily promised to make this route unviable. so far it has been unable to and some british mps think france needs to do more. it is to and some british mps think france needs to do more.— needs to do more. it is simply not credible that _ needs to do more. it is simply not credible that 1000 _ needs to do more. it is simply not credible that 1000 people - needs to do more. it is simply not credible that 1000 people came i credible that 1000 people came muster on the french beaches in the french not spot them as they get into small boats. they have money provided from the british buyer they have drones and security intelligence and they need to get the people, the french police down on the beaches to put a spot to these boats leaving the french shores. : : these boats leaving the french shores. ., ., ., shores. natalie referring to ideals sined in shores. natalie referring to ideals signed in when — shores. natalie referring to ideals signed in when the _ shores. natalie referring to ideals signed in when the uk _ shores. natalie referring to ideals signed in when the uk pledged i shores. natalie referring to ideals signed in when the uk pledged to| signed in when the uk pledged to give france £54 million to support efforts to stop the boats, let's be
7:27 am
clear, france has stopped hundreds of them, but others are getting through. this french policeman told the daily mail... the rise and attempted crossings is a factor, but others see politics as well. the times quoted a uk government's source who called french approach... and france puzzlement equally unimpressed. its interior minister said recently... but for all of this, the uk and france both know they must work together on this, and wednesday's tragedy has given his extra urgency. that may mean more patrols on the french coast, but there is another option the uk wants to pursue. iris and i option the uk wants to pursue. iris and i have — option the uk wants to pursue. i" 3 and i have worked intensively with
7:28 am
every institution with the responsibility to protect our borders to deliver operational solutions, including new seed tactics which we are working to implement to turn back the boats. there is the home secretary, priti patel, in october. as well as a moral and legal arguments about turning back the boats, the french argue that without the cooperation, it is impossible to do anyway. here is my colleague simonjones. the is my colleague simon jones. the osition is my colleague simon jones. the position from _ is my colleague simonjones. ti2 position from the french authorities is it is simply not safe them to do that because they fear migrants could threaten to jump in the water or the boats are so flimsy that attempting to turn them around could actually capsize the boats and lead to deaths in the channel. ibis actually capsize the boats and lead to deaths in the channel.— to deaths in the channel. as far as we know, to deaths in the channel. as far as we know. not _ to deaths in the channel. as far as we know. not a — to deaths in the channel. as far as we know, not a single _ to deaths in the channel. as far as we know, not a single boat - to deaths in the channel. as far as we know, not a single boat has i to deaths in the channel. as far as i we know, not a single boat has been turned around. that has led to this criticism from the opposition. headline grabbing plans repeatedly from the home secretary which achieve nothing are achieving nothing. achieve nothing are achieving nothinu. ,, : : , achieve nothing are achieving nothinu. ,, . : ., , nothing. since wednesday's tragedy, the uk's government _
7:29 am
nothing. since wednesday's tragedy, the uk's government focus _ nothing. since wednesday's tragedy, the uk's government focus has - nothing. since wednesday's tragedy, the uk's government focus has been| the uk's government focus has been people smugglers. the task of taking them on is getting harder.— them on is getting harder. because of covid restrictions _ them on is getting harder. because of covid restrictions on _ them on is getting harder. because of covid restrictions on travel, - of covid restrictions on travel, many of which are not yet lifted, the single method of entry is now deepened and intensified and has become so profitable for criminals that it become so profitable for criminals thatitis become so profitable for criminals that it is going to take a phenomenal amount of effort shifted. and this method of entry meaning small boats is now seen as many people as their best chance of getting the uk. and so, a vicious circle is being created as demand for the crossings increases, so the people smuggling operations expand. more capacity the smugglers have, the more crossings there are, the more crossings there are, the more demand for them increases. it is a that is very hard to break, and as it plays out, there
7:30 am
is another dimension as well. because these crossings are very visible and the more images we see of people arriving on british beaches, the more this becomes political. the refugee council describes... the point being that these crossings have become intertwined with some people's desire to change how the uk's orders work. here is one conservative mp speaking last week. we tell the people at the referendum, as brexiteers, that we would take back control. it is clear that in this we have lost control. it is certainly true that the government has not controlled channel crossings is it that it would, but look at net migration in the uk stop a number of people arriving minus a number of people leaving. it fell by 88 cents last year. it is now in the tens of thousands. then there is a number of people who were granted asylum in the uk. that is lower than germany,
7:31 am
france or greece. to be clear, the uk remains a signatory of the long—standing international agreement on refugees, but for the government, this particular issue in the channel is about showing control and about a system that overall in its view isn't working. we fundamentally believe that people should seek asylum in the first safe country. they should not be making dangerous journeys across the channel. dangerous “ourneys across the channel. �* : , dangerous “ourneys across the channel. �* ., , , ., ., «i channel. but many people are making the dangerous — channel. but many people are making the dangerous journey _ channel. but many people are making the dangerous journey to _ channel. but many people are making the dangerous journey to the - channel. but many people are making the dangerous journey to the uk - channel. but many people are making the dangerous journey to the uk for i the dangerous journey to the uk for a number of reasons, as this migration expert explains. these reasons won't be easily addressed by more patrols on the french coast, and there is perhaps another factor to. nearly anybody who crosses the channel in a small boat applies for asylum and most are accepted, and even if they aren't,
7:32 am
the vast majority still stay, as we learnt in this exchange. can the vast majority still stay, as we learnt in this exchange.— learnt in this exchange. can you tell us how _ learnt in this exchange. can you tell us how many _ learnt in this exchange. can you tell us how many asylum - learnt in this exchange. can you i tell us how many asylum seekers learnt in this exchange. can you - tell us how many asylum seekers or how many people arriving have been returned to any eu country in the course of the last — since january? this year it is five. course of the last - since january? this year it is five.— this year it is five. that's right, five this year, _ this year it is five. that's right, five this year, and _ this year it is five. that's right, five this year, and brexit - this year it is five. that's right, | five this year, and brexit means this year it is five. that's right, i five this year, and brexit means a previous return arrangement with the european union no longer applies. this high chance of staying is one of a number of reasons that the uk is a desirable destination, and if those pull factors, you mustn't lose sight of why these people left home in the first place. in the year to september 2021, the top five countries of origin of people making asylum applications are iran, eritrea, albania, iraq and syria. now, of course, each person's story is different. some may travel for economic reasons, but the percentage of asylum request that are granted by the uk suggest that these are countries where you have good reason
7:33 am
to leave for your safety, as my colleague louis goodall heard. curtis then. colleague louis goodall heard. curtis then-— colleague louis goodall heard. curtis then. : , :, curtis then. and why did you leave? the politicians, _ curtis then. and why did you leave? the politicians, you _ curtis then. and why did you leave? the politicians, you know. - curtis then. and why did you leave? the politicians, you know. they - curtis then. and why did you leave? j the politicians, you know. they said to me, you must leave this country or we will kill you.— or we will kill you. these other ersonal or we will kill you. these other personal stories _ or we will kill you. these other personal stories at _ or we will kill you. these other personal stories at the - or we will kill you. these other personal stories at the heart i or we will kill you. these other| personal stories at the heart of this, and they are why this issue will not easily be resolved, because the reasons for people seeking a new home in europe not going away. nor is the need for better cooperation. among the countries these people are heading to. this is accepted by france and by the uk. this heading to. this is accepted by france and by the uk.- france and by the uk. this is a complicated — france and by the uk. this is a complicated issue, _ france and by the uk. this is a complicated issue, and - france and by the uk. this is a complicated issue, and there i france and by the uk. this is a | complicated issue, and there is france and by the uk. this is a - complicated issue, and there is no simple fix. it does mean a herculean effort, and it will be impossible without close cooperation between all international partners and agencies. all international partners and aencies. ~ : all international partners and aencies. ~ . all international partners and aencies.~ . , , agencies. which in some ways brings us back to brexit. _ agencies. which in some ways brings us back to brexit. boris _ agencies. which in some ways brings us back to brexit. boris johnson - agencies. which in some ways brings us back to brexit. boris johnson has| us back to brexit. borisjohnson has always said that brexit will not affect close cooperation with the eu, and that is being put to the
7:34 am
test. but as priti patel says, no—one country can solve this alone. and while for some getting into a dinghy feels like the best option, a solution is desperately needed. plaid cymru and the welsh government are preparing to work together during the next three years to implement key policy commitments including free school meals for all primary children and introducing a national care service. plaid members will vote on the deal today, and party leader adam price joins us now from cardiff. we have so much that we need to do in wales, the introduction of
7:35 am
universal healthcare for premier schoolchildren is going to be so important in terms of their health and educational opportunities. free childcare, extending that tim mohr two —year—olds, i think that will make such a huge difference for so many families across wales. extending that to more two —year—olds. the rapid expansion of measures to deal with the housing affordability crisis, in rural of communities and the housing crisis that we are facing in many urban areas as well. there is a commitment for the first time to end homelessness. there will be a white paper on rent control in the private sector, the right to housing. these are going to be massively transformational or our country. wales is going to look very different in a few short years as a result of this cooperation agreement if our members at our conference pass it later today. it if our members at our conference pass it later today.— pass it later today. it does come down to whether _ pass it later today. it does come down to whether or _ pass it later today. it does come down to whether or not - pass it later today. it does come down to whether or not this - pass it later today. it does come down to whether or not this is i down to whether or not this is passed. down to whether or not this is assed. ~ : : down to whether or not this is assed. ., ., , ., . , passed. we are a democratic party, es. the
7:36 am
passed. we are a democratic party, yes- the final— passed. we are a democratic party, yes. the final decision _ passed. we are a democratic party, yes. the final decision has - passed. we are a democratic party, yes. the final decision has to - passed. we are a democratic party, yes. the final decision has to be - yes. the final decision has to be with the members. is yes. the final decision has to be with the members.— with the members. is this 'ust because you i with the members. is this 'ust because you wouldn't �* with the members. is thisjust because you wouldn't have i with the members. is thisjust| because you wouldn't have any influence, plaid cymru wouldn't have an influence on its own? iiiiihat influence, plaid cymru wouldn't have an influence on its own?— an influence on its own? what is olitics an influence on its own? what is politics for? _ an influence on its own? what is politics for? what _ an influence on its own? what is politics for? what is _ an influence on its own? what is politics for? what is a _ an influence on its own? what is| politics for? what is a democracy for? it is actually come up with solutions to our problems, and if we can do that by parties working together, reaching across their political differences, even government and opposition working together, i think that is what people want. people look at westminster and the sort of adversarial yahoo politics, which is all about the theatre of politics and not about actually providing solutions. i think it is a refreshing new way of doing politics, and the response that we have had since we published the draft agreement has been incredible. people are saying this is exactly the new way of doing politics that we want. : the new way of doing politics that we want. ., ., , . ., ., we want. ok, what has changed for ou? just we want. ok, what has changed for you? just in — we want. ok, what has changed for you? just in april — we want. ok, what has changed for you? just in april you _ we want. ok, what has changed for you? just in april you said - we want. ok, what has changed for you? just in april you said anotherl you? just in april you said another five years of labour in power fills you with despair. what changed? iiiiihat
7:37 am
you with despair. what changed? what chaned is you with despair. what changed? what changed is that — you with despair. what changed? �*li�*ié�*ii changed is that we you with despair. what changed? iv"isgt changed is that we have been able to persuade this labour government to move to the left and all these key areas. the national care service— we have been campaigning for that for years, the idea of creating a national care service built on the same principles as the nhs, paying care workers the same level of pay rates as nhs staff and also providing that free at the point of need. we have managed to persuade the labour government in this area as in all those other areas that we need radicalism, in wales. not changing and tinkering at the margins, buta radical changing and tinkering at the margins, but a radical programme of change. that is what plaid cymru is all about, change. that is what plaid cymru is allabout, it change. that is what plaid cymru is all about, it is about changing wales for the better, making a massive difference to the lives of the people of wales, and this is a fantastic opportunity for us. it is an exciting moment for our democracy. that is why we are doing it, because we will always put wales first. we will always put the people first. we will always put the people first rather than our narrow party interest. 50 first rather than our narrow party interest. . . .,
7:38 am
interest. so at the next election are ou interest. so at the next election are you going — interest. so at the next election are you going to _ interest. so at the next election are you going to be _ interest. so at the next election| are you going to be campaigning interest. so at the next election - are you going to be campaigning for plaid cymru or are you going to be campaigning fora plaid cymru or are you going to be campaigning for a plaid cymru labour cooperation party? we campaigning for a plaid cymru labour cooperation party?— cooperation party? we are going to be continuing _ cooperation party? we are going to be continuing the _ cooperation party? we are going to be continuing the campaign - cooperation party? we are going to be continuing the campaign for - cooperation party? we are going to be continuing the campaign for a i be continuing the campaign for a radical wales which is fairer. trio. be continuing the campaign for a radical wales which is fairer. trial radical wales which is fairer. no, i meant which _ radical wales which is fairer. no, i meant which party? _ radical wales which is fairer. no, i meant which party? which - radical wales which is fairer. no, i meant which party? which party are you going to ask people to vote for? why would you vote for plaid cymru if labour is in power and is putting in the policies that that you say you have had such influence over? it you have had such influence over? it will be plaid cymru, because it is only because of plaid cymru that we are getting this radical programme that we have managed to negotiate. we have been injecting the radicalism that has long been needed here in wales. that is only happening because of us. we are able to achieve this as an opposition party. now imagine what we will be able to achieve when we are in government. d0 able to achieve when we are in government-— able to achieve when we are in government. do you think it will -ass? government. do you think it will ass? do government. do you think it will pass? do you — government. do you think it will pass? do you think— government. do you think it will pass? do you think the - government. do you think it will pass? do you think the party - government. do you think it will| pass? do you think the party will vote for it today? what is your gut instinct? i vote for it today? what is your gut instinct? . ., vote for it today? what is your gut instinct? . ,, ., ., instinct? i take nothing for granted. — instinct? i take nothing for granted, but _ instinct? i take nothing for granted, butjudging - instinct? i take nothing for granted, butjudging from | instinct? i take nothing for i granted, butjudging from the conversations i have had with members throughout this week, i am
7:39 am
very hopeful that our membership will be inspired by this positive, radical, transformational programme in the same way as people the length and breadth of wales have been inspired. and breadth of wales have been insired. . ., and breadth of wales have been insired. . ,, i. , and breadth of wales have been insired. . ~v ,, , . and breadth of wales have been insired. . ., ,, , . ., inspired. thank you very much for our time inspired. thank you very much for your time with — inspired. thank you very much for your time with us. _ stars of the west end and broadway have been paying tribute to the american composer and songwriter stephen sondheim, who has died at his home in conneticut at the age of 91. sondheim found fame after writing the lyrics for west side story and went on to create musicals including sweeney todd, passion, and into the woods. daniela relph has been taking a look back at his life. # isn't it bliss? # don't you approve? # one who keeps tearing around, one who can't move... send in the clowns, from the musical a little night music. # send in the clowns...
7:40 am
it was stephen sondheim's only hit song — remarkably, because this was the man who revolutionised the american musical. as a young man he learned his trade from oscar hammerstein, the lyricist who wrote shows like oklahoma and the sound of music. sondheim, too, started by doing the words — notably for leonard bernstein's music in west side story. # i like to be in america! # ok by me in america! soon he was writing his own music as well. # for a small fee in america... most of the shows that followed were hits. and then in 1970 he came up with a new idea — a musical that didn't follow an obvious plot. # phone rings, door chimes, in comes company... company was a series of vignettes featuring a dozen central characters. no two sondheim musicals were the same. i don't want to get bored writing. and you know, it's — when you hit a chord that you've hit before or a technique
7:41 am
of using a song that you've done before — or when i do, i get very nervous. and i think "i've written that, i mustn't do that again." somebody will catch me up on it, so to speak. it's as if somebody's saying, "wait a minute, you did that in that show." into the woods was based on fairy stories like jack and the beanstalk. sondheim's music was rhythmically complicated and harmonically sophisticated. # we've no time to sit and dither. # while her withers wither with her. # and no—one keeps a cow for a friend... that's one of my favourite things about a sondheim musical, is the material that you learn is some of the most complex series of notes put together that you can learn, and so you feel such a sense of accomplishment when you finally get to — when you've arrived at a place where you realise i've
7:42 am
i've got it. i've figured out how to sing this sondheim lyric and sing this beautiful phrase that he wrote. # i thought that you'd want i what i want, sorry, my dear... for his admirers, stephen sondheim produced some of the most sophisticated and thoughtful musicals ever written. # quick, send in the clowns. # don't bother, they're here. how very fitting to end on that song, because it is a stunning song, it really is. biographer and theatre critic david benedict and performer andy coxon join us now. very good morning to you, gentlemen. david, we should add to the list as well as biographer and theatre critic, you are a friend. stephen sondheim was a friend of yours, and i suppose the first thing to say is i suppose the first thing to say is i am sorry to you for the loss, because this feels very personal, i
7:43 am
am sure. it because this feels very personal, i am sure. . , because this feels very personal, i am sure. , , ., ., , ., am sure. it is very odd to be in a osition am sure. it is very odd to be in a position of— am sure. it is very odd to be in a position of starting _ am sure. it is very odd to be in a position of starting to _ am sure. it is very odd to be in a position of starting to grieve - am sure. it is very odd to be in a position of starting to grieve for| am sure. it is very odd to be in a| position of starting to grieve for a friend and also as his biographer, having to have something to say about it that is hopefully cogent. well, yes. the stages yours, if i use that phrase. what is so special about what he did?— use that phrase. what is so special about what he did? well, i think as was shown — about what he did? well, i think as was shown in _ about what he did? well, i think as was shown in that _ about what he did? well, i think as was shown in that excellent - about what he did? well, i think as l was shown in that excellent package, what is really interesting about him is that he was a master craftsman who never did anything twice. he wrote a song by that title, and he was constantly changing. i remember years and years ago going to an exhibition at the royal academy about a century of revolution and change, and each room, the best work was by picasso. and stephen sondheim is like that. he was working from 1957 until right up until the day he died, and every decade he was doing something completely different and
7:44 am
influencing an entire succession of generations. without him we wouldn't have had lin—manuel miranda's hamilton, we wouldn't have had chorus line in the 19705. he was such a significant presence. you -la ed such a significant presence. you played tony. — such a significant presence. you played tony. the _ such a significant presence. you played tony, the lead in west side story, one of stephen sondheim's most famous musicals, and it is brilliant. what does it feel like when you are singing his work, when you are being the character he envisaged as well? what does it feel like? . ., ,, , ., ., like? half the work is done for you. all of sondheim's _ like? half the work is done for you. all of sondheim's material - like? half the work is done for you. all of sondheim's material is - all of sondheim's material is written so intricately, and every note and every word is put out there with the feeling that he intended. a5 with the feeling that he intended. as an actor, it is an absolute gift to be given that material, because half of yourjob is done. all you have to do is put your character on top of it, and the rest of itjust
7:45 am
soars. the balcony seen in west side story is one of the most beautifully written moments in musical theatre history and it is a dream to do because of the lyrics.- history and it is a dream to do because of the lyrics. when you know as a performer _ because of the lyrics. when you know as a performer and _ because of the lyrics. when you know as a performer and as _ because of the lyrics. when you know as a performer and as an _ because of the lyrics. when you know as a performer and as an actor, - because of the lyrics. when you know as a performer and as an actor, that. as a performer and as an actor, that you are going to get before sondheim, it must feel so special. he is the aim, as a musical actor, it is a must. you have to do it. it is what we will aim to do and is is the material we want. it is so clever, so smart. you don't have to do as much work because he has put his heart and soul into it and you feel that. , ., his heart and soul into it and you feel that. i. , ,., ~v his heart and soul into it and you feel that. i. , ,., ,, ., feel that. david, when you spoke to stehen feel that. david, when you spoke to stephen and _ feel that. david, when you spoke to stephen and he _ feel that. david, when you spoke to stephen and he see _ stephen and he see various reincarnations of things like westside story, did he keep an eye on those? did he look to see how his work was being interpreted or was he just, like, idid
7:46 am
work was being interpreted or was he just, like, i did what i needed to do, everyone canjust just, like, i did what i needed to do, everyone can just do what they want? do, everyone can 'ust do what they want? ., ., ~v do, everyone can 'ust do what they want? ., ., ,, . ., want? you would think that it would be the latter. _ want? you would think that it would be the latter, that _ want? you would think that it would be the latter, that he _ want? you would think that it would be the latter, that he would - want? you would think that it would be the latter, that he would go, - want? you would think that it would be the latter, that he would go, i i be the latter, that he would go, i have _ be the latter, that he would go, i have written this work and i will think— have written this work and i will think about something else, but in fact he _ think about something else, but in fact he was— think about something else, but in fact he was constantly fascinated by what successive generations did with his work _ what successive generations did with his work. on broadway currently in preview _ his work. on broadway currently in preview is — his work. on broadway currently in preview is marianne elliott's reduction of his 19705 show my company, _ reduction of his 19705 show my company, and she went to him sometime _ company, and she went to him sometime and said this is a show about— sometime and said this is a show about a _ sometime and said this is a show about a man who is 35 and is trying to work_ about a man who is 35 and is trying to work out— about a man who is 35 and is trying to work out whether or not he should be married _ to work out whether or not he should be married and his friends are telling — be married and his friends are telling him to be married. i want to do it now— telling him to be married. i want to do it now and make the lead a woman, and lots _ do it now and make the lead a woman, and lots of— do it now and make the lead a woman, and lots of writers would go, thank you very _ and lots of writers would go, thank you very much but no thank you, and he completely embraced the idea and was highiy— he completely embraced the idea and was highly involved in redeveloping the show _ was highly involved in redeveloping the show. it turn into a massive hit in london — the show. it turn into a massive hit in london and is now about to open on broadway. he was constantly
7:47 am
mentoring younger composers and tyricists _ mentoring younger composers and tyricists i— mentoring younger composers and lyricists. i would often be working at his _ lyricists. i would often be working at his house and young writers that had written — at his house and young writers that had written to him not really expecting much by way of return, would _ expecting much by way of return, would have received a letter saying, if you _ would have received a letter saying, if you are _ would have received a letter saying, if you are in — would have received a letter saying, if you are in new york, make an appointment i will come and talk to you about _ appointment i will come and talk to you about your work, and he did that _ you about your work, and he did that he — you about your work, and he did that. he believed that his life had been _ that. he believed that his life had been saved by teachers and he was really _ been saved by teachers and he was really intent on teaching the people that were _ really intent on teaching the people that were going to follow him. people — that were going to follow him. people will be aware, westside story, new movie virgin, this is steven spielberg. it is about to come out in the cinemas in december. we are seeing a little bit of it now. i can only imagine, he must have been aware that this was forthcoming. did he have any thoughts about it? he forthcoming. did he have any thoughts about it?— forthcoming. did he have any thoughts about it? forthcoming. did he have any thou~hts about it? , . ., thoughts about it? he sent me a note sa int thoughts about it? he sent me a note sa in: how thoughts about it? he sent me a note saying how happy _ thoughts about it? he sent me a note saying how happy he _ thoughts about it? he sent me a note saying how happy he was _ thoughts about it? he sent me a note saying how happy he was with it, - saying how happy he was with it, which _ saying how happy he was with it, which is — saying how happy he was with it, which is as— saying how happy he was with it, which is as good as you can get. he was very— which is as good as you can get. he was very involved with spielberg and slightly— was very involved with spielberg and slightly reordering the material and
7:48 am
they wrote a screenplay, and it was in consultation. all across it. it in consultation. all across it. [i is in consultation. all across it. is lovely in consultation. all across it. it is lovely hearing those tributes, and david, thank you very much for your time this morning, and andy, your time this morning, and andy, you perform some of those works, so you perform some of those works, so you know what that feels like, which is what lots of people just listening to the music, you get a sense of well. thank you for talking to us this morning.— to us this morning. thank you so much. to us this morning. thank you so much- ruth. _ to us this morning. thank you so much. ruth, people— to us this morning. thank you so much. ruth, people know- to us this morning. thank you so much. ruth, people know from i much. ruth, people know from musicals will _ much. ruth, people know from musicals will be _ much. ruth, people know from musicals will be seeking - much. ruth, people know from musicals will be seeking to - much. ruth, people know from musicals will be seeking to us i musicals will be seeking to us later. just after 9:30am this morning. now it's time for newswatch, with samira ahmed. we will see you at eight o'clock with the headlines. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. migrants or just people? we discuss the use of language in reporting on those trying to cross the english channel. and is this man the president
7:49 am
of belarus or not? it was a disaster many had predicted, but wednesday's news of a boat sinking in the english channel was no less shocking for that. here's the bbc�*s home editor mark easton on that evening's news at six. cold, but calm seas encouraged dozens of migrants, including many small children, to head down the beaches of calais this morning, preparing to make the perilous journey across the channel. where are you going now? the uk. uk. a number of small boats are understood to have pushed up —— off around dawn, but it now appears at least one vessel capsized with reports of around 30 deaths. the use of the word �*migrant�* there and widely across the bbc concerned some viewers such as veronique singer.
7:50 am
and dave tucker agreed. that view was supported in the house of commons on thursday by the home secretary, priti patel, who said that she would be asking the bbc and other media to reflect on what she called "inappropriate language". and to discuss the use of language on this story, i am joined now by richard burgess, the executive editor for uk news content at bbc news. well, richard, thank you very much for coming on newswatch. a lot of viewers are saying, "why don't you just call them people?" well, i think, first of all, i should say, this was a terrible human tragedy, as you were reflecting there, and i think it's important that our coverage reflects that
7:51 am
in a sensitive way and in a respectful way. in terms of the use "migrant", i think it's about being as clear and as accurate as we can be for the audience. it's a term that the audience understands, we know that from research. and, ultimately, it actually explains why those people were on the channel — they were migrating, they were migrants, they were trying to move to another country. so, i think it's about being clear and accurate, but at the same time, absolutely going on to try and tell the stories of those people as individuals. some people — and including the home secretary, it seems — are apparently saying the bbc�*s language is dehumanising. i don't think so. and i think we need to be a little careful here. i mean, the term "migrant" is about a person on the move — and a person on the move, often, for very good reasons — to avoid war, persecution, to get a better life for themselves. and we work really hard with our reporting to humanise the story, to speak to people who are making those
7:52 am
perilous journeys often. i don't know if you saw nick beake's report from dunkirk on the six and ten o'clock news where he spoke to one of the people in the migrant camp there who'd actually spoken to two people who were on that boat, and, you know, it was so moving, and i think that's really incumbent upon us to really work hard to tell the stories of these individuals, the journeys they've made, the pressures on them. i should say as well that there are some viewers who contacted us to say that they should all be called "illegal immigrants" — what's the bbc�*s position? yeah, again, ithink it's about being accurate, because i don't think that is accurate. if you look at the un's description on this, anybody has the right to claim asylum in another country. we don't know what the status of all those people who died on the boats were, but some may well have been seeking asylum, might�*ve had refugee status. so it wouldn't be accurate to describe them as illegal. how does the bbc decide which word to use?
7:53 am
you know, there's the word "refugee", there's the term "asylum seeker", and then the term "migrant". how do you decide when to use which one? we used migrants in this case because, you know, often it's not clear the reasons why somebody is travelling. as i say, they could be seeking asylum, they may already have refugee status, they may be somebody who's on the move for a better life for themselves and their families. so i think it's about us being as accurate as we can. and as we get more information on people, we get more accurate, you know. so, in this case, we've talked furtherly about men, women, that pregnant woman on the boat, children, so as you get more information, you get names, you get back stories, and i think that's a really important part of ourjournalism. when a tragedy happens like in the past week with the 27 people who drowned in the channel, it does create a huge emotional response from the public, and i wonder if it's a challenge, particularly at those moments, for the bbc to get the terminology right in reporting such a story? absolutely. and, you know, journalists within the bbc
7:54 am
feel that emotion as well. i think it's about being accurate, as i say, but i think it's about trying to tell stories, but also trying to get to the issues that obviously relate to this matter. so whether that's political issues, diplomatic issues, issues for local communities, the bigger geopolitical issues around wars around the world. so it's important that we try and put these things into context, it's important that we try and tell the human stories, and get our terminology right. richard burgess, thank you. another country where migration is high on the agenda is belarus, and last friday, its leader, alexandra lukashenko, granted a rare interview to the bbc�*s steve rosenberg. it was a combative encounter. translation: since july, 270 ngos have been shut down in belarus. - translation: |'u answer - your question with no bother. we'll massacre all the scum that
7:55 am
you, the west, have been financing. oh, you're upset that we've destroyed all your structures, your ngos and all those that you've been paying for. europe doesn't see mr lukashenko as a legitimate president. he claims not to care. many viewers praised steve rosenberg's interview, but in addition to that lack of recognition he mentioned from the eu, the uk government has also said it considers last year's presidential election in belarus to be fraudulent and it does not accept the results, which gave mr lukashenko 80% of the vote. so, some viewers were surprised that he was described on bbc news online as �*president lukashenko' and on tv headlines like this. in an exclusive bbc interview, the man known as europe's last dictator, president lukashenko of belarus, says he won't stop the flow of migrants through his country. one viewer, nordeast, posted this plea.
7:56 am
we put that point to bbc news and they gave us this statement. closer to home, on monday, the news at six reported that the brits, the biggest award ceremony in british music, were scrapping separate categories for men and women. here's sophie raworth. it will no longer give out prizes for best male or best female, but instead, choose one artist of the year. the brit award—winning singer
7:57 am
sam smith, who identifies as non—binary, has campaigned for the change. he says he felt unable to enter last year because of the gender—based nature of the categories. that use of the pronoun "he" in relation to sam smith, who's asked to be referred to as they or them rather than he or him infuriated some members of the audience, including grace davies. and george aylett wrote: well, bbc news told us: finally, the power
7:58 am
of the mute button. last thursday morning, the day the government announced it was scrapping the leeds leg of the h52 rail line, victoria derbyshire interviewed the conservative mp miriam cates. i would say we don't know the detail, but what's important is that we have deliverability and we have better transport, we have fast transport and we get that in the best way... with respect, wouldn't voters say, actually, what's most important is a prime minister keeping his promises? our promise is to level up... no, no, the promise was, no, excuse me, let's be accurate here — the promise was to build a high—speed rail line between nottingham and leeds, that's now not happening. keith sheppard spotted that miriam cates had carried on speaking there, but could not be heard. he emailed:
7:59 am
but mike wilson had a different perspective. we wondered why, when miriam cates and victoria derbyshire were seen to be speaking simultaneously, it was the presenter�*s voice that could be heard, not the guest's. so, we asked what had happened and were told: thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions about what you see, hear or read on bbc news on tv, radio, online or social media, email newswatch@bbc.co.uk or you can find us on twitter, @newswatchbbc. you can call us on:
8:00 am
and do have a look at our website for previous interviews: that's all from us. we'll be back to hear your thoughts about news coverage again next week. goodbye. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: the united states and australia join the list of countries banning flights from southern african countries after confirmation of a worrying new variant of coronavirus. a man is killed in northern ireland as storm arwen hits northern parts of the uk, with winds of nearly 100 miles per hour. with winds of nearly there with winds of nearly are still some very strong winds there are still some very strong winds out there this morning, a mix of rain, sleet and snow falling as well. . , ., , ..,
8:01 am
well. the weather will slowly come down through _ well. the weather will slowly come down through this _ well. the weather will slowly come down through this weekend, - well. the weather will slowly come down through this weekend, but i well. the weather will slowly come down through this weekend, but it| well. the weather will slowly come i down through this weekend, but it is going to stay cold. good morning. ex—england captain, michael vaughan speaks to this programme about the racism scandal, that has engulfed cricket. it follows allegations by former yorkshire player azeem rafiq. i played for yorkshire county cricket club for 18 years, and if in any way, shape orform, i'm responsible for any of his hurt, i apologise for that. good morning. it's saturday, 27th november. the united states and australia have become the latest in a growing list of countries to impose travel restrictions on people arriving from southern african countries. it comes amid mounting concern about a new variant of coronavirus, which has been named omicron by the world health organisation. scientists fear it could pose an increased risk of re—infection and current vaccines may be less effective. our health correspondent
8:02 am
dominic hughes has more. covid variant b.1.1.529 now has a name, omicron, according to the world health organization, which met in geneva last night to discuss the threat posed by this mutation of the coronavirus. the who had advised against travel bans, stressing instead that the measures we are all so familiar with — hand hygiene, masks and social distancing — are more important than ever. what's really important as an individual is to lower your exposure. these proven public health measures have never been more important — distancing, wearing of a mask, making sure that it's over your nose and mouth, with clean hands, making sure you avoid crowded spaces, be in rooms where there's good ventilation, and when it's your turn, get vaccinated. but governments around the world have taken a different view. the uk isjust one a number of countries to have imposed bans on southern african nations where cases have been identified. the united states, the eu, singapore, israel, japan, and kenya are among those who have
8:03 am
either imposed bans and restrictions on travellers or are considering them. i've decided that we're going to be cautious and make sure there's no travel to and from south africa and six other countries in that region — except for american citizens, who are able to come back. the who has described omicron as a variant of concern. it is the most mutated version of the virus yet, scientists identifying 50 mutations overall. more than 30 are on the spike protein, the target of most vaccines. and on the part of the virus that makes first contact with our body's cells, there are ten mutations compared to just two for the delta variant. so far, the evidence is that it's not causing a different spectrum of disease or death and that is really important but we do know that viruses mutate to become better
8:04 am
transmitting and then they can overtake the other viruses. the problem this may present for us is that this virus might evade some of the vaccines, but it probably won't evade people who have had boosters or two proper doses. all this comes as europe is facing a fresh wave of covid infections still linked to the delta variant. in the netherlands, fresh restrictions will come into force tomorrow. venue such as bars, cafes, museums and cinemas will have to close from 5pm. but, as so often through the course of this pandemic, decisions are clouded by uncertainty. exactly how transmissible this new variant is, whether it will make people sicker, the impact on existing treatments and how effective vaccines will be against it are all unknowns. it is likely to be some weeks before the answers to those questions become clear. the former england cricket captain michael vaughan has spoken publicly for the first time since being accused of racism by his yorkshire teammate azeem rafiq. speaking to bbc breakfast, before the england and wales cricket board released
8:05 am
a new action plan to tackle racism and discrimination, he apologised for any hurt he may have caused. michael vaughan leading england to the ashes in 2005. now he's fighting for his reputation after being accused by three asian players of making a racist comment ahead of a game for yorkshire. "too many of you lot, we need to do something about it." do you in any way remember or recognise those words? i don't. my recollection from that day — as i've said, i was a yorkshire player for 18 years. i was the first player to sign for that club that was not born in the county, so for 18 years we've gone from me being the first to sign for the club, for sachin tendulkar to be the first from overseas, to players being able to sign from other clubs. and it was my last few games, and ijust remember it clearly that i was proud as punch that we had four asian players representing
8:06 am
yorkshire county cricket club. it was azeem rafiq, the yorkshire whistleblower, who made the initial allegation. he has said that michael vaughan might not remember the alleged remarks because they didn't mean anything to him. yes, that hurts. that hurts, because i've always felt that every single team that i've been involved in — the biggest praise i ever got as the england captain for six years was that i was the kind of person that really galvanised the group, got the team working together as one. i always felt that i was the person in the dressing room that really wanted everyone to feel included. michael, you said you wanted to sit down with azeem and hear his story. the chances are he could be watching you this morning. he could be watching this now. what would be your message to him? i'm sorry for the hurt that he's gone through. yorkshire county cricket club, i believe, is me. you know, it's been my life.
8:07 am
whether i'm a player or not, i'm a senior ex—player and ex england captain, and i believe that once you've played for yorkshire you're always a yorkshire player. i'm sorry for all the hurt that he's gone through. hopefully — time, i don't think, can ever be a healer in the situation that he's gone through. but hopefully time can be a way of us making sure that yorkshire county cricket club never goes through this situation again and never puts themselves in a position of denial that they treated a player so badly. vaughan says he wants to work with azeem rafiq to repair the damage done to cricket. he also says he regrets and is embarrassed by several posts he made on social media between 2010 and 2018, insisting he wouldn't post them now. when i look back on my 12 years on social media, i regret many tweets. i regret the tweets that you've just read out. i apologise deeply to anyone that
8:08 am
i offended with those tweets. since retirement, michael vaughan has covered cricket for bbc radio, but earlier this week it was revealed that he has been stood down from his role at the ashes in australia this winter. yeah, i won't be doing the ashes, which i understand. editorial at the minute, the story is all about azeem rafiq and racism in the game of cricket. i get that. ijust hope, in time, i get that chance to come back, and the one thing that i've loved more than anything since i retired is talking cricket. i love being on test match special, and hopefully in time i'll get that chance to do it again. michael vaughan's hopes for a return to the airwaves rest with his employers. it is his hope that he will have a role in helping to repair the damage done to cricket by this racism scandal. dan walker, bbc news. we put the remarks made
8:09 am
by michael vaughan in that interview to azeem rafiq, but he declined to comment. it saturday morning. you probably know this already if you are waking up know this already if you are waking up in northern parts of the uk, they have been hit by winds of almost 100 mph overnight caused by storm arwen. amber and yellow weather warnings remain in place, with more strong winds and further travel disruption expected. tens of thousands of people are waking up this morning without power — and in wales, many railand bus services have been suspended. we'll speak to our reporter cameron buttle, who's in scotland, injust a moment, but first, let's speak to alison freeman, who's in whitley bay. good morning. it's the first chance we have had to see you this morning in daylight and we are getting a sense of the wind buffeting you now. yes, just overnight the met office recorded a top wind speed of 98 mph, that was a little bit further up the coast. you can see i'm getting blown
8:10 am
about a bit. if you can see the sea behind me, someone hasjust commented they have never seen the sea at whitley bay look like this before. on our drive in this morning, there is a lot of debris on the roads. a temporary traffic lights had been blown over, and on one street all of the barriers that had been put up far roadworks had also been blown across the street so there is quite a mess and a lot of clearing up today. we know there is disruption on the rail, they have asked people not to travel at all this weekend because they have problems on the line with the debris. more locally, the metro closed early last night and bosses are saying it is unlikely to open until nine o'clock this morning because again, they have been posting on social media pictures of trees and other debris on the line. as you mentioned, 55,000 homes in the north—east are without power. the power grid say they are unlikely
8:11 am
to get that power back on until later today. to get that power back on until later today-— to get that power back on until later toda . ~ ., later today. well done in the wind because i know _ later today. well done in the wind because i know it _ later today. well done in the wind because i know it is _ later today. well done in the wind because i know it is playing - later today. well done in the wind because i know it is playing havoc| because i know it is playing havoc with the microphone, but we will see you later on. thank you. an amber weather warning remains in place for some parts of scotland this morning. our reporter cameron buttle is in coldstream in the scottish borders for us — cameron, what's the situation there? significant disruption across this area last night, straight down the east coast of scotland. still 80,000 homes without power in these areas, in morayshire, aberdeenshire, perthshire, significant disruption of there and on the rail which will continue right through the weekend. a5 continue right through the weekend. as you can see behind me, there has been horrific damage across rural areas on the east coast. i'm on the scottish borders. there is so much debris on the road, it sometimes felt like i was driving off—road
8:12 am
when i was on the road. you can see the trees behind me and you can see the trees behind me and you can see the house just here outside coldstream, they had a lucky escape. they told me they were listening from midnight onwards to tree after tree coming down before the local tree coming down before the local tree surgeon came out and cleared the road. this isjust one road down in the scottish borders. there is significant disruption to come today. the advice is to check before you travel and only travel if you really have to do.— you travel and only travel if you really have to do. thank you, can render. really have to do. thank you, can render- you _ really have to do. thank you, can render. you take _ really have to do. thank you, can render. you take care _ really have to do. thank you, can render. you take care too. - here's ben with a look at this morning's weather. the pictures are pretty dramatic, a lot of people are sending pictures of trees coming down. what is the picture across the uk? absolutely, and the disruption _ picture across the uk? absolutely, and the disruption has _ picture across the uk? absolutely, and the disruption has been - and the disruption has been widespread with various different types of weather. obviously we have had the strong winds and the gusts close to 100 mph in parts of
8:13 am
northumberland. it is all of course because of storm arwen, this area of low pressure, and we still have a squeeze of strong winds. these areas still have met office amber warning is in force. the warnings expire at nine o'clock this morning, the one in eastern scotland, north—east england, coast and parts of wales and the south—west, but although they expire at nine o'clock there are still yellow warning is in force and the winds will only slowly ease as the day wears on. we have also had some snow in places, this was the scene in sheffield. you can see it is a bit of a messy mix of rain, sleet and snow that has been falling, most of the snow over high ground but some too lower levels. in scotland there is no falling at relatively lower levels. as we go through the day, the winds that have
8:14 am
been so badly affected easing. brighter skies following into wales and west in england. northern ireland having a mix of sunshine and showers, but as i mentioned, lots of the showers will be wintry. not as windy this afternoon for the exposed coasts in the north and indeed the west, but actually turning a bit more windy as we go through the day across parts of eastern england, and those ir temperatures. single did —— digits for all and it will feel cold. we keep some cloud and rain pushing into northern ireland, a bit more snow into north—west scotland, but where we see clear skies, temperatures will drop like a stone down to —6 degrees in some places out in the countryside, so ice is quite a significant concern tomorrow morning. for many, some spells of sunshine tomorrow. this wet and wintry weather to clear from eastern
8:15 am
england. a bit of cloud and patchy rain into northern ireland, west wales and the far south—west of england later. but in between, sunny skies and light winds. it will be calmer but still cold. for the weekend temperatures up and down, touching double digits at times. brisk winds at times but hopefully nothing as stormy as we have seen at the start of this weekend. back to you. the start of this weekend. back to ou. . ~' the start of this weekend. back to ou. . ,, y ., y the start of this weekend. back to ou. . ~' , ., , . the start of this weekend. back to ou. . , . , the start of this weekend. back to ou. .~ , . , you. thank you very much, see you later on. quarter past eight is the time. the uk has recorded its highest number of daily coronavirus cases in more than five weeks, after a further 50,000 people tested positive in the latest 24—hour period. it comes amid growing concern that existing vaccines could be less effective against a new mutated variant of the virus, first identified in south africa. we're joined now by one of our regular gps, dr nighat arif. very good morning to you. do you
8:16 am
want tojust share very good morning to you. do you want to just share with us some of your thoughts as a gp, as you have watched, as everyone has, looking at this new variant. it's important to say limited number of cases, it is not in the uk yet and has been taken to try to keep it away to stop it spreading. what are your thoughts? the first thing, just as a member of the public you get heart sinking feeling. i'm going to tackle this as a clinician and is a member of the public. because as doctors, we are humans who have family members with health problems or even our own health problems or even our own health problems. the new variant, we knew it was going to be coming. it is very naive as head clinicians not to think we would get a variant at some point. this has lots of different mutations on the spike protein and it is far more transmissible. we compare it to the
8:17 am
delta variant, where the most dominant variant in the uk, that took about six weeks to become the most dominant, this has gone from zero to about 60% transmission within two weeks so it is far more transmissible. because it has the changes on the spike protein, we are worried that it could render the vaccine programme something that will affect the barrier against this outbreak in the country. we are not averse to having variants of concern. so this is that feeling of here we go again, but we know how viruses behave and we can do so many things already as members of the public. making sure we are hand washing, having physical distancing, wearing masks effectively around our mouth and nose enclosed spaces, making sure that if we can work from home, we have got to look at our travel, and this is where we have got to get ahead of the virus. we
8:18 am
have been here before with variant and this is where we have to learn the lesson from the past for the future. as a member of the public, am i worried? i'm not panicking. i have a son who is immunocompromised, has had a liver transplant, and as variants come around i do get worried as a mother. our occupational hazard is we get infected by patients. i think it is naive to think we don't have the omicron variant in this country because i always like to prepare as a mother and doctor as well, and this is where it's a mother and doctor as well, and this is where its key. we know the measures have worked to keep the numbers down and we should be reliant on that. you numbers down and we should be reliant on that.— reliant on that. you are very well-placed _ reliant on that. you are very well-placed that _ reliant on that. you are very well-placed that a _ reliant on that. you are very well-placed that a of- reliant on that. you are veryj well-placed that a of people reliant on that. you are very - well-placed that a of people are well—placed that a of people are saying, they talk about this new variant which means think even harder about getting the vaccines
8:19 am
and a booster. leaving aside those people who had clinical reasons not to be vaccinated, what do you see of people who are still choosing not to be vaccinated?— be vaccinated? unfortunately, the misinformation _ be vaccinated? unfortunately, the misinformation is _ be vaccinated? unfortunately, the misinformation is well _ be vaccinated? unfortunately, the misinformation is well and - be vaccinated? unfortunately, the misinformation is well and alive i misinformation is well and alive around the vaccines just as much as the virus is so we are still getting people who are incredibly hesitant. the reason we have that is because i feel as clinicians we are not effectively able to communicate with them. a lot of people i'm seeing are not anti—vaxxers, theyjust them. a lot of people i'm seeing are not anti—vaxxers, they just feel they don't have enough of their questions answered so we have got to get better as clinicians at answering the hesitancy is they might have, but we are getting better. in my population i'm dealing with actually they are so grateful to get the booster vaccine. we still have some patients who say i have two vaccines, why should i get a booster? that is human nature. we hate being told what to do but we
8:20 am
are finding people are getting the vaccine. nearly 70% of the population has had two vaccines which gives us some protection but we have got to look at what our leaders are saying because as we head into the winter months, we are under pressure. inundated with not just covid viruses, pneumonia, norovirus, a lot of the other viruses in the community. and again, there was viruses will be held back by public health measures. hand washing, physical distancing, face mask wearing. i know we have got complacent about face mask wearing since it has become a choice. but if anyone says to me i don't want to wear a face mask, look, covid is an airborne virus, pleasejust wear a face mask, look, covid is an airborne virus, please just wear a mask because no harm comes from wearing a mask. you are only going to protect yourself and those around you. we are in a global pandemic. we
8:21 am
are only vaccinated as a community, but we need to get the global vaccination programme up and running because this is what happens, we end “p because this is what happens, we end up getting mutations. yesterday he said we have got to look at the poorer nations around the country because we will get these variants and then be back to square one again. i and then be back to square one aaain. ., , and then be back to square one aaain. .,, ,, and then be back to square one aaain. . , ., again. i hope you get a bit of time to yourself— again. i hope you get a bit of time to yourself today. _ again. i hope you get a bit of time to yourself today. get _ again. i hope you get a bit of time to yourself today. get a _ again. i hope you get a bit of time to yourself today. get a cup - again. i hope you get a bit of time to yourself today. get a cup of- to yourself today. get a cup of coffee, enjoy yourself. i to yourself today. get a cup of coffee, enjoy yourself.- coffee, enjoy yourself. i have! welcome. _ coffee, enjoy yourself. i have! welcome, naga _ coffee, enjoy yourself. i have! welcome, naga and _ coffee, enjoy yourself. i have! welcome, naga and charlie. | coffee, enjoy yourself. i have! i welcome, naga and charlie. 20 coffee, enjoy yourself. i have! - welcome, naga and charlie. 20 past eitht is welcome, naga and charlie. 20 past ei . ht is the welcome, naga and charlie. 20 past eight is the time. _ a widespread shortage of care workers who help people with daily tasks like washing and cooking is putting huge pressure family members who have stepped in to help look after their loved ones. one merseyside support group says unpaid carers are becoming increasing desperate, asjill dunigan has been finding out.
8:22 am
for 63 years, derek and yvonne have been side by side, but recently life's been challenging. i've got problems with mobility. yvonne's got problems with her memory and various other things. you name it, we've got it. derek and yvonne now need extensive help to stay in their home. for the past year, that's been provided by theirfamily, particularly their daughter, mandy. i make sure that the washing is done and the dishes are done and that they have meals. i was starting to have to do personal care and it got to the point where my dad couldn't get out of bed by himself and my mum needed help. and then it was like, i think we need carers in. the family arranged for an agency to come three times a week. but then yvonne fell and ended up in hospital. they said she was ready to be released from hospital to come home, but we had to have a care package in place unless family stepped in. because they couldn't
8:23 am
organise it in time, so i agreed, i moved in and helped with everything. and then six weeks later, a care package was organised. that hospital care package ends in a fortnight. mandy now needs her own care company to come more often — four times every day, but they can't do it. they are able still to offer their two visits a day on three days, but they haven't got the capacity to increase that. so we've either got to look for another care company to fill the gaps or i'm filling the gaps. mandy's care company is also in southport and they're currently being inundated with requests like hers, but theyjust haven't got the staff. we had someone from norwich wanting us to provide carers to their... from norwich? from norwich, yeah, because they couldn't get any carers at all. and one lady phoned, she wasn't from southport but she tried 20, we were her 20th agency and nobody could provide care for her family. the agency has gone to extraordinary
8:24 am
lengths to try to solve the issue. we wrote to all our staff and said, "if you can introduce a new carer to us, we will give you £1,000 bonus at the end of the new carer being with us for six months." but we had no response from that at all. none? none whatsoever, no. is it about money? partly money, i think, yeah. the company would like to pay more, but they say the money they get in fees isn't enough to do that. one of the big supermarkets is offering a £300 joining bonus and 30% discount on their shopping, but we can't compete with that. the problems in getting staff isn't unique to this agency or even to this town, it's everywhere, and it's creating huge amounts of stress for unpaid carers like mandy, who then have to struggle to provide that care themselves. many of those carers end up at this local charity, which provides vital support to those who often feel they have nowhere else to turn.
8:25 am
mentally it's enormous help. it really is, meeting people. people support each other. they give little nuggets of information that really does help. the minute we walked _ through the door, we were asked about benefits, how it was coping, what we were getting, _ it's been absolutely lovely. the charity says an increasing number of carers are becoming increasingly desperate with the current situation. and we are at breaking point, total breaking point in the world that they have because they can't get that break in support because there's no staff there in the care of agencies to help. the charity has been running for 27 years but this year they've introduced a new service. this is the first time that we're having to actually focus on bespoke training around suicide prevention and enabling staff and our volunteers to be supportive
8:26 am
in these conversations. suicide prevention? so you're actually getting people contacting, you know, who are suicidal because they can't get the help they need? on a daily basis. the centre's doing all it can, but what it can't do is solve the crisis. i don't see anything good. i don't see a plan. i don't see where where this is going to get better. i cannot see where it's going to get better. in the meantime, mandy, derek and yvonne have just two weeks to find another agency. if they can't provide the amount of care that we want, um, i find it very difficult to know exactly how we will manage. but manage we will. we're joined now by helen walker, chief executive of carers uk. good morning to you. the carers you represent are unpaid carers. do you just want to explain... that report was taking a look at the shortage of paid carers and some of the efforts that agencies have been making to get more into the industry to help,
8:27 am
but unpaid carers, just talk to me typically about the situation they are in. ~ . . typically about the situation they arein.~ ., , typically about the situation they arein. . , , �*, are in. what is happening is there's are in. what is happening is there's a knock on — are in. what is happening is there's a knock on effect _ are in. what is happening is there's a knock on effect by _ are in. what is happening is there's a knock on effect by the _ are in. what is happening is there's a knock on effect by the lack - a knock on effect by the lack of paid carers. unpaid carers are picking up the slack and have been doing so for a long time, but particularly throughout the pandemic. services, respite centres have been closed. a5 pandemic. services, respite centres have been closed. as they have reopened, they have not reopened at the same level so carers, as you heard on your vtjust now, they are teetering on the brink because they are taking on more and more care with less and less held by the coming into the house or being able to use respite centres to get a break. 50 72% of carers have said they haven't had a break since the pandemic started. those are people who are constantly looking after the person they care for, and that is just not sustainable, so we are going to see the terrible and really concerning things you have just heard, with people teetering on the
8:28 am
edge. heard, with people teetering on the edre, . ., ., , heard, with people teetering on the edte.~ . ., , . heard, with people teetering on the edrer ., ., , ., heard, with people teetering on the ede.. ., ., , ., ,, edge. what does that look like, helen? because _ edge. what does that look like, helen? because when - edge. what does that look like, j helen? because when someone edge. what does that look like, i helen? because when someone is caring for someone and trying to get on with life, earning a living, running a household, what does it look like? you have spoken of them teetering on the brink, the actual carers but also the care they are offering when they are exhausted. exactly, so it is very difficult to provide that level of care when you are exhausted but also very difficult to look after yourself. the problem of course is carers are teetering on the brink, and if they do break down, the health and social care service will then have to pick up care service will then have to pick up two people. that will then put even greater pressure on the services. even before the pandemic, 600 people a day were giving up work to care because they weren't able to juggle to care because they weren't able to juggle work and care, so that has huge financial implications. carer�*s allowance is the lowest benefit of its type at 67.60 a week, so you
8:29 am
could go from a salary to a really low benefit, so there is financial implications which has long term implications. what we need is investment in social care but also some investment in breaks for unpaid carers so they don't teeter over the edge and they can look after their own mental and physical wellbeing. in the meantime though, i mean asking for that funding, ok, but in the meantime we are hearing in that report from care providers who have done things like try to offer a bonus orjoining incentive who have said to their own carers they employ, can you introduce someone? and over a six—month period no one introduced anyone. if they are not gathering those to employment, the stalemate continues, doesn't it? it does, and it's terribly worrying.
8:30 am
there is a point about investment, so money isn't the solution to everything, it's also about recognising and valuing care workers. but more importantly is recognising and valuing work that unpaid carers do because they are doing it behind closed doors and they feel they are the forgotten carers in this pandemic. they have picked up the slack is we have gone through this pandemic of the crumbling social care service and now they are on the edge. we need to get them some help somehow, and i don't have the solution to social care but i certainly know that we need to do more quickly. in the spending review there simply wasn't enough money to local authorities. the money that has been allocated through the levy is mostly to the nhs. this is an immediate problem. you heard in your vt, people are suicidal. that cannot happen, it cannot be allowed in our society, so
8:31 am
we need to find a solution very quickly. well it is happening, that is why we ran this report. at this moment in time, carers uk, when you get a phone call from someone who is, in your words, teetering, what do you say to them? in terms of the message today, or anyone who may know someone in that situation, what can you do? someone in that situation, what can ou do? . . ., , someone in that situation, what can ou do? . . . , ., you do? there are a variety of su ort you do? there are a variety of support groups- _ you do? there are a variety of support groups. the - you do? there are a variety of support groups. the first - you do? there are a variety of| support groups. the first point you do? there are a variety of. support groups. the first point of call is to go on to our website and you will find some posting to your local carers centre, for example. you should go to your local authority for advice. you have an entitlement to a carers assessment, and there are a variety of carers well being groups. we run an online forum and a series of support sessions, and there are a variety of organisations that support people who are suicidal. but we should not
8:32 am
be in this situation. we should not be in this situation. we should not be having to support people who are at that terrible stage. we need to find a way of investing in social care, investing in unpaid carers as soon as possible so that we don't have to pick up the pieces. but right now, the immediacy of the problem is about going to your local authority and your local carers centres, go to our website and our own national helpline and we will signpost you to the help you need. helen walker, ceo of carers uk, thank you for your time with us this morning on breakfast. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today:
8:33 am
we have been talking to michael vaughan in light of the allegations about azeem �*5 time at yorkshire county cricket club. about azeem 's time at yorkshire county cricket club.— about azeem 's time at yorkshire county cricket club. yes, and he sat down and talked _ county cricket club. yes, and he sat down and talked about _ county cricket club. yes, and he sat down and talked about this - county cricket club. yes, and he sat down and talked about this before. | the former england captain, michael vaughan, has apologised for any hurt he may have caused his yorkshire teammate, azeem rafiq. commenting publically for the first time since being accused of racism, he spoke to bbc breakfast, before the england and wales cricket board, released its new action plan to tackle racism and discrimination. it has been very difficult. i have seen the stress and the hurt that
8:34 am
azeem rafiq has gone through. i care hugely about cricket and about yorkshire cricket, and i can see the yorkshire cricket, and i can see the yorkshire cricket club in particular has not dealt with the situation at all well. i see a young lad, someone that i played with, that has gone through a huge amount of hurt. i have to take some response ability for that because i played for yorkshire county cricket club for 18 years, and if in any way, shape or form i am responsible for any of his hurt, i apologise for that. you know, seeing a young person sitting in front of the parliamentary committee in tears, going through his experiences, you know, that hurts. �* . his experiences, you know, that hurts. �* , �* ., ., hurts. i'm sure you've gone over many conversations _ hurts. i'm sure you've gone over many conversations you - hurts. i'm sure you've gone over many conversations you have i hurts. i'm sure you've gone over| many conversations you have had hurts. i'm sure you've gone over. many conversations you have had in the past over the last few weeks. did you, during your time at yorkshire cricket, did you ever make
8:35 am
any racist comments? ila. yorkshire cricket, did you ever make any racist comments?— any racist comments? no, i didn't. no. i any racist comments? no, i didn't. no- i have — any racist comments? no, i didn't. no- i have got _ any racist comments? no, i didn't. no. i have got to _ any racist comments? no, i didn't. no. i have got to be _ any racist comments? no, i didn't. no. i have got to be honest, - any racist comments? no, i didn't. no. i have got to be honest, you i no. i have got to be honest, you know, 18 years in a professional dressing room, ten of those with england, i would dressing room, ten of those with england, iwould be dressing room, ten of those with england, i would be lying if i sat here now and said i'd never heard words or conversations that i would certainly pick out now. you know, we are a long way on from that. i believe society is a different place. we are in a world now and we all know that things back then were wrong, and things are getting better now. that's the platform that i think we all want to try and create. our move on from this situation is the key. ifirmly believe our move on from this situation is the key. i firmly believe that it is education, honest conversations, people admitting that things may have been said and sticking their hands up and saying yes, maybe i did say one or two things, but back then
8:36 am
it wasn't deemed to be offensive but obviously now it would be. let it wasn't deemed to be offensive but obviously now it would be.— obviously now it would be. let me read ou obviously now it would be. let me read you the _ obviously now it would be. let me read you the quote _ obviously now it would be. let me read you the quote that _ obviously now it would be. let me read you the quote that three - read you the quote that three players said you said to them. "too many of you lot, we need to do something about it". do you remember or recognise those words? i something about it". do you remember or recognise those words?— or recognise those words? i don't. my recollection _ or recognise those words? i don't. my recollection from _ or recognise those words? i don't. my recollection from that - or recognise those words? i don't. my recollection from that day, - or recognise those words? i don't. my recollection from that day, as l or recognise those words? i don't. j my recollection from that day, as i said, i was a yorkshire playerfor 18 years, i was the first player to sign for that club that was not born in the county. the 18 years we have gone from me being the first to sign for the club to its action tell zilkha to be the first overseas, to players being able to sign from other clubs, and it was my last few games, i remember it clearly, i was proud as punch that we had four asian players representing yorkshire county cricket club. nothing but a proud senior, old projust about county cricket club. nothing but a proud senior, old pro just about to retire, absolutely delighted that yorkshire had come so far in my time at the club. are they lying? i'll
8:37 am
think we have got to move on from accusations of conversations for many years ago. there is a bigger picture here. i said from the minute that this has been talked about that yorkshire have dealt with it terribly. they avoided it. they thought it was going to go away. they were stubborn, thinking this was not going to come out. for that, i can apologise as a former yorkshire player. what azeem rafiq has gone through over the last few years, and obviously his campaign in the last year, it would have been awful for him to try and the last year, it would have been awfulfor him to try and do, i think we are all responsible as former yorkshire players. we have all got to take responsibility and the important aspect of a dressing room is culture, and it has to be inclusive. ifeel is culture, and it has to be inclusive. i feel throughout my whole time, i can look back and i honestly believe it was inclusive, but i'm more than happy for someone to have a conversation with me to say that it wasn't. can to have a conversation with me to say that it wasn't.— to have a conversation with me to say that it wasn't. can you see that there is a difference _
8:38 am
say that it wasn't. can you see that there is a difference between - say that it wasn't. can you see that there is a difference between you i there is a difference between you saying if i upset him, i apologise him, and "i'm sorry". saying ifi upset him, i apologise him, and "i'm sorry".— saying ifi upset him, i apologise him, and "i'm sorry". yes, again, we can to him, and "i'm sorry". yes, again, we can go round — him, and "i'm sorry". yes, again, we can go round corners _ him, and "i'm sorry". yes, again, we can go round corners in _ him, and "i'm sorry". yes, again, we can go round corners in terms - him, and "i'm sorry". yes, again, we can go round corners in terms of- can go round corners in terms of having conversations, and i can apologise if i was involved in any way, shape orform in a dressing room that had a culture that wasn't inclusive for everyone. my recollections are of all the dressing rooms i paid in, that we were inclusive to everyone. but i'm more than happy for people to come forward and say, that was not the case. . . . , ., forward and say, that was not the case. a . forward and say, that was not the case. v. ., forward and say, that was not the case. a . , case. michael, you said you listen to the dcm _ case. michael, you said you listen to the dcm s _ case. michael, you said you listen to the dcm s hearing _ case. michael, you said you listen to the dcm s hearing where - case. michael, you said you listen i to the dcm s hearing where azeem to the dcm 5 hearing where azeem rafiq spoke for some time. can you press play on that and watch what he said about you. it press play on that and watch what he said about you-— said about you. it was a long time ato. said about you. it was a long time ago- michael— said about you. it was a long time ago. michael might _ said about you. it was a long time ago. michael might not _ said about you. it was a long time | ago. michael might not remember said about you. it was a long time i ago. michael might not remember it because _ ago. michael might not remember it because it _ ago. michael might not remember it because it doesn't mean anything to him. because it doesn't mean anything to him but— because it doesn't mean anything to him. but three of us, we remember it. him. but three of us, we remember it we _ him. but three of us, we remember it we have — him. but three of us, we remember it. we have spoken at length about it. we have spoken at length about it michaet— it. we have spoken at length about it. michael used this platform at the daily—
8:39 am
it. michael used this platform at the daily telegraph to try and discredit before anything had even spoken— discredit before anything had even spoken about, again, he clearly had a snippet _ spoken about, again, he clearly had a snippet of— spoken about, again, he clearly had a snippet of my statement. | spoken about, again, he clearly had a snippet of my statement.- a snippet of my statement. i mean, there are two _ a snippet of my statement. i mean, there are two specific _ a snippet of my statement. i mean, there are two specific allegations i there are two specific allegations in that. let's deal with the last one first. the daily telegraph article. ,, one first. the daily telegraph article. . article. do you regret writing that? i don't. article. do you regret writing that? i don't- itut — article. do you regret writing that? i don't- itut i _ article. do you regret writing that? l don't. but | will— article. do you regret writing that? i don't. but i will say _ article. do you regret writing that? i don't. but i will say that - article. do you regret writing that? i don't. but i will say that i - article. do you regret writing that? i don't. but i will say that i think i i don't. but i will say that i think the whole of this situation i think many will regret, and i regret many things about it. december the 15th was the first time, twenty20, that i got given a statement with these allegations, 11 years on from the game itself. that hurt me deeply. it hurt me deeply to think a player did not feel i was inclusive towards them in a team environment. i always felt that in my time playing the
8:40 am
game, eitheras felt that in my time playing the game, either as a player, and now as a broadcaster, the 30 years i have always felt i was that person that includes everybody. the always felt i was that person that includes everybody.— always felt i was that person that includes everybody. the other thing he raised was _ includes everybody. the other thing he raised was he _ includes everybody. the other thing he raised was he said _ includes everybody. the other thing he raised was he said you _ includes everybody. the other thing he raised was he said you properly i he raised was he said you properly don't remember making the comment because it doesn't mean anything to you. it's almost as damaging as the allegation of the comment itself. that hurts because i have always felt that every single team i have been involved in, the biggest praise i ever got as the england captain for six years was that i was the galvanised at the group and got the team working together as one. i really felt i was the person in the dressing room who wanted to get everyone included. i dressing room who wanted to get everyone included.— everyone included. i know this is uncomfortable _ everyone included. i know this is uncomfortable and _ everyone included. i know this is uncomfortable and i'm _ everyone included. i know this is uncomfortable and i'm going - everyone included. i know this is uncomfortable and i'm going to i everyone included. i know this is - uncomfortable and i'm going to read some things you have put on social media in the past. there are old
8:41 am
tweets of yours that have been doing the rounds in the last few weeks. from 2010 you said. finally, in response to an actor and presenter after the manchester arena attack in 2017, you suggested it might be appropriate for one cricketer to go around and asking muslims he doesn't know if they are terrorists. those are your words, those are your tweets, that's how you have chosen to portray yourself online. is that who you are?— to portray yourself online. is that who you are? to portray yourself online. is that who ou are? . ,, . , who you are? damn, i look back at my 12 ears who you are? damn, i look back at my 12 years on — who you are? damn, i look back at my 12 years on social— who you are? damn, i look back at my 12 years on social media _ who you are? damn, i look back at my 12 years on social media and _ who you are? damn, i look back at my 12 years on social media and i - 12 years on social media and i regret many tweets. i regret the ones who just read out, i regret many tweets. i regret the ones whojust read out, i have apologise deeply to anyone i
8:42 am
offended with those tweets. would ou not offended with those tweets. would you not send _ offended with those tweets. would you not send those _ offended with those tweets. would you not send those now? - offended with those tweets. would i you not send those now? absolutely not. times have _ you not send those now? absolutely not. times have moved _ you not send those now? absolutely not. times have moved on, - you not send those now? absolutely not. times have moved on, and - you not send those now? absolutely not. times have moved on, and i i not. times have moved on, and i regret those tweets. i regret things i have done this week! we have all made mistakes and in my life i have made mistakes and in my life i have made quite a few mistakes and i apologise for that, but i can't suddenly get rid of it. it has happened. i hope people realise and know me. i think sometimes through social media people can presume who you are and interpret who you are because of a tweet or two, but i know who i am and i hope the people close to me know exactly who i am. does it embarrass you, reading those back? . you does it embarrass you, reading those back? yes. you feel you are a different _ back? yes. you feel you are a different person _ back? yes. you feel you are a different person now? - back? jazz you feel you are a different person now? absolutely. you were a player at yorkshire county cricket club from 1993 until 2009. can you give us an insight
8:43 am
because lots of people have talked about the culture at the cricket club. you were there for a long time. what was it like? it club. you were there for a long time. what was it like?- club. you were there for a long time. what was it like? it was an environment _ time. what was it like? it was an environment that _ time. what was it like? it was an environment that you _ time. what was it like? it was an environment that you knew - time. what was it like? it was an environment that you knew you i time. what was it like? it was an i environment that you knew you had time. what was it like? it was an - environment that you knew you had to work hard. it was an environment that, you know, you tried to win. i neverfelt that, you know, you tried to win. i never felt anything but welcomed stop during your time there, you said you listened to what azeem rafiq said at the hearing when he talked about some of the racist comments that he had said to him, and some of the cultural issues at the club as well.— and some of the cultural issues at the club as well. were you aware of that during — the club as well. were you aware of that during any _ the club as well. were you aware of that during any of _ the club as well. were you aware of that during any of your— the club as well. were you aware of that during any of your time? - the club as well. were you aware of that during any of your time? no, l the club as well. were you aware of that during any of your time? no, i | that during any of your time? no, i never heard _ that during any of your time? no, i never heard that. _ that during any of your time? no, i never heard that. as _ that during any of your time? no, i never heard that. as i _ that during any of your time? no, i never heard that. as i said - that during any of your time? iirr, i never heard that. as i said before, i heard plenty of things in my 18 years as a player in the dressing room which i would not even consider to be acceptable now, and i would say any sportsperson that is out there from that era that says otherwise, i don't think they are telling the truth. there were things said and back on the day it wasn't
8:44 am
deemed to be offensive. it would be now. i never heard racial language in the dressing room. isine now. i never heard racial language in the dressing room.— in the dressing room. one indian batsmen. _ in the dressing room. one indian batsmen. you — in the dressing room. one indian batsmen, you in _ in the dressing room. one indian batsmen, you in 2018 _ in the dressing room. one indian batsmen, you in 2018 when - in the dressing room. one indian batsmen, you in 2018 when you i in the dressing room. one indian i batsmen, you in 2018 when you are playing australia said he was dot—macro. that was just three years ago. is that acceptable now and do you regret saying that? can you see how something like that, where you can't say someone's name because they are from a different culture, can be a problem? from a different culture, can be a roblem? . from a different culture, can be a roblem? , , , problem? yes, i can completely acce -t problem? yes, i can completely accept that- _ problem? yes, i can completely accept that. clearly _ problem? yes, i can completely accept that. clearly we - problem? yes, i can completely accept that. clearly we are - problem? yes, i can completely accept that. clearly we are in i accept that. clearly we are in different times now. as you say, that was three years ago, that's how much times have moved on in three years, so when you talk about five years, so when you talk about five years, ten years, 12 years, things move so quickly. we are in the situation now for the game, sporting dressing rooms, notjust cricket dressing rooms, notjust cricket dressing rooms, notjust cricket dressing rooms, where i think
8:45 am
everyone needs to be educated, understanding, and the only reason why we can get to that is by having conversations. i think everyone needs to know, whereas that line? where is that line but that can happen in the dressing room and this can't happen because the market may have happened back in the day, but it now can't happen. does have happened back in the day, but it now can't happen.— it now can't happen. does cricket have a problem _ it now can't happen. does cricket have a problem with _ it now can't happen. does cricket have a problem with racism? - it now can't happen. does cricketl have a problem with racism? yes, it now can't happen. does cricket - have a problem with racism? yes, and i think have a problem with racism? yes, and i think cricket — have a problem with racism? yes, and i think cricket has _ have a problem with racism? yes, and i think cricket has to _ have a problem with racism? yes, and i think cricket has to accept _ have a problem with racism? yes, and i think cricket has to accept that - i think cricket has to accept that problem. that's why i keep saying we need to have conversations. we need to be open and honest. we need to be very understanding. we need people to come forward and tell their stories. i hope in five years' time we are looking back and maybe we could be sat here and say that was a line in the sand.— line in the sand. many people have seen that the _ line in the sand. many people have seen that the bbc _ line in the sand. many people have seen that the bbc have _ line in the sand. many people have seen that the bbc have taken - line in the sand. many people have seen that the bbc have taken you i seen that the bbc have taken you away from your cricketing duties at the moment. what have they said about the future?— about the future? yes, i won't be doint about the future? yes, i won't be doin: the about the future? yes, i won't be doing the ashes, _ about the future? yes, i won't be doing the ashes, which _ about the future? yes, i won't be doing the ashes, which i - about the future? yes, i won't be - doing the ashes, which i understand.
8:46 am
the story is all about azeem rafiq and racism in cricket, i get that. i just hope in time i get that chance to come back. the one thing i've loved more than anything since i retired is talking cricket. i love being on test match special, and hopefully in time i will get the chance to do it again.- hopefully in time i will get the chance to do it again. have they said there _ chance to do it again. have they said there is _ chance to do it again. have they said there is a _ chance to do it again. have they said there is a time _ chance to do it again. have they said there is a time when - chance to do it again. have they said there is a time when they l chance to do it again. have they l said there is a time when they will reconsider you coming back to the job? reconsider you coming back to the “ob? ., . reconsider you coming back to the 'ob? ., ., ., reconsider you coming back to the “ob? ., . . ., ., job? no, we are having ongoing conversations, _ job? no, we are having ongoing conversations, and _ job? no, we are having ongoing conversations, and i— job? no, we are having ongoing conversations, and i think- job? no, we are having ongoing conversations, and i think that i job? no, we are having ongoing| conversations, and i think that is the right way forward. i just conversations, and i think that is the right way forward. ijust hope for the next year i can get back working with the team, bbc cricket, test match special, it has been my one joy. test match special, it has been my onejoy. i have had a view, but since retiring in 2009, it has been my realjoy, being able to turn up and talk cricket on the radio and hopefully i will be able to do that in the future. d0 hopefully i will be able to do that in the future.— hopefully i will be able to do that in the future. do you think you can rebuild your _ in the future. do you think you can rebuild your reputation? _ in the future. do you think you can rebuild your reputation? yes, - in the future. do you think you can rebuild your reputation? yes, i - in the future. do you think you can| rebuild your reputation? yes, i do. is it a long road? it
8:47 am
rebuild your reputation? yes, i do. is it a long road?— is it a long road? it will take time, is it a long road? it will take time. but — is it a long road? it will take time, but i'm _ is it a long road? it will take time, but i'm sure _ is it a long road? it will take time, but i'm sure people i is it a long road? it will take i time, but i'm sure people will is it a long road? it will take - time, but i'm sure people will see the true me. time, but i'm sure people will see the true me— time, but i'm sure people will see the true me. michael, you said you wanted to sit _ the true me. michael, you said you wanted to sit down _ the true me. michael, you said you wanted to sit down with _ the true me. michael, you said you wanted to sit down with azeem - the true me. michael, you said you i wanted to sit down with azeem rafiq and hear his story. what would be your message to him if he was watching this now? i your message to him if he was watching this now?— your message to him if he was watching this now? i am sorry for the hurt he _ watching this now? i am sorry for the hurt he has _ watching this now? i am sorry for the hurt he has gone _ watching this now? i am sorry for the hurt he has gone through. i the hurt he has gone through. yorkshire county cricket club, i believe, is me, it has been my life, whether i am a player or not i am a seniorformer player, the captain. once you have played for yorkshire, you are always a yorkshire player and i'm sorry for the hurt he has gone through. hopefully, time can't ever be a healer in the situation he has through, but hopefully time can be a way of us making sure that yorkshire county cricket club never goes through this situation again, and never puts themselves in a situation of denial that they treated a player so badly. d0 situation of denial that they treated a player so badly. do you think ou treated a player so badly. do you think you can _ treated a player so badly. do you think you can repair _ treated a player so badly. do you think you can repair that - think you can repair that relationship with him? anything in
8:48 am
life is can be _ relationship with him? anything in life is can be repaired, _ relationship with him? anything in life is can be repaired, i— relationship with him? anything in life is can be repaired, i would - life is can be repaired, i would like to get the stage where we can shake hands, talk about how to get cricket back on track, how to get yorkshire county cricket club back on track, can we both help, can we both help the club to get to a position that in five or ten years time we can look at this moment has been that moment that changed the game. i would love to be a part of that, and i'm sure azeem rafiq would also like to be a part of that. irate also like to be a part of that. we did ut also like to be a part of that. we did put the remarks made by michael vaughan in that interview to azeem rafiq, but he declined to comment. that's it for now. i will be back in an hour with more sports news, including agony for bath rugby fans. thank you. you probably know as you
8:49 am
wake up this morning it has been a blustery night, there have been some real problems and ben has got all the details for us right now. good morning. we have seen some major damage and disruption across many parts of the uk. that is thanks to these really strong winds, courtesy of storm arwen. we have seen gusts up to 98 mph in parts of north—east england, but many other spots not far behind. it is all because of this area of low pressure, this named storm which has been moving close to the uk. this swathe of really strong winds are still affecting parts of eastern scotland, north—east england, wales and the south—west, but this is the last time i show you this chart this money because this amber warning expires at 9am. butjust because it is expiring, the winds are only very slowly going to ease, so still some
8:50 am
very blustery conditions out there. and also, on top of all of that, we have seen snow in places. a beautiful scene there in north yorkshire. it does have the potential to cause some disruption. it is a really messy, awkward mix of rain, sleet and snow that has been falling across parts of england and wales, and in scotland many showers will be wintry even to quite low levels and also in northern ireland. through the day, the winds will ease, this mixture of rain, sleet and snow will move east. wales will brighten up and also western england, northern ireland and scotland will keep a mix of sunny spells and wintry showers. these are the gusts we expect by mid—afternoon, not as windy for coastal parts, the north—east all the south—west, but still very blustery across southeastern parts. temperatures this afternoon, these are the best we can expect today, 3-8 c. this are the best we can expect today, 3—8 c. this evening, we keep some of
8:51 am
the wet and wintry weather in eastern england. cloud will bring rain into parts of northern ireland. more snowfall into the north—west of scotland. for many spots under clear skies, it's going to turn into a really cold night with a widespread frost. temperatures down to —7 c. with some very wet surfaces around, still some lying snow in places, ice could be a big concern tomorrow morning. the wet and wintry weather in eastern england should clear and we will see some sleet and snow working east across scotland, and through the afternoon cloud will graze northern ireland, west wales and the south—west of england with the odd spot of rain. many other places dry through tomorrow with lots of sunshine. still cold, but not as windy. a much calmer day. as we head into the new week, temperatures up and down like a yo—yo. briefly getting into double digits at times. some wet and windy weather, but hopefully not quite as stormy as we have had to contend with so far this weekend. that's all from me for now.
8:52 am
we have put a shout out earlier on to see your pictures and anything that has happened on yourjourneys this morning and quite a few have come in, so we will look at them after 9am. the author, matt haig, and his novel has recently been made into a film. �*a boy called christmas' has now been made into a film, starring maggie smith andjim broadbent. it's out in cinemas this weekend, and our reporter alex stanger sat down with matt to hear all about it. what is the word for the really scary big thing that has four legs and horns on its head? i scary big thing that has four legs and horns on its head?— scary big thing that has four legs and horns on its head? i don't know. reindeer? that's _ and horns on its head? i don't know. reindeer? that's it! _ and horns on its head? i don't know. reindeer? that's it! why _ and horns on its head? i don't know. reindeer? that's it! why do - and horns on its head? i don't know. reindeer? that's it! why do you - and horns on its head? i don't know. | reindeer? that's it! why do you ask? no reason, except there is one charging right at us! is it exciting to have one _ charging right at us! is it exciting to have one of— charging right at us! is it exciting to have one of your _ charging right at us! is it exciting to have one of your books - charging right at us! is it exciting to have one of your books made | charging right at us! is it exciting i to have one of your books made into a film? i
8:53 am
to have one of your books made into a film? . , , ., a film? i had my first novel, the film rights _ a film? i had my first novel, the film rights were _ a film? i had my first novel, the film rights were sold _ a film? i had my first novel, the film rights were sold to - a film? i had my first novel, the film rights were sold to brad - a film? i had my first novel, the | film rights were sold to brad pitt in 2004, and we still had our student loans to pay off, and at that point i thought, that's it. we would start looking at houses in malibu, we're going to retire now. obviously it is not like that. the film never happened. and all the other books that were sold to be made into films, that never happened. and with a boy called christmas, i didn't believe it was actually going to be made into a film until i was on set in prague. there are still elves that like to party _ there are still elves that like to party. mother dot—macro quiet! haste party. mother dot-macro quiet! have we learned nothing? _ party. mother dot—macro quiet! the we learned nothing? matt wrote party. mother dot—macro quiet! ike: we learned nothing? matt wrote a boy called christmas straight after penning his bestselling memoir, reasons for, alive. i
8:54 am
penning his bestselling memoir, reasons for, alive.— reasons for, alive. i had 'ust finished writing i reasons for, alive. i had 'ust finished writing this i reasons for, alive. i hadjust finished writing this intense i reasons for, alive. i had just - finished writing this intense book about my own experience of suicidal depression, and afterwards i almost wanted to do the opposite. although i have to say, the first draft of a boy called christmas, there is still a lot of intense depression, and my editor said, you have made father christmas depressed, said a second draft i put him on prozac, metaphorically. you think that people remember you for reasons to stay alive, and then they realise you have written all these other books for children as well? people see the common connections between my books, even between the children's books and adult books, so i suppose in recent years, all my books have been about trying to find hope, but out of a dark place. i try and write hopeful, optimistic books, but while recognising problems and
8:55 am
issues and the tough stuff. the film is now available to view here and in america, making it one sweet reward for this patient author. isn't it beautiful? wait there, i will be — isn't it beautiful? wait there, i will be right back. it will be right back. it is _ will be right back. it is joyful. we're joined now by henry lawful who plays the lead character, nikolas. we were just talking, and something i've learnt a lot over the last few years is that actors not like watching themselves at all. ila. years is that actors not like watching themselves at all. no, i've had to watch — watching themselves at all. no, i've had to watch the _ watching themselves at all. no, i've had to watch the film _ watching themselves at all. no, i've had to watch the film about - watching themselves at all. no, i've had to watch the film about four- had to watch the film about four times. :. , :, i had to watch the film about four times-_ i sit— had to watch the film about four times._ i sit down - had to watch the film about four| times._ i sit down with had to watch the film about four- times._ i sit down with my times. have you? i sit down with my head down. — times. have you? i sit down with my head down. trying — times. have you? i sit down with my head down, trying to _ times. have you? i sit down with my head down, trying to get _ times. have you? i sit down with my head down, trying to get through i times. have you? i sit down with my head down, trying to get through it. | head down, trying to get through it. who would you be watching it with? family, most of the time. i still watch it, but there are a few scenes where ijust watch it, but there are a few scenes where i just want to at least put watch it, but there are a few scenes where ijust want to at least put my head down, i can't watch. this
8:56 am
where ijust want to at least put my head down, i can't watch.— head down, i can't watch. this was filmed in 2019. — head down, i can't watch. this was filmed in 2019. you _ head down, i can't watch. this was filmed in 2019. you do _ head down, i can't watch. this was filmed in 2019. you do look - filmed in 2019. you do look different. you are clearly two years older and you have changed a bit. when you first walked in here, i thought you must be conscious of that as well. thought you must be conscious of that as well-— that as well. yes. i guess it is a ositive that as well. yes. i guess it is a positive because _ that as well. yes. i guess it is a positive because i _ that as well. yes. i guess it is a positive because i won't - that as well. yes. i guess it is a positive because i won't really i that as well. yes. i guess it is a i positive because i won't really get recognised. s, positive because i won't really get recognised-— recognised. a good point. i hadn't thou~ht recognised. a good point. i hadn't thought about _ recognised. a good point. i hadn't thought about that _ recognised. a good point. i hadn't thought about that as _ recognised. a good point. i hadn't thought about that as a _ recognised. a good point. i hadn't thought about that as a plus. - recognised. a good point. i hadn't thought about that as a plus. tell| thought about that as a plus. tell us about the filming. you went to some pretty cold places. stories behind—the—scenes, things that went wrong? fin behind-the-scenes, things that went wront ? , behind-the-scenes, things that went wron: ? , . behind-the-scenes, things that went wront? , , :, wrong? on the very first day of shooting. _ wrong? on the very first day of shooting. l _ wrong? on the very first day of shooting, i was _ wrong? on the very first day of shooting, i was new _ wrong? on the very first day of shooting, i was new to - wrong? on the very first day of shooting, i was new to it - wrong? on the very first day of i shooting, i was new to it because i'm not really had any experience whatsoever. the first day of filming, we were on a frozen lake in slovakia in the mountains, and i remember a blizzard just started. i was lying on the floor filming a scene when i was meant to be passed out, and this blizzard just shoots across the lake. honestly, it was beautiful, but the director decided
8:57 am
it added to the filming so he carried on and just let me lay there through it. carried on and 'ust let me lay there throu~h it. :, :, i. :, through it. how long were you on the round through it. how long were you on the ground for? — through it. how long were you on the ground for? maybe _ through it. how long were you on the ground for? maybe a _ through it. how long were you on the ground for? maybe a couple - through it. how long were you on the ground for? maybe a couple of- through it. how long were you on the | ground for? maybe a couple of hours. you have some _ ground for? maybe a couple of hours. you have some brilliant _ you have some brilliant qualifications for the film. the director said you don't really get bothered by the cold. and yet he had these socks, which are a revelation to me. tell us about the socks. iie to me. tell us about the socks. he won't like — to me. tell us about the socks. ile: won't like me talking about this. he had bluetooth sock so he could control the temperature by bluetooth. whereas i'm in this old—fashioned costume, freezing to death. no, idon't old—fashioned costume, freezing to death. no, i don't mind it, i've grown up skin quite a lot, so i don't mind the cold. dash—mac skiing. don't mind the cold. dash-mac skiint. �* . :. don't mind the cold. dash-mac skiin., �*, ., ., ., don't mind the cold. dash-mac skiini. �*, . . . , don't mind the cold. dash-mac skiini. . . , ~ skiing. it's an amazing cast list. a talking mouse. — skiing. it's an amazing cast list. a talking mouse, you _ skiing. it's an amazing cast list. a talking mouse, you can't - skiing. it's an amazing cast list. a talking mouse, you can't go - skiing. it's an amazing cast list. a| talking mouse, you can't go wrong with that. and you have got dame
8:58 am
maggie smith, kristen wiig, real hollywood credentials. what was it like working with those people? amazing. i'm a massive harry potter fan and there were lots of those stars in it. it was a bit surreal. the first time i metjim broadbent, i was sitting in the middle of the studio on basically a bucking bronco as if i was flying through the sky on a reindeer. it is quite weird, quite surreal.— quite surreal. how quick was it before they — quite surreal. how quick was it before they just _ quite surreal. how quick was it before theyjust became - quite surreal. how quick was it before theyjust became jim? i quite surreal. how quick was it - before theyjust became jim? rather before theyjust becamejim? rather than that "oh, my goodness"? thea;r than that "oh, my goodness"? they are all normal— than that "oh, my goodness"? they are all normal people, _ than that "oh, my goodness"? the are all normal people, really. than that "oh, my goodness"? tte: are all normal people, really. i'm sure you have spoken to plenty of actors over the years but they make you feel comfortable, they're just normal people. idvid you feel comfortable, they're 'ust normatpeoptei you feel comfortable, they're 'ust normatpeoptefi you feel comfortable, they're 'ust normal eole. , , . , normal people. did they give you any hints? they — normal people. did they give you any hints? they leave _ normal people. did they give you any hints? they leave it _ normal people. did they give you any hints? they leave it to _ normal people. did they give you any hints? they leave it to the _ normal people. did they give you any hints? they leave it to the director i hints? they leave it to the director because if the _ hints? they leave it to the director because if the director _ hints? they leave it to the director because if the director doesn't - hints? they leave it to the director because if the director doesn't like j because if the director doesn't like the tip they gave me,. haste
8:59 am
because if the director doesn't like the tip they gave me,.— because if the director doesn't like the tip they gave me,. have you got a favourite christmas _ the tip they gave me,. have you got a favourite christmas film? - the tip they gave me,. have you got a favourite christmas film? elf. - a favourite christmas film? elf. that is a classic. _ that is a classic. that is a classic. that is a classic. that is right up there. what is yours? that is right up there. what is ours? :, . that is right up there. what is ours? ., ., , , , that is right up there. what is ours? :, . , , , , that is right up there. what is ours? , ,,, , yours? polar express is very beautiful. _ yours? polar express is very beautiful. tom _ yours? polar express is very beautiful. tom hanks - yours? polar express is very beautiful. tom hanks as - yours? polar express is very beautiful. tom hanks as the yours? polar express is very - beautiful. tom hanks as the train manager. die hard for me. yes, a lot of people say that. manager. die hard for me. yes, a lot of people say that-— of people say that. lovely to see this morning- — of people say that. lovely to see this morning. how— of people say that. lovely to see this morning. how was _ of people say that. lovely to see this morning. how was that, - of people say that. lovely to see j this morning. how was that, was of people say that. lovely to see - this morning. how was that, was that all right? you were a bit nervous. you did great. yes, thank you. you will be recognised now though. that's the downside of coming on the sofa. but it's a lovely film. henry did the filming for this a couple of years ago and cinemas now.
9:00 am
headlines are coming up. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: the united states and australia join the list of countries banning flights from southern african countries after confirmation of a worrying new variant of coronavirus. two people are killed as storm arwen hits northern parts of the uk, with winds of nearly 100 miles per hour.
9:01 am
there are still some very strong winds out there this morning, a mix of rain, sleet and snow falling as well. the weather will slowly come down through this weekend, but it is going to stay cold. good morning. ex—england captain, michael vaughan speaks to this programme about the racism scandal that has engulfed cricket. it follows allegations by former yorkshire player azeem rafiq. i played for yorkshire county cricket club for 18 years, and if in any way, shape orform, i'm responsible for any of his hurt, i apologise for that. broadway legend stephen sondheim, who was behind some of theatre's best known musicals including west side story, has died at the age of 91. good morning. it's saturday, the 27th of november. the united states and australia have
9:02 am
become the latest in a growing list of countries to impose travel restrictions on people arriving from southern african countries. it comes amid mounting concern about a new variant of coronavirus, which has been named omicron by the world health organisation. scientists fear it could pose an increased risk of re—infection and current vaccines may be less effective. our health correspondent dominic hughes has more. covid variant b.1.1.529 now has a name, omicron, according to the world health organization, which met in geneva last night to discuss the threat posed by this mutation of the coronavirus. the who had advised against travel bans, stressing instead that the measures we are all so familiar with — hand hygiene, masks and social distancing — are more important than ever. what's really important as an individual is to lower your exposure. these proven public health measures have never been more important — distancing, wearing of a mask, making sure that it's over your nose and mouth, with clean hands, making sure you avoid crowded spaces, be in rooms where there's good ventilation, and when it's your
9:03 am
turn, get vaccinated. but governments around the world have taken a different view. the uk isjust one a number of countries to have imposed bans on southern african nations where cases have been identified. the united states, the eu, singapore, israel, japan, and kenya are among those who have either imposed bans and restrictions on travellers or are considering them. i've decided that we're going to be cautious and make sure there's no travel to and from south africa and six other countries in that region — except for american citizens, who are able to come back. the who has described omicron as a variant of concern. it is the most mutated version of the virus yet, scientists identifying 50 mutations overall. more than 30 are on the spike protein, the target of most vaccines. and on the part of the virus that makes first contact with our body's cells, there are ten mutations compared
9:04 am
to just two for the delta variant. so far, the evidence is that it's not causing a different spectrum of disease or more deaths and that is really important but we do know that viruses mutate to become better transmitting and then they can overtake the other viruses. the problem this may present for us is that this virus might evade some of the vaccines, but it probably won't evade people who have had boosters or two proper doses. all this comes as europe is facing a fresh wave of covid infections still linked to the delta variant. in the netherlands, fresh restrictions will come into force tomorrow. venue such as bars, cafes, museums and cinemas will have to close from 5pm. but, as so often through the course of this pandemic, decisions are clouded by uncertainty. exactly how transmissible this new variant is, whether it will make people sicker, the impact on existing treatments and how effective vaccines will be against it are all unknowns.
9:05 am
it is likely to be some weeks before the answers to those questions become clear. northern parts of the uk had been hit by storm arwen overnight, two people are known to have died. amber and yellow weather warnings remain in place, with more strong winds and further travel disruption expected. tens of thousands of people are waking up this morning without power — and in wales, many railand bus services have been suspended. we'll speak to our reporter cameron buttle, who's in coldstream, injust a moment, but first, let's speak to alison freeman, who's in whitley bay. good morning, we know there has been tragically loss of life in the uk. tell us about how it is there. winds
9:06 am
have been recorded _ tell us about how it is there. winds have been recorded up _ tell us about how it is there. winds have been recorded up to _ tell us about how it is there. winds have been recorded up to close - tell us about how it is there. winds have been recorded up to close to i tell us about how it is there. "tc; have been recorded up to close to 90 mph overnight and we have had the tragic news in the past hour that a man died after being hit by a tree in ambleside in cumbria, cumbrian police announced they were called to the lake district town at around 11 o'clock last night. the weather has been atrocious, it is still absolutely battering us as we stand here. we are out of the wind actually for now. we know that lner has told people not to travel this weekend on its services. locally the tyne and wear metro had to close overnight and they are still inspecting lines to make sure they can get them going again. this morning we know 55,000 homes have been affected by power cuts, northern power grid said some people will have to be patient because it is going to take some time to get them back on the grid. i don't know
9:07 am
if you can see the waves. we just had somebody pass by and say they have never seen the sea look like this in whitley bay. the message is for people to stay safe and stay inside if they possibly can. alison, thank you- — an amber weather warning remains in place for some parts of scotland this morning. our reporter cameron buttle is in coldstream in the scottish borders for us. i know your journey to where you i know yourjourney to where you are now was pretty tricky because of how the landscape has changed because of the landscape has changed because of the winds buffeting the country, cameron. . the winds buffeting the country, cameron. , , .. cameron. there is significant disruption — cameron. there is significant disruption right _ cameron. there is significant disruption right up _ cameron. there is significant disruption right up and - cameron. there is significant disruption right up and down| cameron. there is significant. disruption right up and down the east coast of scotland where the red weather warning was issued last night from two o'clock in the morning. this morning we arejust starting to see the effects of that. i drove through the scottish borders this morning, the roads were covered in debris. sometimes it felt like i was driving off—road rather than on the road. there is significant
9:08 am
damage to the woodland which disappears into the background, trees as far as i can see. if you can look over here to the side, you can look over here to the side, you can see the house there. keith and christine had a very uncomfortable night with trees coming down. we get storms in scotland, but it was the consistent length of time of these high winds, so we are just starting to see the effects of the damage. the roads in the scottish borders alone, hundreds of trees down according to the local authority down here. at one point the scottish fire service was appealing to people not to phone them about trees down, speak to the local authorities because they were so much disruption. railand roads in scotland, really difficult travelling conditions today. the advice is check before you travel and only travel if you really have to do. . :, i. . ,, and only travel if you really have to do. . :, .«v . ,, to do. cameron, you take care. thank ou. the
9:09 am
to do. cameron, you take care. thank you- the home _ to do. cameron, you take care. thank you. the home office _ to do. cameron, you take care. thank you. the home office minister- to do. cameron, you take care. thank| you. the home office minister damian heinz has defended an open letter which was sent by borisjohnson to his french counterpart, president emmanuel macron. let's speak to our political correspondentjoining us from our london newsroom. the phrase being used by the uk government is the britain and france relationship remains strong, it also remains the case that priti patel is still not invited to that meeting, a very important crisis meeting in connection with the migrants which is due to take place tomorrow. yes. is due to take place tomorrow. yes, the relationship _ is due to take place tomorrow. yes, the relationship may _ is due to take place tomorrow. yes, the relationship may be _ is due to take place tomorrow. yes the relationship may be strong is due to take place tomorrow. ies the relationship may be strong in the relationship may be strong in the words of one government minister this morning but it is certainly strained. there is no doubt boris johnson is under huge political pressure over this issue and that was only exacerbated by the tragedy we saw in the english channel during the week, when so many people died. he is under pressure not only from the labour party accusing him of losing control of this problem, and also his own conservative
9:10 am
backbenchers, many of whom get letters and e—mails from their constituents over this issue, and that will only increase after the loss of life we saw in the last few days. so the prime minister needs to be seen at the very least to be trying to do something about this, and i think there is no doubt he feels a sense of frustration over the fact that these crossings are continuing. but the way he went about publicising that letter to emmanuel macron clearly didn't go down very well in paris, and there is something of a diplomatic spat in results. the security minister damien heinz speaking this morning has defended what the prime minister did, saying he wanted to demonstrate the suggestions that the uk government had in terms of addressing the problem, but there was no doubt about the seriousness of the situation. —— damian hinds. on the day of this tragedy, there
9:11 am
0n the day of this tragedy, there were _ 0n the day of this tragedy, there were 23— 0n the day of this tragedy, there were 23 further crossings and anyone of them _ were 23 further crossings and anyone of them could have met the same fate _ of them could have met the same fate. these wicked people who put their fellow man and woman and in this case _ their fellow man and woman and in this case children, sometimes two, under— this case children, sometimes two, under these — this case children, sometimes two, under these horribly dangerous crafts, — under these horribly dangerous crafts, they do not care about the risks _ crafts, they do not care about the risks so — crafts, they do not care about the risks so we — crafts, they do not care about the risks. so we as the international community, as the community of nations— community, as the community of nations have to do everything we can to break— nations have to do everything we can to break up— nations have to do everything we can to break up that business model and stop these _ to break up that business model and stop these people being put in this mortal— stop these people being put in this mortal danger. if stop these people being put in this mortal danger-— mortal danger. if there's any hope the tragedy _ mortal danger. if there's any hope the tragedy we — mortal danger. if there's any hope the tragedy we saw _ mortal danger. if there's any hope the tragedy we saw in _ mortal danger. if there's any hope the tragedy we saw in the - mortal danger. if there's any hope the tragedy we saw in the channel| the tragedy we saw in the channel this week would redouble efforts to do something about the channel crossings and potentially prevent further loss of life, well that hasn't been helped by the way that frankly both the british and french governments have responded to this crisis and relations are not particularly good at this point. we will have to see if there are any new suggestions, any fresh ideas put forward as to what to do about it because everything that has been discussed so far, as we have seen,
9:12 am
hasn't really helped.— hasn't really helped. jonathan, thank you _ hasn't really helped. jonathan, thank you very _ hasn't really helped. jonathan, thank you very much. - hasn't really helped. jonathan, thank you very much. you - hasn't really helped. jonathan, | thank you very much. you need hasn't really helped. jonathan, i thank you very much. you need to update you with the weather, and we have had lots of reports about how the weather has affected so many people from journeys to homes to travel disruption as well. what is going to happen for the rest of the weekend? :. v' , going to happen for the rest of the weekend? . ,, , , . going to happen for the rest of the weekend? . ,, , , :, , going to happen for the rest of the weekend? . ,, , , . , :, , :, weekend? thankfully it is a story of thins weekend? thankfully it is a story of things slowly _ weekend? thankfully it is a story of things slowly but _ weekend? thankfully it is a story of things slowly but surely _ weekend? thankfully it is a story of things slowly but surely calming i things slowly but surely calming down, certainly in terms of the winds. but what about the winds? we saw from our reporters earlier on the damage that has been caused, and no wonder. we have had winds up to 98 mph in parts of north—east england, but you can see many parts of the uk have seen exceptionally strong winds from storm arwen. the strongest of the winds are now transferring eastwards closest to this centre of the area of low pressure. things will be calming down across western parts of the uk, but we have also seen snow in places with parts of the west midlands
9:13 am
waking up to a covering of snow for example. showers over the high ground in cumbria. it's been a messy mix of rain, sleet and snow in wales, some snow at low levels. many of these showers are now pushing on across northern scotland are pushing in as snow even to relatively low ground. as we go through the day, this line of rain, sleet and hill snow will continue to track slowly across east england. it's a mix of sunny spells and showers, but many showers across scotland will be wintry. and the winds will ease in those places that have been so blustery so far, but actually it's going to turn windier as we go through into the afternoon across parts of eastern england. what about the temperatures? no great shakes here, three degrees, and factor in the strength of the winds and it will feel really cold. through tonight we keep a mix of sleet and snow for a time in eastern england.
9:14 am
some more snowfall in scotland, and temperatures will plummet all the way down to —6 in some parts. 50 with some wet surfaces, still some snow lying around, there could well be icy stretches tomorrow morning. we are likely to see some sleet and snow tracking eastwards through the day tomorrow. still some wintry showers for eastern england and this zone of cloud flirting with northern ireland, west wales, the far south—west of england at times through the day. but for many spots tomorrow it will be dry and sunny, crucially not as windy but it will still feel cold. a5 crucially not as windy but it will still feel cold. as we head into the coming week, things will change a little bit. there are various frontal systems heading in our direction so it won't settle down. there will be brisk winds that time but the rain mainly coming in from the west, certainly for the first part of this week. you can see the temperatures will get a little bit
9:15 am
higher, double digits for many as we get into tuesday. how long that will last, that remains open to question and it may turn colder again through the middle part of the week. but certainly nothing as stormy on the horizon as we have seen so far this weekend. still some brisk winds and snow lying in places. take care if you do need to head out this saturday morning.— you do need to head out this saturday morning. you do need to head out this saturda mornini. . . . ,, saturday morning. good advice, thank ou. it is saturday morning. good advice, thank you- it is quarter— saturday morning. good advice, thank you. it is quarter past _ saturday morning. good advice, thank you. it is quarter past nine. _ let's return to our top story now. there's growing concern about the emergence of a new variant of coronavirus first identified in south africa, with fears current vaccines could be less effective against it. we've had lots of questions on this already this morning, we can try and get some answers with virologist dr chris smith and professor of public health, linda bauld. good morning to both of you. let's crack on because there is plenty to talk about this morning, and margaret has the question a lot of people are asking this morning. it's a simple one and linda, maybe i will
9:16 am
put this one to you first. �*how concerned we should be about the new omicron variant?�* i think we should be concerned and we should be paying attention but i don't think we should be panicking yet. there's a lot of work scientists need to do. as credit to the scientists in south africa that they have shared so much information with the scientific community and authorities already. we are always going to see these variants when we have virus circulating. we have discussed that many times on the programme before. the reason it's been classified as a variant of concern, is that they arise for three potential reasons, because the authorities think they are more transmissible, because they might result in more severe disease or they may evade the vaccines. those are the three categories we are worried about. from the data from south africa, it looks like the variant is more transmissible, it has a lot of mutations on the spike
9:17 am
protein. we don't know if it will evade the vaccines or some of the immune response. or will it result in more disease severity? we don't know those things. science needs time now. it takes a while to produce these cultures needed, so in the land it can be tested for example with people's blood when they have received a vaccine. so we will know more in a week to ten days, maybe longer, and in the meantime that's why you see authorities taking action. the final point on this from me. in the uk in the meantime we need to follow all the meantime we need to follow all the precautions such as face coverings, distancing, ventilation, open the window, and importantly getting your vaccines, particularly the boosters. fin getting your vaccines, particularly the boosters-— the boosters. on that theme, i noticed this _ the boosters. on that theme, i noticed this morning _ the boosters. on that theme, i noticed this morning people i the boosters. on that theme, i. noticed this morning people may the boosters. on that theme, i- noticed this morning people may or may not have seen this already, dutch health authorities said that today 61 passengers who came in from
9:18 am
two flights from south africa tested positive for covid—19. we don't know what strand. they are now being held in quarantine. this of course is the concern. how quickly can you know which variant it is?— which variant it is? personally i'm iioin which variant it is? personally i'm going back _ which variant it is? personally i'm going back to _ which variant it is? personally i'm going back to the _ which variant it is? personally i'm going back to the point _ which variant it is? personally i'm going back to the point we - which variant it is? personally i'm going back to the point we were i going back to the point we were making, — going back to the point we were making, quite reassured by the fact we have _ making, quite reassured by the fact we have got this information. as linda _ we have got this information. as linda alluded to, we have the south african _ linda alluded to, we have the south african scientists to thank for the fact they— african scientists to thank for the fact they picked this up and we can now monitor it. much better to have the devil— now monitor it. much better to have the devil you do know than one that catches— the devil you do know than one that catches you — the devil you do know than one that catches you unawares. there is a huge _ catches you unawares. there is a huge movement of people around the planning _ huge movement of people around the planning all the time and free pandemic we were buzzing around like nobody's _ pandemic we were buzzing around like nobody's business. rolls—royce would say they— nobody's business. rolls—royce would say they were supporting in the air
9:19 am
about— say they were supporting in the air about 800,000 people in the air at any one _ about 800,000 people in the air at any one time, if that is a third of the market— any one time, if that is a third of the market you can work—out at peak we have _ the market you can work—out at peak we have around 2 million people airborne — we have around 2 million people airborne around the planet. so we are very— airborne around the planet. so we are very mobile as a population. if you pick— are very mobile as a population. if you pick people up in one place in the world — you pick people up in one place in the world who have a disease circulating, they can be on the other— circulating, they can be on the other side _ circulating, they can be on the other side of the world with that disease — other side of the world with that disease potentially spreading it under— disease potentially spreading it under the time it takes to have any symptoms, — under the time it takes to have any symptoms, which is exactly what happened — symptoms, which is exactly what happened with wuhan when this broke out in _ happened with wuhan when this broke out in the _ happened with wuhan when this broke out in the first place. the fact we have _ out in the first place. the fact we have picked these things up and we know— have picked these things up and we know about these cases, and now we can scrutinise them, that is to be expected — can scrutinise them, that is to be expected but also quite reassuring. the tests _ expected but also quite reassuring. the tests are pretty fast to do. it doesn't _ the tests are pretty fast to do. it doesn't take long when you have a positive _ doesn't take long when you have a positive to — doesn't take long when you have a positive to read the right bit of the genetic code to see what fraction _ the genetic code to see what fraction of the positives are this new variant. going back to south africa, _ new variant. going back to south africa, this — new variant. going back to south africa, this is a particularly special— africa, this is a particularly special circumstance. the part of south _ special circumstance. the part of south africa which includes johannesburg, there is very high
9:20 am
population density and as a result of poor— population density and as a result of poor living conditions and low vaccine — of poor living conditions and low vaccine uptake, only about a third of the _ vaccine uptake, only about a third of the population are vaccinated at the moment, and that is patchy as well _ the moment, and that is patchy as well we _ the moment, and that is patchy as well. we might be looking at an uneven — well. we might be looking at an uneven distribution of how this is spreading — uneven distribution of how this is spreading in parts of south africa and it— spreading in parts of south africa and it is— spreading in parts of south africa and it is very early days or so before — and it is very early days or so before we _ and it is very early days or so before we get too concerned we need to learn _ before we get too concerned we need to learn more about this and find out where — to learn more about this and find out where we stand.— to learn more about this and find out where we stand. learning is key, isn't it? linda, _ out where we stand. learning is key, isn't it? linda, we _ out where we stand. learning is key, isn't it? linda, we know— out where we stand. learning is key, isn't it? linda, we know that - out where we stand. learning is key, isn't it? linda, we know that any - isn't it? linda, we know that any travellers that come, particularly scotland or to the uk from those six countries, the southern african countries, the southern african countries and regions as well are going to be traced and tested, and those results will come through. how long before those results come through? and then chris, i will get you to pick up on that point, how quickly can a vaccine be modified to deal with it? figs quickly can a vaccine be modified to deal with it?— deal with it? as chris says, people can iet deal with it? as chris says, people can get their _ deal with it? as chris says, people can get their pcr _ deal with it? as chris says, people can get their pcr quite _ deal with it? as chris says, people can get their pcr quite quickly. i can get their pcr quite quickly. there's two things going on with
9:21 am
returning travellers. the first one is if you are arriving now after the rules come into place, you will be asked to take a pcr and that result will come within 24 hours but the sequencing will take a bit longer. if anyone has returned from south africa in the last ten days, they will be contacted by test and trace, or peer test and protect, and ask to get a vcr and it is important people take that up. —— asked to get a pcr. at the moment, as you know, testing is not required for everyone. it could be a lateral flow for example. sorry to interrupt, but one of the things the government has been praised for is reacting quickly to knowledge of this new variant. do you think that actually in terms of having that frame of mind, testing
9:22 am
should be put back in at the border, quickly? should be put back in at the border, iuickl ? . ._ should be put back in at the border, iuickl ? , . should be put back in at the border, uiickl ? , ., ., quickly? yesterday i had a correspondence _ quickly? yesterday i had a correspondence with - quickly? yesterday i had a correspondence with a - quickly? yesterday i had a i correspondence with a couple quickly? yesterday i had a - correspondence with a couple of colleagues for example on nervtag, one of the committees. if you speak to scientists, although we recognise requiring that for everyone is burdensome, of course we did it previously. if you want to sequence cases to find out if there is a variant, you cannot do that with just a lateral flow which picks up a protein from the virus, not the genetic material, so you would need a pcr. the government has acted quickly in terms of travel restrictions, although i know they are controversial and have been criticised. those are to buy time to find out more about this variant, and that's why they are in place. the testing, we will see what the governments decide. we heard from pfizer this week they need at least 100 days. there is some very good analysis of that you can read online. it is pretty easy or more straightforward than you would think
9:23 am
to modify the vaccines, to tweak them. essentially it's a kind of framework if you will that we have developed, particularly for the mrna vaccines, then they can slot in a new version that is needed to respond to a different type of variant. but then the challenge is in the production of that, distribution and getting into people's arms. the approvals are quick but it will still take time. so we cannot turn up a week from now with a new vaccine even if the fundamentals can be done quickly. we should be reassured that if they need to be changed, they can. but at the moment we don't have any evidence of the current vaccines are not working against severe disease and death and that's why we need to continue to come forward to take them up. continue to come forward to take them u. . continue to come forward to take them u. , . continue to come forward to take them u -. , . ., them up. chris, i want to get throuih them up. chris, i want to get through a — them up. chris, i want to get through a couple _ them up. chris, i want to get through a couple more - them up. chris, i want to get- through a couple more questions we have had this morning. lyn asked, �*is there a problem with the lateral flow tests, as
9:24 am
we repeatedly get a positive result with them followed by negative pcr results?�* that is her personal experience, clearly it may not be everyone�*s, but what can you say about that? ilo but what can you say about that? no test but what can you say about that? iii? testis but what can you say about that? iii? test is perfect and the lateral flow test is perfect and the lateral flow test will miss cases, they will miss up test will miss cases, they will miss up to half of cases of coronavirus in fact compared with pcr so they do miss cases and also sometimes they generate a so—called false positive and that happens maybe one time in 1000. if you tested 1000 people, none have coronavirus, one of them would be told by the test they have it. those are average numbers. when we stick swabs in our nose and throat, it is a pretty mucky place to stick the swab and it is hard to do a test perfectly with what is a mucky sample. we like to test pristine samples and these are not pristine, so anything you put in your mouth and your nose can affect the performance of the test, so it�*s
9:25 am
possible that certain things people have eaten and drunk can change the chemistry of the mouth, the saliva for a short period of time and that can throw some of these tests, so thatis can throw some of these tests, so that is one possibility. pcr is a very reliable test platform normally, but no test is positive and as we saw earlier this year, one test centre had problems with their pcr test leading some people to be told you don�*t have coronavirus, but there lateral flow tests were saying that they did. if you get the sequence of positive lateral flows but a sequence of negative pcr tests, normally you should regard the pcr tests as the gold standard and assume something is upsetting the lateral flow test because it is more practical and easy to deploy but are less sensitive test than the pcr. ., , but are less sensitive test than the pcr. :, , ., pcr. putting aside, linda, the new variant, because _ pcr. putting aside, linda, the new variant, because that _ pcr. putting aside, linda, the new variant, because that is _ pcr. putting aside, linda, the new variant, because that is obviously i variant, because that is obviously what we are talking about now, the situation is in the uk that we have seen, what, 50,000 cases in 24
9:26 am
hours, the highest i think in five weeks, and we are seeing case number is rising. we were talking to professor callum son who is part of sage as well, and kind ofjust to get a feel of where we are at. one of the phrases he used was "we are running hot" is in no panic but it is not comfortable, do you feel the same? . . . , is not comfortable, do you feel the same? , , , , . same? unsurprisingly i agree with him. same? unsurprisingly i agree with him- concern _ same? unsurprisingly i agree with him. concern you _ same? unsurprisingly i agree with him. concern you will _ same? unsurprisingly i agree with him. concern you will hear - same? unsurprisingly i agree with i him. concern you will hear expressed from the scientific and public health community is twofold. the first is if we have high levels of infection and we are going into winter where we are mixing more indoors, infections may rise even more and that is a concern primarily because of the pressure it puts on the nhs, and the nhs is under tremendous pressure notjust because of covid but a backlog of care, delayed discharge, a challenging situation so we need to get covid
9:27 am
down to help colleagues on the front line. that is the issue, but the good news, i�*m not sure whether callum mentioned this, if you look at infection rates, they are starting to decline finally in primary age schoolchildren, but most importantly they are declining in the oldest age groups, people over the oldest age groups, people over the age of 60. in scotland we have seen a 20% reductions recently in that age group, and that is the booster is doing theirjob. fewer of that age group are in hospital. it is not an ideal situation but we need to recognise we are trying to keep things going and i�*ve already mentioned the measures people can do for themselves do not make that situation worse.— for themselves do not make that situation worse. chris, where are ou act situation worse. chris, where are you act on _ situation worse. chris, where are you act on this? _ situation worse. chris, where are you act on this? i'm _ situation worse. chris, where are you act on this? i'm optimistic. situation worse. chris, where are. you act on this? i'm optimistic and althouih you act on this? i'm optimistic and although we _ you act on this? i'm optimistic and although we do — you act on this? i'm optimistic and although we do have _ you act on this? i'm optimistic and although we do have high - you act on this? i'm optimistic and although we do have high levels i you act on this? i'm optimistic andj although we do have high levels of cases. _ although we do have high levels of cases. i'm — although we do have high levels of cases, i'm looking at the consequences of those cases. in january— consequences of those cases. in january we — consequences of those cases. in january we had a significant number of people _ january we had a significant number of people in hospital and people who
9:28 am
lost their— of people in hospital and people who lost their lives. that has been transformed by these vaccines, and notwithstanding variant and that kind of— notwithstanding variant and that kind of thing, which at the moment we don't _ kind of thing, which at the moment we don't know if they will continue to do— we don't know if they will continue to do their— we don't know if they will continue to do theirjob, the vaccines have transformed the landscape which means— transformed the landscape which means we feel more comfortable, despite _ means we feel more comfortable, despite this heavy caseload, going into the _ despite this heavy caseload, going into the months ahead. in winter we are all— into the months ahead. in winter we are all mixing, having a relatively good _ are all mixing, having a relatively good semblance of what is normal life, good semblance of what is normal life. and _ good semblance of what is normal life, and we have only got 50,000 cases— life, and we have only got 50,000 cases a _ life, and we have only got 50,000 cases a day — life, and we have only got 50,000 cases a day. i think that is something to be celebrated compared with where we were. the booster programme has been very successful now. programme has been very successful now we _ programme has been very successful now we are — programme has been very successful now. we are seeing the effects of that beginning to bite as linda was saying _ that beginning to bite as linda was saying with 14 million doses or thereabouts administered. that really _ thereabouts administered. that really matters because keeping immunity high helps stop the spread and stops _ immunity high helps stop the spread and stops people becoming severely unwell _ and stops people becoming severely unwell. we are not going to get rid of this— unwell. we are not going to get rid of this virus. — unwell. we are not going to get rid of this virus, we have to live alongside _ of this virus, we have to live alongside it and we have to have strategies — alongside it and we have to have strategies that moderate and
9:29 am
mitigate its severity, and the vaccines _ mitigate its severity, and the vaccines are proving they can do that _ vaccines are proving they can do that. : :, . vaccines are proving they can do that. : , :, . vaccines are proving they can do that. : :, . i, that. always good to have you guys with us. especially _ that. always good to have you guys with us. especially as _ that. always good to have you guys with us. especially as the _ that. always good to have you guys with us. especially as the virus - with us. especially as the virus evolves, as the story does as well, of course. thank you both, and we will see you next week.— this is breakfast. we�*re on bbc one until ten o�*clock this morning, when matt tebbutt takes over. he is there now, all ready to go. you have been demanding waves from people. is you have been demanding waves from --eole. . you have been demanding waves from .eo ile, , ., , you have been demanding waves from --eole. . . , . people. is there anything in that cu - ? people. is there anything in that cu? is it people. is there anything in that cup? is it real? _ people. is there anything in that cup? is it real? i— people. is there anything in that cup? is it real? i have _ people. is there anything in that cup? is it real? i havejust- cup? is it real? i have 'ust finished it, it i cup? is it real? i have 'ust finished it, it was i cup? is it real? i have 'ust finished it, it was an h cup? is it real? i havejust- finished it, it was an espresso. i need _ finished it, it was an espresso. i need the — finished it, it was an espresso. i need the energy to deal with you two _ need the energy to deal with you two. ~ , :, �* , :, need the energy to deal with you two. , . :, two. why don't you concentrate on our own two. why don't you concentrate on your own programme! _ two. why don't you concentrate on your own programme! moving - two. why don't you concentrate on your own programme! moving on, | two. why don't you concentrate on i your own programme! moving on, our secial your own programme! moving on, our special guest _ your own programme! moving on, our special guest today _ your own programme! moving on, our special guest today is _ your own programme! moving on, our special guest today is former - special guest today is former boyzone _ special guest today is former boyzone band member and also a tv
9:30 am
and radio— boyzone band member and also a tv and radio presenter and father of five _ and radio presenter and father of five, ronan keating. how are you? good _ five, ronan keating. how are you? good morning. five, ronan keating. how are you? good morning-— five, ronan keating. how are you? good morning.- i _ five, ronan keating. how are you? good morning.- i know. - five, ronan keating. how are you? good morning.- i know. good morning. five?! i know. where do ou iet good morning. five?! i know. where do you get the _ good morning. five?! i know. where do you get the energy? _ good morning. five?! i know. where do you get the energy? i _ good morning. five?! i know. where do you get the energy? i got - good morning. five?! i know. where do you get the energy? i got a - do you get the energy? i got a double — do you get the energy? i got a double dose of you last night, joined — double dose of you last night, joined you on the one show and then i joined you on the one show and then i was _ joined you on the one show and then i was in _ joined you on the one show and then i was in bed — joined you on the one show and then i was in bed listening to your album — i was in bed listening to your album. ~ i was in bed listening to your album.- anyway, - i was in bed listening to your album.- anyway, i - i was in bed listening to your album.- anyway, i was | i was in bed listening to your. album.- anyway, i was in album. woo! anyway, i was in my hotel room _ album. woo! anyway, i was in my hotel room listening _ album. woo! anyway, i was in my hotel room listening to _ album. woo! anyway, i was in my hotel room listening to your album in my— hotel room listening to your album in my kimono! but let's talk about food heaven. in my kimono! but let's talk about food heaven-— in my kimono! but let's talk about food heaven. , . , food heaven. yes, food heaven, beef, mexican, food heaven. yes, food heaven, beef, mexican. chile. _ food heaven. yes, food heaven, beef, mexican, chile, amazing. _ food heaven. yes, food heaven, beef, mexican, chile, amazing. hell- food heaven. yes, food heaven, beef, mexican, chile, amazing. hell is - mexican, chile, amazing. hell is anything — mexican, chile, amazing. hell is anything with _ mexican, chile, amazing. hell is anything with mushrooms, - mexican, chile, amazing. hell is. anything with mushrooms, oysters. nice combination, _ anything with mushrooms, oysters. nice combination, i'm _ anything with mushrooms, oysters. nice combination, i'm excited - anything with mushrooms, oysters. | nice combination, i'm excited about
9:31 am
that _ nice combination, i'm excited about that we _ nice combination, i'm excited about that. we have nicholas cooking, you are the _ that. we have nicholas cooking, you are the oldie, and he's 43 today. | are the oldie, and he's 43 today. i don't are the oldie, and he's 43 today. don't know are the oldie, and he's 43 today. i don't know why i signed up for this on my— don't know why i signed up for this on my birthday! _ don't know why i signed up for this on my birthday!— don't know why i signed up for thisj on my birthday!_ i'm on my birthday! what you got? i'm doini on my birthday! what you got? i'm doing some _ on my birthday! what you got? i'm doing some johnson's _ on my birthday! what you got? i'm doing some johnson's temptation, | on my birthday! what you got? i'm. doing some johnson's temptation, a very classic — doing some johnson's temptation, a very classic swedish _ doing some johnson's temptation, a very classic swedish dish _ doing some johnson's temptation, a very classic swedish dish with - very classic swedish dish with potatoes— very classic swedish dish with potatoes and _ very classic swedish dish with potatoes and anchovies. - very classic swedish dish with| potatoes and anchovies. what very classic swedish dish with - potatoes and anchovies. what could possibly— potatoes and anchovies. what could possibly go — potatoes and anchovies. what could possibly go wrong? _ potatoes and anchovies. what could possibly go wrong?— possibly go wrong? emily, nice to have ou, possibly go wrong? emily, nice to have you. first — possibly go wrong? emily, nice to have you, first time _ possibly go wrong? emily, nice to have you, first time on _ possibly go wrong? emily, nice to have you, first time on the - possibly go wrong? emily, nice to have you, first time on the show. | have you, first time on the show. what _ have you, first time on the show. what have — have you, first time on the show. what have you got? i�*m have you, first time on the show. what have you got?— have you, first time on the show. what have you got? i'm bringing some sweetness to — what have you got? i'm bringing some sweetness to your _ what have you got? i'm bringing some sweetness to your life, _ what have you got? i'm bringing some sweetness to your life, moran, - sweetness to your life, moran, cornish cream and passion fruit. very nice, and we will talk about your— very nice, and we will talk about your brilliant experience of cooking at the _ your brilliant experience of cooking at the g7~ — fish i am so excited about the wind today, _ fish i am so excited about the wind today, not— fish i am so excited about the wind today. not least— fish i am so excited about the wind today, not least because _ fish i am so excited about the wind today, not least because there - fish i am so excited about the wind today, not least because there is. fish i am so excited about the wind today, not least because there is al today, not least because there is a pudding _ today, not least because there is a pudding and — today, not least because there is a pudding and i_ today, not least because there is a pudding. and i have _ today, not least because there is a pudding. and i have to— today, not least because there is a pudding. and i have to sneak- today, not least because there is a| pudding. and i have to sneak some bubbles _ pudding. and i have to sneak some bubbles in — pudding. and i have to sneak some bubbles in there _ pudding. and i have to sneak some bubbles in there as _ pudding. and i have to sneak some bubbles in there as well _ pudding. and i have to sneak some bubbles in there as well because i
9:32 am
bubbles in there as well because there _ bubbles in there as well because there is— bubbles in there as well because there is a — bubbles in there as well because there is a birthday. _ bubbles in there as well because there is a birthday. ifind - bubbles in there as well because there is a birthday.— there is a birthday. and we will talk about _ there is a birthday. and we will talk about boys _ there is a birthday. and we will talk about boys and _ there is a birthday. and we will talk about boys and later - there is a birthday. and we will i talk about boys and later because that is _ talk about boys and later because that is one of your karaoke favourites. was that a surprise? sorry _ favourites. was that a surprise? sorry. looks cosy already. have a good one. one story is dominating the sports news this morning. yes, the first time michael vaughan has spoken publicly since named in the report by razeem. he spoke before the england and wales cricket board released a new action plan to tackle racism and disconnection. he apologised for any hurt he may have caused. michael vaughan leading england to the ashes in 2005. now he is fighting for his reputation after being accused by three asian players of making a racist comment ahead of a game for yorkshire.
9:33 am
"too many of you lot, we need to do something about it." do you in any way remember or recognise those words? i don�*t. my recollection from that day — as i�*ve said, i was a yorkshire player for 18 years. i was the first player to sign for that club that was not born in the county, so in 18 years we�*ve gone from me being the first to sign for the club, for sachin tendulkar to be the first from overseas, to players being able to sign from other clubs. and it was my last few games, and ijust remember it clearly that i was proud as punch that we had four asian players representing yorkshire county cricket club. it was azeem rafiq, the yorkshire whistleblower, who made the initial allegation. he has said that michael vaughan might not remember the alleged remarks because they didn�*t mean anything to him. yes, that hurts. that hurts, because i�*ve always felt that every single team that i�*ve been involved in —
9:34 am
the biggest praise i ever got as the england captain for six years was that i was the kind of person that really galvanised the group, got the team working together as one. i always felt that i was the person in the dressing room that really wanted everyone to feel included. michael, you said you wanted to sit down with azeem and hear his story. the chances are he could be watching you this morning. he could be watching this now. what would be your message to him? i�*m sorry for the hurt that he�*s gone through. yorkshire county cricket club, i believe, is me. you know, it�*s been my life. whether i�*m a player or not, i�*m a senior ex—player and ex england captain, and i believe that once you�*ve played for yorkshire you�*re always a yorkshire player. i�*m sorry for all the hurt that he�*s gone through. hopefully — time, i don�*t think, can ever be a healer in the situation he�*s gone through.
9:35 am
but hopefully time can be a way of us making sure that yorkshire county cricket club never goes through this situation again and never puts themselves in a position of denial that they treated a player so badly. vaughan says he wants to work with azeem rafiq to repair the damage done to cricket. he also says he regrets and is embarrassed by several posts he made on social media between 2010 and 2018, insisting he wouldn�*t post them now. i look back on my 12 years on social media, i regret many tweets. i regret the tweets that you�*ve just read out. i apologise deeply to anyone that i offended with those tweets. since retirement, michael vaughan has covered cricket for bbc radio, but earlier this week it was revealed that he has been stood down from his role at the ashes in australia this winter. yeah, i won�*t be doing the ashes, which i understand. editorial at the minute, the story is all about azeem rafiq and racism in the game of cricket.
9:36 am
i get that. ijust hope, in time, i get that chance to come back, and the one thing that i�*ve loved more than anything since i retired is talking cricket. i love being on test match special, and hopefully in time i�*ll get that chance to do it again. michael vaughan�*s hopes for a return to the airwaves rest with his employers. it is his hope that he will have a role in helping to repair the damage done to cricket by this racism scandal. we put the remarks made by michael vaughan in that interview to azeem rafiq, but he declined to comment. onto football, and wales kept alive their hopes of qualifying, for theirfirst, women�*s world cup, by thrashing greece 5—0. they dominated in llanethli. keri holland scored twice as they secured all three points. wales remain second in their group, two points behind france,
9:37 am
the team they play next week. abi harrison salvaged a point for scotland with a late equaliser in a 1—1 draw with ukraine at hampden. the scots are second in their group, two points behind spain who they visit on tuesday. eddie howe will be in the team for newcastle this afternoon after testing negative thought tempo macro. :, , y testing negative thought tempo macro. :, , , . macro. hopefully there are some chanies macro. hopefully there are some changes happening, _ macro. hopefully there are some changes happening, we - macro. hopefully there are some changes happening, we can - macro. hopefully there are some changes happening, we can see i macro. hopefully there are some i changes happening, we can see the momentum, it is different, the last game we played as well you see some different things, a new manager, new coaching staff. 50 i�*m sure they will be fully prepared. there was agony for bath,
9:38 am
in rugby union�*s premiership, as they were just four minutes away, from their first win of the season. 16—13 up and against exeter — imagine the tension here, a scrum almost on the bath line, the clock was ticking down, with fans were on the edge of their seats. 16—13 up, until, uh—oh, england�*s sam simmonds went over for exeter and they went on to win it 23—16 and it�*s now eight defeats in a row for bath. elsewhere, northampton beat bristol, and gloucester won at wasps. a special venue for a special home coming, and emma raducanu�*s first home match, since her historic us open victory will be broadcast on the bbc tomorrow. and it will be live from the royal albert hall, when the 19—year—old plays elena—gabriela ruse of romania in an exhibition match — the top billing is in recognition of her star status, since her incredible run at the us open in september, when she came through qualifying to win herfirst grand slam. coverage starts at 11:55am on the bbc iplayer, the red button and the bbc sport website.
9:39 am
talking of tennis, right now great britain are taking on france. it is early days in that match. i think it is 1—1 in the first set. thank you, mike. stars of the west end and broadway have been paying tribute to the american composer and songwriter stephen sondheim, who�*s died at his home in conneticut at the age of 91. sondheim found fame after writing the lyrics for west side story, and went on to create musicals including sweeney todd, passion, and into the woods. daniela relph has been taking a look back at his life. # isn�*t it bliss? # don�*t you approve? # one who keeps tearing around, one who can�*t move...# send in the clowns, from the musical a little night music.
9:40 am
# send in the clowns...# it was stephen sondheim�*s only hit song — remarkably, because this was the man who revolutionised the american musical. as a young man he learned his trade from oscar hammerstein, the lyricist who wrote shows like oklahoma and the sound of music. sondheim, too, started by doing the words — notably for leonard bernstein�*s music in west side story. # i like to be in america! # ok by me in america!# soon he was writing his own music as well. # for a small fee in america...# most of the shows that followed were hits. and then in 1970 he came up with a new idea — a musical that didn�*t follow an obvious plot. # phone rings, door chimes, in comes company...# company was a series of vignettes featuring a dozen central characters. no two sondheim musicals were the same. i don�*t want to get bored writing.
9:41 am
and you know, it�*s — when you hit a chord that you�*ve hit before or a technique of using a song that you�*ve done before — or when i do, i get very nervous. and i think "i�*ve written that, i mustn�*t do that again." somebody will catch me up on it, so to speak. it�*s as if somebody�*s saying, "wait a minute, you did that in that show." into the woods was based on fairy stories like jack and the beanstalk. sondheim�*s music was rhythmically complicated and harmonically sophisticated. # we�*ve no time to sit and dither. # while her withers wither with her. # and no—one keeps a cow for a friend...# that's one of my favourite things about a sondheim musical, is the material that you learn is some of the most complex series of notes put together that you can learn, and so you feel such a sense of accomplishment when you finally get to — when you've arrived at a place where you realise i've got it. i've figured out how to sing this sondheim lyric and sing this
9:42 am
beautiful phrase that he wrote. # i thought that you�*d want what i want, sorry, my dear...# for his admirers, stephen sondheim produced some of the most sophisticated and thoughtful musicals ever written. # quick, send in the clowns. # don�*t bother, they�*re here.# tributes have been made from all around the world.
9:43 am
now let�*s remind ourselves of some of stephen sondheim�*s work — this is damejudi dench performing "send in the clowns" at the bbc proms in 2010. # isn�*t it rich?
9:44 am
# isn�*t it queer? # where are the clowns? # there ought to be clowns # well, maybe next year...# we�*re joined now by actor and west end star, ruthie henshall. good morning, i�*m not sure if you could hear the version by damejudi dench, that was a particularly beautiful version of it. one of the things i�*m learning about stephen sondheim and his words and the lyrics on the way he wrote things was that everyone could interpret them a little bit differently, and do magical things with them. lilgl’eilll. do magical things with them. well, judi dench "s— do magical things with them. well, judi dench 's version _ do magical things with them. well, judi dench 's version was _ do magical things with them. well, judi dench 's version was the - do magical things with them. i judi dench 's version was the first judi dench �*5 version was the first one i had heard on a cd that i hadn�*t seen in person that i cried
9:45 am
to in my car. this is a man who, you know, taught us how hard and absolutely necessary it is to love. he was, you know, we all use the word genius, but he was a genius, he changed the landscape for musical theatre. he was a professor of the human condition. hejust had a theatre. he was a professor of the human condition. he just had a way of being able to, you know, convey what it is to love, to hurt, to feel. i always say that he came along and changed the landscape for musical theatre. along and changed the landscape for musicaltheatre. i along and changed the landscape for musical theatre. i can�*t even call him the shakespeare of musical theatre because he is his own. he was amazing. 0ne theatre because he is his own. he was amazing. one of the things, you
9:46 am
will know this as a performer, and an actor, is when you perform someone �*5 work, which has come from their soul, you know, come from their soul, you know, come from their passion, and you don�*t realise it at the time but they are watching much more closely. they are watching much more closely. they are watching much more closely than perhaps you realise. talk to me about one of your encounters with stephen sondheim. it your encounters with stephen sondheim-— your encounters with stephen sondheim. . , , , sondheim. it was the first preview for puttini sondheim. it was the first preview for putting it _ sondheim. it was the first preview for putting it together _ sondheim. it was the first preview for putting it together on - sondheim. it was the first preview i for putting it together on broadway, the first show ever. and i forgot the first show ever. and i forgot the words to my big song, which is very wordy, but regardless, iforgot it and had to stop the show and start again. i put all the props backin start again. i put all the props back in the right place, started again and sang the number, and the audience went mad because it was, kind of, bless her heart, she got through it. let�*s give her a good clap. when the show had finished, i
9:47 am
came off stage and in through the door walks stephen sondheim and sir cameron mackintosh and they have beenin cameron mackintosh and they have been in the audience watching, and i had no idea. isaid... he said, well done for getting out of it, don�*t do it again. i said, why on earth would die? that was the worst moment of my life. he said a woman in one of his shows had done that, she had heard the applause she got from the audience, and he came back three weeks later and she was still doing the same thing, pretending to go wrong because she got such a great reaction from the audience. i said, don�*t ever need to be in that situation again. how can you forget the lyrics? when the gentleman who wrote them is out the audience! it is a great story and it says a lot about him, that he understood the role of the performer and things don�*t always go right. we read out some of the messages from, you know, some of the messages from, you know, some of the biggest names in music.
9:48 am
barbra streisand was paying tribute, hugh jackman barbra streisand was paying tribute, huthackman as well, known for working in musicals and a lot of them say the same thing, that he rewrote the script about what you can do on stage with a musical. he brought an edge that may be didn�*t exist. a lot of people straight away about west story.— about west story. yes, and thank goodness. _ about west story. yes, and thank goodness, what _ about west story. yes, and thank goodness, what beautiful - about west story. yes, and thank goodness, what beautiful timing l about west story. yes, and thank i goodness, what beautiful timing for side story this film to be released. that is one of his finest, most beautiful, brilliant works. —— west side story. but he chose subjects you wouldn�*t necessarily think of writing a musical about. he wrote a show called assassins, which was about the people who tried to assassinate president. and sweeney todd, the demon barber of fleet street. you know, these were incredible and rich and brilliant pieces of work. i will always remain
9:49 am
terribly honoured and grateful that i got to sit in a room with him and, because he was always there in rehearsals, he was never one of these writers who just left the director and the producers and the musicians to it. he was there, and rewriting if it needed rewriting. nothing ever needed rewriting, it was so brilliant. i nothing ever needed rewriting, it was so brilliant.— was so brilliant. i don't know if ou was so brilliant. i don't know if you have _ was so brilliant. i don't know if you have had _ was so brilliant. i don't know if you have had the _ was so brilliant. i don't know if you have had the chance, - was so brilliant. i don't know if you have had the chance, what was so brilliant. i don't know if. you have had the chance, what will be your go to stephen sondheim song that he will put on and reminisce a little and think about what he did question about what would you go to? i think it would be something from into the woods, and we also all know sendin into the woods, and we also all know send in the clans. but also loving you is another one of his, excessive loves. it gets right into your soul. he has left us a legacy that will never end, and that�*s the thing. it
9:50 am
is not of its time, it is timeless. you are going to be starring in passion and rehearsals will be under way. i imagine there will be a lot of fond memories and tributes being made, and it will make it all the more special to continue his legacy of work. . :. more special to continue his legacy of work. , . , more special to continue his legacy ofwork. , . , . of work. yes, i am 'ust sad that he won't of work. yes, i am 'ust sad that he wont _ of work. yes, i am 'ust sad that he wont it _ of work. yes, i am just sad that he won't see it because _ of work. yes, i am just sad that he won't see it because he _ of work. yes, i am just sad that he won't see it because he was - of work. yes, i am just sad that he . won't see it because he was supposed won�*t see it because he was supposed to, you know, be a part of it and see it. i am devastated from that point of view, but how wonderful to be able to be so quickly able to show audiences how utterly brilliant he was. :, , . ,, :, ,, , he was. lovely talking to you this mornini , he was. lovely talking to you this morning, thank— he was. lovely talking to you this morning, thank you _ he was. lovely talking to you this morning, thank you and - he was. lovely talking to you this morning, thank you and good - he was. lovely talking to you this | morning, thank you and good luck with the show. i�*m thinking quite a lot of people today will be searching out a few of those songs, they maybe haven�*t had them for a while. yes, absolutely. we�*ve been talking a lot about
9:51 am
storm arwen this morning, and the disruption it�*s causing across the uk. you�*ve been sending in pictures of how the weather is looking where you are, so let�*s take a look. gary sent in this photo of his car on a roadside near huddersfield — he managed to get home eventually! luckily tracy was nice and warm inside when she took this photo of her garden in leeds. the images are showing quite a lot of snow in some places. and steve said he wasn�*t expecting to see this weather when he woke up this morning in barnsley. back to huddersfield and john sent us this picture earlier and says there�*s nowhere else to go than back to bed! or, of course, on the sofa watching us on the sofa. ben has got the big picture for us this morning. you have had a busy night looking at what is going on. i hope you are there for us now, ben. what is the picture for us this morning? i am here, morning? lam here, yes. it has morning? i am here, yes. it has been a busy morning, piecing this weather story
9:52 am
together. we have seen pictures of the snow, but it is the wind that�*s caused the major problems and damage in many places. no wonder we have had a gust close to 100 mph in parts of north east england. we have seen those pictures of the snow as well across parts of northern england and into the midlands. that was the scene in worcestershire earlier this morning. mostly low levels, somewhere in tunis at low levels with the snow mainly confined to high ground. western england and where is will brighten up and northern ireland and scotland will see a mixture of sunny spells and showers. the showers will be wintry across the north of scotland. those are the gusts we are expecting into the afternoon. not quite as windy as it has been for those exposed coasts in the north east, or the south—west of the uk. temperaturesjust in the north east, or the south—west of the uk. temperatures just 3—8 c. this evening, the wet and wintry weather continues into eastern england and cloud will bring patchy rain into northern ireland. some
9:53 am
snow into north—west scotland, and a few showers into west wales and cornwall. it will turn into a very cold night with lows of minus seven celsius. ice could be a problem tomorrow morning. cloud and patchy rain for northern ireland, west wales and cornwall and more snow across scotland. the most of us, dry, sunny, but still cold but feeling calmer. more weather through the day on the news channel. now, back to the studio. ben, thank you. with strictly and i�*m a celebrity in full swing and decemberjust around the corner, it�*s time to take a look at what we can expect from the christmas tv line up. i�*m rather enjoying the pictures of the old—fashioned tv. i�*m trying to recognise, those are the kind of tvs where you would give them a whack on the top if they were going wrong and
9:54 am
the top if they were going wrong and the picture would come back. remember? while he is reminiscing, let�*s look at some of the let's look at some of the highlights-— let's look at some of the hiihilihts. , :, ,,:, : highlights. because of storm arwen for the first time _ highlights. because of storm arwen for the first time ever _ highlights. because of storm arwen for the first time ever we _ highlights. because of storm arwen for the first time ever we are - highlights. because of storm arwen for the first time ever we are not i for the first time ever we are not coming to you live.— coming to you live. don't be like that. not seeing _ coming to you live. don't be like that. not seeing richard - coming to you live. don't be like that. not seeing richard 's - coming to you live. don't be like i that. not seeing richard 's smiley face was hard. _ that. not seeing richard 's smiley face was hard. it _ that. not seeing richard 's smiley face was hard. it was _ that. not seeing richard 's smiley face was hard. it wasjust - that. not seeing richard 's smiley face was hard. it wasjust anotherj face was hard. it was 'ust another wrench to all of- face was hard. it was 'ust another wrench to all of our- face was hard. it wasjust another wrench to all of our hearts. - face was hard. it wasjust another wrench to all of our hearts. we i face was hard. it wasjust another i wrench to all of our hearts. we were hoping _ wrench to all of our hearts. we were hoping he _ wrench to all of our hearts. we were hoping he would be back.— hoping he would be back. that's riiht, m hoping he would be back. that's right, my adventure _ hoping he would be back. that's right, my adventure is - hoping he would be back. that's right, my adventure is over. - hoping he would be back. that's right, my adventure is over. i i hoping he would be back. that's i right, my adventure is over. ijust want to say how much i love you, you know i mean that. if it wasn�*t for covid, i would be back there. if it wasn't for covid, i would be back there-— if it wasn't for covid, i would be backthere. �*, , , , ,, back there. it's because you stepped out of the temple macro _ back there. it's because you stepped out of the temple macro bubble. . back there. it's because you stepped i out of the temple macro bubble. when out of the temple macro bubble. when ou said out of the temple macro bubble. when you said yes — out of the temple macro bubble. when you said yes to — out of the temple macro bubble. when you said yes to the _ out of the temple macro bubble. you said yes to the wedding, i hope i -et you said yes to the wedding, i hope i get a _ you said yes to the wedding, i hope i get a yes— you said yes to the wedding, i hope i get a yes to the invitation. | i get a yes to the invitation. really, i get a yes to the invitation. i really, really enjoyed what i saw there. i�*ve enjoyed you, i was relaxed watching because i felt you were enjoying yourself and having a great time.
9:55 am
we�*re joined now by tv critic, scott bryan. immediately he is criticising our pictures of a television. fine immediately he is criticising our pictures of a television.- pictures of a television. one is u side pictures of a television. one is upside down! _ pictures of a television. one is upside down! we _ pictures of a television. one is upside down! we were - pictures of a television. one is upside down! we were all - pictures of a television. one is i upside down! we were all looking pictures of a television. one is - upside down! we were all looking at it wondering why the buttons are not at the bottom-— at the bottom. yes, they should be as a general— at the bottom. yes, they should be as a general rule. _ at the bottom. yes, they should be as a general rule. as _ at the bottom. yes, they should be as a general rule. as long - at the bottom. yes, they should be as a general rule. as long as - at the bottom. yes, they should be as a general rule. as long as the i at the bottom. yes, they should be | as a general rule. as long as the tv is the right way up when you are watching it. is the right way up when you are watching it— watching it. yes, and working. there is a _ watching it. yes, and working. there is a little _ watching it. yes, and working. i there is a little theme through watching it. yes, and working. l there is a little theme through a couple of the big shows at the
9:56 am
moment which is covid and problems with health. , ~ ~ with health. yes, i think so. with i'm with health. yes, i think so. with m a celebrity — with health. yes, i think so. with i'm a celebrity with _ with health. yes, i think so. with i'm a celebrity with richard - with health. yes, i think so. with | i'm a celebrity with richard having to go to hospital, it resulted in having to leave the show because he broke the temple macro bubble. the show has had a difficult week, having to have the show last night pre—recorded for the first time in its history because of storm arwen last night, the ratings are a bit down. 4 million compared to last year. that's to be expected a little bit because, of course, this time last year we were in a national lockdown so we were in watching a lot of tv, but having it so far down would be a concern to tv bosses because they are thinking... but isn't i'm because they are thinking... but isn't m a _ because they are thinking... but isn't i'm a celebrity one of those things where it starts off quite slowly, and then people start hearing about it and they tune in and it built up momentum and
9:57 am
viewership?— and it built up momentum and viewership? and it built up momentum and viewershi - ? , , ., ., ., and it built up momentum and viewershi? , , ., . ., ., viewership? yes, you are right to an extent. it depends _ viewership? yes, you are right to an extent. it depends whether - viewership? yes, you are right to an extent. it depends whether there i viewership? yes, you are right to an | extent. it depends whether there are those moments in the show, those little observations, think after a while in the "jungle", you go a little bit with... you start picking up little bit with... you start picking up some of the odd thing is you were going to say, and that's the sadness with richard leaving, everyone was expecting to be him in the moment, and the montage last night only lasted about ten seconds. and and the montage last night only lasted about ten seconds. and of course, strictly _ lasted about ten seconds. and of course, strictly has _ lasted about ten seconds. and of course, strictly has had - lasted about ten seconds. and of course, strictly has had some - course, strictly has had some amazing moments.— course, strictly has had some amazing moments. course, strictly has had some amazin: moments. , . ., , amazing moments. yes, and what is so interestin: amazing moments. yes, and what is so interesting is — amazing moments. yes, and what is so interesting is we _ amazing moments. yes, and what is so interesting is we are _ amazing moments. yes, and what is so interesting is we are coming _ amazing moments. yes, and what is so interesting is we are coming to - amazing moments. yes, and what is so interesting is we are coming to the - interesting is we are coming to the point now where there have been some front runners who have been consistent all the way through, but others are coming to the top now who are taking people by surprise. for example, telly and akita ended up
9:58 am
having a full score of a0 last week —— tilly and nikita. you can see the passion and how keen they are to be at the top. they were told, shows some more passion, really give it your all. you can sense that's the way it is going to be happening this week. ., , ., ., ., week. you understand how tv works. you have been _ week. you understand how tv works. you have been looking _ week. you understand how tv works. you have been looking ahead - week. you understand how tv works. you have been looking ahead to - you have been looking ahead to christmas. maybe two pics of something that's particularly interested you.— something that's particularly interested ou. , , , interested you. first things first, it is better _ interested you. first things first, it is better than _ interested you. first things first, it is better than last _ interested you. first things first, it is better than last year. - interested you. first things first, it is better than last year. i - interested you. first things first, | it is better than last year. i would say, ghosts is coming back for another christmas special, such a delight. and sarah phelps, who adapted all the agatha christie.
9:59 am
perfectly timed. thank you. that's all from breakfast for today. we'll be back tomorrow from 6am.
10:00 am
this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the us joins the growing list of countries restricting travel from southern africa amid fears a new covid variant found there could be more resistant to vaccines. two people are killed as storm arwen batters the uk with strong winds, rain and snow. the former england cricket captain michael vaughan says he's "sorry for all the hurt" azeem rafiq went through during the yorkshire racism scandal. i played for yorkshire county cricket club for 18 years, and if any way, shape or form cricket club for 18 years, and if any way, shape orform i am responsible for any of his hurt, i apologise for that.

59 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on