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tv   Newscast  BBC News  November 26, 2021 9:30pm-10:00pm GMT

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the french president, emmanuel macron, has accused the uk of not being serious about tackling the migrant crisis. it comes after the uk's prime minister, borisjohnson, suggested france should take back people crossing the english channel. and the england and wales cricket board has published a 12—point, game—wide action plan to tackle racism and all forms of discrimination in the game. it's in response to the azeem rafiq scandal. at ten o'clock, reeta chakrabarti will be here with a full round up of the days news. first, it's time for newscast. so, no adam fleming this week. no, but we have got two very exciting guests. we have. we have got boris. yeah. and the speaker of the house of commons. we have got the prime minister and the speaker of the house of commons. better than that, arguably. we have got a parrot! boris the parrot.
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so, lindsay, one of many of sir lindsay's pets, perched there upon laura's microphone. i don't know if he is more nervous or i am, what do you think? i can hear it in your voice, laura. you are! he is properly eyeballing me. so, lindsay, boris is a well travelled parrot, isn't he? this is just the latest venue for him to drop in on, because you are forever taking him from westminster, from from here, back to chorley. he has settled in very well, actually, he does, he loves the journey between chorley and westminster. in fact, he is very good, because he entertains. if he is on the train, he will chat away or if he is in the car, he lets people know. he wants to entertain, he is good value. so, what does he say? well, it was quite embarrassing, because obviously he travels in a cat basket, which people do not realise and the cat is actually in the dog trolley, so he is on the trying
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and he will shout out, lock the doors! lock the doors! and people are looking at me, my lips aren't moving, and it is like, lock the doors... he will wait until it is absolutely silent, but somehow he seems to know when to say lock the doors on the train. it seems to be when they are closing. it is quite uncanny. it is unnerving, and people do not realise the parrot is there and you can see everyone looking around, you know, order! order! he really starts then. you haven't taught him to say order, have you? well, i have, yes. some of the house as well. i have to say that some of our household are terrible, they deliberately do it and i think they record my voice. well, you know, he is perched on the microphone, so if it feels like a big moment, he can certainly have a word or two, can't he? is there anything that you have to do to get him to say, order, order, or is it down to his creative temperament when he thinks the moment is right. the problem is, like everything, he decides, everything is on boris' terms. boris will have it no other way. when boris decides, that is when it happens.
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all right. we still talking about the parrot? but, he is part of a wider menagerie, so maybe, just give him a minute and see if he does want to share any views with the newscast audience. he mayjust join in as we go along. brilliant, blimey, he is part of a menagerie though, i think we have got some video of your home, actually, maybe you can just talk us through. there are a couple of dogs, a giant tortoise. yes. called maggie. hard shell and not for turning. very good, what about the rest? is that a rottweiler? that, unfortunately, poor gordon, we lost gordon last year, but the thing is with gordon, he was fantastic, because why he was called gordon, he had the clunking paw. when you stopped talking, he would bang you on the knee 0h, well maybe then we should get on with this week's edition of newscast. we are delighted to have the speaker of the house of commons with us this week and indeed,
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boris, the african grey. well, because we have got quite a lot to talk about, boris has gone off for a little break, but it was a joy to meet him and have him here in the studio and it is lovely to have you with us. it is the first time we have talked to you like this, as speaker, it is a pretty strange job, isn't it? do you like it? so, i have got to say, it is tremendous. first lancashire mp to make speaker, what better accent could we have in the chair, but also this is the north, this is the north coming south. this is about lancashire being represented in the house of commons and i have got to say, it is an absolute privilege to be able to become speaker. it is very enjoyable, it is something that i get a lot out of it. there are times when it can test me, but overall i have got to say, i have been very lucky, the people of chorley put their trust in me to be an elected member of parliament
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and then to become the speaker and still represent chorley, there is no betterjob in the world. what are those testing times that you talk about? as you have seen recently, you know, i must be pretty unusual, no sooner have i got elected then we have a general election. during a general election, i find out i am a type one diabetic, following that, i still have brexit to pick up — but we thought the big thing was brexit, but we were completely overtaken by covid. you know, who would have thought that covid, a worldwide pandemic, and trying to deal with that, so what i would say is, i would like to know what it is like to be speaker in normal times. i have just not got there. but obviously i think we will get there shortly, i think it is important, but we have taken the house through, we are one of only eight legislators in the world that sat every day that we should. we have never lost a day. that is a big thanks to the house of commons staff. what a difference they make.
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without them, they had to change 750 years of working within 48 hours and we got there. who would have thought that we could vote remotely? mps would be speaking from their constituencies? and we did it. so much for us to talk about in the next 15 minutes or so and i guess one of the really big things, lindsay, in your role and for you and your deputies is presiding over discussions of the highest importance, the most seriousness and we have seen today that home secretary priti patel came to the commons to answer questions from mps about the horrendous situation in the channel over the last 36 hours or so and we can talk now to our newscast friend, european editor katya adler who is in calais for us. hello, katya. hello. so, katya, we have seen so much, haven't we in the news in the last 2a hours or so about what has happened in the channel. let's take a step back, this is a colossal challenge, isn't it, it is a colossal challenge for the government here in the uk
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and indeed for france, we have had conversations in the eu, about what to do. absolutely and i think from france's point of view, it is as much a pan—european problem as it is a bilateral issue with the uk. so, i mean, you also have to take the politics into it, whereas for boris johnson, he promised with brexit he would be taking back control over our borders, so what does that look like right now, with these deaths in the channel? on the other hand, you have got emmanuel macron here in france, heading into a difficult french presidential election, under pressure from the political right, wanting to sound tough, nationalist, tough on security and so when the uk again offered these joint patrols with the french on french beaches and in french waters, emmanuel macron said no way. he said, you should understand, uk, it is a question of national sovereignty, but he has asked for help
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from the european union, because for him it is as much a european problem as it is an issue with united kingdom and of course we have seen what is known as irregular migration, basically these awful dinghies in different parts of the edges, external borders of europe. remember, chris and laura, the migrant crisis of 2015. that affected southern member states. we had poland recently asking for help from the eu with its border with belarus and here we have the problem in calais and something else that president emmanuel macron has said is, look, these asylum seekers and others who are here in calais and want to get to the uk, they do notjust magically appear here, they often have to make their way through other european countries in order to get here. so, katya, it is interesting tonight, so priti patel, the home secretary has talked to her french counterpart this afternoon and we understand that some uk officials and law enforcement officers are actually going to france tonight. she is going to go on sunday.
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but when emmanuel macron seems to be taking a hardline saying we cannot do this kind of collaboration that the uk government is asking for, what do you the think prospects government is asking for, what do you think the prospects are of that stand—off changing? it is an historic movement of people across not just one but two continents, if you think that people are coming from the middle east and further afield. what are the chances actually then, in a big picture way, of anything changing? it is interesting, laura, because as much as we have seen the uk and the eu, sorry, france, saying we will co—operate more in the wake of those awful deaths yesterday, there has been so much cross—channel sniping by france saying the uk, it is your fault and vice versa. at the same time, when they do work together, like when they stepped up patrols in the channel tunnel,
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it is actually extremely effective and it is because they are so effective in the channel tunnel that you have desperate people taking even more desperate measures to cross over to the united kingdom, even the media here in france, they are saying, just shut up with the politics, all of you, what we really need to do is save lives, this is not acceptable. this loss of life we are seeing. thank you, katya. i am sure that will be regularly back in the commons because it is so important. what is also not an issue going away is the question of the behaviour of mps. with you in the chair. a couple of years ago you said you hope that the house would once again be a great respected house and i hope that once again it is the envy of the world. does it feel like that over the last few weeks? some days. we saw the house at its best with the tragedy of sir david amess, a great friend to the house,
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the house was at its best when it united and there is no better way than remembering sir david, he brought the house together and we wanted to show that we stood shoulder to shoulder, that we will not give in to terrorism, far from it. this was the house and i have to say the tributes that were paid were unbelievable. people speaking from the heart, right across the chamber, that was fantastic, to be followed a short time later, when we went through the issue of owen paterson and that is when the house, without doubt, was at its worst. what we've got to do is take the best and try and maintain that and that is why i said on wednesday, please, we havejust been, the day before, we have been at the cathedral, to the funeral of sir david amess, let us try and do it for him, let us be more respectful of each other and more tolerant in the way we approach it. the public out there, if we do not show respect to each other, why should other people?
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do you think there is a terrible reality now that actually because political debate in this country has become so vicious in the last few years. i remember that it was shocking during the brexit debate, the first time i heard an mp use the word traitor and everyone remembers, everyone followed the debate and is the reality now that political debate, being so vicious, has made politicians more likely to be targeted? do you think both are linked and we have got to be very careful about making direct connexions, but the way that people speak to each other, it has changed, hasn't it? that is why i want to get tolerance and respect into the views. do you think your colleagues listen? we have heard you say it quite a lot. i am going to keep trying, i do not give up. i will keep pursuing that. i think ten days ago it was pretty rough in that chamber. it was slightly better this week, we have got to keep trying to improve and turn down the heat,
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trying to show there is a way forward. i think brexit divided the country, but it divided families. it divided views and it allowed a lot of hate to come out. we have to take the hate out of politics and i always say to people, i do not expect people to agree, if you do not agree, there is a ballot box. do it through the ballot box, prove you have the right argument, prove you are in charge of this debate. do not do it by shouting and threatening. journalists got threatened just as much as mp5, it became a nasty and toxic horrible period and we have got to get beyond that now. you talk about it being pretty rough in the chamber last week and you talked about it being a dark week, the week surrounding the whole question about owen paterson and the way the government approached all of that. clearly no actions by anyone in this postcode justify any kind of threats
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that mps or others are subjected to, but when you have a situation like that, that allows critics to look in on this postcode and say, articulate that all of their worst prejudices about politicians might be playing out in reality, how does parliament collectively confront that? depends where it's coming from as well. but we got to do is where the social media comes from. they have a responsibility, they have a duty. oh why doesn't somebody else do that because my first of all it should be for that week these people. people who want to do harm to others, we don't stand by, we don't allow it. zero tolerance.— don't stand by, we don't allow it. zero tolerance. should you get rid of anonymity _ zero tolerance. should you get rid of anonymity online? _ zero tolerance. should you get rid of anonymity online? absolutely. | zero tolerance. should you get rid| of anonymity online? absolutely. i believe you _ of anonymity online? absolutely. i believe you should _ of anonymity online? absolutely. i believe you should not _ of anonymity online? absolutely. i believe you should not be - of anonymity online? absolutely. i believe you should not be puttingl believe you should not be putting messages out there. i think the government also needs to look at legislation for the if we cannot get
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the social media companies to engage properly, work with us therefore the only answer will be legislation. i don't want anyone to choose legislation because i think comments and say the companies have a social responsibility, they've got to take out... the instigation of all those carry out attacks as well that really do worry me. in fairness, we have a much better interaction with social media companies are working much closely to discourage people. we do get things taken down straight away. and quite rightly so. but we should know who these people are. zero tolerance is where we need to be. we got a cup prosecute people, we better take people to court and right right we should. and i'm at the forefront of making sure that happens. i've given a witness statement on behalf of all mps that could be used in court because determined to stamp this out. we get threats, somebody said were going to place a bomb under my car. the fact is somebody�*s going commit murder me. it's much easier of me to brush
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it aside but actually, a new mp, summit has not been around, we should have to tolerate it. that's the reality of it.— the reality of it. and you said it was a pretty — the reality of it. and you said it was a pretty rough _ the reality of it. and you said it was a pretty rough week - the reality of it. and you said it was a pretty rough week in - was a pretty rough week in the chamber. what did you mean by that? you are no stranger to showing your passion for manners and protocol house was and what did you mean by a rough week? it house was and what did you mean by a rough week?— rough week? it was rough because you could see the — rough week? it was rough because you could see the sides _ rough week? it was rough because you could see the sides the _ rough week? it was rough because you could see the sides the moments - rough week? it was rough because you could see the sides the moments of. could see the sides the moments of these stood up the wave of noise was coming, trying to calm the upside down, the other side would interrupt as well. i think the exchange as we could all say became very heated. it wasn't a way forward. and then became a challenge, was that a challenge to me? in the end, i don't wanted to be about me. i don't want people to of it was about me. unfortunately, that day it was about me because i had to absolutely slam down, i'm in charge of the cells, i will decide what is right and what
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is wrong. will decide what is right and what is wronu. �* , ., will decide what is right and what iswronu.�* , ., , will decide what is right and what iswronu. �* , ., , ., is wrong. and 'ust for people who mi . ht've is wrong. and just for people who might've missed _ is wrong. and just for people who might've missed it _ is wrong. and just for people who might've missed it you're - is wrong. and just for people who might've missed it you're talking | might've missed it you're talking about a very heated prime ministers questions where you mister speaker if i may basically told the prime minister to sit down and shut up. i hope it was slightly nicer than that. i think he was a bit more like you know, you might be the prime minister of this country but in this house on the chart. i wanted to really assure that in that chamber i will be undermined for them in the end and doing it for them. because those mps matter to me. they have 30 minutes in which to get those questions in for the people have been told, i can get through that, i've got it make sure .net the questions are posed to him and what i didn't want was this exchange of nastiness was up and that's where we were going on both sides. i pulled up were going on both sides. i pulled up both sides and quite rightly. it does look though every week the prime minister drives around the twist. . ., ~ ,
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twist. far from. are you sure? 0h, absolutely- — twist. far from. are you sure? 0h, absolutely- it _ twist. far from. are you sure? 0h, absolutely. it would _ twist. far from. are you sure? 0h, absolutely. it would be _ twist. far from. are you sure? 0h, absolutely. it would be just - twist. far from. are you sure? 0h, absolutely. it would be just the - absolutely. it would be just the prime minister. 5ir absolutely. it would be 'ust the prime minister.* absolutely. it would be 'ust the prime minister. sir keir starmer treasure round _ prime minister. sir keir starmer treasure round the _ prime minister. sir keir starmer treasure round the twist. - prime minister. sir keir starmer treasure round the twist. i - prime minister. sir keir starmer treasure round the twist. i have| prime minister. sir keir starmer. treasure round the twist. i have a 'ob treasure round the twist. i have a “0b to treasure round the twist. i have a job to do- — treasure round the twist. i have a job to do- and — treasure round the twist. i have a job to do. and hopefully - treasure round the twist. i have a job to do. and hopefully i've gotl treasure round the twist. i have a. job to do. and hopefully i've got to show i can carry thatjob. sometimes i got to use a little bit more authority than i would do normally. i tried to be mark harm to the neck, my approach was that what i can't be is on the bond. did my approach was that what i can't be is on the bond-— my approach was that what i can't be is on the bond. did that moment with the prime minister _ is on the bond. did that moment with the prime ministerjust _ is on the bond. did that moment with the prime ministerjust come - is on the bond. did that moment with the prime ministerjust come to - is on the bond. did that moment with the prime ministerjust come to you | the prime ministerjust come to you because of— the prime ministerjust come to you because of what was happening at that point? the anger bubbling up within_ that point? the anger bubbling up within you, it was quite a kind of a visceral_ within you, it was quite a kind of a visceral intervention was up two of us can't _ visceral intervention was up two of us can't be — visceral intervention was up two of us can't be stood up at the same time _ us can't be stood up at the same time. ~ ., , ., , ., time. went want somebody wants to stood u- time. went want somebody wants to stood up one — time. went want somebody wants to stood up one of— time. went want somebody wants to stood up one of us _ time. went want somebody wants to stood up one of us has _ time. went want somebody wants to stood up one of us has to _ time. went want somebody wants to stood up one of us has to sit - stood up one of us has to sit down. well, it can be made. unfortunately i got to give a reason to the prime minister to give them a good reason to sit down and hopefully that's all that was for so a gentle reminder say look, please sit down. i’m say look, please sit down. i'm startin: say look, please sit down. i'm starting my — say look, please sit down. i'm starting my feet. _ say look, please sit down. i'm starting my feet. let's talk about what _ starting my feet. let's talk about what a _ starting my feet. let's talk about what a big — starting my feet. let's talk about what a big talking points this week
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in parliament and the whole business of her_ in parliament and the whole business of her three—month—old baby asleep when _ of her three—month—old baby asleep when she _ of her three—month—old baby asleep when she wanted to take part in the chamhen _ when she wanted to take part in the chamber. she's had plenty to say sense _ chamber. she's had plenty to say sense about an email she received saying _ sense about an email she received saying that — sense about an email she received saying that wasn't appropriate. how should _ saying that wasn't appropriate. how should parliament strike the balance between _ should parliament strike the balance between allowing an mp to go about their business.— their business. making all sorts of faces if you're _ their business. making all sorts of faces if you're listening _ their business. making all sorts of faces if you're listening rather - faces if you're listening rather than watching. aha, faces if you're listening rather than watching.— faces if you're listening rather than watching. a certificate to enact difficult _ than watching. a certificate to enact difficult balance. - than watching. a certificate to enact difficult balance. some| than watching. a certificate to - enact difficult balance. some would argue _ enact difficult balance. some would argue there are certain duties that only an _ argue there are certain duties that only an mp— argue there are certain duties that only an mp can perform and therefore someone else can't do the work for her. someone else can't do the work for hen on_ someone else can't do the work for hen on the — someone else can't do the work for her. on the other hand will be newscasters watching and listening to us and _ newscasters watching and listening to us and thinking well, i can't take _ to us and thinking well, ican't take my— to us and thinking well, i can't take my child to the police station when _ take my child to the police station when i _ take my child to the police station when i turn — take my child to the police station when i turn up for my shift or whateven _ when i turn up for my shift or whatever. and therefore it may be her argument shouldn't be given too much _ her argument shouldn't be given too much credibility. what her argument shouldn't be given too much credibility.— much credibility. what i would say is where all _
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much credibility. what i would say is where all have _ much credibility. what i would say is where all have our— much credibility. what i would say is where all have our view. i've - much credibility. what i would say| is where all have our view. i've got mothers who say i don't agree with that. we should be treated differently, i constituents, that. we should be treated differently, iconstituents, i expect to be treated the same. there really is an issue. sockets both sides of the argument. what i'm saying is, whoever�*s in the chair they should take what is the right decision at that moment. in the meantime, for me rule is a male, here i am a gray—haired man to say you should or should not. it puts me in an impossible position. i think quite rightly the procedure committee is well, let's hear the evidence and take it forward. at the moment the rules are clear, you shouldn't bring children into the chamber. that's not something i've made up, that something i've inherited. so what i said is, look, let's use some discretion. whoever�*s sharing or in the chamber use discretion for that moment in time. it could be a bit confusing for the view the boss after all.— it could be a bit confusing for the view the boss after all. yes, there are certain —
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view the boss after all. yes, there are certain things _ view the boss after all. yes, there are certain things that _ view the boss after all. yes, there are certain things that you - view the boss after all. yes, there are certain things that you bow . are certain things that you bow to. and i got to say when i look after my grandchildren they would love to come into the chamber but that's not the right thing for me to do. you bring patent as well. boris would love to sit on the chair arm. i genuinely think it's a big issue. at the house needs to make its mind up. as i say, i've been heavily lobbied not to change the rules. by who? by other mothers. and it's been very clear, they've made their voice, and that tax on my phone who say, "do not give in! '.i that tax on my phone who say, "do not give in! i don't tickets are given and i think it's about doing the right thing. and that's why the procedure committee has been asked to report and note it will allow both sides of the argument to give evidence and let us make the right decision. in evidence and let us make the right decision. . ., ., ., ., ,, decision. in the annual have to make a decision. — decision. in the annual have to make a decision, won't _ decision. in the annual have to make a decision, won't you? _ decision. in the annual have to make a decision, won't you? well, - decision. in the annual have to make a decision, won't you? well, the - a decision, won't you? well, the procedure _ a decision, won't you? well, the procedure committee _ a decision, won't you? well, the procedure committee will - a decision, won't you? well, the procedure committee will make | a decision, won't you? well, the | procedure committee will make a recommendation. quite rightly there's no point having other people
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look into something if you're going to dismiss it. and i don't know what they're going to say.— they're going to say. as things stand though, _ they're going to say. as things stand though, you _ they're going to say. as things stand though, you can - they're going to say. as things stand though, you can have i they're going to say. as things stand though, you can have a| they're going to say. as things - stand though, you can have a look at the rules but right now could she bring her baby pip into the commons next week? tell! bring her baby pip into the commons next week? . . , ., . , next week? tell me the circumstances wh , what next week? tell me the circumstances why. what is — next week? tell me the circumstances why. what is the _ next week? tell me the circumstances why, what is the need? _ next week? tell me the circumstances why, what is the need? what - next week? tell me the circumstances why, what is the need? what is - next week? tell me the circumstances why, what is the need? what is the i why, what is the need? what is the need, white next week, it's better i'm informed and whatever the subject is next week. somebody said to me, i can't believe it, i noticed the baby wasn't missing. what i would say is it's about the event, what is the discussion, what is the need. let's make that decision at the time and find out what is the real reason to do that. it may be nobody�*s to look after the baby. it must be something may have happened in that constituency that so pressing. but i would say is let's not put the handcuffs on at this stage, let the house report back on the let's try and calm it down. that was the other issue about this
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today. the babies burped, therefore he managed to move the situation on. i thought that's an awful unusual way of suggesting what the mothers doing. what i want to try and do is say it's a matter that's very heated, let's take the heat out of it and let's make some rational decisions going forward. essen it and let's make some rational decisions going forward. even the prime minister _ decisions going forward. even the prime minister has _ decisions going forward. even the prime minister has joined - decisions going forward. even the prime minister has joined in. - decisions going forward. even the i prime minister has joined in. before prime minister hasjoined in. before we finish _ prime minister hasjoined in. before we finish i _ prime minister hasjoined in. before we finish i have to ask about chinos and the _ we finish i have to ask about chinos and the whole business dress code in the comments. what's wrong with chinos? _ the comments. what's wrong with chinos? �* , ., , chinos? don't start me, chris. let me 'ust chinos? don't start me, chris. let mejust say. _ chinos? don't start me, chris. let me just say, chinos, _ chinos? don't start me, chris. let me just say, chinos, very - chinos? don't start me, chris. let mejust say, chinos, very good, i | mejust say, chinos, very good, i don't want to get into fashion for women or men. i'm very lucky the deputies love talking about what we should wear and not where in the chambers. in the end i think we have a job and i think you should wear an outfit that is appropriate to the chamber. now, who to define whether
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his jeans, chamber. now, who to define whether hisjeans, chinos? igot chamber. now, who to define whether hisjeans, chinos? i got to say, short—sleeved, long sleeve dresses, i am lost. i don't want to get into fashion, i'll be quite honest with you. fashion, i'll be quite honest with ou. ., fashion, i'll be quite honest with 0“. ., ., ., fashion, i'll be quite honest with ou. ., ., ., , fashion, i'll be quite honest with ou. ., ., ., ., ., you. you got a black cloak to wear so ou you. you got a black cloak to wear so you don't _ you. you got a black cloak to wear so you don't have _ you. you got a black cloak to wear so you don't have to _ you. you got a black cloak to wear so you don't have to worry. - so you don't have to worry. absolutely. i think it is a dress code that they feel that it's a check out for me. i’m code that they feel that it's a check out for me.— check out for me. i'm glad i asked that. i'm check out for me. i'm glad i asked that- i'm very _ check out for me. i'm glad i asked that. i'm very glad _ check out for me. i'm glad i asked that. i'm very glad you _ check out for me. i'm glad i asked | that. i'm very glad you asked that. i'm very reassured that the speaker of the house that the mother of parliament to misquote is very competent getting himself dressed. thank you so much forjoining. come back another time. bring the rest of the menagerie. the back another time. bring the rest of the menagerie-— the menagerie. the cat would love it. it the menagerie. the cat would love it- it would — the menagerie. the cat would love it. it would never _ the menagerie. the cat would love it. it would never move. _ the menagerie. the cat would love it. it would never move. amazing. | it. it would never move. amazing. thank you — it. it would never move. amazing. thank you so _ it. it would never move. amazing. thank you so much. _ it. it would never move. amazing. thank you so much. please - it. it would never move. amazing. thank you so much. please do - it. it would never move. amazing. l thank you so much. please do come again. bring some of the rest of the menagerie but maybe we must go.
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before we go we will share with you what actually happened with boris the parent before we started officially recording. hello. hi. hello for the just a little to the right. oh! oh, no bars. ido hello for the just a little to the right. oh! oh, no bars. i do you do this. come on. good boy. it was rather alarming and explains why am sitting here nervous. i wasn't sure. obviously we come across as entirely cool and _ obviously we come across as entirely cool and calm in front of the cameras _ cool and calm in front of the cameras as always. and then boris landed on — cameras as always. and then boris landed on the speakers head. there we go _ landed on the speakers head. there we go. which is newscast moments a-o, we go. which is newscast moments ago. we've — we go. which is newscast moments ago, we've had a few over the years. that was— ago, we've had a few over the years. that was the — ago, we've had a few over the years. that was the one of them were a record for— that was the one of them were a record for quite a while. a sentence i never record for quite a while. a sentence i never thought _
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record for quite a while. a sentence i never thought i'd _ record for quite a while. a sentence i never thought i'd hear. _ record for quite a while. a sentence i never thought i'd hear. a - record for quite a while. a sentence i never thought i'd hear. a good - record for quite a while. a sentence | i never thought i'd hear. a good way to draw to a close. thank you everyone for watching and listening. adam will be back here tomorrow for them and we will both be back here next week. ,., ., , them and we will both be back here next week. _ _ so far the strongest wind gusts i've seen are of across coastal region of aberdeen share picking up a top gust of 70mph. not too far behind northumberland, 70 formal progressive when here. those wind gusts strong enough to bring down some trees. no doubt some transport disruption out and about as we head into saturday. the peak red weather warning collapses during the early hours of saturday and is our low—pressure moves southwards will
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be left with two regions of strong winds. one affecting eastern areas of scotland, northeast england and another for wales of scotland, northeast england and anotherfor wales in of scotland, northeast england and another for wales in southwest england. both of these areas was a gust of wind around about 60 to 70mph. so strong enough to bring down some trees, we could see some further disruption as well as that we've got some rain, heavy snow of high ground. critically of the southern uplands and high parts of the pennines could see some disruptive falls of snow higher. even low down you might see a little bit of snowjust even low down you might see a little bit of snow just for a even low down you might see a little bit of snowjust for a time as we head into the first part of saturday morning. and of course it will be a very blustery and cold start to the day on saturday with those costs well up even inland very must—read indeed. through the rest of saturday we will have this zone of rain, still a bit of sleet and snow mixed in with that. although anything accumulating not likely to happen, anything that falls is just a note back to reign as a day goes by. we would keep those strong winds all
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day and it's going to feel very cold. temperatures around three or four quite widely by factoring those wins, it will feel better. for the second half of the weekend, our continues to work away from the weekend we still got these fairly strong winds and those wins will be feeling any warmer at all. sunday will be a date really of sunshine and showers without the sun showered back showers most frequent but i think will be a whole raft of flop lead back showers. no one is immune from seeing in our downpour. though showers still having a bit of wintry flavour a bit of hail mixed in with some of those. temperatures around 2 or so some of those. temperatures around 2 orso in some of those. temperatures around 2 or so in newcastle. maybe four in london. again helical photo into next week we argued to see a sharp jump next week we argued to see a sharp jump upward in temperatures with the terms much milder by tuesday but rain and some strong winds in the week ahead. that your latest weather.
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concern mounts as countries around the world ban called omicron, the variant has emerged in europe, as belgium reported its first case. here, the health secretary said it could pose a substantial risk to public health. early indications show this variant may be more transmissible than the delta variant, and current vaccines may be less effective against it.
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