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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  November 26, 2021 6:00pm-6:30pm GMT

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stepping up the vaccine programme in south africa, where the first cases of the latest variant were detected. today the eu commission called on all european nations to join the uk in stopping flights to and from southern africa. also tonight: 12—year—old ava white was stabbed to death in an argument in liverpool city centre — four teenage boys are arrested on suspicion of her murder. how to resolve the migrant crisis in calais? the uk and france find themselves at loggerheads as a diplomatic row breaks out. and it's bargain hunt black friday. but can supply keep up with demand? coming up in sport on the bbc news channel: wales will play austria and scotland face ukraine in the play—off semifinals for the world cup. if they win, both home nations will then face each other.
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good evening. officials in belgium say they've discovered the first case in europe of a new variant of covid deemed to be of huge international concern. there are fears that the variant, which has been circulating in south africa, might be more transmissible, and that vaccines may be less effective against it. from midday today, the uk suspended direct flights from six countries in southern africa — and from 4am on sunday, anyone arriving here from those countries will have to quarantine at their own expense for ten days in an approved hotel. this afternoon, the european union also said that air travel to and from the six countries should be halted. with ourfirst report tonight, here's our medical editor, fergus walsh. after months of opening up,
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a new coronavirus variant means travel restrictions are back. at heathrow, the last flights from south africa arrived this morning. i feel extremely relieved, because, yeah, who knows how long this is going to last? we've been told we have to isolate at home, so that shouldn't be too bad. from sunday, only uk and irish residents will be allowed in from six southern african countries, and they'll have to pay to quarantine in a hotel. the travel restrictions mean catherine will miss her niece�*s wedding in south africa. it's devastating. they've held back this wedding for two years for us, so we were all going to be together, which is really important. and literally, we were off on the ninth, and now we are not. the health secretary said the new variant may pose a substantial risk to public health, so the
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restrictions were necessary. i want to reassure this house that there are no detected cases of this variant in the uk at this time, but this new variant is of huge international concern. several coronavirus mutations have already made the covid pandemic worse. the alpha variant, identified in kent, drove a huge wave of hospital admissions and deaths are your last winter. the delta variant, first detected in india, was even more transmissible and is currently the dominant strain worldwide. on paper, the new variant looks worrying, with twice the number of mutations found on delta. around 30 of these are on the spike protein, the key the virus uses to unlock our cells, and these
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changes may help it evade our body's defences. so far, we don't know whether the variant causes more severe disease, whether vaccines will be less effective, or whether drugs won't work. it's the sheer number and type of mutations that has scientists who are troubled. some of them have never been seen in combinations like this before, and many of them we have seen in various variants of concern so far, but it is the complexity of the mutations that we are seeing today, and the effect that it may have won both the immune response and transmissibility, that are a huge concern. , concern. the next few weeks will see scientific detective _ concern. the next few weeks will see scientific detective work _ concern. the next few weeks will see scientific detective work in _ concern. the next few weeks will see scientific detective work in labs - concern. the next few weeks will see scientific detective work in labs to . scientific detective work in labs to determine the threat posed by this variant. travel bans will slow the spread but won't stop it going global if it has a competitive advantage over other variants. fergus walsh, bbc news. as we've just been hearing, the first confirmed cases
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of the new variant were found in south africa and botswana. the suspension of travel by the uk and some european countries will affect travellers from there, as well as from namibia, zimbabwe, lesotho, and eswatini, which was swaziland. the south african government and scientific community have criticised the move, saying it will cause more damage than good. from there, our africa correspondent, andrew harding reports. a technical university in pretoria, south africa, this afternoon. this is where the new variant was first properly identified, spreading fast among students.— properly identified, spreading fast among students. obviously, this is so overwhelming, _ among students. obviously, this is so overwhelming, we _ among students. obviously, this is so overwhelming, we are - among students. obviously, this is so overwhelming, we are all - among students. obviously, this is i so overwhelming, we are all worried, but the management took a decision to suspend all social gatherings and social activities. the to suspend all social gatherings and social activities.— social activities. the impact he has been swift. — social activities. the impact he has been swift, with _ social activities. the impact he has been swift, with many _ social activities. the impact he has been swift, with many countries i social activities. the impact he has i been swift, with many countries now following britain's lead in banning flights from south africa. so, this morning's arrivals from johannesburg and cape town could be the last for
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some time. it and cape town could be the last for some time-— some time. it is absolutely ridiculous _ some time. it is absolutely ridiculous that _ some time. it is absolutely ridiculous that they - some time. it is absolutely ridiculous that they have i some time. it is absolutely - ridiculous that they have imposed it again so quickly, without really investigating this new variant. the timin: for investigating this new variant. the timing for south africa could hardly be worse. it is summer here, and the tourist industry was hoping for a big boost after two richard years of lockdowns and red listings. no wonder south africa's foreign minister has criticised the travel ban, calling it rushed, economically damaging, and are urging britain to reconsider. not that that seems very likely, at least not in the short term. today, south africa is gearing up term. today, south africa is gearing up for a likely fourth wave, dominated by this new variant, but scientists here insist that trying to isolate countries or regions makes no practical sense. we saw with the delta — makes no practical sense. we saw with the delta variant _ makes no practical sense. we saw with the delta variant that - makes no practical sense. we saw with the delta variant that within i with the delta variant that within three _ with the delta variant that within three weeks, 53 countries were reporting — three weeks, 53 countries were reporting cases of the delta
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variant, _ reporting cases of the delta variant, so stop stopping —— so stopping — variant, so stop stopping —— so stopping travel from one country or a small_ stopping travel from one country or a small group of countries very soon becomes_ a small group of countries very soon becomes superfluous. it�*s a small group of countries very soon becomes superfluous.— becomes superfluous. it's really not the solution- _ becomes superfluous. it's really not the solution. but _ becomes superfluous. it's really not the solution. but could _ becomes superfluous. it's really not the solution. but could there - becomes superfluous. it's really not the solution. but could there be - becomes superfluous. it's really not| the solution. but could there be one upside to the arrival of this new variant? in recent months, south africa's vaccine roll—out has slowed down. it is the same in other south african countries, partly down to a shortage of vaccines, but also due to public apathy, and fear of the new variant could change that. hopefully, we get past the stage areyou vaccinated? i’m hopefully, we get past the stage areyou vaccinated?— areyou vaccinated? i'm vaccinated, so hepefully _ areyou vaccinated? i'm vaccinated, so hepefully i'll _ areyou vaccinated? i'm vaccinated, so hopefully i'll be _ areyou vaccinated? i'm vaccinated, so hopefully i'll be so. _ areyou vaccinated? i'm vaccinated, so hopefully i'll be so. the - areyou vaccinated? i'm vaccinated, so hopefully i'll be so. the focus i so hopefully i'll be so. the focus is on this south _ so hopefully i'll be so. the focus is on this south african - so hopefully i'll be so. the focus. is on this south african laboratory and the scientists trying to unlock the secrets of the virus�*s new mutations. andrew harding, bbc news, johannesburg. our transport correspondent katy austin is at heathrow for us this evening.
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we've seen the disruption for some travellers, and this is a blow for the industry?— travellers, and this is a blow for the indust ? , ., , , the industry? yes, potentially. news ofthe the industry? yes, potentially. news of the new variant _ the industry? yes, potentially. news of the new variant has _ the industry? yes, potentially. news of the new variant has caused - the industry? yes, potentially. news of the new variant has caused some l of the new variant has caused some jitters on stock markets today, with shares in airline and travel firms among the worst hit. the uk has seen something of an opening up in international travel again in recent months, and it was at the end of october that all the countries that were still on the red list at that point were taken off. however, the system has remained in place, and now we are seeing just how quickly the situation can still change, how quickly countries can go onto the red list again without hotel quarantine requirement. businesses will say they recognise the reason is that decisions are being taken, to try and prevent the new variant taking hold, but they will be very nervous at any prospect of a dent to put in consumers�* confidence to
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book, confidence that had been on the up. book, confidence that had been on the u -. ., ., , book, confidence that had been on and our medical editor fergus walshjoins me now. how worried should we be? which now has a name. it is the omicron variant, named after a letter of the greek alphabet by technical organisation that world health organization. we have already had alpha, beta and delta. i have not seen the level of concern that i have been hearing among senior scientists so far in this pandemic that they have about the omicron variant. it is all potential at the moment, all on paper, it looks worrying, and it will take two or three weeks before we know for sure just what we are in for. but it is inevitable, i think, just what we are in for. but it is inevitable, ithink, that just what we are in for. but it is inevitable, i think, that we are going to find cases in the uk eventually. travel bans tend to slow down variants, they don�*t stop them altogether. but it will be interesting to see what happens when the omicron variant comes across a
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very highly immunised population. you have to remember that vaccines so far have provided good protection against all variants so far, so the key thing is, get immunised. maw; key thing is, get immunised. many thanks, key thing is, get immunised. many thanks. fergus— key thing is, get immunised. many thanks, fergus walsh _ key thing is, get immunised. many thanks, fergus walsh there. the government�*s latest coronavirus figures for the uk show there were just over 50,000 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. on average, over ltlt,000 cases were reported per day in the last week. 7,633 people were in hospital with covid as of yesterday. there were 160 deaths, that�*s of people who died within 28 days of a positive test, which means the average number of deaths over the past seven days was 125. the total number of people who�*ve died with covid now stands at 144,593. on vaccinations, 88.5 percent of people aged 12 and over have now received a first dose. and 80.4 percent have
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been double—jabbed. and more than 16.7 million people have received their booster jab. a girl of 12 has died after being attacked in the street by a group of teenage boys in liverpool city centre. ava white was with friends when it�*s thought they were involved in an argument, and she suffered what police have described as �*catastrophic injuries�*. four boys, aged between 13 and 15, have been arrested on suspicion of her murder. danny savage reports. ava white was 12 years old. last night, she came into liverpool city centre as the christmas lights were switched on. she never made it home. today, police investigating the killing of a year eight schoolgirl. any investigating the killing of a year eight schoolgirl. any 12-year-old d in: in eight schoolgirl. any 12-year-old dying in these — eight schoolgirl. any 12-year-old dying in these circumstances - eight schoolgirl. any 12-year-old i dying in these circumstances would be shocking. it�*s devastating for the family, and i think many people
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who have 12, 13—year—olds will be... just can�*t believe that has happened. fits just can't believe that has happened-— just can't believe that has happened. just can't believe that has ha ened. r ., ., just can't believe that has hat-ened. r ., ., , happened. as the day wore on, people came to leave — happened. as the day wore on, people came to leave flowers. _ happened. as the day wore on, people came to leave flowers. some - happened. as the day wore on, people came to leave flowers. some of - happened. as the day wore on, people came to leave flowers. some of them l came to leave flowers. some of them knew ava, many of them didn�*t, just shocked that such a terrible thing could happen here. she shocked that such a terrible thing could happen here.— shocked that such a terrible thing could happen here. she was “ust so small, could happen here. she was “ust so smart. and — could happen here. she was “ust so small, and loving * could happen here. she was “ust so small, and loving and fi could happen here. she was “ust so small, and loving and kind. _ could happen here. she wasjust so| small, and loving and kind. she had one of— small, and loving and kind. she had one of the _ small, and loving and kind. she had one of the most... she was one of the kindest— one of the most... she was one of the kindest people i've met. they were _ the kindest people i've met. they were all— the kindest people i've met. they were all so— the kindest people i've met. they were all so lovely. the fact that she has— were all so lovely. the fact that she has been talked so early in life. _ she has been talked so early in life. it's — she has been talked so early in life, it's not nice.— she has been talked so early in life, it's not nice. businesses in the crime _ life, it's not nice. businesses in the crime scene _ life, it's not nice. businesses in the crime scene cord _ life, it's not nice. businesses in the crime scene cord and - life, it's not nice. businesses in| the crime scene cord and stayed closed for most of the day, but in the communities ava white was part of, people tried to sum up who she was. r . of, people tried to sum up who she was. �* ., ., , ., ., was. ava was a thoughtful, considerate _ was. ava was a thoughtful, considerate girl. _ was. ava was a thoughtful, considerate girl. she - was. ava was a thoughtful, | considerate girl. she looked was. ava was a thoughtful, - considerate girl. she looked for the positive in everything. she was a much loved member of the school community, and shejust made much loved member of the school community, and she just made friends with absolutely everyone. she took
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everyone under her wing and was just a genuinely nice little girl. fit, a genuinely nice little girl. a passer—by who a genuinely nice little girl. a passer— by who saw what happened passer—by who saw what happened to ava try to help. paramedics came and treated her at the scene before taking her onto to alder hey children�*s hospital. she died a short time later. she was a pupil here at notre dame catholic college in everton. the head teacher released a statement saying, ava was a much loved, valued and unique member of the notre dame family. she was an incredibly popular girl with a fantastic group of friends. our deepest thoughts and prayers go out to ava�*s family and friends and all those affected by this utterly tragic event. in the moments after the attack, those responsible were seen running away. police later arrested four teenage boys aged between 13 and 15. they are now being questioned by detectives. danny savage, bbc news, liverpool. our top story this evening: as belgium reports the first case of the southern africa variant,
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the health secretary warns it could pose a substantial risk here. coming up: the hope for new laws to secure a better quality of life for people with down�*s syndrome. coming up in sportsday on the bbc news channel: manchester united reach an agreement for lokomotiv moscow�*s head of sports and development ralf rangnick to move to old trafford as interim manager. the french president emmanuel macron has accused borisjohnson of not being serious, after the prime minister sent him a letter — which he also put on twitter — calling on france to accept the return of people making illegal crossings across the channel. france has also withdrawn an invitation to the home secretary priti patel to attend a meeting this weekend to discuss the crisis. it follows the deaths of 27 people who drowned on wednesday while trying to reach the uk. lucy williamson reports from calais.
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the road between paris and london is getting colder. the political distance a little whiter each day. here in the migrant camps caught between the two governments they know about barriers and communication.- know about barriers and communication. ., ., communication. macron says you are not serious. — communication. macron says you are not serious. is _ communication. macron says you are not serious. is he — communication. macron says you are not serious, is he right? _ communication. macron says you are not serious, is he right? he - communication. macron says you are not serious, is he right? he says - not serious, is he right? he says co-0peration _ not serious, is he right? he says co-operation between _ not serious, is he right? he says co-operation between european| co—operation between european partners was the riches of the migrant crisis. but partners was the riches of the migrant crisis.— partners was the riches of the mitrant crisis. �* ., ., , migrant crisis. but again underlines that this is a _ migrant crisis. but again underlines that this is a problem _ migrant crisis. but again underlines that this is a problem we _ migrant crisis. but again underlines that this is a problem we have - migrant crisis. but again underlines that this is a problem we have to i that this is a problem we have to fix together. that this is a problem we have to fix together-— fix together. boris johnson is accused by — fix together. boris johnson is accused by france _ fix together. boris johnson is accused by france of - fix together. boris johnson is accused by france of using i fix together. boris johnson is l accused by france of using the migrant crisis for his own political ends. last night borisjohnson sent out a series of tweets saying he had written to the french president with a number of proposals. he treated the letter calling forjoint patrols
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and suggesting that all illegal migrants across the channel be returned to france. this, he said, would break the business model of the criminal gangs. france is agitated by mrjohnson�*s style of diplomacy and it shows. translation: i am surprised when things are not done seriously. we do not communicate between leaders on these issues in tweets or published letters. we are not whistle—blowers. come on. the ministers will work seriously to settle a serious issue with serious people. the tensions between france _ with serious people. the tensions between france and _ with serious people. the tensions between france and the - with serious people. the tensions between france and the uk - with serious people. the tensions between france and the uk builtl with serious people. the tensions i between france and the uk built up over a range of issues are becoming increasingly public. the home secretary priti patel wish due here in calais this weekend to discuss migration but since the tweets last night she has been designated. uk officials are in paris today to discuss the issue. as officials try
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to bridge the political divide, migrants here are planning day after day how to bridge the channel. like this person from sudan, queuing at a food distribution truck. he is undeterred by the deaths of 27 people in the channel this week. would he stop trying if he thought he would be sent straight back to france? , , , ., ., ., france? this is my dream to go to the uk. france? this is my dream to go to the uk- if— france? this is my dream to go to the uk- if i _ france? this is my dream to go to the uk. if i came _ france? this is my dream to go to the uk. |f| came back to - france? this is my dream to go to the uk. |f| came back to france i the uk. if i came back to france again i would go to the uk. never be stopped. not stop never.— stopped. not stop never. neither disaster nor _ stopped. not stop never. neither disaster nor diplomacy _ stopped. not stop never. neither disaster nor diplomacy has - stopped. not stop never. neither l disaster nor diplomacy has stopped the rhythm of these crossings. an alternative to the promises of people smugglers can feel as remote here as downing street. lucy williamson, bbc news. our political correspondent iain watsonjoins us from downing street. how serious is this row, iain?
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usually tragedies bring people closer together about the deaths in the channel seem to have only highlighted the difference between the uk and french governments. boris johnson is under huge pressure from many of his own mps to do more to stop the small boats arriving on our shores so perhaps it was unsurprising he made that letter to the french president public but what downing street are emphasising is that everything he asked for in that letter, joint patrols, agreements to return refugees, he had made that case privately to no avail. attempts are going on tonight to get priti patel be invited to meet her french counterpart in any case i am told she spoke to him to discuss the migrant crisis lines of remain open. british officials are in france this evening trying to cooperate but only by plane borisjohnson and cts showing a huge error ofjudgment. —— labour blame. and our europe editor
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katya adler is here. we�*ve just heard the view from westminster — what�*s the view from france and the eu? i think ithink in i think in this case we have to separate france and the rest of the ego. we are seeing a briefing by between france and the uk over the crisis on the channel. we have just heard the viewpoint from westminster. the concerns of france were very critical of the prime minister publicising his letter of proposal to france and they say that meant he was not serious. they accuse the prime minister of pitting domestic concerns first. france has its own political concerns. emmanuel macron heading into a presidential election and he wants to send nationalist and resolute and he doesn�*t have much wiggle room over migration. how constructive wasn�*t to just invite the home secretary from a meeting of immigration ministers in calais on sunday?
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everyone is going to have to work together to make any progress. relations bilateral between britain and france right now are sour. a man has appeared before magistrates charged with murdering an 18—year—old woman from plymouth. bobbi—anne mcleod was reported missing last weekend after failing to meet friends in the city centre. cody ackland — who�*s 24 and from the southway area of plymouth — is due back in court on monday. the met office has issued a rare red weather warning for north eastern parts of the uk — that means people are being advised not to travel in those areas. the warning is because of storm arwen moving in from the east — travel disruption has already been extensive and trains between edinburgh and england have been cancelled. our scotland correspondent lorna gordonjoins me now from stonehaven on the east coast of scotland.
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it looks wild. very difficult conditions out here tonight. the red weather warnings are not issued lightly. the last one was almost two years ago. a huge sweep of the east coast of britain has affected from the north of aberdeen down to middlesbrough in the north—east of england. there are warnings of gusting winds up to 90 miles an hour, reports of wave height eight to sea reaching nine, ten metres high. coastal communities like here in stonehaven are alert for the overtopping waves and flooding. so far that has not happened here but there are very treacherous conditions out on the roads with those gusting winds, falling debris. the regular meaning that as a potential risk to life. the police in scotland tonight saying that if you live in any of these affected areas you should not head out onto the roads. ., ., ..,
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areas you should not head out onto the roads. ., ,, ., ~ , ., england looks set to become the first country in the world to introduce legislation to better support people with down�*s syndrome. the new bill, backed by mps from all parties, will mean bodies like councils, schools and job centres will be required to recognise the needs of people who have down�*s. megan paterson reports. a musical solo celebrating the progress of landmark legislation. i love stories and not many people with down syndrome have good stories. the bill hopefully will become an act and i am very excited for that. fits become an act and i am very excited for that. �* , become an act and i am very excited forthat. a , . ., ~, become an act and i am very excited forthat. a , . ., _ ., for that. as the life expectancy of eo - le for that. as the life expectancy of peeple with _ for that. as the life expectancy of people with down's _ for that. as the life expectancy of people with down's syndrome - people with down�*s syndrome has increased campaigners argue the support of it has been left behind. there is hope the new down�*s syndrome bill will help join
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there is hope the new down�*s syndrome bill will helpjoin up fragmented services, recognised egg and i don�*t support where it is needed. if and i don't support where it is needed. , , and i don't support where it is needed. ,' ., and i don't support where it is needed. , , ., , , ., needed. if society is not set up to be beyond — needed. if society is not set up to be beyond those _ needed. if society is not set up to be beyond those personal- needed. if society is not set up to i be beyond those personal moments thatis be beyond those personal moments that is the thing that is missing, that is the thing that is missing, thatis that is the thing that is missing, that is where this bill will deliver that. ~ ., ., , that is where this bill will deliver that. . ., ., ,, ., that. what has happened here today is rare, cross-party _ that. what has happened here today is rare, cross-party support - that. what has happened here today is rare, cross-party support for - that. what has happened here today is rare, cross-party support for the l is rare, cross—party support for the legislation. legislation which will make it a jetty for the needs of people with down�*s syndrome to be met in nhs settings, education and social care. tom is one of the people who could benefit. he is 17 and ambitious. i people who could benefit. he is 17 and ambitious.— and ambitious. i want to be a fitness coach _ and ambitious. i want to be a fitness coach and _ and ambitious. i want to be a fitness coach and i _ and ambitious. i want to be a fitness coach and i want - and ambitious. i want to be a fitness coach and i want to i and ambitious. i want to be a l fitness coach and i want to get and ambitious. i want to be a i fitness coach and i want to get a wife, a baby, a dog, ab abbey out and enjoy life. the wife, a baby, a dog, ab abbey out and enjoy life-— and enjoy life. the bell is “ust the beginning, — and enjoy life. the bell is “ust the beginning, at and enjoy life. the bell is “ust the beginning. it is h and enjoy life. the bell is “ust the beginning, it is not i and enjoy life. the bell is “ust the beginning, it is not going i and enjoy life. the bell isjust the beginning, it is not going to i and enjoy life. the bell isjust the j beginning, it is not going to solve everything — beginning, it is not going to solve everything overnight, but it will at least _ everything overnight, but it will at least recognise people with down's syndrome. least recognise people with down's s ndrome. :: :: :: , .,,
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least recognise people with down's s ndrome. :: :: :: , syndrome. 47,000 people across the uk have down's _ syndrome. 47,000 people across the uk have down's syndrome. _ syndrome. 47,000 people across the uk have down's syndrome. the i uk have down�*s syndrome. the progress in parliament today recognition of the support they need, the contributions they make in the life they want to lead. megan paterson, bbc news. the leader of plaid cymru adam price says the party�*s co—operation agreement with labour in the welsh senedd will change the lives of thousands of people. party members will vote on whether to endorse the three—year co—operation agreement tomorrow. for wales to be free we must first be united and that is what this cooperation agreement sets out to achieve. it launches us on a pathway to a united wales, one that sooner than perhaps we think will find it both comfortable and natural, indeed essential, tojoin the world community of normal, independent nations. the england and wales cricket board has announced a full review of dressing—room culture as part of an action plan to tackle discrimination and racism in the game. the measures follow statements made by the former yorkshire player
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azeem rafiq and a number of other players. our sports correspondent laura scott is at lord�*s cricket ground. what�*s the reaction been, laura? i spoke to one of the people whose alleged racist abuse within cricket and he says he wants the momentum to be maintained. the ecb chief executive said the race crisis that has engulfed the game has felt like an earthquake has hit it. a powerful testimony of azeem rafiq and others has exposed major fault lines within cricket�*s culture and governance on those areas are the focus of the 12 action points agreed by the game today, which covers a filled review of the dressing room culture, removing the barriers which are stopping ethnically diverse players from reaching the professional ranks and making brands like here at lords more welcoming for everyone. boardroom diversity targets have been set with a deadline of april
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next year and 22 do not meet those can expect to have their funding withheld. tom harrison acknowledged today this will not be a silver bullet or answer all of the questions around cricket and all of its problems but he hopes it will be a good start. its problems but he hopes it will be a good start-— love it or hate it, the annual shopping extravaganza black friday is underway. it�*s no longerjust a day — some retailers have been offering deals since the start of the month. this weekend, shoppers are expected to spend over £9 billion. that�*s up 15% on last year. but it�*s the first big test for retailers as they prepare for the christmas rush, and the question is — can supply chains cope? our correspondent emma simpson reports. it wouldn�*t be black friday without big tvs, gadgets and appliances flying off the shelves. this vast distribution hub in newark is home to britain�*s biggest electrical retailer. it is their most important time of the year but
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the pressure is really on. it truly has been a perfect storm of shortages across the board, so we�*ve taken on more warehousing space, we�*ve got more stock than ever in our stores and we have recruited over 3200 colleagues across our business so we have got the drivers, the warehouse staff, we�*ve got everything we need to deliver this peak. how many playstation 55 do you have, then? never enough of the ps5s but we�*ve got some and we are getting more. black friday deals started even earlier this year to help spread the demand. even so, they are still processing an order every second here. this shopping bonanza is going to test many retailers to the limits but it is the ones with the deepest pockets and the biggest clout with suppliers who will likely cope the best. they sell a bit of magic at this small shop in york — potions and drinks. they don�*t do black friday but they do need to conjure up more stock.
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the huge headache right now is not having the products we want on the shelves to sell. stock being stuck all over the place from here in the uk, where we can�*t get manufacturers to make what we need, to as far as stuck in a port in china somewhere, our giftware not being able to get onto boats because the boats aren�*t there. it is frustrating and it is sad. there are fewer deals this year and some are not all they are cracked up to be but shoppers are spending. i always love a good deal. especially on black friday, yes. we didn't plan on spending as much money as we have, but we've got some. we saved a lot of money. this could turn out to be the biggest black friday yet if retailers can deliver the goods. emma simpson, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. time for a look at the weather. we have already seen the effects of tirr have a look at the weather. the storm. , ., ., .,
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the storm. yes, and more of the same to come overnight. _ the storm. yes, and more of the same overnight. quite to come overnight. quite _ the storm. yes, and more of the same to come overnight. quite a _ the storm. yes, and more of the same to come overnight. quite a serious i to come overnight. quite a serious speu to come overnight. quite a serious spell of weather and a red weather tirr have a look at the weather. of overnight. quite warning remains in force for the rest of the night with some very tirr have a look at the weather. rest of the strong one is particularly affecting tirr have a look at the weather. coastal areas. that is where we are going to see the strongest winds and rest of one there is scope for them to pick up £0}. further over the next few hours as storm arwen starts to drift arwen for southwards on the stronger winds, drift south with. aside from the aside right areas we have amber weather areas aside warnings for dust in the range of 60 areas as amber of 60 to 70 miles an hour across parts of hour across east scotland, north—east england, wales and the south—west. strong enough to blow some trees down hence the risk of travel disruption elsewhere as well. overnight we are also going to see rain, a bit of sweet, needy accumulating snow across the high grounds over the pennines and the chance of a few centimetres across the hills of the
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midlands and southern england. as

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