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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 26, 2021 10:00am-1:00pm GMT

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president macron criticises borisjohnson over his proposals to tackle the crisis in the channel, saying he's not acting seriously. the french have cancelled talks with the uk home secretary this weekend. i'm ben boulos live in dover. that escalation of the political crisis comes after the deaths of 27 people who were trying to cross the channel on wednesday. i'll have all the latest. four teenage boys are arrested on suspicion of murder after a 12—year—old girl is stabbed to death in liverpool. mps will vote on plans that will see better support for people in england with down�*s syndrome in what could become the first law of its kind in the world. and coming up this hour... # we are family...# the multi—award winning music producer,
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nile rodgers, auctions some of his favourite guitars — for charity. hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. eu countries will consider whether to halt air travel from the southern african region while scientists investigate the new variant of covid which has emerged there. germany, italy and the netherlands have alreadyjoined the british government in introducing urgent travel restrictions on south africa and neighbouring countries because of concerns about the strain which scientists fear could be more infectious and better able to evade vaccines. the variant�*s potential danger is still not fully understood,
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and only a few dozen cases involving it have been confirmed. the uk will halt all flights from south africa, namibia, zimbabwe, botswana, lesotho and eswatini this afternoon. from sunday, travellers arriving in england from those countries will have to quarantine. germany's restrictions will begin tonight. cases have been identified in south africa, hong kong and botswana so far. but no cases have been confirmed in the uk. britain's health secretary, sajid javid, says the variant has a significant number of mutations, which means it could be more transmissible, and that current vaccines could be less effective. scientists say the new variant is the "most complex that we've seen" and "the most worrying". our medical editor, fergus walsh, has this assessment of the new variant. the speed at which new and stringent travel restrictions have been
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imposed show just how seriously this variant is being taken. between 500 and 700 travellers arrive in the uk from south africa every day. that's where most of the cases have so far been identified and where it appears the variant may be driving a new wave of infection. it may be more transmissible than the delta variant. and the vaccines that we currently have may be less effective against it. now, to be clear, we have not detected any of this new variant in the uk at this point in time, but we've always been clear that we will take action to protect the progress that we have made. the new variant was formally identified only three days ago. genetic analysis shows it has twice the number of mutations as delta, the dominant variant worldwide, including around 30 changes to the spike protein which the virus uses to break into human cells.
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this makes it dramatically different from the original wuhan strain, on which all current vaccines are based. but crucially, there is no evidence yet the variant causes more severe disease or that it makes vaccines less effective. it will take two to three weeks before laboratory tests can show whether this is another defining moment in the pandemic, or a false alarm. fergus walsh, bbc news. professor ravi gupta is a clinical microbiologist from the university of cambridge. he explained what we know about the new covid variant. we know that the variant has been isolated in southern africa, in particular south africa, where there appears to be quite a rapid growth of the virus in a number of provinces. and this virus is notable because it has a number of mutations, a greater number than we have ever seen before. it has a total of around 50
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mutations, 30 of them being in a key protein that we study and use to vaccinate against, which is the spike protein which sits on the virus surface. this spike protein engages our receptors and gains entry into our cells. it is also the target of the response following vaccination against natural infection so it really is a critical part of the virus and we are seeing a large number of changes occurring in this new variant. and of course now the race is on to try and find outjust how contagious it might be. how long will that take and whether or not it stands up to the vaccines that we have? it will take time. the laboratory experiments will probably take between three and four weeks and in the meantime, i think the knowledge from public health and research networks in south africa will give us real time information about what's going on. we are very lucky because actually the variant can be tracked by an anomaly in pcr testing that
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occurs with this variant and we saw it before with alpha, so there is a way of tracking it as it spreads and that is going to be vital in understanding how fast this thing is spreading. for more on the concerns over this variant, our correspondent andrew harding gave this update from johannesburg. the one thing scientists here say they are sure of so far is that this is a highly transmissible variant. they have seen how quickly it has spread through the province around johannesburg and it is now pushing out any other variants and there is evidence it appears to be spreading faster than previous variants in previous waves here in south africa. so that in itself and alone is cause for concern. as for the details, the impact of some of these mutations, right now, scientists are studying those very closely. they don't expect to have results for some
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weeks and obviously, they will be waiting to see the impact on the population as a whole here. and the extent to which the penetration of vaccination rates here will provide some safety and some defence. joining me now is our correspondent damian mcguinness. real concern in the uk about this variant, but what kind of alarm bells are ringing across the eu about this?— bells are ringing across the eu about this? , , ., about this? very similar debate. ital has about this? very similar debate. italy has now — about this? very similar debate. italy has nowjust _ about this? very similar debate. italy has nowjust introduced - about this? very similar debate. italy has nowjust introduced a l about this? very similar debate. i italy has nowjust introduced a ban on travel for anyone who has been in those affected southern african states within the last 14 days. germany this morning also introduced new restrictions meaning that only german citizens arriving back to germany from that affected region will be able to enter the country and eu commission president ursula
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von der leyen has also announced that she wants a coordinated action between eu member states to restrict or possibly ban travel from that region because, you know, we are seeing very similar debate here, as to the uk, great concern over the variant spreading and people want to buy as much time as possible to stop the variant coming to the eu. for now, the variant coming to the eu. for now. thank— the variant coming to the eu. for now, thank you. dr david nabarro is special envoy of the who on covid-i9 and joins me now. david, good to talk to you and thank you for being with us. a lot of concern, we have already heard from the uk government and eu governments as well, about this new variant. how worried are you? we have seen variance amputations before and no doubt we will see them again but is this rather different? i doubt we will see them again but is this rather different?— this rather different? i was going to start with _ this rather different? i was going to start with that _ this rather different? i was going to start with that way _ this rather different? i was going to start with that way of - this rather different? i was going to start with that way of talking! | to start with that way of talking! when you are dealing with an
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infectious disease like covid—i9, you expect the virus will mutate. as the months and years go on, the number of mutations will increase. most mutations do not end up making the virus any more viable butjust occasionally, mutations do occur that are troublesome. we know about alpha, delta. and now we have another one and of course, there will be concern. the world health organization technical advisory 0rganization technical advisory group on variance is meeting today and they will explore just how to approach this new one that is provisionally called variant nu. i tell you why there is concern. the virus looks like it will have
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greater capacity to evade the defences that we have all built up as a result of the vaccinations we have received since the beginning of this year. and that is a concern because that would then mean that it's a bit like having to reset the dial and go back and start dealing with a totally new pandemic all over again. we have to treat it as a new virus. so that is the concern. and the only thing i want to say to people is remember the way we deal with a pandemic like this is we do everything possible to stop the virus being transmitted. so as well as trying to get everybody vaccinated, the really important thing is wear face vaccinated, the really important thing is wearface masks, maintain physical distance and, practice good hygiene, and try to ensure decent ventilation, particularly in indoor areas. i ventilation, particularly in indoor areas. , h ventilation, particularly in indoor areas. , �*, ., , ventilation, particularly in indoor areas. , , ., areas. i suppose there's a couple of questions- — areas. i suppose there's a couple of questions- is _ areas. i suppose there's a couple of questions. is it _ areas. i suppose there's a couple of questions. is it more _ areas. i suppose there's a couple of questions. is it more transmissiblel questions. is it more transmissible and it clearly seems to be, this variant. and is it more damaging if
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and when we get it? is it more likely to result in serious illness or death? ~ , ., ., likely to result in serious illness ordeath? , ., ., or death? well, first of all, as you “ust said, or death? well, first of all, as you just said, scientists _ or death? well, first of all, as you just said, scientists are _ or death? well, first of all, as you just said, scientists are looking i just said, scientists are looking super—hard at the transmissibility. i would ask everybody to track not to reach conclusions based on the very preliminary data that we have. to sort out transmissibility and compare variance with each other it takes a bit of time in the same applies to whether it leads to worse disease. but the baseline is this could well be a particularly difficult so let's get into the habit of using face masks and maintaining physical distance again. the one thing that really concerns me particularly across europe, is that we seem to have got out of that habit recently and i don't think thatis habit recently and i don't think that is putting us in a good situation, in dealing with the current wave as well as dealing with a possible new variant. to
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current wave as well as dealing with a possible new variant.— a possible new variant. to what extent do _ a possible new variant. to what extent do you _ a possible new variant. to what extent do you think— a possible new variant. to what extent do you think vaccines i a possible new variant. to what. extent do you think vaccines might be able to be tweaked or slightly altered to be able to combat this new virus? and if they can, how quickly could that be done? everybody, the patent for the future will be that vaccines need to be adapted or possibly quite substantially adjusted to deal with these very heavily mutated new variants as they appear but it's doable. and because of the excellent work on developing vaccines that is happening right now, it can be done within months. so i don't sit here thinking, my goodness, we have got an unsolvable situation. i actually see it as solvable but i have one request. if any national leader is listening to this broadcast, please, could you ask your presidents and your prime ministers to prioritise
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governments working together to deal with his present situation? we are not helped if governments work independently. i5 not helped if governments work independently.— not helped if governments work indeendentl . , ., ., ,, , independently. is one of the issues also that there _ independently. is one of the issues also that there are _ independently. is one of the issues also that there are not _ independently. is one of the issues also that there are not very - independently. is one of the issues also that there are not very many, | also that there are not very many, or enough people vaccinated in africa were this latest variant has emerged from? 0r africa were this latest variant has emerged from? or in south africa but in other african nations, the vaccine rate is still incredibly low, isn't it? i vaccine rate is still incredibly low, isn't it?— vaccine rate is still incredibly low, isn't it? ., , , . low, isn't it? i have been since the vaccine started _ low, isn't it? i have been since the vaccine started to _ low, isn't it? i have been since the vaccine started to appear, - low, isn't it? i have been since the vaccine started to appear, saying l low, isn't it? i have been since the | vaccine started to appear, saying to everybody, this is a global pandemic! and that is why we use the word pandemic, it is affecting people in every nation. we have amazing vaccines that could stop folk who are at risk from dying. why on earth are we not focusing on this as a global problem with a global solution? why don't we share it vaccines fairly? why are we insisting on boosting people's
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vaccinations in a small number of countries when we have got really low vaccination levels in other countries? it is grossly unfair. but it's also wrong for the world as a whole. no one individual is safe until the world is vaccinated at a consistent rate using similar policies. i agree with you. it is high time that we realised we have got to deal with this is a global issue and stopjust got to deal with this is a global issue and stop just focusing on individual countries, trying to prove that they are doing better than other countries.— prove that they are doing better than other countries. david, very aood to than other countries. david, very good to talk _ than other countries. david, very good to talk to _ than other countries. david, very good to talk to you. _ than other countries. david, very good to talk to you. thank - than other countries. david, very good to talk to you. thank you i than other countries. david, very| good to talk to you. thank you so much for your time, as ever. caroline davies is here. lets talk more about the restrictions announced by the uk authorities and travel as a result. what is in place? this is coming in various different stages. from midday today, anyone arriving in the uk for many of these countries, south africa, botswana, lesotho,
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namibia etc, if they are not uk or irish citizens they will not be allowed entry into the country. and from 4am on sunday, anyone who is arriving from these countries to the uk will have to pay to quarantine in a hotel. that is of course a change from what we have previously seen, countries in the red list being removed about a month or so ago. to rebuild the quarantine hotels again, the government saying they need to mmp the government saying they need to ramp those up so that's why there is a delay between midday today and sunday morning. at, a delay between midday today and sunday morning.— sunday morning. a little bit of a dela but sunday morning. a little bit of a delay but the — sunday morning. a little bit of a delay but the government - sunday morning. a little bit of a | delay but the government saying sunday morning. a little bit of a - delay but the government saying they have moved very fast in this, pretty much as soon as the four uk cheap medical advisers had a meeting and came to them with this latest advice about the very end, they have moved on this. . , , on this. the travel industry reacting — on this. the travel industry reacting in _ on this. the travel industry reacting in the _ on this. the travel industry reacting in the same - on this. the travel industry reacting in the same way, l on this. the travel industry | reacting in the same way, it on this. the travel industry - reacting in the same way, it was relatively short notice for everybody, the travel industry i think were last night trying to understand what that meant for them, trying to rearrange flights and let
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passengers know that they were going to have to cancel those flights because there is also a flight ban, it's not possible to travel between these countries and the uk from midday today until sunday morning. the travel industry trying to react and work out what this means for them but of course quite a lot of concern from the travel industry, on the one hand they want to make sure people are kept safe. infections are kept out, the variant is kept out. but there are worries that things have been going in one direction, everything opening up and suddenly things are closing down, it doesn't just mean there might be concerns about travel to these countries. i guess the industry is hopeful this does not mean they are going back into more travel restrictions in the future. . ~ into more travel restrictions in the future. ., ~' , ., in the uk a 12—year—old girl has died after sustaining what's been described as catastrophic injuries in liverpool. ava white was with friends when she was assaulted. four teenage boys from the toxteth area of the city have been arrested on suspicion of murder.
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0ur correspondent andy gill is in liverpool for us with the latest. what more can you tell us about what happened? what more can you tell us about what ha ened? ~ ., i. .., what more can you tell us about what ha ened?~ ., i. , what more can you tell us about what hauened? ., , , happened? what you can see behind me, the happened? what you can see behind me. the police _ happened? what you can see behind me, the police presence _ happened? what you can see behind me, the police presence as - happened? what you can see behind me, the police presence as part - happened? what you can see behind me, the police presence as part of. happened? what you can see behind me, the police presence as part of a| me, the police presence as part of a massive police presence in liverpool as police investigate the death of this 12—year—old girl. a number of city centre streets are closed, the place where ava white was assaulted as a couple of hundred yards from here, a side street off one of the main shopping streets. police said they were called about 8:40 pm last night, they found ava white collapsed on the ground with a passer—by who witnessed the incident giving herfirst passer—by who witnessed the incident giving her first date. passer—by who witnessed the incident giving herfirst date. she passer—by who witnessed the incident giving her first date. she was taken to alder hey children”s hospital but despite the best efforts of paramedics, she died. police in a statement said the —— no parent should have to wait for the knock on the door to tell them their child has died and this family's world has
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been torn apart. police say they believe ava white was in an altercation with a group of youths at the scene which resulted in her receiving catastrophic injuries. a postmortem will be held to establish the exact cause of death. as you said, four teenagers from the toxteth area of liverpool have been arrested on suspicion of murder. they are 13, two aged 14, one aged 15. this happened at a time when the city centre in liverpool was very busy. there had been a christmas lights switch on before it happened. police think there may have been a load of witnesses. they want those people, anyone who saw anything that might help the inquiry, to come forward so they can get what they call justice for ava white. forward so they can get what they calljustice for ava white.- calljustice for ava white. andy, thank you- _ a 24—year—old man has been charged with murder in connection to the disappearance of 18—year—old bobbi—anne mcleod. cody ackland from the southway area of plymouth, has been charged with murder.
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he's due to appear at plymouth magistrates court later today. last night, a candlelit vigil was held close to where the 18—year—old was last seen alive. the french president, emmanuel macron, has accused britain of not being serious about dealing with the migrant crisis involving the two countries. he was speaking two days after 27 people drowned trying to reach britain. mr macron confirmed that european interior ministers would meet on sunday without their british counterpart, priti patel. france withdrew its invitation after borisjohnson released a letter outlining steps to prevent crossings. my colleague ben boulos is following developments for us in dover. 0ver over to you. yes and how different the situation is politically from just 24 hours ago. i was standing
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here yesterday talking about how there was a spirit of cooperation between the uk and french governments. talk ofjoint action, unity of purpose in trying to deter people from making the perilous crossing from france to the uk in small boats. and also, to tackle the problem of the people smugglers, human traffickers making vast sums as they packed people into overcrowded boats in some cases, as we saw on wednesday, sending them ultimately to their deaths. last night, the uk prime minister boris johnson published an open letter to the french president emmanuel macron setting out a number of points which he believed were essential to tackling the problem. among them joint patrols and french beaches. air surveillance, joint patrols and french beaches. airsurveillance, using joint patrols and french beaches. air surveillance, using technology such as sensors, radars and crucially, getting france to agree to a deal to accept the return of people who had made the crossing back to deter others from trying to do the same. that has angered the
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french government so much so that the invitation to the uk home secretary to attend talks on sunday has now been revoked. a little earlier, president macroand explained why he felt borisjohnson �*s letter was so misplaced. translation: i am surprised by methods that are not serious. we i am surprised by methods that are not serious-— i am surprised by methods that are not serious. ~ ., ., _, not serious. we do not communicate from one leader _ not serious. we do not communicate from one leader to _ not serious. we do not communicate from one leader to another - not serious. we do not communicate from one leader to another by - not serious. we do not communicate | from one leader to another by tweets and letters on these issues. we do not throw warnings around. come on. come on. so ministers will work seriously to deal with the serious issue with serious people. that is why on sunday my interior minister will meet with counterparts from the european union and the commission to work on this issue and we will see how we can work with the british and how we can work with the british and how to respond effectively. if they decide to be serious. fiur how to respond effectively. if they decide to be serious.— decide to be serious. our europe correspondent _ decide to be serious. our europe correspondent jessica _ decide to be serious. our europe correspondent jessica parker - decide to be serious. our europe correspondent jessica parker is l decide to be serious. our europe | correspondent jessica parker is in correspondentjessica parker is in cali. she told me while the uk has been frozen out, the talks will still go ahead with friends and
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other eu countries. priti still go ahead with friends and other eu countries. priti patel, the uk home secretary _ other eu countries. priti patel, the uk home secretary will _ other eu countries. priti patel, the uk home secretary will not - other eu countries. priti patel, the uk home secretary will not be - other eu countries. priti patel, the i uk home secretary will not be there, thatis uk home secretary will not be there, that is currently the situation, we will have to see how things develop over the next couple of days but you are right. germany, the netherlands, belgium, the european commission ministers from those countries will come here to discuss the issue. and i think this is part of a french push to really try and point out from their view, this is a shared european problem. why? are some of the people who end up here on the coast of northern france and then try and make that incredibly dangerous journey across the channel, they will have entered the eu via another country. so that is why president macroand, the french president, has talked about the need to also reinforce support for the european union external borders. so that discussion will go on and involving us will importantly, the european commission who will want to have a role in coordinating any efforts because this is all part of
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a wider migration crisis that takes many different forms. and brings various complications. but of course we have also seen huge issues, very different set of circumstances though on the pole in belarus border as well. so i think there is increasingly on the agenda, this issue of migration which has been an issue of migration which has been an issue now for a long time and of course, the problems that have been here are not new. but we saw a particularly tragic day on wednesday when at least 27 people lost their lives. a couple of days on, now, it seems all that talk ofjoint cooperation at least between britain and france seems to be crumbling. that was jessica parker for us and france seems to be crumbling. that wasjessica parker for us in that wasjessica parkerfor us in calais. that wasjessica parker for us in calais. let's get the westminster perspective with our political correspondent ione wells. has been any reaction from the government on the decision to revoke that invitation to priti patel about attending the talks?- invitation to priti patel about attending the talks? invitation to priti patel about attendin: the talks? ., , , attending the talks? there has been reaction this —
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attending the talks? there has been reaction this morning _ attending the talks? there has been reaction this morning from - attending the talks? there has been reaction this morning from the - attending the talks? there has been reaction this morning from the uk i reaction this morning from the uk government, both from the transport secretary grant shapps who has been out and about responding to this but also from downing street themselves. grant shapps has stressed that he would like to see more cooperation stop that he would like to see that invitation to the home secretary priti patel reinstated. and the general view from the uk government is that they believe in some kind of cooperation is necessary to try and resolve this problem. downing street has said they want it explained why this invitation to priti patel has suddenly been revoked. and the priority should be saving lives. the uk government have also stressed the solutions or ideas that boris johnson set out in his letter which has sparked this controversy, or ideas that have been put forward before but that is kind of at the crux of what the problem is. the french have argued in particular that sort of by writing this letter with the suggestion that france should be taking back migrants who have made a dangerous channel
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crossing, they are putting france in a difficult situation because these are ideas that have been put forward to france before in private. they are ideas that have previously been rejected in france feel by now playing this out in a very public way with this open letter by the prime minister, but also through tweets, they are put in a difficult position and they feel in a way like this is kind of putting pressure on them. but also, this is potentially politicising the events that we have seen over the last couple of days. i think what has originally started as this tragic humanitarian crisis now also bubbling into what is swiftly becoming quite a public diplomatic row about this. fiic becoming quite a public diplomatic row about this.— becoming quite a public diplomatic row about this. ., ., row about this. 0k. for the moment, thank you- — row about this. 0k. for the moment, thank you- as — row about this. 0k. for the moment, thank you. as was _ row about this. 0k. for the moment, thank you. as was mentioned, - row about this. 0k. for the moment, thank you. as was mentioned, this i row about this. 0k. for the moment, thank you. as was mentioned, this is j thank you. as was mentioned, this is becoming a political row but at the very heart of this is a human tragedy, people putting their lives at risks and at in some cases, dying
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while trying to do that crossing. simonjones is with me here in dover. it is important to remember there is a human tragedy at the centre of all of this? despite the political finger—pointing and falling out. we political finger-pointing and falling out-— political finger-pointing and fallin: out. ~ ., ., ~ ., political finger-pointing and fallin. out, . ., ., ~' ., ., falling out. we are talking about a war of words _ falling out. we are talking about a war of words but _ falling out. we are talking about a war of words but remember, - falling out. we are talking about a war of words but remember, we i falling out. we are talking about a i war of words but remember, we are talking about 27 people who lost their lives out there in the channel on wednesday. the police are still trying to identify over in france all of those who were involved in the tragedy. but some of the stories behind the people have been emerging. for example, one iraqi kurds based here in the uk has told the telegraph newspaper he believes his wife drowned in the channel. he said she got onto a boat, he was tracking herjourney using gps. and he was following herjourney tracking herjourney using gps. and he was following her journey for four hours and 18 minutes, he said he spoke to her when she was on the boat, she said there were around 30 people on board but after four hours and 18 minutes, the signal disappeared and he heard nothing
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from her afterwards. he then phoned the people smugglers who had organised this journey and they said they had been able to make no contact with anyone else on board that boat. so he fears that she was one of the victims but he is left in a state of limbo. the crossing is to continue yesterday despite all the deaths on wednesday. we know around 60 people reach the uk by boat yesterday. 0n 60 people reach the uk by boat yesterday. on wednesday, when we had 27 deaths, the total was 757 managed to reach the uk on 17 boats, gives you an id of the scale and desire of people to get here to the uk. simon, thank ou. people to get here to the uk. simon, thank you- as — people to get here to the uk. simon, thank you. as simon _ people to get here to the uk. simon, thank you. as simon mentioned, - thank you. as simon mentioned, details are starting to emerge about the human stories around the 27 people who died trying to make that crossing on wednesday. the bbc has spoken to several charities now. they cite many of the dead appear to have been kurds from iraq and iran.
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0thers have been kurds from iraq and iran. others may have been afghans as well as some iranians. that is yet to be confirmed by the authorities, of course. that is what some charities are telling the bbc. let's speak to khanda baban, founder of kurdish umbrella, a charity which helps kurdish refugees and those seeking asylum. it's so good to have you with us, albeit under such sad circumstances. i wonder what you make of the events this week? how do you feel hearing the news about those 27 people? it is absolutely devastating. as a private person and as a charity founder, i am devastated. private person and as a charity founder, iam devastated. it private person and as a charity founder, i am devastated. it is really hard knowing the difficult and dangerous journey these really hard knowing the difficult and dangerousjourney these migrants have to endure and go through crossing all of these countries to come to europe. and when you leave
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your country, when these people leave, nobody knows, there is no guarantee that they will actually get to safety. you disappear. you are jailed. you were abused hearing yourjourney. it is really devastating.— yourjourney. it is really devastating. yourjourney. it is really devastatina. �* ., , ., devastating. and what is it that drives people _ devastating. and what is it that drives people to _ devastating. and what is it that drives people to take _ devastating. and what is it that drives people to take such - devastating. and what is it that l drives people to take such great risks, risking everything, including their lives, to try and get across their lives, to try and get across the channel to the uk? in kurdistan, its many different regions for people to leave. it's the lack of prosperity, the sense of hopelessness, the complete collapse in trust with the institutions and the rule of law combined with economic hardship. people in kurdistan regions, especially the youth, are withoutjobs. you have
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public sector employees who are not even guaranteed to receive their monthly wages. you have the public sector where you have to know people to get a position. you also have been human rights aspect, the tension between governments and independent media. we have recorded cases of the independent media being jailed and prosecuted for exercising their right to free speech. for example, a famous case where 80 journalists and activists have been jailed and the majority of them haven't been put on trial yet. to say the least, its poor conditions in the region that makes people take these journeys. in the region that makes people take thesejourneys. flit in the region that makes people take these journeys-— these “ourneys. of course. it is “ust these journeys. of course. it is “ust that these journeys. of course. it is just that circumstances - these journeys. of course. it is just that circumstances that. these journeys. of course. it is i just that circumstances that force people to take such desperate measures but i wonder what you make of the letter that boris johnson
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rate to the french president where the focus seemed to be on trying to intercept boats, to deter people. in your view, intercept boats, to deter people. in yourview, does intercept boats, to deter people. in your view, does that solve the problem, will it stop further deaths in the channel? i problem, will it stop further deaths in the channel?— in the channel? i don't think so. i think obviously _ in the channel? i don't think so. i think obviously the _ in the channel? i don't think so. i think obviously the british - think obviously the british government are in panic. last month we received 4000 migrants crossing the water. they are panicking. the core problem is in the kurdistan region, the solution has to be created, come from kurdistan. the only way you would do that is by creating socioeconomic reforms, by holding days in charge responsible for the decisions they are making that are affecting the region and resulting in migration.— that are affecting the region and resulting in migration. when you look at the _
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resulting in migration. when you look at the situation _ resulting in migration. when you look at the situation in _ resulting in migration. when you look at the situation in the - resulting in migration. when you | look at the situation in the camps in calais, do you think, i mean, the point some people make is that once people reach france it is a western country, it offers protection, is it to do with the conditions in those camps in calais that mean people don't want to claim asylum there or seek refugee status there but would rather come to the uk?— seek refugee status there but would rather come to the uk? people come to the uk for— rather come to the uk? people come to the uk for two _ rather come to the uk? people come to the uk for two main _ rather come to the uk? people come to the uk for two main reasons. - to the uk for two main reasons. firstly, they have family and friends here and they want to live with them, to help them with their everyday life. the second reason is because the uk is known for its open asylum system. people want to move to the uk because they have better chances for asylum and to create a better life. , , ., ., chances for asylum and to create a better life-— better life. just from a personal oint of better life. just from a personal point of view. — better life. just from a personal point of view, if _ better life. just from a personal point of view, if you _ better life. just from a personal point of view, if you hadn't - better life. just from a personall point of view, if you hadn't made the journey to the uk, if you hadn't
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arrived here, as a young girl, what would your life be like now? me would your life be like now? iie: personally, so, would your life be like now? ii2 personally, so, we moved to sweden. from iraqi kurdistan to sweden. who knows? it's hard to say. people in kurdistan are living in poor conditions, to say the least. it's not a pleasant place right now. do ou not a pleasant place right now. do you think with winter setting in, people will be deterred from making the journey? people will be deterred from making thejourney? we people will be deterred from making the journey? we see people will be deterred from making thejourney? we see in people will be deterred from making the journey? we see in extraordinary numbers in november, the onset of autumn. will the situation itself subside because of the weather or do you not see that happening? do you see people still desperate to make the crossing?— see people still desperate to make the crossinu? ~ , ., , the crossing? absolutely. through my chari , i the crossing? absolutely. through my charity. i always _ the crossing? absolutely. through my charity, i always ask— the crossing? absolutely. through my charity, i always ask other _ the crossing? absolutely. through my charity, i always ask other people - charity, i always ask other people that we are helping, why do you make this journey? that we are helping, why do you make thisjourney? it's so that we are helping, why do you make this journey? it's so dangerous. they say, because they are desperate
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and they have nothing to lose. the people in france feel like they don't have anything to lose. they will take the chances. {liiq don't have anything to lose. they will take the chances.— don't have anything to lose. they will take the chances. 0k, thank you for speaking — will take the chances. 0k, thank you for speaking to _ will take the chances. 0k, thank you for speaking to us _ will take the chances. 0k, thank you for speaking to us on _ will take the chances. 0k, thank you for speaking to us on bbc— will take the chances. 0k, thank you for speaking to us on bbc news. - will take the chances. 0k, thank you for speaking to us on bbc news. it i for speaking to us on bbc news. it is extraordinary how quickly the tone of political discourse changed within the last 24 hours, as quickly as the tide in the english channel at times perhaps. but we will wait and see if the exercise of blame and finger pointing and sniping between the uk and french governments once again returns to a spirit of cooperation. studio: thank you, with the latest from dover. the headlines on bbc news... the uk halts flights from six countries in southern africa after the discovery of a new and potentially more dangerous variant of coronavirus. the eu is considering
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following suit. scientists are said to be deeply concerned because the new variant could evade immunity. president macron criticises borisjohnson over his proposals to tackle the crisis in the channel, saying he's not acting seriously — the french have cancelled talks with the uk home secretary this weekend. in the uk, a 12—year—old girl dies following an incident in liverpool. four teenage boys are arrested on suspicion of murder. also coming up. shoppers are expected to splurge nearly £9 billion on what could be britain's biggest black friday yet. let's get more now on the emergence of a new coronavirus variant of "serious concern" which scientists fear could be more transmissible and better able to evade vaccines.
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strict travel restrictions have been brought in for south africa and five neighbouring countries because of concerns in england. adam finn is a member of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation, advising the government, and joins me now. how worried are you about this variant? put it into a bit of context because we've had variants before, we've had mutations and no doubt will have some more in the future. , ~ , ., , future. yes, i think it is really important _ future. yes, i think it is really important to _ future. yes, i think it is really important to take _ future. yes, i think it is really important to take this - future. yes, i think it is really i important to take this seriously. future. yes, i think it is really - important to take this seriously. it will be much better to take precautions now than for it to turn out to be a full salam, as has happened previously and react to light and end up with the problem that can't be solved —— full salam. there plenty of reason to be careful and cautious. the reason we are concerned about this mutant is it has so many different changes,
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particularly in the protein we are immune from the vaccines. it could mean it's capable of spreading itself around but also getting around the immunity many of us have achieved by being vaccinated. it could be more transmissible but could be more transmissible but could it also be more dangerous in the sense of making more people ill, seriously ill, and causing death? theoretically it could and that's not particularly an advantage to the virus. so, pressures on the virus to transmit and evade immunity but it's conceivable it could change the way the virus behaves in terms of illness. so, that's another question that needs to be answered urgently, yet. that needs to be answered urgently, et. , , . ., , , yet. these restrictions between the uk and southern _ yet. these restrictions between the uk and southern african _ yet. these restrictions between the uk and southern african nations - yet. these restrictions between the uk and southern african nations in| uk and southern african nations in terms of travel, how effective are they likely to be? theoretically, this mutation could be anywhere in
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the world now, couldn't it? yes. they won't _ the world now, couldn't it? yes. they won't be — the world now, couldn't it? yes. they won't be very _ the world now, couldn't it? yes. they won't be very effective - the world now, couldn't it? yes. they won't be very effective if i the world now, couldn't it? i2; they won't be very effective if it turns out this variant is already everywhere and already has spread. if it hasn't or hasn't any extent, that might mean we could restrict its development here or even prevent its development here or even prevent it from reaching the shores. and certainly, it was a good idea to minimise the chances of that happening while we learn more about it and really establish if it's a serious problem that we need to be concerned about. so, it's a precautionary measure, i don't think people should be concluding we really have got a massive problem yet but it certainly might turn out to be the case. i5 yet but it certainly might turn out to be the case.— to be the case. is it a case that scientists _ to be the case. is it a case that scientists will _ to be the case. is it a case that scientists will be _ to be the case. is it a case that scientists will be looking - to be the case. is it a case that scientists will be looking at - to be the case. is it a case thatj scientists will be looking at the vaccines and seeing whether they can tweak them a bit to take account of this new variant? how easy or difficult is it to do, how quickly could that be done? i
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difficult is it to do, how quickly could that be done?— difficult is it to do, how quickly could that be done? i think the first step before _ could that be done? i think the first step before that _ could that be done? i think the first step before that would - could that be done? i think the first step before that would be | could that be done? i think the i first step before that would be to do work in the lab, looking at serum antibodies from people who have been vaccinated, and we have plenty of those now. and putting those with this new mutant in the lab and seeing if the antibodies still work. if that turns out not to be the case, and that the immunity that we've got isn't really there anymore, then absolutely, the next step would be to start thinking about reformulating vaccines. that can be done quickly but it does, there are challenges beyond just creating the vaccine. you've got to work out whether it's safe and effective. you've got to manufacture it and get it approved by the regulators. it's not an instantaneous task and it's not something you would want to embark upon until you knew there was a need for it. 50 upon until you knew there was a need for it. ., �* ~ ., for it. so we don't know whether the current vaccines _ for it. so we don't know whether the current vaccines that _ for it. so we don't know whether the current vaccines that we _ for it. so we don't know whether the current vaccines that we have - for it. so we don't know whether the current vaccines that we have can i current vaccines that we have can combat this particular mutant strain. they might be able to? yes.
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strain. they might be able to? yes, i think it's highly _ strain. they might be able to? i23 i think it's highly unlikely they won't have any effect. that really would be a catastrophe. but we may well see that the protection we get is to some degree reduced. particularly because there are so many mutations in the part of the protein that many of the antibodies bind to. so, i don't think we are likely to see that vaccines don't work at all. as with the delta variant, we saw a reduction there in the protection from the original vaccines and this might be the same. but it's hard to speculate at this point how much of a problem that would be. it could be anything from no problem to be in quite a serious one. . ~' no problem to be in quite a serious one. ., ~ , ., no problem to be in quite a serious one. ., ~ i. . the city of coventry has reached the halfway point in its year as uk city of culture.
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and with the challenges of the pandemic still a concern when it comes to getting visitors and tourists to attend events, how are coventry�*s hotels attracting guests? it's time for our monthly check in with all things city of culture, with our reporter trish adudu. how are you? i am very well, thank ou. how are you? i am very well, thank you- yes. — how are you? i am very well, thank you- yes. i'm _ how are you? i am very well, thank you. yes, i'm here _ how are you? i am very well, thank you. yes, i'm here outside - how are you? i am very well, thank you. yes, i'm here outside the - you. yes, i'm here outside the telegraph hotel which has had a massive transformation. it's the newest hotel in this, the uk city of culture year. it used to be the coventry evening telegraph, a paper plant. thank you very much, lovely service. as you can see, this used to be the print nerve centre. it was the console that would fire the generators and this opened in 1959 and is still going strong. it's one of the aspects of how the hotel want to make sure that the history is
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kept. yes, it is to be the main city centre paper, it's now an 88 bedroom hotel. the co—owner is brian. what a transformation. how has it been? it's been a challenge, obviously doing _ it's been a challenge, obviously doing any— it's been a challenge, obviously doing any project like this during normal_ doing any project like this during normal times would be a challenge but to— normal times would be a challenge but to do— normal times would be a challenge but to do it — normal times would be a challenge but to do it through covid has taken it to a _ but to do it through covid has taken it to a whole new level. we are very pleased _ it to a whole new level. we are very pleased with the end result.- pleased with the end result. you've ke -t the pleased with the end result. you've kept the history. — pleased with the end result. you've kept the history, a _ pleased with the end result. you've kept the history, a lovely _ pleased with the end result. you've kept the history, a lovely picture i kept the history, a lovely picture there of how the editors used to be working away in this room. the whole desiun working away in this room. the whole design team — working away in this room. the whole design team have _ working away in this room. the whole design team have worked _ working away in this room. the whole design team have worked really - working away in this room. the whole design team have worked really hard | design team have worked really hard from inception to keep the best of the old _ from inception to keep the best of the old and keeping all the artefacts. but with the best of the new and _ artefacts. but with the best of the new and mid mid—century modern feel with the _ new and mid mid—century modern feel with the design of the hotel. talking — with the design of the hotel. talking about keeping the artefacts, that was the clock for the journalists. it that was the clock for the journalists.— that was the clock for the “ournalists. ., , ., ., journalists. it was the original clock in clock _
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journalists. it was the original clock in clock and _ journalists. it was the original clock in clock and has - journalists. it was the original clock in clock and has been i clock in clock and has been refurbished and is in full working order~ _ refurbished and is in full working order. , , , ., refurbished and is in full working order. , , ., ., ~' order. jeremy vine used to work tier when it was — order. jeremy vine used to work tier when it was a _ order. jeremy vine used to work tier when it was a paper _ order. jeremy vine used to work tier when it was a paper operation. - order. jeremy vine used to work tier when it was a paper operation. yes, | when it was a paper operation. yes, there is a lot _ when it was a paper operation. yes, there is a lot of _ when it was a paper operation. yes, there is a lot of big _ when it was a paper operation. yes, there is a lot of big names that have _ there is a lot of big names that have gone _ there is a lot of big names that have gone on to do great things who were trained here by a have gone on to do great things who were trained here bya man in have gone on to do great things who were trained here by a man in the picture _ were trained here by a man in the picture behind us. he went on to become — picture behind us. he went on to become the editor of the coventry evening _ become the editor of the coventry evening telegraph and trained a lot of those _ evening telegraph and trained a lot of those well—known evening telegraph and trained a lot of those well— known names now. whatever— of those well— known names now. whatever challenges been? the challenges _ whatever challenges been? the challenges in — whatever challenges been? the challenges in terms of staffing, obviously the supply chain issues have _ obviously the supply chain issues have been— obviously the supply chain issues have been a challenge throughout and building _ have been a challenge throughout and building a _ have been a challenge throughout and building a new team through covid. we started — building a new team through covid. we started with nobody, we started with appointing a general manager and then— with appointing a general manager and then built a team around them. we were_ and then built a team around them. we were hoping for millions of people visiting coventry, that's not going to happen because of the pandemic, how have you been coping? we are really delighted with the way
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it's going _ we are really delighted with the way it's going and obviously city of culture — it's going and obviously city of culture has been a significant boost but we _ culture has been a significant boost but we are — culture has been a significant boost but we are doing really well with business — but we are doing really well with business picking up midweek. we welcomed 15,300 guests since the 19th of— welcomed 15,300 guests since the 19th of may. we served 13,000 eggs for breakfast. we've got 324,000 toilet— for breakfast. we've got 324,000 toilet rolls. so, it's quite a task but we — toilet rolls. so, it's quite a task but we are _ toilet rolls. so, it's quite a task but we are pleased. may toilet rolls. so, it's quite a task but we are pleased.— toilet rolls. so, it's quite a task but we are pleased. may be too much information about _ but we are pleased. may be too much information about the _ but we are pleased. may be too much information about the toilet _ but we are pleased. may be too much information about the toilet roll! - information about the toilet roll! i'm going to try and sit where jeremy vine sat. i want exactly what he had, the same breakfast. am i going to get that service? definitely. we've had some great feedback— definitely. we've had some great feedback on the level of service. anything — feedback on the level of service. anything that's good enough for jeremy vine is good enough for me. and it's good enough for me! thank you very much. you're watching bbc news. an update on the appearance in
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court in plymouth crown court, a man has appeared at plymouth magistrates�* court charged with the murder of 18—year—old bobbi—anne mcleod. cody ackland, 24, spoke to confirm his name and address, so thatis confirm his name and address, so that is in connection with the disappearance of bobbi—anne mcleod who went missing last saturday in plymouth, last seen at a bus stop near her home. that is the latest, a man appearing in court charged with her murder. experts are predicting some of the biggest black friday sales ever seen in the uk, with around 60% of adults expected to make purchases today. but there�*s a warning that discounts will probably be less generous this year and there�*ll be potentially fewer options on the shelves. that�*s because of issues with coronavirus, shortages of lorry drivers and warehouse staff and disruption to supply chains. joining me now isjessica moulton, head of retail and consumer packaged
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goods at consultancy firm mckinsey. first of all, in terms of supplies, how much is there on the shelves for people to buy? we hear all about these global supply issues. there are len these global supply issues. there are plenty of— these global supply issues. there are plenty of challenges, - these global supply issues. there are plenty of challenges, but - these global supply issues. there j are plenty of challenges, but only in some categories and i think a lot of retailers have done heroic things in order to try and get as many goods onto the shelves as they can. i think consumers won�*t be disappointed. iii i think consumers won't be disappointed.— i think consumers won't be disa ointed. , ., , disappointed. in terms of discounts, that's what most _ disappointed. in terms of discounts, that's what most shoppers - disappointed. in terms of discounts, that's what most shoppers are - disappointed. in terms of discounts, l that's what most shoppers are always that�*s what most shoppers are always interested in on black friday, what other discounts like this year compared to previous years? thea;r other discounts like this year compared to previous years? they are si . nificant compared to previous years? they are significant but — compared to previous years? they are significant but they _ compared to previous years? they are significant but they might _ compared to previous years? they are significant but they might be - compared to previous years? they are significant but they might be a - compared to previous years? they are significant but they might be a bit - significant but they might be a bit less. ~ , . . significant but they might be a bit less. i, ., �* , ., significant but they might be a bit less. ,, .," �* , ., less. why is that? because of the issues retailers _ less. why is that? because of the issues retailers have _ less. why is that? because of the issues retailers have had - less. why is that? because of the issues retailers have had with - less. why is that? because of the issues retailers have had with the pandemic? i issues retailers have had with the andemic? ~ ., �* , pandemic? i think that's right. i think some _ pandemic? i think that's right. i think some retailers _ pandemic? i think that's right. i think some retailers in - pandemic? i think that's right. i think some retailers in generall think some retailers in general thought maybe black friday got a bit
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overheated and so in the last two years some of the boil has come off it. there are supply shortages, is a strong brands are looking to prioritise full price sales and in some cases probably have less deep discounting at this time of year. but retailers plan for this time backin but retailers plan for this time back in february, so they come up with many special deals and work with their suppliers in order to have some fantastic offers for consumers and those will be on shelves. ., ,., ., , consumers and those will be on shelves. ., ., , �* shelves. how important is black frida for shelves. how important is black friday for retailers? _ shelves. how important is black friday for retailers? is - shelves. how important is black friday for retailers? is it - shelves. how important is black friday for retailers? is it a - shelves. how important is black friday for retailers? is it a big i friday for retailers? is it a big deal in terms of annual profitability?— deal in terms of annual rofitabili ? ., , ., ., , profitability? lots of retailers have their — profitability? lots of retailers have their sales _ profitability? lots of retailers have their sales in _ profitability? lots of retailers have their sales in the - profitability? lots of retailers have their sales in the fourth | have their sales in the fourth quarter, and black friday is the single biggest day in. what quarter, and black friday is the single biggest day in. what about sho ers single biggest day in. what about shoppers habits _ single biggest day in. what about shoppers habits in _ single biggest day in. what about shoppers habits in terms - single biggest day in. what about shoppers habits in terms of- single biggest day in. what about| shoppers habits in terms of online against going on to the high street?
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is that trend still continuing? are people still wanting to do more online as opposed to going to physically buy their goods and products? physically buy their goods and roducts? ., ., . products? prior to the pandemic, oane products? prior to the pandemic, online sales _ products? prior to the pandemic, online sales are _ products? prior to the pandemic, online sales are about _ products? prior to the pandemic, online sales are about 1096 - products? prior to the pandemic, | online sales are about 10% higher than they were prior to that time and you see that holding fairly steady. yes, it seems that consumers are looking to have online be a permanent portion of their sales and it�*s especially true for black friday where a lot of consumers will have looked in their inboxes today this morning for promotions and will be buying over the course of the day. be buying over the course of the da . ~ , ., �* be buying over the course of the da . 2 , ., �* 4' ., be buying over the course of the da. �*m, day. well, if you didn't know it was black day. well, if you didn't know it was islack friday _ day. well, if you didn't know it was islack friday in _ day. well, if you didn't know it was black friday in the _ day. well, if you didn't know it was black friday in the uk, _ day. well, if you didn't know it was black friday in the uk, you - day. well, if you didn't know it was black friday in the uk, you do - day. well, if you didn't know it was| black friday in the uk, you do now. thank you very much. with just a few months to go to the winter olympics, china is holding test events for ski and snowboard cross. but despite repeated calls from the olympic committee not to politicise the event — some countries are considering a boycott, in light of china�*s human rights violations and the recent
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concerns over the wellbeing of chinese tennis star, peng shuai. our china correspondent stephen mcdonnell reports. the way to see if you�*re ready to host the olympics is with test events. and beijing is holding them right now. beijing wants spectators at the games and has already tried this out at the sliding centre. but tennis star peng shuai sent shock waves through the preparation process when she accused a former government leader of sexual abuse. there�*s also the recent coronavirus outbreak, straining this country�*s zero—covid strategy. precautions are high at olympic venues. so, i�*m getting off a dedicated media bus here, just to show you that we�*re part of a, kind of, media bubble, quite separate from the athletes�* bubble. here you have to have your facemask on, and this is the media hotel.
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so i come up here, this is checking my temperature. that says i�*m 0k. these are the various health checks and some hand sanitiser. we can only talk to the athletes remotely. we�*re told there�*s been a lot of covid testing. just had to do pcr tests on arrival, then on arriving to the hotel — and every day from there onwards. if that�*s what we have to do to not quarantine, then so be it. the games will be held in a freezing, mostly dry area. a mountain of snowmaking is required. but this can make for quick dynamic runs. speed and everything is going to be key, and that�*s the difficult bit. so, it�*s going to be challenging for sure to try and get the most out of the track, anyway.
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the athletes we spoke to said these sites will make for high quality competition, and the drive to win in february is already taking its toll. in the mountains outside beijing, the test events are in full swing. games organisers will be hoping, despite the coronavirus headaches, despite the alleged human rights abuses, despite the allegations from a former chinese olympian, tennis star at that, involving a senior government official, that they can still produce a memorable winter olympics. for everyone here, the clock is now ticking. stephen mcdonell, bbc news, chongli. what�*s the link between sister sledge, david bowie and madonna? well, aside from being global icons, they were also all produced by nile rodgers. he�*s responsible for some of the biggest hits of the last 50 years and now he�*s decided to auction off some of his most
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prized possessions to help thousands of teenagers follow in his footsteps. he�*s been speaking to our media editor, amol rajan. so, this guitar, i remember playing this on madonna, on... likea virgin? no, no, a song called dress you up. # gonna dress you up in my love... # in my love. # from your head down to your toes #. i had already laid down the rhythm guitar part on a new telecaster. so i always try and marry two types of guitar that are similar but... subtly different. correcto. is that a signature nile rodgers technique? that�*s your thing? that�*s a signature technique. i do it all the time. obviously, this is before she becomes a mega selling, super global icon.
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did you honestly have a sense early on that she was going to be someone who had that magic dust? insta ntly. # oh yeah. # from your head down to your toes #. the guitar called the hit maker is an unusually sounding strat. it doesn�*t sound like any other stratocaster on the planet. after a while, you get afraid that something is going to happen to your guitar. because it�*s the only one that sounds like that. so what i did was, i went to fender and i said, can you make me a replica of my guitar that�*s exactly the same? if you like the hit maker, you�*ll love this. because it really does sound very, very, very good. not the same, but close. # freak out #.
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nile, don�*t drop this! how do you feel auctioning all of this stuff, all of this musical history, all of this creative energy? well, let me put it to you like this. there�*s 162 more of these things! and they�*re all amazing, and they all have great stories. why would you get rid of them? because if this all works out the way i expect it to work out, that means that i could help, like, hundreds more kids. i mean, right now, we have, now, the we are family foundation, we have at least 400 or 500 kids that we are working with, we come up with new programmes every year. but these things cost a lot of money. i mean, you know, to put on workshops that we do, to find the mentors that we find, to have the kids travel from countries far and wide. it costs money. yeah.
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# freak out!# cheering a lavish ceremony has taken place in egypt to mark the opening of the 3,000—year—old avenue of sphinxes to the public. it�*s taken more than 70 years to excavate the statues, which had been buried along a three kilometre ancient walkway, connecting two of the city�*s greatest temples. you�*re watching bbc news. now it�*s time for a look at the weather. good morning. the met office had
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just issued a red weather warning, a danger to life one inflated today and tonight. it is across coastal parts of north—east england and eastern scotland. there is likely to be flying debris, winds could be touching 90 mph. power cuts, travel disruption also likely. if you are in these areas, please keep a close eye on the forecast over the next 24 hours and on the latest travel details. let�*s take a look at what is causing it, spawn when, pushing southwards through the north sea —— storm arwen is pushing southwards through the north sea. those winds will be strengthening today. we are not out of the woods yet. a scattering of showers across southern parts, sunshine, drier spells for northern england and parts of the north midlands and south—west scotland. but in northern ireland, frequent showers, some wintry and in the north—east of scotland, rain around the coast but
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blizzard conditions inland. it�*s across these areas where that met office red warning has been issued from late afternoon all the way through to the early hours of tomorrow morning. it�*s to go with those danger to life conditions around the seas, pretty atrocious weather so stay away from the coast if you can. winds could be up to 90 miles an hour. strong winds transferring into north—east england through the night, rain, sleet and snow. we could see plenty of snow across the top half of the pennines and blizzard conditions. rain, sleet and blizzard conditions. rain, sleet and snow possible further south. across the board, the winds will strengthen and there will be amber warnings, not only across eastern areas but down these western coasts as well. that could cause problems as well. that could cause problems as well. that could cause problems as we head into saturday, a particularly lively day. we�*ll see those strong winds across the board. there could be problems on the trans—pennine route during the
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morning. more showers in the north of scotland and northern ireland. some western areas finish the day bright but a cold day given the fact the strength of the wind coming down from arctic regions, linked sub zero across the board. conditions will gradually improve into sunday, low pressure moving east, a frosty start to sunday. still some wintry showers and blustery winds in the east but things will gradually turn quieter. we�*ll keep you updated on bbc news.
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this is bbc news. i�*m annita mcveigh. the headlines at 11. flights from six countries in southern africa will be suspended after the discovery of a new and potentially more dangerous variant of coronavirus. the eu is considering following suit. the world health organization as well as scientists say they are deeply concerned because the new variant could evade immunity.
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the virus looks like it will have a greater capacity to evade the defences that we have all built up as a result of vaccination. let�*s defences that we have all built up as a result of vaccination. let's go strai . ht as a result of vaccination. let's go straight to — as a result of vaccination. let's go straight to the _ as a result of vaccination. let's go straight to the as a result of vaccination. let's go straiaht to the house of as a result of vaccination. let's go straight to the as a result of vaccination. let's go straiaht to the house of commons straight to the house of commons where the health secretary is making a new statement on the help new very mint. i want to reassure the house that there are no detective cases in the uk at this time but this new variant is of huge international concern. the world health organization has called a special meeting this morning and that meeting this morning and that meeting is taking place right now. i want to update the house on what we know so far and why we are concerned and the action we are taking, although i must stress that this is although i must stress that this is a fast moving situation and there remains a high degree of uncertainty. the sequence of this variant cannot be called b11529 was
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someone travelling from south africa and the uk was the first country to identify the threat of the new variant and alert international partners. further cases have been identified in south africa and in botswana and it�*s highly likely that it is now spread to other countries. yesterday the south african government held a press conference where they provide an update on what they know so far. i want to put on record my thanks to south africa, not only for their rigorous scientific response, but the openness and transparency with which they have acted, much as we did here in the united kingdom when we first detected what is now known as the alpha variant. we are concerned that
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this new variant may pose substantial risk to public health. the variant has none large ? an unusually large amount of new tay shins and yesterday their uk health security agency classified b11529 as a new variant under investigation and the variant technical group has designated it as an under investigation with high priority and this is the only invariant with this designation making a higher priority than beta and it shares many of the features of alpha, beta and delta variants. early indications show that this variant may be more transmissible than the delta variant and current vaccines may be less effective against it. it may also impact the effectiveness of one of our major treatments. we are also
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worried about the rising cases in countries in southern africa, especially as these populations should have a significant natural immunity. in south africa in particular, there has been exponential growth with cases increasing fourfold over the last two weeks. some 80% of cases when tested with a pcr test. which we associate with this variant. so while we don�*t know whether the exponential growth in south africa is not associated with this new variant, this pcr test suggests than those have been sequenced so far.. even as we learn more about the new
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variant. one of the lessons of the pandemic is that we must move quickly and at the most possible moment. the uk remains in a strong position and we have made. and the initial success of the booster programme but we are heading into winter. we must act with caution. yesterday, i announced that from midday today, we are placing six countries in the africa on the troubled red list. these countries are south africa, botswana, lesotho, s martini, namibia and zimbabwe. anyone who is not an irish resident who has not been in in the countries in the last ten days will be denied entry into england. uk and irish residents arriving from the country from four am on sunday will enter
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hotel quarantine. anyone arriving from before those dates should take pcr tests even if they are and they should be along with the rest of their households.. and i am asking you to take pcr tests. but please, do not wait to be contacted. we have been working closely with the devolved administrations on this and they will be aligning with their response. and in recent hours israel has taken similar precautions. we are working quickly and with a high degree of uncertainty. and we are
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continuing to make assessments about the countries with strong travel links to south africa. and we want to ensure aniline response. and we want to remind people that the pandemic is. and we want to do all we can including once you are eligible. and we have already given 16,000,000 booster shots and it was already important before it was the variant. but now it could not be more important, so if you are eligible, get your booster shots and do not delay. madam deputy speaker, we have made great progress against
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the virus, progress we are determined to hold on to. this government will continue to do whatever is necessary to keep us safe and we all have our part to play and i commend this statement to the house. i play and i commend this statement to the house. . ~ play and i commend this statement to the house. ., ,, ., , play and i commend this statement to the house. ., «i ., , «i the house. i thank him for his kind words about _ the house. i thank him for his kind words about the _ the house. i thank him for his kind words about the shadow _ the house. i thank him for his kind words about the shadow secretary | the house. i thank him for his kind i words about the shadow secretary of state which we share on the side of the house as well. and we have been critical for taking too long to correct borders from new variance when delta was left to run free. and we are glad to see swift action. and this is the right: we support it. and this is where carrie is have been detected. and where is under active consideration and maybe in the meantime we might be for countries on the red list may be have cases with a pcr test rather
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than lateral flow. and we have made great strides in getting people vaccinated and but no bomb will be safe until everyone is safe and it�*s regrettable that when we offered plans of the government around vaccination that was not taken off and today�*s news to reflect a failure of the global community to distribute the vaccine with just five point 5% of low income countries being vaccinated, so can the secretary of state tellers the work he will do with his counterparts in affected countries to sure they have the vaccines and infrastructure to deliver them and make sure that the cuts in these countries will affect that and will he share with us the regret that we have to destroy 600,000 expired doses of the vaccine in august and to make sure the stockpiles get to other countries who need them? turning to testing, earlier this
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month capacity went down significantly with members of the public reporting that their local centres had closed and would the secretary of state make sure that it will still be an integral part and can he take the opportunity that test entries will be scaled down further. this is a reminder that we need to go further and faster with vaccination at home and children�*s vaccination at home and children�*s vaccination rates remain low and the progress on the booster is welcome but we know to get there by christmas we need to go quicker. there are huge pockets of the country where significant members are unvaccinated and in nottingham it�*s are unvaccinated and in nottingham it's 38%, are unvaccinated and in nottingham it�*s 38%, and one is worth 38%, and bolton the secretary of state message was an important one. because this is a reminder that coronaviruses not gone away so will the secretary of state make sure they fix sick pay and make sure that public building schools and businesses have the support they need and surely we must now revisit
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cost free measures such as mask wearing in public spaces. to conclude, this is a sobering reminder of the challenges that this pandemic brings and we must meet this moment as we have throughout the last 19 months. by pulling together and looking out for each other and in that british spirit of doing what must be done. i am leased doing what must be done. i am pleased to _ doing what must be done. i am pleased to respond _ doing what must be done. i am pleased to respond to - doing what must be done. i am pleased to respond to the shadow minister and his first question was around the country�*s six countries that have decided to be put on the red list from midday today and we are going by primarily where these new variants have been detected at this point and that�*s been into countries in southern africa and botswana and we have been included in the countries earlier in southern africa as a precaution. and the
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shadow minister will be no surprise it seems under review and there a very live discussions going on around when we might and we might hesitate to actively need to do so. and the shadow safety importance about this and he will know that that the country has done more in the world in the 30,000,000 donations and we are committed to the 100,000,000 target and we have worked bilaterally with countries throughout the alliance to get more vaccines to the developing world. testing remains a hugely important part of our response to this pandemic and it�*s an incredibly important role and that will continue for as long as necessary. and lastly on vaccination, there is
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the primary form of defence that is in the country, and in one sense we are fortunate with such a high level of vaccination over 80% of people and that�*s one of the highest in the world, but we need to go even faster and it�*s great news that the booster programme and over 16,000,000 jobs across the uk is the most successful in europe and over 26% of the population over the age of 12, we would want more people to come forward as soon as they are illegible and i cannot stress the importance of that enough and as he said, it is a sober reminder that we are fighting the pandemic and we can all play a part. sajid javid saying
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there are no detected case of the new variance at this time but it is of huge international concern and he is setting out the steps taken by the government in response to this variant of coronavirus that has emerged in south africa. south africa and another are placed on the travel red list with almost immediate effect and a clear warning from the health secretary and also from the health secretary and also from the health secretary and also from the shadow public health and patient safety from alex norris saying that this is a sobering reminder of the challenges that the pandemic brings. let me bring you anotherfew key lines pandemic brings. let me bring you another few key lines from what sajid javid was saying. and there are early indications that the
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variant b11529 is more transmissible than the delta variant and he said one of the lessons of the bat pandemic is that countries must move quickly and at the earliest possible moment, so from midday today six countries on the travel red list and anyone not from the uk or ireland will be denied entry to the uk and any irish residents returning to the uk must enter hotel currency and anyone who has arrived in the last ten days will be contacted by nhs test and trace and he reminded that the pandemic is far from test and trace and he reminded that the pandemic is farfrom over. let�*s try to get us up—to—date with what we know and what we don�*t know at the moment. professor claire bryant is an immunity specialist from the university of cambridge and joins me now. thank you very much for your time today and on the question of what we know and don�*t know, how has
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the new variance emerge? we were told earlier in the pandemic that if there were significant transmission community transmission there was the possibility of new strains of the virus emerging.— virus emerging. coronavirus is notorious _ virus emerging. coronavirus is notorious for _ virus emerging. coronavirus is notorious for mutating - virus emerging. coronavirus is notorious for mutating and - virus emerging. coronavirus is i notorious for mutating and we've notorious for mutating and we�*ve seen it before with the alpha and beta and delta variants which were mutations of the original wuhan strain and this is what we have seen. and this strain has mutated more than the earlier mutation which is why it is a variant of concern. on the question of transmissibility, it�*s what evidence do we have from africa than it is more transmissible than the other variations we�*ve seen so far? irate than the other variations we've seen so far? ~ ., ., ., , so far? we are waiting to see, reall . so far? we are waiting to see, really- we _ so far? we are waiting to see, really. we were _ so far? we are waiting to see, really. we were seeing - so far? we are waiting to see, i really. we were seeing mutations in similar regions to the delta which are associated with transmissibility and the data emerging, and the case
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numbers in south africa, and when the strains have been sequenced that these are the new strains which are causing concern as it is more transmissible.— transmissible. the other big . uestion transmissible. the other big question people _ transmissible. the other big question people will - transmissible. the other big question people will be i transmissible. the other big i question people will be asking themselves if they are vaccinated, will those vaccinations hold out against this new variant? will it work against it? irate against this new variant? will it work against it?— against this new variant? will it work against it? against this new variant? will it work auainst it? ~ .,, , , work against it? we hope so. this is the other reason _ work against it? we hope so. this is the other reason why _ work against it? we hope so. this is the other reason why we _ work against it? we hope so. this is the other reason why we are - the other reason why we are concerned because there are a significantly large number of mutations in the spike protein and from the wuhan street, that was used to make the original vaccine. so if the mutations are around that might be the new virus could mutate and not be able to be vaccinated against but we will see how it pans out the next two or three weeks. iii but we will see how it pans out the next two or three weeks.— next two or three weeks. in the meantime _ next two or three weeks. in the meantime it's _ next two or three weeks. in the meantime it's important - next two or three weeks. in the meantime it's important that i next two or three weeks. in the i meantime it's important that we've meantime it�*s important that we�*ve heard that measures the government
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have taken to stop people who may have taken to stop people who may have unknowingly got the virus arriving into the uk and we are seeing other countries in europe taking similar action and further afield. what is the key thing we can all do. we all have a part to play, so what can we all do to help stop the possibles bred of this variant? anybody who has come from the countries to get pcr tests, get them as soon as possible and it was good if we went back to wearing mask and remember hand, space, face messaging that�*s been with us to some time and take as many precautions to stop transmission of the virus the community and getting vaccinated. there was no mention on hands, face, space in the commons, but would you like to see that messaging coming from the government and do you think it is important? irate from the government and do you think it is important?— it is important? we will have to see how the data _ it is important? we will have to see how the data pans _ it is important? we will have to see how the data pans out _ it is important? we will have to see how the data pans out from - it is important? we will have to see how the data pans out from the i how the data pans out from the variance in south africa and then see what happens moving forwards but
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the critical thing everybody can do now is get vaccinated and the more people who are vaccinated and the more people we have a booster the more people we have a booster the more we have of keeping it under control. �* ., more we have of keeping it under control. . ., ., �* more we have of keeping it under control. �* ., ., �* «i ., control. although we don't know if the vaccines _ control. although we don't know if the vaccines will _ control. although we don't know if the vaccines will work _ control. although we don't know if the vaccines will work effectively l the vaccines will work effectively against the variant as they do against the variant as they do against delta, that�*s the whole point, we don�*t know, so people should be questioning the vaccination programme in terms of its effectiveness. ida. vaccination programme in terms of its effectiveness.— its effectiveness. no, because we have no evidence _ its effectiveness. no, because we have no evidence whatsoever- its effectiveness. no, because we have no evidence whatsoever to l have no evidence whatsoever to suggest that this variant will evade the immune response, so it�*s really important for everyone to get vaccinated get boosters. i important for everyone to get vaccinated get boosters. i know the scientific community _ vaccinated get boosters. i know the scientific community will _ vaccinated get boosters. i know the scientific community will be - vaccinated get boosters. i know the| scientific community will be working once again to get as much data as quickly as possible on the new variant. thank you very much for your expertise. let me just tell you the who is meeting as i speak to discuss the new variance and we will bring you any news from that meeting as soon as it emerges and at half past 11 this morning we will be
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answering your questions on the new variant emerging in south africa and do send them to us on twitter. in the uk a 12—year—old girl has died after sustaining what�*s been described as �*catastrophic injuries�* in liverpool. ava white was with friends when she was assaulted. four teenage boys from the toxteth area of the city have been arrested on suspicion of murder. our correspondent andy gill gave us the latest from the scene. what you can see behind me is the police presence which is part of a massive police presence in liverpool as police investigate the death of the 12—year—old girl. a number of city centre streets are closed off and the place where she was
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assaulted is a couple of yards from here, a side street of one of the main shopping streets and police said they were called at 20 to nine last night and van ava collapsed on the ground with a passer—by giving her first aid and ava was taken to alder hey children�*s hospital and despite the best efforts of paramedics she died and police in a statement have said that no parent should have to wait for the knock on the door to tell them that their child has died and two to�*s world has been torn apart. she was believed to be an altercation at the scene which resulted in her receiving catastrophic industries and a postmortem will be held to establish the cause of death. for teenagers from the toxteth area of liverpool have been arrested on suspicion of murder and between 13 and 32 years old and one is 15 years old and this happened at a time when
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the city centre in liverpool was busy with the christmas lights switched on just before it happened so the police think there might have been a lot of witnesses and they want those people or anybody who saw anything that might help the enquiry to come forward so they can get what they call justice for ava to come forward so they can get what they calljustice for ava white. the french interior minister says he�*ll no longer meet the uk home secretary this weekend after borisjohnson made a number of demands on france to tackle the crisis of people crossing the channel in small boats. priti patel was due to attend a meeting on sunday, after the deaths of of twenty seven people on wednesday. but france described as �*unacceptable�* a letter by mrjohnson, which outlined steps to prevent attempted crossings. my colleague ben boulos is following developments for us in dover. quite a change in the political language since you spoke to us yesterday. b. language since you spoke to us
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yesterday-— language since you spoke to us esterda . . ., , . ., ., yesterday. a remarkable change, a comlete yesterday. a remarkable change, a complete about _ yesterday. a remarkable change, a complete about turn. _ yesterday. a remarkable change, a complete about turn. 24-hour i yesterday. a remarkable change, a complete about turn. 24-hour is i yesterday. a remarkable change, a i complete about turn. 24-hour is ago complete about turn. 24—hour is ago the talk was about cooperation, unity of purpose and joint action and a united effort between the uk and a united effort between the uk and france to deter people from trying to make that life risking crossing through the channel from france to the uk and also to deal with the problem of the people smugglers, the human traffickers who make vast sums from sending people out on flimsy boats and in some cases, sending them out to their deaths. and in the interim, the thing that seems to have changed the course of the dialogue is the letter that borisjohnson, the uk prime minister, published and sent to president macron and published it on like setting out a number of things that he thought needed to be done to solve the issue and among them, he said he wanted france to accept the return of people who try to make the crossing in order to deter others.
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that letter has been met with an incredibly frosty reception in paris. a little earlier today, emmanuel macron gave his reaction to it. i emmanuel macron gave his reaction to it. ., , , , _ emmanuel macron gave his reaction to it. i am surprised by methods that aren't serious. _ it. i am surprised by methods that aren't serious. we _ it. i am surprised by methods that aren't serious. we do _ it. i am surprised by methods that aren't serious. we do not - aren't serious. we do not communicate by one leader to another by letters— communicate by one leader to another by letters or _ communicate by one leader to another by letters or tweets on these issues and we _ by letters or tweets on these issues and we don't throw warnings around. come _ and we don't throw warnings around. come on _ and we don't throw warnings around. come on. come on. some ministers will work— come on. come on. some ministers will work seriously to deal with the serious _ will work seriously to deal with the serious issue with serious people. which _ serious issue with serious people. which is _ serious issue with serious people. which is why on sunday we will meet with the _ which is why on sunday we will meet with the compound bounce from the european _ with the compound bounce from the european union and commission to work— european union and commission to work on _ european union and commission to work on the — european union and commission to work on the issue and then we will see how— work on the issue and then we will see how we — work on the issue and then we will see how we can work with the british on how— see how we can work with the british on how to _ see how we can work with the british on how to respond effectively, if they decide to be serious. let�*s they decide to be serious. let's seak they decide to be serious. let's s - eak to they decide to be serious. let's speak to the — they decide to be serious. let's speak to the shadow _ they decide to be serious. let's speak to the shadow home i they decide to be serious. l2i�*3 speak to the shadow home secretary and it�*s good to have you with us. what do you make of the rapid deterioration in the relations between the uk and french governments over this? this
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between the uk and french governments over this? this is a humiliation _ governments over this? this is a humiliation for— governments over this? this is a humiliation for a _ governments over this? this is a humiliation for a prime - governments over this? this is a humiliation for a prime ministerl governments over this? this is a i humiliation for a prime minister and home _ humiliation for a prime minister and home secretary who have completely lost control of the situation in the channet — lost control of the situation in the channet at — lost control of the situation in the channel. at the very moment when the prime _ channel. at the very moment when the prime minister needed to be a statesman, to actually deal with this, _ statesman, to actually deal with this, what— statesman, to actually deal with this, what we saw instead was a grave _ this, what we saw instead was a grave error— this, what we saw instead was a grave error ofjudgment, bringing up a public— grave error ofjudgment, bringing up a public letter on twitter where he was trying — a public letter on twitter where he was trying to seek international cooperation and it's ended up within a matter— cooperation and it's ended up within a matter of— cooperation and it's ended up within a matter of hours with our government being excluded from these vital talks— government being excluded from these vital talks that need to take place to prevent people from risking their lives in _ to prevent people from risking their lives in the — to prevent people from risking their lives in the channel. i to prevent people from risking their lives in the channel.— lives in the channel. i suppose the prime minister _ lives in the channel. i suppose the prime minister thought _ lives in the channel. i suppose the prime minister thought he - lives in the channel. i suppose the prime minister thought he was i prime minister thought he was setting out points that he felt would help to solve the crisis, to help deal with the problem and ultimately save lives. if you�*d been writing the letter instead, what would you have put in the different to what he had suggested? firstly, i
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wouldn't have _ to what he had suggested? firstly, i wouldn't have been _ to what he had suggested? firstly, i wouldn't have been posting - to what he had suggested? firstly, i wouldn't have been posting letters l wouldn't have been posting letters up wouldn't have been posting letters up on _ wouldn't have been posting letters up on twitter, i would have been judging _ up on twitter, i would have been judging the talks in such a way that we could _ judging the talks in such a way that we could have actually got to a more constructive — we could have actually got to a more constructive place. but what struck me about _ constructive place. but what struck me about the letter was the prime minister— me about the letter was the prime minister was asking for a lot of things— minister was asking for a lot of things you would hope would already have been_ things you would hope would already have been happening in terms of deeper— have been happening in terms of deeper co—operation which only goes to show— deeper co—operation which only goes to show how little the prime minister— to show how little the prime minister and home secretary have achieved _ minister and home secretary have achieved for months and months now. but specifically, what i would be doing _ but specifically, what i would be doing is— but specifically, what i would be doing is saying to the french authorities that important as coastal— authorities that important as coastal patrols are, we need to go far beyond — coastal patrols are, we need to go far beyond it and we need to be doing _ far beyond it and we need to be doing properjoint law enforcement work with— doing properjoint law enforcement work with the french authorities and other— work with the french authorities and other countries as well to tackle these _ other countries as well to tackle these vile — other countries as well to tackle these vile people smuggling gangs upstream. people do not become displaced — upstream. people do not become displaced from their homes in northern— displaced from their homes in northern europe. they come thousands of mites— northern europe. they come thousands of miles whether through central europe, — of miles whether through central europe, whether through the mediterranean and i've been offering
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up mediterranean and i've been offering up that— mediterranean and i've been offering up that broader law enforcement work is the _ up that broader law enforcement work is the same _ up that broader law enforcement work is the same time as making the case for safe _ is the same time as making the case for safe legal routes.— for safe legal routes. nick, we must leave it there. _ for safe legal routes. nick, we must leave it there, but _ for safe legal routes. nick, we must leave it there, but thanks _ for safe legal routes. nick, we must leave it there, but thanks for - leave it there, but thanks for speaking to us. the labour shadow home secretary there. a lot of the focus on people trying to make the crossing by boat is being attributed to the fact that security at the ports and on the eurotunnel has become much, much tighter, which is why we have seen such high numbers of people trying to make the crossing, albeit in those flimsy, unsuitable boats from france to the uk and let�*s speak to steve harvey, a british police officer who served with euro poll and has experience of dealing with the problem of human trafficking. what you make of the idea that borisjohnson set out of patrols along the french beaches, of
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aerial surveillance, patrols along the french beaches, of aerialsurveillance, of patrols along the french beaches, of aerial surveillance, of radar, patrols along the french beaches, of aerialsurveillance, of radar, using other technology and also sending migrants back to france to deter others from even attempting the crossing? would all of that work, do you think? good morning. deterrent measures are effectively that, they deter the professional criminal from working in a particular area or level and likewise, disruption tactics and you�*ve mentioned deterrent measures which would be increased securities at the point of embarkation. bhd increased securities at the point of embarkation— increased securities at the point of embarkation. . ., ., , , , ., embarkation. and arrival. disruption would be maybe _ embarkation. and arrival. disruption would be maybe surveillance - embarkation. and arrival. disruption would be maybe surveillance of i embarkation. and arrival. disruption would be maybe surveillance of the l would be maybe surveillance of the beaches _ would be maybe surveillance of the beaches where boats have been launched — beaches where boats have been launched and with push the works elsewhere, but what you have to consider — elsewhere, but what you have to consider moving away from politics which _ consider moving away from politics which is _ consider moving away from politics which is not — consider moving away from politics which is not my confidence, is the british— which is not my confidence, is the british and — which is not my confidence, is the british and french law enforcers have _ british and french law enforcers have been— british and french law enforcers have been working together for over
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two decades on this is issue and we were _ two decades on this is issue and we were working, the british forces, were _ were working, the british forces, were working, the british forces, were working with the french in the european _ were working with the french in the european police and in the 2,000 is and ever— european police and in the 2,000 is and ever since we had 58 chinese migrants — and ever since we had 58 chinese migrants arrive and suffocated in dover _ migrants arrive and suffocated in dover so — migrants arrive and suffocated in dover. so we should move away from the fact _ dover. so we should move away from the fact that — dover. so we should move away from the fact that british law enforcement and eu law enforcement, notjust_ enforcement and eu law enforcement, notjust of— enforcement and eu law enforcement, notjust of rents enforcement and eu law enforcement, not just of rents work together on a daily basis— not just of rents work together on a daily basis and are very successful in what _ daily basis and are very successful in what they do and there is however a lack— in what they do and there is however a lack of— in what they do and there is however a lack of resources and also a recognised lack of intelligence on when _ recognised lack of intelligence on when the — recognised lack of intelligence on when the migrant smuggling networks move to _ when the migrant smuggling networks move to a _ when the migrant smuggling networks move to a new methodology and a modus _ move to a new methodology and a modus operandi that prevents challenges to law enforcement, such as these _ challenges to law enforcement, such as these inflatable craft which are leaving _ as these inflatable craft which are leaving the beaches in france. it leaving the beaches in france. sounds leaving the beaches in france. it sounds from what you are saying as though we have pretty much reached
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the limits of what border enforcement capabilities can achieve and it is now down to reaching a political solution to all of this. is that right, or is there more on the way of enforcement yet to be done? i the way of enforcement yet to be done? ~ the way of enforcement yet to be done? .. . the way of enforcement yet to be done? «i , ., ., . «i ., done? i think there is a lack of awareness _ done? i think there is a lack of awareness by _ done? i think there is a lack of awareness by people - done? i think there is a lack of awareness by people sat i done? i think there is a lack of l awareness by people sat outside done? i think there is a lack of i awareness by people sat outside of the law _ awareness by people sat outside of the law enforcement community on what is _ the law enforcement community on what is available. there is an eu agency— what is available. there is an eu agency which is there in warsaw specifically to deal with eu border security— specifically to deal with eu border security and they are currently recruiting _ security and they are currently recruiting a standing core, which they— recruiting a standing core, which they anticipate, thousands of officers — they anticipate, thousands of officers by 2025 and one of the elements of that standing core is a reserve. _ elements of that standing core is a reserve. a — elements of that standing core is a reserve, a rapid deployment force to assist _ reserve, a rapid deployment force to assist eu _ reserve, a rapid deployment force to assist eu member states with matters of border— assist eu member states with matters of border security and i don't think that the _ of border security and i don't think that the uk— of border security and i don't think that the uk needs to offer british police _ that the uk needs to offer british police officers or law enforcement tojoin_ police officers or law enforcement tojoin the — police officers or law enforcement tojoin the french on french
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territory _ tojoin the french on french territory. the french and brussels can ask— territory. the french and brussels can ask their agency to support them with a _ can ask their agency to support them with a border security issue and border— with a border security issue and border security is not just about dealing — border security is not just about dealing with arrivals, till also deals— dealing with arrivals, till also deals with those persons seeking to leave _ deals with those persons seeking to leave and _ deals with those persons seeking to leave and we have people seeking to leave and we have people seeking to leave france irregularly without documentation, without any security checks _ documentation, without any security checks whatsoever on a daily basis and that _ checks whatsoever on a daily basis and that surely is an issue for border— and that surely is an issue for border management governance within the european union. so the resources are there _ the european union. so the resources are there and — the european union. so the resources are there and i don't think we are looking _ are there and i don't think we are looking in— are there and i don't think we are looking in the right direction for an immediate solution and i'm not suggesting there is a one stop shop solution _ suggesting there is a one stop shop solution to— suggesting there is a one stop shop solution to this. this is a complex problem — solution to this. this is a complex problem and it's being played out in the media _ problem and it's being played out in the media and i think everybody, you don't _ the media and i think everybody, you don't have _ the media and i think everybody, you don't have pre— law enforcement, everybody— don't have pre— law enforcement, everybody has to have an appreciation of how multifaceted this migrant smuggling criminal enterprise is.
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the politicians need to find a common— the politicians need to find a common ground more constructively than we _ common ground more constructively than we are — common ground more constructively than we are currently hearing at thank you very much for sharing your thoughts with us. it's it�*s not just it�*s notjust the relationships between the uk and french governments that have been turning better but the weather. weather conditions are set to get worse over the next 24 hours and many met office warning is issued, please head to the bbc weather website. the greatest concern is parts of eastern scotland and coastal districts into the north east of england and at the met office have issued a red danger to life morning and we could see winds of over 90 mph. sleet and snow
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showers have been replaced by longer shells and right around the course and blizzard conditions over the grampians. away from that quiet for the time being and the breeze will pick up and there will be some sunshine. through tonight at the wins eastern scotland and north—east england the worst conditions. we could see significant snowfall across the higher ground of the north of england and the trans—pennine route in the morning and a cold night and a cold start into the morning. gale force winds forjust into the morning. gale force winds for just about into the morning. gale force winds forjust about all as into the morning. gale force winds for just about all as we start tomorrow and easing through the day. tightening up across western areas and very strong winds towards the east and it will feel bitterly cold. 7 east and it will feel bitterly cold. ? brightening up. hello, this is bbc news with me annita mcveigh. the headlines:
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flights from six countries in southern africa will be suspended after the discovery of a new and potentially more dangerous variant of coronavirus. the world health organization as well as scientists say they are deeply concerned because the new variant could evade immunity. president macron criticises borisjohnson over his proposals to tackle the crisis in the channel, saying he�*s not acting seriously. the french have cancelled priti patel�*s invitation to talks this weekend. four teenage boys are arrested on suspicion of murder after a 12—year—old girl is killed in liverpool. shoppers are expected to splurge nearly £9 billion on what could be britain�*s biggest black friday yet. now on bbc news, it�*s time for your questions answered, on the new virus variant and updated travel restrictions.
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with me isjeremy brown, professor of respiratory medicine at university college london and member of thejcvi and lisa minot, travel editor of the sun. thank you both very much for your time today. let�*s begin with the question everyone wants the answer to, jeremy, as this variant worse than others? i to, jeremy, as this variant worse than others?— to, jeremy, as this variant worse than others? i think it is too early to sa . it than others? i think it is too early to say- it looks — than others? i think it is too early to say. it looks like _ than others? i think it is too early to say. it looks like it _ than others? i think it is too early to say. it looks like it spreads i to say. it looks like it spreads reasonably fast and it has supplanted the delta variant in south africa which is a concern because it means it could have which this country displaced the delta variant and become the dominant variant and become the dominant variant of this country as well. but whether the mutations have altered
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its resistance to our vaccine immunity is not clear at the moment. but mag that is what all the scientists are working to try to be clear about as quickly as possible. lots of people have that travel plans thrown up in the area and graham in bristol says what are the rules for those of us scheduled to travel to south africa? side might unfortunately the six countries on the red list means that from 4am on sunday you can travel to south africa if there are flights, and thatis africa if there are flights, and that is the issue at the moment. flights are suspended from midday today— flights are suspended from midday today until sunday but india returned to the uk on the uk and irish citizens and those with the right— irish citizens and those with the right to — irish citizens and those with the right to remain in the uk can come back into— right to remain in the uk can come back into the uk from 4am on the sunday— back into the uk from 4am on the sunday and — back into the uk from 4am on the sunday and will have to go into hotel— sunday and will have to go into hotel quarantine at our cost of £2285— hotel quarantine at our cost of £2285 for— hotel quarantine at our cost of £2285 for 11 nights so it really
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does — £2285 for 11 nights so it really does put _ £2285 for 11 nights so it really does put aqaba is on any type of travelling — does put aqaba is on any type of travelling if you're talking about pleasure — travelling if you're talking about pleasure travelling. that quarantine is obsolete in _ pleasure travelling. that quarantine is obsolete in place _ pleasure travelling. that quarantine is obsolete in place when _ pleasure travelling. that quarantine is obsolete in place when you i is obsolete in place when you return. dash—mac now obviously in place. it return. dash-mac now obviously in lace. . return. dash-mac now obviously in lace. , ., , return. dash-mac now obviously in lace. . ., , ., place. it is not “ust the uk that has decided _ place. it is not “ust the uk that has decided to i place. it is notjust the uk that has decided to suspend - place. it is notjust the uk that has decided to suspend flights| place. it is not just the uk that i has decided to suspend flights and we have _ has decided to suspend flights and we have seen the eu say it would like to— we have seen the eu say it would like to suspend flights and israel so actuallyjust getting back from south _ so actuallyjust getting back from south africa even by another country will be _ south africa even by another country will be difficult. will south africa even by another country will be difficult.— will be difficult. will the vaccine not protect _ will be difficult. will the vaccine not protect us _ will be difficult. will the vaccine not protect us against _ will be difficult. will the vaccine | not protect us against variance? will be difficult. will the vaccine i not protect us against variance? i think it probably will. it is quite likely the high level of antibodies despite protein induced by the vaccine especially if you have had two doses and a booster would be good enough to prevent even this new variant from causing severe disease
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but it is likely that is the case. what is less known is whether this virus can break through the vaccination and cause mild infections. we know this happens with existing delta variant so people who have been double vaccinated can still get a mild infection and are much less likely to get one on unvaccinated people but it can break through and it is possible this new variant might also be able to do that and maybe even more so than the delta variant but we just don�*t know at the moment. i think it is very likely the vaccine inducing immunity against severe disease will still exist against this variant. might the concern is because there is such a number of mutations scientists are uncovering this new variant but it sounds like everyone should take a better safe than sorry approach and if they have not been vaccinated with
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than sorry approach and if they have not been vaccinate— not been vaccinated with their initial doses _ not been vaccinated with their initial doses and _ not been vaccinated with their initial doses and have - not been vaccinated with their initial doses and have got i not been vaccinated with their| initial doses and have got their booster you would recommend they do that as soon as possible. the booster you would recommend they do that as soon as possible.— that as soon as possible. the lesson from previous _ that as soon as possible. the lesson from previous variance _ that as soon as possible. the lesson from previous variance is _ that as soon as possible. the lesson from previous variance is if - that as soon as possible. the lesson from previous variance is if you i from previous variance is if you have been vaccinated only vaccinated, the booster antibody levels overcomes any effects of mutations in making that particular virus less protective against the vaccine. booster doses are incredibly important. we vaccine. booster doses are incredibly important. we had a . uestion incredibly important. we had a question from _ incredibly important. we had a question from somebody - incredibly important. we had a question from somebody who l incredibly important. we had a i question from somebody who had planned to travel to south africa. mary and says i am due to leave south africa on the 3rd of december. i am british and have been double vaccinated, what are the rules now? of the rules are you will have to self isolate in hotel quarantine at a cost _ self isolate in hotel quarantine at a cost of — self isolate in hotel quarantine at a cost of £2285, a significant amount_ a cost of £2285, a significant amount of money, for 11 nights. that is exactly— amount of money, for 11 nights. that is exactly what has to happen. we have _ is exactly what has to happen. we have at _ is exactly what has to happen. we
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have at the — is exactly what has to happen. we have at the moment this red list which _ have at the moment this red list which until— have at the moment this red list which until today we didn't have countries — which until today we didn't have countries on. we now have the six countries — countries on. we now have the six countries on — countries on. we now have the six countries on the red list and the government are still revisiting it every— government are still revisiting it every three weeks as they have done throughout— every three weeks as they have done throughout the last year. the red list will _ throughout the last year. the red list will be — throughout the last year. the red list will be revisited in three weeks _ list will be revisited in three weeks. the next update we were due to have _ weeks. the next update we were due to have was — weeks. the next update we were due to have was on ninth december so that would — to have was on ninth december so that would be the next time i would imagine _ that would be the next time i would imagine they would look at this list and say— imagine they would look at this list and say whether or not they need to remove _ and say whether or not they need to remove countries from it. if you are due to _ remove countries from it. if you are due to be _ remove countries from it. if you are due to be travelling on the 3rd of december— due to be travelling on the 3rd of december there is every chance probably— december there is every chance probably south africa will still be on the _ probably south africa will still be on the red list at that point. do ou on the red list at that point. you think on the red list at that point. dr? you think this is the sensible approach at the moment from the health and travel industry perspective? i health and travel industry nominative?— health and travel industry --ersective? ., �* ~' perspective? i don't think the travel industry _ perspective? i don't think the travel industry would - perspective? i don't think the travel industry would argue . perspective? i don't think the l travel industry would argue this perspective? i don't think the - travel industry would argue this was entirely— travel industry would argue this was entirely proportionate in their view — entirely proportionate in their view but— entirely proportionate in their view. but i do think having seen what _ view. but i do think having seen what happened with the delta variant in india. _ what happened with the delta variant in india. i_ what happened with the delta variant in india, i think to error on the side _ in india, i think to error on the side of— in india, i think to error on the side of caution when we are doing so well at _ side of caution when we are doing so well at the _ side of caution when we are doing so well at the moment with a good
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irooster— well at the moment with a good booster programme, i had my booster done this— booster programme, i had my booster done this morning, it would seem a folly done this morning, it would seem a fottv to _ done this morning, it would seem a folly to throw all that hard work we have put— folly to throw all that hard work we have put in— folly to throw all that hard work we have put in a way stop just as we are seeing — have put in a way stop just as we are seeing restrictions across other countries _ are seeing restrictions across other countries finally starting to left. jeremy. — countries finally starting to left. jeremy. a — countries finally starting to left. jeremy, a question from pete who asks if there are new variants will we ever see the end of covid will we see and need new vaccines every year? see and need new vaccines every ear? ~ .., �* see and need new vaccines every ear? . .. �* ., see and need new vaccines every ear? �* .. ., see and need new vaccines every ear? ., .,, year? we can't give a clear answer to that. year? we can't give a clear answer to that it's _ year? we can't give a clear answer to that. it's likely _ year? we can't give a clear answer to that. it's likely that _ year? we can't give a clear answer to that. it's likely that the - to that. it's likely that the vaccines will protect against, hopefully all of these new variants to a large degree, preventing severe disease. we do not know for sure but it is hopeful that is the case because so far every variant we have had the vaccine does maintain detection against severe disease evenif detection against severe disease even if the vaccine is less good at preventing mild infection. if that is the case, most of the problem we get with coronavirus, people in
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hospital and intensive care and on ventilators and dying would still be controlled with the new variants that will crop up every now and then for some time to come, i suspect. it is not the most palatable thing to confront but it is the situation we are facing an sciences working really hard to keep pace with all the new developments. this is from valerie in cape town at the moment. she says we are booked from cape town to heathrow on the 19th of december with british airways. do we have to cancel? i december with british airways. do we have to cancel?— have to cancel? i wouldn't suggest cancellin: have to cancel? i wouldn't suggest cancelling your _ have to cancel? i wouldn't suggest cancelling your flight _ have to cancel? i wouldn't suggest cancelling your flight now - have to cancel? i wouldn't suggest cancelling your flight now because | cancelling your flight now because if the _ cancelling your flight now because if the airline itself has to cancel your— if the airline itself has to cancel your flight then you are entitled to a full— your flight then you are entitled to a full refund. if you cancel yourself _ a full refund. if you cancel yourself this far out there is no reason, — yourself this far out there is no reason, they don't have to give you your money— reason, they don't have to give you your money back in that situation. they— your money back in that situation. they are _ your money back in that situation. they are really trying to be as
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flexible — they are really trying to be as flexible as possible, most airlines, and are _ flexible as possible, most airlines, and are offering you perhaps the chance _ and are offering you perhaps the chance to — and are offering you perhaps the chance to have future credit or to rehook _ chance to have future credit or to rehook for — chance to have future credit or to rebook for different dates. but at the moment i would say hold tight for now _ the moment i would say hold tight for now. we have this next update on the red _ for now. we have this next update on the red list _ for now. we have this next update on the red list on the 9th of december and it— the red list on the 9th of december and it will— the red list on the 9th of december and it will give people enough time to perhaps, scientists time to perhaps— to perhaps, scientists time to perhaps look at this and see what the threat — perhaps look at this and see what the threat is and if it is something that will— the threat is and if it is something that will be a serious threat. but you should — that will be a serious threat. but you should always wait for your airline — you should always wait for your airline to — you should always wait for your airline to cancel your flight are not cancel— airline to cancel your flight are not cancel it yourself unless you actually — not cancel it yourself unless you actually have to because there is a chance _ actually have to because there is a chance you — actually have to because there is a chance you will lose out in that sense — chance you will lose out in that sense. �* , . ., chance you will lose out in that sense. ,~ ., ., , sense. are very clear answer there. jerem , a sense. are very clear answer there. jeremy. a question _ sense. are very clear answer there. jeremy, a question from _ sense. are very clear answer there. jeremy, a question from gary - sense. are very clear answer there. jeremy, a question from gary in - jeremy, a question from gary in london who asks when can we expect the government to introduce basic mandates to stop the spread? we are talking about hands and face and space. the health secretary said there are no detected cases of the new variant in the uk at this time but he did add there is a high degree of uncertainty and there was
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no talk of masks in the house of commons. no talk of masks in the house of commons— no talk of masks in the house of commons. ., ., , commons. the government would be best laced commons. the government would be best placed to _ commons. the government would be best placed to answer— commons. the government would be best placed to answer that. _ commons. the government would be best placed to answer that. we - commons. the government would be best placed to answer that. we have | best placed to answer that. we have had high levels of infection in this country for the past three or four months and it is continuing at a pretty high level with about 5% of hospital beds occupied with people with covid. it has been going on for several months and has not taken off like in europe which is a good thing. like in europe which is a good thin. �* ., ., ,. . thing. but from a scientific perspective _ thing. but from a scientific perspective if _ thing. but from a scientific perspective if not - thing. but from a scientific perspective if not a - thing. but from a scientific| perspective if not a political thing. but from a scientific - perspective if not a political one, jeremy, do you think it would be a goodidea jeremy, do you think it would be a good idea over the winter period, even before we brought this nu variant into the equation for people to be a little extra careful? i think it is wise, i would wear a mask if i was in a crowded space, transport, a shop. we test very frequently as medical staff and i think that is a reasonable thing to
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do in general, do a lateralflow test, especially if you're going to gathering over christmas. if you do a lateral flow test very sensible to do that because if it is positive you should not go to the party and if it is negative you can be reassured and if everyone else does the same you can be reassured the party is unlikely to infect you. these things very sensible and relatively easy to do and i think most people should be able to do them without too much difficulty. magdalen asks i want to know why hong kong and japan are not on the red list as they also have someone with the virus. are you aware of other countries outside africa are reporting cases of the nu variance? we have heard of cases reported in hong _ we have heard of cases reported in hong kong — we have heard of cases reported in hong kong and israel. in south africa _ hong kong and israel. in south africa is— hong kong and israel. in south africa is where they have seen this will increase in this variant and the number of cases they've seen with the _ the number of cases they've seen with the variant, really significant cases—
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with the variant, really significant cases and — with the variant, really significant cases and it has taken over from dealt _ cases and it has taken over from dealt in — cases and it has taken over from dealt in those countries. i think it is a question of proportion. people want _ is a question of proportion. people want is _ is a question of proportion. people want is to— is a question of proportion. people want is to error on the side of caution — want is to error on the side of caution and make sure we are doing everything _ caution and make sure we are doing everything we can to prevent this coming _ everything we can to prevent this coming into the uk but at the same time i_ coming into the uk but at the same time i think— coming into the uk but at the same time i think there is a desire not to have — time i think there is a desire not to have to— time i think there is a desire not to have to go back to those real very. _ to have to go back to those real very. very — to have to go back to those real very, very difficult restrictions we had in _ very, very difficult restrictions we had in place at the start of the pandemic— had in place at the start of the pandemic when virtually all borders were closed and all flights were shut down. i were closed and all flights were shutdown. i think it isjust a shut down. i think it isjust a question— shutdown. i think it isjust a question of trying to work out what is the _ question of trying to work out what is the happy medium for all of this. this question, jeremy, is asking as this nu variant is because of low vaccination rates in south africa? it is probably not really that which is the major issue. we think these variants with lots of mutations occur when someone gets infected with the virus was a poor immune system, may have had a bone marrow transplant are a new suppressive
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drugs are bad hiv infection and that allows the virus to hang around in that person for a long period of time and build up new mutations and then develop into new variant that can spread from that person to others. that is probably what is happening and vaccines don't work and a lot of people with poor immune systems such as problem not the vaccination rate that is the problem, it is the existence of people with poor immune system so you can catch the virus. you could argue they would be less likely to catch the virus if the vaccine uptake and be much higher in south africa. mike and it is true to say not all but a lot of african countries don't have vaccination rates anywhere close to europe and this takes into the avenue of questions about vaccine deputy and this the vaccines. the questions about vaccine deputy and this the vaccines.— this the vaccines. the south african u take is this the vaccines. the south african uptake is 2496 _ this the vaccines. the south african uptake is 2496 but _ this the vaccines. the south african uptake is 2496 but quite _ this the vaccines. the south african uptake is 2496 but quite a _ this the vaccines. the south african uptake is 2496 but quite a lot - this the vaccines. the south african uptake is 2496 but quite a lot of- uptake is 24% but quite a lot of people have been exposed to covid and are immune from exposure to
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previous covid infection so probably more immune than most countries in the south african subcontinent. sarah and ben says my husband is working in south africa. presumably if he flies backfire somewhere in your p can still enter the uk and quarantine? that becomes slightly more complicated because it depends where he is travelling to or can travel from south africa into an unspecified country elsewhere in europe. unspecified country elsewhere in euro e. ., unspecified country elsewhere in euroe. ., , �* europe. that is the thing. at the moment, europe. that is the thing. at the moment. the — europe. that is the thing. at the moment, the flight _ europe. that is the thing. at the moment, the flight ban - europe. that is the thing. at the moment, the flight ban is - europe. that is the thing. at the moment, the flight ban is from | moment, the flight ban is from midday— moment, the flight ban is from midday today from four on sunday there _ midday today from four on sunday there will — midday today from four on sunday there will be the need to quarantine if you _ there will be the need to quarantine if you come — there will be the need to quarantine if you come back into the uk. if you can possibly— if you come back into the uk. if you can possibly get a flight from somewhere in south africa via another — somewhere in south africa via another country back to the uk before — another country back to the uk before 4am on sunday there is no need _ before 4am on sunday there is no need to— before 4am on sunday there is no need to go— before 4am on sunday there is no need to go into hotel quarantine but the government have asked those people _ the government have asked those people who come on in that period self isolated home and take pcr test
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you can _ self isolated home and take pcr test you can get from the nhs on days two and eight _ you can get from the nhs on days two and eight if_ you can get from the nhs on days two and eight. if he does not manage to aet and eight. if he does not manage to get back— and eight. if he does not manage to get back lry— and eight. if he does not manage to get back by the 4am quarantine on sunday— get back by the 4am quarantine on sunday whether or not he is been via another— sunday whether or not he is been via another country, he will have to go into self— another country, he will have to go into self quarantine, into hotel quarantine. into self quarantine, into hotel quarantine-— into self quarantine, into hotel uuarantine. ., ,, . thank you to our viewers for sending in those questions. and at 12:30 we'll be answering
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more of your questions on the new coronavirus variant. do keep sending them in to us on twitter, using the hash tag bbc your questions, or by emailing yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. that's coming up just after 2130. —— that's coming up just after 12:30. the city of coventry has reached the halfway point in its year as uk city of culture. and with the challenges of the pandemic still a concern, how has it gone so far and what do the next six months have in store? it 5 time for our monthly check in with all things city of culture with our reporter trish adudu. look ahead to the next six months. i am speaking to you from a lovely very mild coventry cathedral ruins. this place is so iconic, it has been one of the landmark places to go for the city of culture and there is a very big event happening today. here is a bit of a clue. i know it looks
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a bit like an ex—boyfriend. we have a bit like an ex—boyfriend. we have a wonderful activity all to do with ice. you wouldn't think about ice when it comes to coventry cathedral but an ice rink in the ruins of coventry cathedral. the creative director, how exciting is this? it is so exciting. we had the ice rink here last year but this year it is bigger and better. you can get a drink, there is lots going on, you can pick up a penguin but also we are open every day until the 9th of january. it is about £5 a ticket. loads of opportunity for all people to comment on it is fully accessible so really looking forward to seeing lots of people over the winter period. b. lots of people over the winter eriod. . ., ., , ._ lots of people over the winter eriod. . ., ., , ., period. a glorious friday afternoon, ou will period. a glorious friday afternoon, you will get — period. a glorious friday afternoon, you will get quite — period. a glorious friday afternoon, you will get quite a _ period. a glorious friday afternoon, you will get quite a lot, _ period. a glorious friday afternoon, you will get quite a lot, after - you will get quite a lot, after school. i you will get quite a lot, after school. ., , ., you will get quite a lot, after school. ., ., school. i hope so, we are sold out for the first _ school. i hope so, we are sold out for the first few _ school. i hope so, we are sold out for the first few days _ school. i hope so, we are sold out for the first few days and - school. i hope so, we are sold out for the first few days and then - for the first few days and then doing accessible sessions tomorrow we the music down and less people on
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theice we the music down and less people on the ice and make a more relaxing for people and then we go all the way through christmas so it is really fun. ., , , through christmas so it is really fun. . , , ., ., ., fun. has it been a fun and relaxing six months? _ fun. has it been a fun and relaxing six months? you _ fun. has it been a fun and relaxing six months? you have _ fun. has it been a fun and relaxing six months? you have reached - fun. has it been a fun and relaxing six months? you have reached the halfway mark and i'm sure there have been some challenges. irate halfway mark and i'm sure there have been some challenges.— been some challenges. we have reflected in _ been some challenges. we have reflected in everything - been some challenges. we have reflected in everything we - been some challenges. we have reflected in everything we have | been some challenges. we have - reflected in everything we have done this year and i have been so many amazing events we have delivered. of course we are always learning and always taking stock of things that have worked but also things that maybe haven't worked so well, for the to do with the vents of communication dash—mac events are communication dash—mac events are communication and we listen and learn how to do better in the new year. ~ ., ., learn how to do better in the new year. ~ . ., ., ., year. what have we got to look forward to _ year. what have we got to look forward to your _ year. what have we got to look forward to your partner- year. what have we got to look forward to your partner lovely l year. what have we got to look i forward to your partner lovely ice skating in the next few weeks and months ahead? in skating in the next few weeks and months ahead?— skating in the next few weeks and months ahead? in january we have nithin sawney _ months ahead? in january we have nithin sawney who _ months ahead? in january we have nithin sawney who will— months ahead? in january we have nithin sawney who will do - months ahead? in january we have nithin sawney who will do in - nithin sawney who will do in response to the one event and in
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february we have the amazing daniel lismor, the fashion i can opening his retrospective and the gardens opening in the spring. share his retrospective and the gardens opening in the spring. are people cominu opening in the spring. are people coming from _ opening in the spring. are people coming from across _ opening in the spring. are people coming from across the _ opening in the spring. are people coming from across the world - opening in the spring. are people coming from across the world or. opening in the spring. are people i coming from across the world or are you still struggling to get people because of the pandemic? irate you still struggling to get people because of the pandemic? we have been in our — because of the pandemic? we have been in our covid _ because of the pandemic? we have been in our covid environment - because of the pandemic? we have been in our covid environment so l because of the pandemic? we have l been in our covid environment so the majority of visitors from across the region but we are starting to see people come from across the uk and wider and things like the radio one big event and the ice rink will draw people and it is in an iconic setting and also events we reveal in january, there will be a lot more events that will attract people. is commentary on the map now? events that will attract people. is i commentary on the map now? yes, absolutely _ commentary on the map now? yes, absolutely we — commentary on the map now? yes, absolutely. we are _ commentary on the map now? use: absolutely. we are talking to commentary on the map now? isis absolutely. we are talking to people all across the uk and they are impressed by what we have done.
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dash—mac coventry. we have created a programme that is creative and ambitious despite the pandemic. defe ambitious despite the pandemic. have ou created ambitious despite the pandemic. have you created jobs? _ ambitious despite the pandemic. have you created jobs? through _ ambitious despite the pandemic. have you created jobs? through our- you created “obs? through our programme — you created jobs? through our programme we _ you created jobs? through our programme we have _ you created jobs? through our programme we have a - you created jobs? through our programme we have a very - you created jobs? through our- programme we have a very sustainable practice so it is all about employing locally and investing in local talent and we have been doing that throughout our programme. occasionally we might have to bring other people and with gaps in knowledge and experience are some things we have used everyone already but we are really committed to that. over the last six months we have sold 150,000 tickets, we have had more than 50,000 people at free events that are not ticketed and we have had nearly a quarter of a million people online watching events so it is quite extraordinary to reach our programme has been able to reach our programme has been able to have despite the pandemic. i thrill to have despite the pandemic. i will have a no to have despite the pandemic. i will have a go on _ to have despite the pandemic. i will have a go on the — to have despite the pandemic. i will have a go on the ice. _ to have despite the pandemic. i will have a go on the ice. i _ to have despite the pandemic. i will have a go on the ice. i can't do it now. i'm not that confident to go on live on tv but i will have a goal, would you have a go as well? maybe,
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we'll see. would you have a go as well? maybe, we'll see- i— would you have a go as well? maybe, we'll see. i was _ would you have a go as well? maybe, we'll see. i was about _ would you have a go as well? maybe, we'll see. i was about to _ would you have a go as well? maybe, we'll see. i was about to ask - would you have a go as well? maybe, we'll see. i was about to ask you - would you have a go as well? maybe, we'll see. i was about to ask you if. we'll see. i was about to ask you if ou are we'll see. i was about to ask you if you are going _ we'll see. i was about to ask you if you are going to — we'll see. i was about to ask you if you are going to have _ we'll see. i was about to ask you if you are going to have a _ we'll see. i was about to ask you if you are going to have a spin - we'll see. i was about to ask you if you are going to have a spin in - we'll see. i was about to ask you if you are going to have a spin in thej you are going to have a spin in the eyes. you can tell us later how you got on. promise?— got on. promise? yeah, i will be cooler on — got on. promise? yeah, i will be cooler on it- _ extremely rare honeybees have been discovered in ancient woodland in the grounds of oxfordshire's blenheim palace. 50 miniature nests were found in tree cavities within the estate. this new subspecies appear to be the descendants of native bees that until now were presumed to have been completely wiped out by disease and competition from imported species. but conservationists say the lack of chemical pesticides and managed honeybee populations on the estate have aided their survival. an expedition has set off
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to the great barrier reef to investigate sightings of shipwrecks there. at least one wreck was dicovered last year during a survey on coral health, but it's believed there could be up to 900 of them in the wider reef. the trip is part of the great reef census — one of the world s largest marine citizen science projects. we are not quite going to the weather yet. a lavish ceremony has taken place in egypt, to mark the opening of the 3,000—year—old �*avenue of sphinxes', to the public. it's taken more than 70 years to excavate the statues, which had been buried along a three kilometre ancient walkway, connecting two of the city's greatest temples. hundreds of people performed at the event and the music was inspired by stories written on the walls of the temples in hieroglyphics. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt.
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we will start with something pretty rare for us and the weather centre, there has been met office red weather warning issued for later today and tonight which means danger today and tonight which means danger to life and particularly across coastal districts of eastern scotland and north—east england where we will see ferocious winds develop later in the day which will have all sorts of impacts. there are amber and yellow warnings across other parts of the uk. head to the bbc whether website, all the warning details are there. it is all due to storm arwen come up this area of low pressure pushing south—east through the nazi for the rest of today and tomorrow. it is on the western side the strongest winds and hence the impact the uk. the wind today relatively quite to later on. showers across southern areas a bit of sunshine in between. frequent showers in northern ireland are not a bad afternoon apart from the strengthening breeze. but the north—east of scotland, went to showers at the moment will turn
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increasingly to blizzard conditions increasingly to blizzard conditions in the grampians and rain around the course. across coastal districts of eastern scotland and north—east england danger to life and property and travel and power disruption possible and pretty atrocious conditions round the coast due to high seas being whipped up by the winds which could touch 90 mph. those warnings go to in the morning. the strongest of the winds in eastern scotland transferring to north—east england and a mixture of rain and sleet and snow to england and wales with a covering on the pennines and gail are severe gale force winds. problem is getting across trans pennine routes into the morning. cold night with temperatures just above freezing for all. tomorrow morning the strongest winds most widely across the country stop as well as red warnings amber and yellow warnings in force. we will see the winds ease only a little across western areas across the day ? eastern areas. rain and
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sleet and snow giving a covering for a few over the hills turning dry and sunny for many and sleet and showers for north and west and a very, very cold day. given the strength of when it will feel some zero across the uk. the conditions will ease saturday into sunday and storm arwen eases into the near continent. showers across eastern districts into sunday but the west a brighter day with cloud in the west to end.
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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh and these are the headlines. britain's suspension of flights from six countries in southern africa comes into effect after the discovery of a new and potentially more dangerous variant of coronavirus. the government has described it as a substantial risk to public health.
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we are concerned the new variant may pose substantial risk to public health. the variant as an unusually large of mutations. the world health organization as well as scientists say they're also deeply concerned because the new variant could evade immunity. the virus looks like it will have greater capacity to evade on the defences we have all built up as a result of the vaccinations we have received since the beginning of the year. president macron criticises borisjohnson over his proposals to tackle the crisis in the channel, saying he's not acting seriously. the french have cancelled priti patel�*s invitation to talks this weekend. iam i am surprised by the methods that aren't serious. we do not communicate from one leader to another by tweets and letters on these issues. we don't throw warnings around. i'm ben boulos live in dover. that escalation
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of the political crisis comes after the deaths of 27 people who were trying to cross the channel on wednesday. i'll have all the latest. four teenage boys are arrested on suspicion of murder after a 12—year—old girl is killed in liverpool. mps will vote on plans that will see better support for people in england with down's syndrome in what could become the first law of its kind in the world. shoppers are expected to splurge nearly £9 billion on what could be britain's biggest black friday yet. the health secretary, sajid javid, says a newly—discovered variant of covid—19 could pose a "substantial risk to public health". new travel restrictions for those arriving in england from several
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countries in southern africa where the variant is feared to be spreading rapidly have just come into force. speaking in the commons, mrjavid said it was a fast—moving and uncertain situation. the world health organisation has been holding an emergency meeting in geneva to discuss the variant. the eu is also considering travel restrictions. the uk has halted all flights from south africa, namibia, zimbabwe, botswana, lesotho and eswatini. from sunday, travellers arriving in england from those countries will have to quarantine. no cases have been confirmed in the uk — so far they have been identified in south africa, hong kong and botswana. the health secretary, sajid javid, says the variant has a significant number of mutations, which means it could be more transmissible, and that current
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vaccines could be less effective. scientists say the new variant is the "most complex that we've seen" and "the most worrying". but the variant�*s potential danger is still not fully understood. the health secretary sajid javid has been telling mps in the commons what steps the government has taken so far to halt the spread of the variant in the uk. we are heading into winter and our booster programme is ongoing so we must act with caution. so we are taking the following steps. yesterday, i announced that from midday today we are placing six countries in southern africa on the travel red list. these countries are south africa, botswana, lesotho, s pettini, namibia and zimbabwe. and anyone who is not a uk or irish resident who has been in one of these countries in the last ten days will be denied entry into england.
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uk and irish residents arriving from these countries from four am on sunday will enter hotel quarantine. anyone arriving before those dates should take pcr tests on day two and day eight, even if they are vaccinated and isolated at home along with the rest of their household. if you have arrived from any of these countries in the last ten days, nhs taste and will be contacting you and asking you to take pcr tests, but please do not wait to be contacted, you should take a pcr test right away. we have been working closely with the devolved administrations on this and they will be aligning their response. in recent hours, israel has also taken similar proportions. i wish to stress that we are working
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quickly and we are working with a high degree of uncertainty. and we are continuing to make assessments including those countries with strong travel links to south africa and we are working with our international partners, including south africa and the european union to ensure an aligned response. but this variant is a reminder for all of us that this pandemic is far from over. we must continue to act with caution and do all we can to keep this virus at bay, including once you are eligible, getting your booster shot.— you are eligible, getting your booster shot. g ., , , ., ,, booster shot. sa'id javid speaking in the booster shot. sajid javid speaking in the comments _ booster shot. sajid javid speaking in the comments in _ booster shot. sajid javid speaking in the comments in the _ booster shot. sajid javid speaking in the comments in the last - booster shot. sajid javid speaking in the comments in the last hour. j dr susan hopkins is the chief adviser to the uk's health security agency — she explained a little earlier why scientists are so concerned about this variant the main thing is we know about the variant so far are the amounts of
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mutations it has, and it has mutations it has, and it has mutations that can confer increased transmissibility and increased tra nsmissibility and increased infectiousness transmissibility and increased infectiousness and are predicted to evade the immune system from prior infection and vaccine response and clearly that needs further study and we do not know how if prior infection or vaccination will protect from severe disease involving hospitalisation and we don't yet know whether the increase cases they are seeing in south africa will stabilise over time but it is highly concerning at the rapid rate of increase in cases associated with the variant both in the central part of where it was first discovered but also in the other provinces in south africa. dr david nabarro is special envoy of the world health organisation on covid—19. he had this assessment
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of the variant�*s potential. my view is that it is appropriate to be concerned, and i will tell you why. the virus looks like it will have greater capacity to evade the defences we have all built up as a result of the vaccinations we have received since the beginning of the year, and that is a concern because that would then mean it's a bit like having to reset the dial and to go back and start dealing with the totally new pandemic all over again and we have to treat it as a new virus. that is the concern. the only thing i want to say to people is, remember, that way we deal with a pandemic like this is we do everything possible to stop the virus being transmitted, so as well as trying to get everybody vaccinated, the really important thing is wear face vaccinated, the really important thing is wearface masks, rain tain physical distancing, practice good hygiene and trying to ensure decent
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ventilation particularly in indoor areas. professor stephen bustin is a specialist in molecular medicine medicine and joins me now/ we know too well, what the virus has thrown at us but there is a bit of a waiting game to use the phrase, because a lot of work is going on to establish just how dangerous the new variant is. , ., ., ~ variant is. yes, indeed and thank ou for variant is. yes, indeed and thank you for the _ variant is. yes, indeed and thank you for the invitation. _ variant is. yes, indeed and thank you for the invitation. it's - you for the invitation. it's important to state that there have been numerous variants already and none of these are the same as the delta variant and we know the vaccinations and boots to protect from severe disease and that's an important thing to remember. the unusual thing about the variant as it contains so many different changes and many of the changes have had variants like alpha and delta r linked to hyper intact ? infectivity
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and blocking antibodies so we need to be concerned but we also need to remember we do have a vaccine that has been working. it’s remember we do have a vaccine that has been working.— has been working. it's important to distinuuish has been working. it's important to distinguish between _ has been working. it's important to distinguish between increased - distinguish between increased transmissibility and increased tra nsmissibility and increased danger to transmissibility and increased danger to public health because a variant might be more transmissible but it doesn't mean that vaccinations that are already in place won't protect people from serious disease as a result. absolutely correct and it's important to remember that. and there is a problem for the virus because it evinces highly infectious, then it may be a balance to be struck between infectivity and the ability of the immune system, so we should be concerned that we should not be panicking as yet and i think public health managers should be mask wearing, social distancing and one of the problems we have in this country is we seem to have forgotten there is a pandemic around
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and have re— adapted to easily and less from there is a pandemic and also reemphasise that we should be providing vaccines to the world because as we all predicted, this was going to happen because as long as people can be affected, the virus will mutate. ila as people can be affected, the virus will mutate-— will mutate. no one is safe until eve one will mutate. no one is safe until everyone is _ will mutate. no one is safe until everyone is safe, _ will mutate. no one is safe until everyone is safe, phrase - will mutate. no one is safe until everyone is safe, phrase i've - will mutate. no one is safe until. everyone is safe, phrase i've heard from people on global health programmes. to go back to the point you are making that hands, face, sprays, do you think there should be a mandate from government to say to people if you're not doing this voluntarily, you ought to be doing it. i voluntarily, you ought to be doing it. , , ., , ., , ., it. i guess that is a question, personally. _ it. i guess that is a question, personally. my _ it. i guess that is a question, personally, my opinion - it. i guess that is a question, personally, my opinion as . it. i guess that is a question, personally, my opinion as it| it. i guess that is a question, - personally, my opinion as it should be mandated but i think there are certain people who cannot wear masks but it should come from the top, there should be more more positive messaging from the top suggesting it
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should be done. d0 messaging from the top suggesting it should be done.— should be done. do you have any sense of how _ should be done. do you have any sense of how long _ should be done. do you have any sense of how long it _ should be done. do you have any sense of how long it will - should be done. do you have any sense of how long it will take - should be done. do you have any| sense of how long it will take with more certainty what we are facing with this variant?— with this variant? that is difficult and it's essential _ with this variant? that is difficult and it's essential that _ with this variant? that is difficult and it's essential that we - with this variant? that is difficult and it's essential that we track . with this variant? that is difficult l and it's essential that we track and trace and see what is happening and at the moment the virus was discovered by sequencing which is of course one way of doing it but we have the test that should be able to discover and detect the virus so thatis discover and detect the virus so that is why testing and tracing is such an important part of the response the virus so i think it will take weeks, i think, certainly several weeks until we know where it is and we know it's in in south africa and hong kong and does not seem to have appeared, and one of the lessons we have learnt is as soon as something this happens we make sure the borders are protected because that is how the virus spreads. because that is how the virus sreads. ., ,,., ., ,, because that is how the virus sreads. ., , ., ,, i. , spreads. professor, thank you very much.
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and at 1230 we'll be answering your questions on the new coronavirus variant, emerging in south africa/. do send them in to us on twitter, using the hash tag bbc your questions, or by emailing yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. that's coming up just after 1130. in the uk a 12—year—old girl has died after sustaining what's been described as �*catastrophic injuries�* in liverpool.( ava white was with friends when she was assaulted. four teenage boys from the toxteth area of the city have been arrested on suspicion of murder. a 24—year—old man has been charged with murder in connection with the disappearance of 18—year—old bobbi—anne mcleod. bobbi—anne went missing on saturday
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after leaving her home to catch a bus and meet friends. cody ackland, from the southway area of plymouth, was remanded in custody at plymouth magistrates�* court. just to tell you a bit more about your questions coming up at half 12 and one of the guess i will be talking to is an expert who has been in the world health organization meeting taking place over the last couple of hours, so he will be fresh from that meeting and he can tell us what has been happening in that who meeting. and that is coming upjust after half past 12. you�*re watching bbc news. we will say goodbye now to viewers on bbc2. the french president, emmanuel macron, has accused the uk government of not being serious about tackling migrant crossings in the english channel. mr macron said he was "surprised" that borisjohnson had published a letter on twitter, suggesting paris should take back anyone who tries to reach britain in small boats. twenty—seven people died attempting the crossing on wednesday.
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france had already cancelled talks this weekend with the home secretary, priti patel, in protest at the letter. my colleague ben boulos is following developments for us in dover. it's it�*s an extraordinary turnaround giving that 24—hour is ago i was standing here and we were talking about the unity of purpose, the joint effort, the determination between the uk and french governments to deter people from risking their over the child from france to the uk and also to deal with the problem of the people smugglers and their human trafficking rings that having taken vast sums of money, out into the channel on flimsy boats and in some cases as we saw on wednesday, to me their deaths. the turnaround has been extraordinary and the talk of
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cooperation and working together is gone and the french invitation to the uk home 70 to attend talks on sunday with her french counterpart, that invitation has been revoked and it seems to have been provoked from the letter from borisjohnson addressed to emmanuel macron and published online star borisjohnson set out a number of points that he thought were necessary to tackle the problem and prevent further loss of life and one of those was to get france to agree to take people back who have been caught trying to make the journey and that has angered the french government and president macron gave the reaction like this earlier today. i macron gave the reaction like this earlier today-— earlier today. i am surprised by methods that _ earlier today. i am surprised by methods that are _ earlier today. i am surprised by methods that are not _ earlier today. i am surprised by methods that are not serious. i translation: i am surprised by methods that aren't serious. we do not communicate from one leader to another by tweets and letters on these issues. we don't throw warnings around. come on, come on. so, ministers will work seriously
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to deal with a serious issue with serious people. that's why on sunday minister darmanin will meet with his counterparts from the european union and the commission to work on this issue, and then we'll see how we can work with the british on how to respond effectively, if they decide to be serious. a little earlier. well, earlier our political correspondent lone wells gave me this assessment of the growing political row between the uk and french governments. grant shapps has stressed that he would _ grant shapps has stressed that he would like to see more cooperation and would — would like to see more cooperation and would like to see that invitation to the home secretary, priti patel— invitation to the home secretary, priti patel reinstated and the general— priti patel reinstated and the general view from the uk government is they— general view from the uk government is they believe in some kind of cooperation that is necessary to resolve — cooperation that is necessary to resolve the problem and downing street _ resolve the problem and downing street have said they wanted explained why the invitation to priti patel has been revoked and the priority— priti patel has been revoked and the priority should be saving lives and the uk _ priority should be saving lives and the uk government has suggested that
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the uk government has suggested that the solutions and ideas that boris johnson _ the solutions and ideas that boris johnson set out in his letter have sparked — johnson set out in his letter have sparked the controversy are ideas that have — sparked the controversy are ideas that have been put forward before but that _ that have been put forward before but that is — that have been put forward before but that is the crux of what the problem — but that is the crux of what the problem is because the french have argued _ problem is because the french have argued that by writing this letter with the — argued that by writing this letter with the suggestions that france should _ with the suggestions that france should be taking back moment to make the danger— should be taking back moment to make the danger channel crossing, they are putting france in a difficult situation — are putting france in a difficult situation because these are ideas that have — situation because these are ideas that have been forward to france in private _ that have been forward to france in private and — that have been forward to france in private and france feel that this is playing _ private and france feel that this is playing out in a very public way with _ playing out in a very public way with the — playing out in a very public way with the open letter by the prime minister— with the open letter by the prime minister but also through tweets and they are _ minister but also through tweets and they are put in a difficult position and they— they are put in a difficult position and they feel that this is putting pressure — and they feel that this is putting pressure on them but also politicising the events we have seen over the _ politicising the events we have seen over the last couple of days, so what _ over the last couple of days, so what originally started as a tragic humanitarian crisis now is also bubbling — humanitarian crisis now is also bubbling into what is becoming a
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quite _ bubbling into what is becoming a quite public diplomatic row. and, es, it is quite public diplomatic row. and, yes. it is a _ quite public diplomatic row. and, yes, it is a diplomatic— quite public diplomatic row. and, yes, it is a diplomatic row, - quite public diplomatic row. fific yes, it is a diplomatic row, and yes, it is a diplomatic row, and yes, it is a diplomatic row, and yes, it is a political crisis but in the conversations i�*ve had here in dover today, the conversations i�*ve had here in dovertoday, people the conversations i�*ve had here in dover today, people have said it�*s vitally important not to lose sight of the fact that there is human tragedy at the centre of all of this and i want to speak more about that element of it with the global humanitarian adviser and joins me here in dover and it would be easy to get swept up in the political blaming, the finger pointing and forget that what we are talking about is desperate people risking their lives to flee some atrocious situations. their lives to flee some atrocious situations-— situations. absolutely and i appreciate _ situations. absolutely and i appreciate you _ situations. absolutely and i appreciate you raising - situations. absolutely and i appreciate you raising that l situations. absolutely and i - appreciate you raising that because these are people on the boat who are brothers, fathers, mothers, children of families spread across the world than from any of them they won�*t have even heard all of this news yet
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and there are many thousands of refugees, millions, who are fleeing real persecution, real problems in the world and as we think about the 27 families today whose lives have changed forever and thank you for remembering them. you have changed forever and thank you for remembering them.— for remembering them. you were tellin: me for remembering them. you were telling me that _ for remembering them. you were telling me that you've _ for remembering them. you were telling me that you've been - for remembering them. you were telling me that you've been all i for remembering them. you were l telling me that you've been all over telling me that you�*ve been all over the world where there were refugee situations in syria and other places, so when people have reached france, often perilousjourneys france, often perilous journeys together far, france, often perilousjourneys togetherfar, why france, often perilousjourneys together far, why is france, often perilousjourneys togetherfar, why is it france, often perilousjourneys together far, why is it that they do not feel that they can breathe a sigh of relief and they are safe. they are somewhere in a country where they can potentially be looked
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after and build a new live, so why risk everything including the lives to make yet another crossing? the reali ou to make yet another crossing? iie: reality you talked to make yet another crossing? tie: reality you talked about, to make yet another crossing? “ii9: reality you talked about, and to make yet another crossing? i““i9 reality you talked about, and i have worked in france and seen them all the way through the european refugee movement as they get to different countries there is that relief but often the reason they are going to the uk is they do have family members here and they might have even learned english through the tv and movies and schooling they have. they feel a level of comfort and see a group of people who may be they have connection with in some way, so when you look at the global crisis, it�*s a very small minority of people coming here from the 80,000,000 refugees we have but they do have some kind of want to be part of a society because they have that connection and you think about the reasons they get on the boat and i can�*t imagine why some of these families, that really difficult decision, why those mothers and fathers with, the bow with the children, it is out of pure desperation and i�*ve spent the last five and a half months in syria and one of the things is we try to work with making people have a more secure life in their countries but they get to the point of sheer desperation and for all of those people there is a real connection with the uk we cannot change. that�*s
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part of their heart and identity for multiple reasons.— multiple reasons. thank you for shannu multiple reasons. thank you for sharing your — multiple reasons. thank you for sharing your thoughts _ multiple reasons. thank you for sharing your thoughts there. i multiple reasons. thank you for. sharing your thoughts there. and multiple reasons. thank you for i sharing your thoughts there. and as we�*ve seen, the weather has improved, but it is still bitterly cold and you can only imagine what it�*s like further out there and the fear is when the clouds break in the sun comes through it encourages other people to make the attempt of that risky crossing and in some cases, as we saw, so tragically earlier this week, never making it to the end of the journey alive. that�*s it from me in doverfor the moment. back to you. ijust that�*s it from me in doverfor the moment. back to you. i just want to bring you up—to—date with the figures from the office for national statistics showing a slight increase in infections across the uk in the latest week up to the 20th of november and the survey suggesting that one million and 35,000 people in the uk would test positive for
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coronavirus in that week, up slightly from just under 1,000,000 the previous week, 1.6% of the population or one in 65 people in the latest week. let me break that down for you. in england, one in 65 estimated to be testing positive for coronavirus in wales it is one in 50 and the same in northern ireland, one in 50, and scotland, one in 70, but in all of the nations, more people estimated to be testing positive for coronavirus in the latest week compared to the week before. experts are predicting some of the biggest black friday sales ever seen in the uk, with around 60% of adults expected to make purchases today. but there�*s a warning that discounts will probably be less generous this year and there�*ll be potentially fewer options on the shelves. that�*s because of issues with coronavirus, shortages of lorry drivers and warehouse staff and disruption to supply chains.
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joining me now is chief executive of the british independent retailers association andrew goodacre. thanks forjoining us today and i suppose the first question is, are people really getting bargains on black friday because there is a suggestion that many of the goods they are buying today will have been priced at a similar price point or lower in the previous six months? i agree. there's lots of evidence this agree. there�*s lots of evidence this week from the consumer groups, and which notice lee indicated many of the prices are not the prices this year and may even see later this year and may even see later this year depending on how successful today is, so i think some of the glass comes off bolack friday when that data comes out. i am just going to pause to make sure we can hear
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you properly because there was a glittering connection.— you properly because there was a glittering connection. andrew, let's t aaain. i glittering connection. andrew, let's try again- i think — glittering connection. andrew, let's try again. i think you _ glittering connection. andrew, let's try again. i think you are _ glittering connection. andrew, let's try again. i think you are back- glittering connection. andrew, let's try again. i think you are back with | try again. i think you are back with us. how much does this affect independent retailers, this big olack friday and the focus on it compared to the bigger retailers? andrew can�*t hear us. i can compared to the bigger retailers? andrew can't hear us.— andrew can't hear us. i can now, actuall . andrew can't hear us. i can now, actually- i— andrew can't hear us. i can now, actually. i think _ andrew can't hear us. i can now, actually. i think we _ andrew can't hear us. i can now, actually. i think we can - andrew can't hear us. i can now, actually. i think we can go i andrew can't hear us. i can now, actually. i think we can go back. | actually. i think we can go back. let's try again — actually. i think we can go back. let's try again and _ actually. i think we can go back. let's try again and keep - actually. i think we can go back. i let's try again and keep everything let�*s try again and keep everything crossed. i wasjust let�*s try again and keep everything crossed. i was just wondering how black friday affects independent retailers against the really big conglomerates? it�*s retailers against the really big conglomerates?— retailers against the really big conalomerates? �* , :, , conglomerates? it's not good news, in fairness because _ conglomerates? it's not good news, in fairness because it's _ conglomerates? it's not good news, in fairness because it's harder- conglomerates? it's not good news, in fairness because it's harder for. in fairness because it�*s harderfor the independent retailer with a small business to offer that sort of discount you might see in a large retailer and all of the marketing power is driven by the large on—time retailers on the high street change so naturally customers are dragged
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to those businesses and our message to those businesses and our message to shoppers is, please don�*t forget independent businesses, they are out there and you can get good value and you will find different products and we need to spread the amount of money that would be spared today and in the run—up to christmas. i hear amongst the bigger retailers and online retailers that this tradition which emanated in the us and has come over here that they are not particularly fond of it and they say excuse business both in the run—up to christmas and also has an impact on what would have been the big sales time, the january sales. i would agree with them in fairness. it traditionally, sales are used by retailers to remove old stock, effectively, which is why the boxing day sale or the new year�*s day sale was so popular over the years and it�*s an opportunity for retailers to remove old stock and for customers to get bargains but by doing such a big event pre—christmas you are
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effectively bringing forward your christmas shopping or a huge amount of it at discounted prices and i don�*t see that working for large retailers in the way that they might expect it to, so i�*m not surprised that the likes of marks & spencer are saying no, we know that 70% of independent retailers have turned their back on black friday this year and i hear experts saying it will be and i hear experts saying it will be a big one but i think it might not be as big as they expect. ok, andrew, thanks for hearing with us. how can we best prepare the next generation for a hi—tech future? kindergartens in south korea think they have the answer: pint—sized robots that sing, teach kung fu and recite stories. the government sponsored trial in three hundred nurseries and childcare centres has certainly caught the imagination of three to five year olds there and our very own mark lobel. nowadays, we are turning into robots
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— with the use of our phone. but they are turning into teachers, perfecting push—ups. translation: i enjoy l watching it, the kung fu. when i tell it to sing, it sings well. they sing. the robots are helpful- when at times it's hard for me to read everyone's stories. they do so in an entertaining way i by switching voices accordingly. i plus, here�*s looking at you kid, with a camera on its head. photos are instantly sent to a tablet to see.
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in the future, knowing how to manage ai and related tools will be very important. we believe having such experience in nursery schools will have a lasting effect throughout their youth and as adults. but when it comes to a recharge, these robots still need someone else in charge — after a powerful lesson about these humanoids and their evolving role in society, as we all look to the future. mark lobel, bbc news. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with darren bett
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met office have issued a red one for the coast of east england and scotland and gus of 90mph meaning a danger to life and stay away from these areas if you can and we are drawing down to the strengthening winds with cold air is so some blizzards in the scottish hills and a mixture of rain and snow heading into england and wales as well but all of the world the winds are strengthening and that is the main story of the weather, a widespread gale as we head into tomorrow morning, notjust windy in the north—east but damaging winds potentially through the irish sea into parts of wales in the south—west of england and we still have a mixture of rain and may be sleet and snow across the hills, retreating towards eastern england and many other areas seeing sunshine developing, wintry showers in northern ireland and particularly northern parts of scotland. it will be a cold day, three or 4, northern parts of scotland. it will be a cold day, three or 4 , but given the strength of the wind it will feel significantly colder.
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hello, this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines: britain�*s suspension of flights from six countries in southern africa comes into effect after the discovery of a new and potentially more dangerous variant of coronavirus. the world health organization as well as scientists say they�*re also deeply concerned because the new variant could evade immunity. president macron criticises borisjohnson over his proposals to tackle the crisis in the channel, saying he�*s not acting seriously. the french have cancelled priti patel�*s invitation to talks this weekend. four teenage boys are arrested on suspicion of murder
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hello and welcome to your questions answered, on the new coronavirus variant which is causing international concern. with me is our health correspondent, also i�*m joined by professor peter openshaw, an immunologist from imperial college london. we are hoping to bejoined by professor tulio de oliveira, director of the centre for epidemic response & innovation, south africa. what is so concerning about this variant? there are so many mutations
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in the .itis . it is early days. we know so much more than we did 24 hours to go questions will have about this will take a bit of time sol questions will have about this will take a bit of time so i think we need to be very alert to this to try to take some actions but it is certainly not the time to panic. and certainly not the time to panic. and of course scientists have built up a lot of expertise and looking up coronavirus and its variants over the best part of the last couple of years so they will apply all of that knowledge now in the situation. absolutely and i think that is the most remarkable thing, how quickly this is all coming out. and it is a real tribute to the south africans they are being so open with data which are just fresh off the analyses and are letting everyone know exactly what they are finding very quickly which is enormously helpful.
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very quickly which is enormously helful. , , helpful. jim, in the uk will this cause the _ helpful. jim, in the uk will this cause the government - helpful. jim, in the uk will this cause the government to i helpful. jim, in the uk will this i cause the government to tighten restrictions further? the restrictions further? the restrictions at the moment we have had around travel. the restrictions at the moment we have had around travel.— restrictions at the moment we have had around travel. the uk government alon: with had around travel. the uk government along with some _ had around travel. the uk government along with some other _ had around travel. the uk government along with some other ones _ had around travel. the uk government along with some other ones around i along with some other ones around the world _ along with some other ones around the world have restricted flights from _ the world have restricted flights from six — the world have restricted flights from six nations in south and south eastern _ from six nations in south and south eastern africa. south africa, botswana, lesotho, eswatini, zimbabwe and namibia add the six countries and one of dash-mac— add the six countries and one of dash—mac involved. from this weekend flights— dash—mac involved. from this weekend flights will _ dash—mac involved. from this weekend flights will start up again but anyone — flights will start up again but anyone coming of most countries will have to _ anyone coming of most countries will have to self— anyone coming of most countries will have to self isolate to make sure they have — have to self isolate to make sure they have not had the virus. the health they have not had the virus. t“i9 health secretary was asked if other countries might be involved in future and he did not rule it out. we have had news this morning that israel had banned flights from a slightly different group of countries and said there had been
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two cases of people detected with this variant coming in from malawi, in south—east africa. that this variant coming in from malawi, in south-east africa.— in south-east africa. that is not in the uk lest _ in south-east africa. that is not in the uk test so _ in south-east africa. that is not in the uk lest so there _ in south-east africa. that is not in the uk lest so there could - in south-east africa. that is not in the uk lest so there could be i in south-east africa. that is not in | the uk lest so there could be some the uk test so there could be some extra _ the uk test so there could be some extra restrictions on some countries going _ extra restrictions on some countries going forward. why extra restrictions on some countries going forward-— going forward. why has this variant emerued? going forward. why has this variant emerged? we _ going forward. why has this variant emerged? we have _ going forward. why has this variant emerged? we have heard - going forward. why has this variant emerged? we have heard well- going forward. why has this variant i emerged? we have heard well through this pandemic that if the virus, transmission was allowed to continue in community in different parts of the world that would more likely give rise to mutations, so why has this variant emerged in south africa particularly? lirate this variant emerged in south africa particularly?— this variant emerged in south africa articularl ? 9 :, �* ,, :, , particularly? we don't know exactly. we know that _ particularly? we don't know exactly. we know that the _ particularly? we don't know exactly. we know that the rates _ particularly? we don't know exactly. we know that the rates of _ we know that the rates of vaccination very low in some parts of africa and in south africa are too low, about 25% or something of that sort. that is by comparison
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with our own vaccination rates extremely high and we did very, very well early on with getting a lot of people vaccinated. i think this absolutely reinforces the message from the world health organisation none of us are safe until all of us are safe and really need to redouble our efforts to ensure vaccines are rolled out globally otherwise we will see a lot of new mutations occurring in the spiders because thatis occurring in the spiders because that is what it does, mutates constantly. that is what it does, mutates constantly-— that is what it does, mutates constantl ., :, :, , :, , constantly. jim, another question is if the nu variant _ constantly. jim, another question is if the nu variant has _ constantly. jim, another question is if the nu variant has also _ constantly. jim, another question is if the nu variant has also been i if the nu variant has also been found in hong kong, why have flights not been suspended from there? send like it was first detected in hong kong detected in travellers coming from south africa, a single traveller coming from south africa and that person entered a form of hotel quarantine in hong kong looks like they were able to pass on the virus to a canadian man in the room opposite to them. it
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virus to a canadian man in the room opposite to them.— opposite to them. it hasn't actually been found — opposite to them. it hasn't actually been found in _ opposite to them. it hasn't actually been found in the _ opposite to them. it hasn't actually been found in the wild _ opposite to them. it hasn't actually been found in the wild in _ opposite to them. it hasn't actually been found in the wild in hong i opposite to them. it hasn't actually| been found in the wild in hong kong yet, been found in the wild in hong kong yet. it— been found in the wild in hong kong yet. it is— been found in the wild in hong kong yet, it is been found in travellers coming _ yet, it is been found in travellers coming from a different part of the country _ coming from a different part of the country as— coming from a different part of the country. as the professor was saying. — country. as the professor was saying. i— country. as the professor was saying, i think all these travel restrictions been talked about not 'ust restrictions been talked about not just in— restrictions been talked about not just in the — restrictions been talked about not just in the uk but in the eu and israel— just in the uk but in the eu and lsrael in— just in the uk but in the eu and israel in place like this, even the british— israel in place like this, even the british government will say they don't _ british government will say they don't think these kind of restrictions will be able to stop the virus — restrictions will be able to stop the virus are this variant of the virus _ the virus are this variant of the virus appearing potentially in the uk at _ virus appearing potentially in the uk at some point. all you're doing is slowing — uk at some point. all you're doing is slowing down the spread and potentially giving yourself a bit more _ potentially giving yourself a bit more time to research it and put in place _ more time to research it and put in place other— more time to research it and put in place other measures to protect the spread _ place other measures to protect the spread. very unlikely to stop it spreading _ spread. very unlikely to stop it spreading completely by these measures. we spreading completely by these measures-— spreading completely by these measures. 9 :, :, ~ :, :, measures. we have talked about what is uncertain about _ measures. we have talked about what is uncertain about what _ measures. we have talked about what is uncertain about what we _ measures. we have talked about what is uncertain about what we don't i is uncertain about what we don�*t know. what do we know for certain at this stage? you have mentioned there has been an awful lot of work done even the 24 hours. lirate has been an awful lot of work done
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even the 24 hours.— has been an awful lot of work done even the 24 hours. we do know there are a lot of — even the 24 hours. we do know there are a lot of mutations _ even the 24 hours. we do know there are a lot of mutations in _ are a lot of mutations in the spiders which are obviously had spiders which are obviously bad because we have seen them before in other variants. there are at least nine mutations which have been seen in previous variants of concern. in addition there are at least three other mutations that look as if they could alter the biological qualities of the virus in ways that could be adverse but we still need to learn a lot more about that. and then there are 11 other mutations that look like they could possibly be functional but that again is going to need more work. that is a particular concern about alterations in the binding site and also the cluster of mutations around the binding site of some of the antibodies which are being used therapeutically. we do not know what all these mutations mean in terms of the performance of the spiders in the performance of the spiders in
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the rapid lateralflow the performance of the spiders in the rapid lateral flow test antigen detection test stroller that needs to be worked out very, very fast. lirate to be worked out very, very fast. we don't get too far into any don�*t get too far into any discussion of this before we get into what we have to do. do you think the uk and other governments around the world will introduce more stringent measures? i mean hands, face, space we talked about at the beginning of the pandemic as a belt and braces approach to this while santas work out exactly what is going on with this variant? 9,5 santas work out exactly what is going on with this variant? as the rofessor going on with this variant? as the professor has _ going on with this variant? as the professor has said _ going on with this variant? as the professor has said i _ going on with this variant? as the professor has said i think- going on with this variant? as the professor has said i think we i going on with this variant? as the professor has said i think we are l going on with this variant? as the l professor has said i think we are at a very— professor has said i think we are at a very early— professor has said i think we are at a very early stage here. we do not really— a very early stage here. we do not really know — a very early stage here. we do not really know if this variant of the virus _ really know if this variant of the virus will— really know if this variant of the virus will behave much differently from _ virus will behave much differently from other variants out there such as the _ from other variants out there such as the delta variant which is no prevalent— as the delta variant which is no prevalent across the world. that is what _ prevalent across the world. that is what scientists need to find out and there _ what scientists need to find out and there are _ what scientists need to find out and there are different ways they can do that. there are different ways they can do that the _ there are different ways they can do that. the first thing people do will be to— that. the first thing people do will be to take — that. the first thing people do will be to take serum, a form of blood
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from _ be to take serum, a form of blood from people either infected by the virus in _ from people either infected by the virus in the past i have had faxing and then— virus in the past i have had faxing and then testing this variant on that serum to see if the antibody response — that serum to see if the antibody response is different. you get an indication— response is different. you get an indication that this variant might be better— indication that this variant might be better at evading vaccines which is one _ be better at evading vaccines which is one of— be better at evading vaccines which is one of the key thing is i think scientists— is one of the key thing is i think scientists will be concerned with and they— scientists will be concerned with and they will look at how this variant— and they will look at how this variant responds and spreads in the real world — variant responds and spreads in the realworld. it variant responds and spreads in the real world. it is very difficult to know _ real world. it is very difficult to know if — real world. it is very difficult to know if they increase in the proportion of cases we have seen in south _ proportion of cases we have seen in south africa — proportion of cases we have seen in south africa is because there is something about this variant which makes _ something about this variant which makes it— something about this variant which makes it fitter and spread more quickly— makes it fitter and spread more quickly and evade vaccines in some way rf_ quickly and evade vaccines in some way rf at— quickly and evade vaccines in some way rf at the moment it isjust slightly— way rf at the moment it isjust slightly down to chance. that this variant _ slightly down to chance. that this variant starts spreading in a pocket of the _ variant starts spreading in a pocket of the population what it looks like it is spreading more quickly? for example — it is spreading more quickly? for example students in this area of
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south _ example students in this area of south africa. so the first thing we need _ south africa. so the first thing we need to— south africa. so the first thing we need to do— south africa. so the first thing we need to do before putting in place new restrictions is to work out if this variant _ new restrictions is to work out if this variant is acting any different.— this variant is acting any different. 9 :, ., this variant is acting any different. 9 :, :, , different. what can we say at this state? different. what can we say at this stage? we _ different. what can we say at this stage? we can — different. what can we say at this stage? we can see _ different. what can we say at this stage? we can see very - different. what can we say at this stage? we can see very much i different. what can we say at this stage? we can see very much at| different. what can we say at this i stage? we can see very much at all. dash-mac we _ stage? we can see very much at all. dash-mac we cannot _ stage? we can see very much at all. dash-mac we cannot say _ stage? we can see very much at all. dash-mac we cannot say very i stage? we can see very much at all. dash-mac we cannot say very much | stage? we can see very much at all. i dash-mac we cannot say very much at dash—mac we cannot say very much at all. i think dash—mac we cannot say very much at all. ithink it dash—mac we cannot say very much at all. i think it is extremely unlikely this will be able to evade vaccines completely. it is been extremely reassuring vaccines in common use are remarkably effective against the variants out there but we would absolutely need to get more laboratory and real—world data about whether we are seeing a lot of infections in people who have been multiplying vaccinated and maybe thatis multiplying vaccinated and maybe that is not going to come necessarily from south africa. 9,5 i necessarily from south africa. as i am talkin: necessarily from south africa. as i am talking to _ necessarily from south africa. as i am talking to you _ necessarily from south africa. as i am talking to you we are seeing the united nations tourism organisation based in madrid making a statement
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saying consciously to decide today on applying travel restrictions over the emergence of this new variant and make the rules are uniform, especially in europe. the secretary general of the united nations world tourism organisation saying if it continues to spread as we expected it will be late and make no sense to apply restrictions. developing that question on restrictions, what else are we likely to see emerging from governments around the world beyond the obvious immediate travel restrictions? i the obvious immediate travel restrictions?— the obvious immediate travel restrictions? i think the travel industry will _ restrictions? i think the travel industry will be _ restrictions? i think the travel industry will be quite - restrictions? i think the travel industry will be quite hard i restrictions? i think the travel industry will be quite hard hit| restrictions? i think the travel i industry will be quite hard hit by this in_ industry will be quite hard hit by this in the — industry will be quite hard hit by this in the short term. you see the share _ this in the short term. you see the share price — this in the short term. you see the share price of the owner of british airways down 12% today and the price of oil around the world is down. off to get— of oil around the world is down. off to get this — of oil around the world is down. off to get this knee jerk reaction and can draw— to get this knee jerk reaction and can draw too much into one days worth— can draw too much into one days worth of— can draw too much into one days worth of movement in these prices but obsolete people are looking at this, hot _ but obsolete people are looking at this, notjust from a health point of view— this, notjust from a health point
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of view but — this, notjust from a health point of view but they are slowly building back confidence that an international travel and if you have a situation — international travel and if you have a situation where people just for the christmas and festive breaks think— the christmas and festive breaks think if— the christmas and festive breaks think if i— the christmas and festive breaks think if ijump on a plane, could there _ think if ijump on a plane, could there be — think if ijump on a plane, could there be a — think if ijump on a plane, could there be a danger i might have to quantity— there be a danger i might have to quantity when i come back and pay extra _ quantity when i come back and pay extra to _ quantity when i come back and pay extra to be — quantity when i come back and pay extra to be in a hotel and so on? obviously— extra to be in a hotel and so on? obviously will put people off so i think— obviously will put people off so i think that is why governments have .ot think that is why governments have got to— think that is why governments have got to be _ think that is why governments have got to be really careful and to a certaih— got to be really careful and to a certain extent tread slightly tightly — certain extent tread slightly lightly here in terms of the impact notjust— lightly here in terms of the impact notjust on— lightly here in terms of the impact notjust on public lightly here in terms of the impact not just on public health lightly here in terms of the impact notjust on public health but lightly here in terms of the impact not just on public health but also in the _ not just on public health but also in the wider economy and i think they— in the wider economy and i think they will— in the wider economy and i think they will be thinking about that as welt _ they will be thinking about that as well. mike professor, people are pmperty— well. mike professor, people are properly thinking if there are new variants _ properly thinking if there are new variants will we ever see the end of covid _ variants will we ever see the end of covid and _ variants will we ever see the end of covid and will be variants will we ever see the end of covid and will he need new vaccines and boosters every year? if covid and will be need new vaccines and boosters every year?— and boosters every year? if you go back to the start _ and boosters every year? if you go back to the start of _ and boosters every year? if you go back to the start of the _ back to the start of the pandemic and new variants emerging wave after wave and people have been trying, even although the party members have been increasing again, trying to live a more normal life so when
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there is news of a new variants, new what and new concerns, it is pretty hard to deal with. it what and new concerns, it is pretty hard to deal with.— hard to dealwith. it is. i think all of us would _ hard to dealwith. it is. i think all of us would desperately i hard to deal with. it is. i think| all of us would desperately like hard to deal with. it is. i think- all of us would desperately like to go back to where we were before all of this started. but i think we must not lose sight of the fact that delta is already taking an appalling toll in many parts of europe and we are running hot and terms of case numbers in the uk and sometime. the nhs really is at its limits at the moment in terms of what it can cope with and we do need to really try to get the levels of the existing by the stone. in terms of the future of vaccines and so on, i think the third dose, the booster dose as it is called, does seem to raise immunity right back up to the very highest levels, even against infection, asymptomatic infection or very little symptomatic infection so
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i think we must not take the foot off the accelerator in terms of getting booster doses and and i really would encourage everyone to get vaccinated and have booster doses if they are eligible. i am doses if they are eligible. i am leased doses if they are eligible. i am pleased to _ doses if they are eligible. i am pleased to i — doses if they are eligible. i am pleased to i bring _ doses if they are eligible. i am pleased to i bring an _ doses if they are eligible. i am pleased to i bring an the - doses if they are eligible. i am pleased to i bring an the professor from the centre in south africa who has been at the world health organisation meeting now discussing this nu variant. thank you for joining us. tell us how the meeting went and what did you discuss? thank ou for went and what did you discuss? thank you for inviting _ went and what did you discuss? thank you for inviting me _ went and what did you discuss? thank you for inviting me to your— you for inviting me to your programme. that is what we call our technical working group on virus revolution and something that normally happens every seven weeks. there are 25 members across the world with many of the top of
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virologists and biologists and we have been meeting since the beginning of the pandemic. we started meeting to really discuss the emergence of mutations and source and transmission. around three days ago, we found the nu variant in south africa, and the suggestion to have a meeting. we had a large group of specialists and had a discussion about this nu variant that has emerged in south africa and discussing which kind of classification should go. what will happen is that 4pm geneva time the world health organisation will have a briefing where they will highlight
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the category they will put on this variant, potentially a variant of concern and then they will decide in the naming of its following the greek alphabet system. haifa the naming of its following the greek alphabet system. how possible is it to say at — greek alphabet system. how possible is it to say at the moment, _ is it to say at the moment, professor, in terms of the speed of the spread of this variant in south africa and its transmissibility? the seed of africa and its transmissibility? tue: speed of transmission africa and its transmissibility? tte: speed of transmission at africa and its transmissibility? tt9 speed of transmission at the africa and its transmissibility? tt9: speed of transmission at the moment, there are many ways to calculate that. one of the best ways is the reproductive number and people will be aware in the uk and south africa is around two, relatively very high, especially in one province. every day we have many more infections in
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previous days. the absolute number yesterday we had around two point 4000 and the previous week about 1000. although the numbers do not sound very large, especially for the uk, all the indicators point for a very fast and direct increase of positivity rate from less than i% yesterday to close to 7% and also very similar to the offer we can detect the variant by pcr and we can see that imagine many different provinces.
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see that imagine many different rovinces. ,, , :, ,:, see that imagine many different rovinces. ,, , :, , , provinces. the sg dropout suggest that as the new _ provinces. the sg dropout suggest that as the new variant _ provinces. the sg dropout suggest that as the new variant when - that as the new variant when scientists are studying pcr samples? the mac normally would do three steps, pcr, then they must test full stop with hundred dash—mac with hundred samples, really confirm and we are really quite confident the sg dropout but we are also utilising samples over the next few days. and it went from i% to 7%? in what period?
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it went from 1% to 796? in what eriod? :. . it went from 196 to 796? in what eriod? ., , .., period? that is called the predictive _ period? that is called the predictive rate _ period? that is called the predictive rate of - period? that is called the predictive rate of testing. period? that is called the l predictive rate of testing. it period? that is called the - predictive rate of testing. it was less than i%, you need 100 test to get one positive and it grew to around 7% and that happened in the last six days. almost increasing 1% per day. last six days. almost increasing 196 er da . :. v last six days. almost increasing 196 er da . ., �*, ., last six days. almost increasing 196 erda. . �*, . ._ last six days. almost increasing 196 erda. . , last six days. almost increasing 196 erda. . �*, . . , . per day. that's a really fast rate of transmission. _ per day. that's a really fast rate of transmission. that _ per day. that's a really fast rate of transmission. that is - per day. that's a really fast rate of transmission. that is a - per day. that's a really fast rate of transmission. that is a very l per day. that's a really fast rate i of transmission. that is a very fast increase in — of transmission. that is a very fast increase in positivity _ of transmission. that is a very fast increase in positivity rates. - increase in positivity rates. professor, what is your reaction to that data? it professor, what is your reaction to that data? . professor, what is your reaction to that data? , . , :, . , that data? it is remarkable how fast the increase — that data? it is remarkable how fast the increase in _ that data? it is remarkable how fast the increase in positivity _ that data? it is remarkable how fast the increase in positivity rate - that data? it is remarkable how fast the increase in positivity rate has i the increase in positivity rate has grown _ the increase in positivity rate has grown but — the increase in positivity rate has grown but of course that is on the background of quite a low rate initially. — background of quite a low rate initially, so i think we need to really— initially, so i think we need to really watch for this and other parts — really watch for this and other parts of— really watch for this and other parts of the world and see what happens — parts of the world and see what happens over the next few days. i hope _ happens over the next few days. i hope that — happens over the next few days. i hope that is in agreement. jim, happens over the next few days. i hope that is in agreement.- hope that is in agreement. jim, i think the watchword _ hope that is in agreement. jim, i think the watchword for - hope that is in agreement. j n t think the watchword for governments looking at this data and waiting to
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know more about this variant is one of extreme caution?— of extreme caution? after the emergence — of extreme caution? after the emergence of _ of extreme caution? after the emergence of the _ of extreme caution? after the emergence of the delta - of extreme caution? after the | emergence of the delta variant coming from parts of india originally i think governments will look at this and think it is better to act early and maybe act too much than actually and therefore allow something to spread that you do not want to. g :. ~ something to spread that you do not want to. . ,, , something to spread that you do not want to. g . ,, i. , . want to. jim, thank you very much for answering _ want to. jim, thank you very much for answering those _ want to. jim, thank you very much for answering those questions - want to. jim, thank you very much for answering those questions and j for answering those questions and also to both professors. thank you very much for your expertise and bringing us up to date what we do know about this nu variant. thank you so much. thank you to viewers for sending in your questions on this nu variant variant that emerging in south africa. we will keep you up to date
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with any developments throughout the day. the challenging circumstances of the past 18 months have forced all of us to adapt but niall guite turned lockdown into a whole new opportunity. he s represented britain at the special olympics, for athletes with a learning disability. but when he was forced indoors niall started to make pictures, and from his bedroom in sheffield they re now going everywhere, winning the respect of some famous figures. joe wilson reports. niall guite ombines his passions for sport, for art. his stadium pictures began as a lockdown distraction. they've become a phenomenon. make a start in the
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morning and get a plan of it and then select the colours and then start the process of drawing it now. this is the stadium. well, they art has travelled. in spain, here is seville's manager julen lopetegui with his home ground. hello, grayson perry here. hello, what's that behind you? a niall guite original. fellow artist, friends. not only is niall a brilliant artist, he's also a special olympian, so a class act. well, sport england figures show that opportunities for people with a disability are only resuming gradually. well, life is about adapting. niall has one room in the loft for training, anotherfor art, and those pictures? they've become a business. niall sells prints of his pictures on his website in conjunction with a special olympics charity. he's now self—employed and in
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britain only 6% of adults with a learning disability have paid jobs. he does a lot of research. you've always done that anyway, haven't you? you've got a head full of football. if you opened him up there would be a ball in there. but to get to this point, it just feels quite dreamlike, actually. perhaps niall�*s pictures represent the power of sport but also the possibility of creativity. a ceremony has taken place in the egyptian city of luxor to mark the public opening of the 3,000 year old avenue of sphinxes. the three kilometre long walkway connects the temples of karnak and luxor. the ceremony incorporates elements of the ancient festival which travelled the route each year, as nickjohnson reports. after more than seven decades of excavation work, egypt celebrates the public reopening of its ancient path of god. nearly three kilometres long, the highway connects the temples
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of karnak and luxor in the southern nile city. the sandstone—paved path is flanked on each side by hundreds of ram—headed sphinx statues, dating back more than 3,000 years, which were buried beneath the desert for centuries before they were uncovered and restored. the ancient road has been opened by egypt's president abdul fattah al—sisi, who hopes this will give a much—needed boost to the country's tourism industry. two million egyptians are employed in tourism, which generates more than 10% of the country's income. but tourists have been kept away in recent years, largely due to a decade of political turmoil, as well as the coronavirus pandemic. but with a procession of mummified pharaohs through the streets of cairo earlier this year and another museum opening plan for the coming months, egypt's government says it hopes this evening's spectacle in luxor
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will cement the country's reputation as the world's open—air museum. nickjohnson, bbc news. an expedition has set off to the great barrier reef to investigate sightings of shipwrecks there. at least one wreck was dicovered last year during a survey on coral health, but it's believed there could be up to 900 of them in the wider reef. the trip is part of the great reef census — one of the world s largest marine citizen science projects. extremely rare honeybees have been discovered in ancient woodland in the grounds of oxfordshire's blenheim palace. 50 miniature nests were found in tree cavities within the estate. this new subspecies appear to be the descendants of native bees that — until now, were presumed to have been completely wiped out by disease and competition from imported species. but conservationists say the lack of chemical pesticides and managed honeybee populations on the estate have aided their survival.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with darren storm arwen it's expected to be so severe that the met office have issued a red warning for north east and it is that the uk. these coastal areas of the north—east of scotland covered by the warning. please stay away from these areas if you can, there will be some very large dangerous waves. storm arwen is heading out to the edge of the north sea and on the edge of that stormy sea winds pushing across many parts of the country. we also have these amber warnings widely across eastern scotland and north—east england down to scarborough and amber warnings with gusts of 60 mph to 70 mph the northern parts of wales and england picking up tomorrow night into
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tomorrow morning. all the while drawing down call they are and it feels chilly out there. these are the numbers late afternoon into their early evening and we also have this rain and snow wrapped around the storm listed for the time in scotland and snow pushing on to the pennines, the welsh hills and may be over some hills into the midlands down into the cotswolds later. clear skies west and a few showers continuing here. these are the temperatures were at but the main story the strength of the damaging wind and it will be very windy through much of saturday across many parts of the country, gales widely in the strongest winds around the coastal areas as we have seen already. we still have the mixture of rain and maybe sleet and snow over the hills, through the midlands and northern and eastern parts of england and are cheating to easternmost parts during the day. elsewhere there will be sunshine and if you want to showers in northern ireland and northern parts of scotland and temperatures will struggle to three or four degrees. whilst the winds may ease a little in the afternoon northern and
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western areas there be a significant wind chill and it will feel cold out there. things start to come down overnight and we get a widespread frost. storm arwen lose away and a little fun front was into northern ireland may be bringing some spots of rain but otherwise we are still in the cold and more wintry showers across scotland and down across england where winds may still be strong in the morning they do is down and it will not be as windy on sunday but it will still feel cold. will still feel cold.
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the health secretary says the new covid variant could pose substantial risk to public health, and is of international concern. experts say it's the most heavily—mutated variant so far — the world health organisation the world health organisation is holding a special meeting is holding a special meeting to discuss the situation.
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