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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 25, 2021 9:00pm-10:00pm GMT

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this requires a coordinated international effort. translation: remember, in a way, we are guarding this border - for the british. these men and women don't want to claim asylum in france. we have offered that. and if they do, we have centres for them. the bbc goes inside one of the camps in northern france where people who've travelled thousands of miles wait for the green light from smuggling gangs. tonight, we will get reaction from geneva, amman and paris. has anyone got a workable solution to stop this trade in human suffering? good evening. a french prosecutor has confirmed
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the 27 people who died making the crossing from france to britain yesterday comprised 17 men, seven women, two teenage boys and a young girl. the uk and france both say they want to prevent a repeat of what happened yesterday, but the british home secretary admits there is no "quick fix". and more will come. in fact, today, in spite of the grim news circulating in the camps in northern france, there were still people willing to pay to get into these flimsy boats for the dangerous journey across the channel. this report from our europe correspondent nick beake. beside an abandoned train track in northern france, families desperate to resume their own journey to the uk, despite the horror of the last 2a hours. for now, more than 500 people call this camp home. among them, new arrivals, this family from iraq. their family has grown in the three years they have been on the road, trudging through more than half
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a dozen countries to get here. romania, after hungary, after france, after the uk. but tonight, all six will sleep in this tent, and every night, until they risk the english channel. would you still be prepared to try and get a boat to the united kingdom? "we cannot survive here," she tells us. "we will freeze. we have to go to the uk." and you say you have travelled through lots of countries, including germany. now you're in france. why do you want to try to reach the united kingdom? "it's much betterforfamilies in the uk," she says, "and for keeping families together." this corner of northern france has witnessed the scenes and heard these scenes and heard these
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sort of stories for more than 20 years now. it feels like a conveyor belt of misery, and this is a new generation, willing to risk everything to try and make it to the united kingdom. we meet a group of afghan men who say they fled the taliban this summer. this man wants to get to britain so his wife can follow, along with his three daughters, who can then continue their studies. have you tried to cross already on a boat? yeah, two times. and what happened? the boat was broken in the sea, - so the police came and took us out. we were all in the water. we nearly died. he then reveals he had briefly met two of those who died yesterday. i said to him, "0k, good luck to go, and i'm not going with you." - they said bye— bye. did it look like they were hopeful? i'm very sorry.
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the deaths of so many of their fellow travellers has numbed many here, but it's not changed where they want to go. nick beake, bbc news, dunkirk. in the last few minutes, there is news the british prime minister has asked france to take back all migrants who cross the channel. we will get reaction on that from paris very shortly. priti patel told mps this afternoon that she has again made an offer to her french counterpart to begin joint patrols on the french side. in a statement to the commons this afternoon, the home secretary said she has spoken at length with gerald darmanin, in an effort to find solutions to the crisis. these journeys across the channel are absolutely unnecessary, but as i have been warning for two years, they are also lethally dangerous. what happened yesterday was a dreadful shock. it was not a surprise, but it is also a reminder of how vulnerable people are put at peril when in the hands of criminal gangs.
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there is also, madam deputy speaker, no quick fix. this is about addressing long—term pull factors. we are going to devote the first half of our programme tonight to the many issues this raises. we will get political reaction from paris shortly. i want to start with the nub of the problem — the sheer number of people who are so desperate to make this journey, they are willing to risk it all and, of course, the criminal gangs who are profiting from the misery. tuesday reitano is from the global initiative against transnational organized crime. amah hadid is from the norwegian refugee council in amman, jordan. we are going to go wide and start with you. how many people do you think there are currently in refugee camps in that region who might want to come to europe? the camps in that region who might want to come to europe?— to come to europe? the hard reality is that there — to come to europe? the hard reality is that there are _ to come to europe? the hard reality is that there are millions _ to come to europe? the hard reality is that there are millions of - to come to europe? the hard reality is that there are millions of people i is that there are millions of people languishing in limbo in refugee camps across the middle east and north africa, for years now, because
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this region has faced decades long conflict across the region, widespread insecurity and deteriorating living conditions, millions of refugees and asylum—seekers who face displacement across the region but they are largely denied of their basic rights and basic services. they feel is that they have no other option but to seek asylum elsewhere. there's also an alarming trend across north africa as well, where we see in places like libya widespread crackdown and mass arrests of refugees and migrants who face torture and inhumane living conditions, so it is these desperate conditions, so it is these desperate conditions that are pushing people to take risks and embark on perilous journeys to seek safety elsewhere. there are two very big refugee camps injordan. if you were in that camp,
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and you were trying to get to the uk, how would you begin the asylum process? uk, how would you begin the asylum rocess? ., ., ~:: :: :: :: :: process? there are over 600,000 reaistered process? there are over 600,000 registered syrian _ process? there are over 600,000 registered syrian refugees - process? there are over 600,000 registered syrian refugees in - registered syrian refugees in jordan, but the number could be well above that, and refugees have to go through the un process, which takes years. of course the resettlement rates of refugees from the middle east and north africa have been shamefully low and take years to process, so many find themselves stuck in limbo, in squalid living conditions, and don't see any and to their displacement, so people feel as though they need to take these risks, especially those who face persecution, who face human rights abuses. , ._ , abuses. tuesday, there is the frustration _ abuses. tuesday, there is the frustration that's _ abuses. tuesday, there is the frustration that's spelled - abuses. tuesday, there is the frustration that's spelled out | abuses. tuesday, there is the i frustration that's spelled out for us. where do these people first make
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contact with the human trafficking gangs? is it in the camps, is it in amman? it gangs? is it in the camps, is it in amman? , ., , gangs? is it in the camps, is it in amman? , . , ., , amman? it is human smuggling gangs, traffickin: in amman? it is human smuggling gangs, trafficking in is — amman? it is human smuggling gangs, trafficking in is slightly _ trafficking in is slightly different. the smugglers will be all over the _ different. the smugglers will be all over the camps. the question is, what _ over the camps. the question is, what can— over the camps. the question is, what can each of the migrants pay, and how— what can each of the migrants pay, and how far— what can each of the migrants pay, and how far along the journey can a smuggler— and how far along the journey can a smuggler guarantee them passage? the negotiation could begin with the person— negotiation could begin with the person in— negotiation could begin with the person in the tent next door to you, but it— person in the tent next door to you, but it will_ person in the tent next door to you, but it will continue throughout your journey, _ but it will continue throughout your journey, either leg—bye lake or for —— leg—bye leg or through scenic and portions _ -- leg-bye leg or through scenic and ortions. �* ., . ., , portions. and how much are they -a in: ? portions. and how much are they paying? again. — portions. and how much are they paying? again, depends. - portions. and how much are they paying? again, depends. when l portions. and how much are they i paying? again, depends. when we portions. and how much are they - paying? again, depends. when we were doinu paying? again, depends. when we were doing research — paying? again, depends. when we were doing research focus _ paying? again, depends. when we were doing research focus across _ paying? again, depends. when we were doing research focus across north - doing research focus across north africa _ doing research focus across north africa towards europe, the average cost of _ africa towards europe, the average cost of a _ africa towards europe, the average cost of a journey range between
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$2500 _ cost of a journey range between $2500 to — cost of a journey range between $2500 to $10,000. the cost of a journey range between $2500 to $10,000.— $2500 to $10,000. the thing i noticed when _ $2500 to $10,000. the thing i noticed when i _ $2500 to $10,000. the thing i noticed when i was _ $2500 to $10,000. the thing i noticed when i was reporting . $2500 to $10,000. the thing i j noticed when i was reporting in central europe on this issue many years ago is that people have sold everything, there were syrians who sold everything, they got so far. when you get to that stage, you are not going back, because there's nothing to go back to. you can only go forwards, which is perhaps what present micron was alluding to do that. —— president macron. that present micron was alluding to do that. -- president macron. that is if they get — that. -- president macron. that is if they get to _ that. -- president macron. that is if they get to the _ that. -- president macron. that is if they get to the beaches. - that. -- president macron. that is if they get to the beaches. but - if they get to the beaches. but we have seen, tragically, time and time again and yesterday as well, is that hundreds of people are dying at sea. this year alone, 500 people died trying to cross the mediterranean to reach europe, and these include very desperate migrants, refugees, asylum—seekers who feel they have no other option, no other choice but to take these perilous journeys across the sea. we can avoid these
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tragedies and we must, and so we need governments to step up their safe illegal pathways of people don't have to take these very dangerous journeys and don't have to depend on people smugglers —— so people don't have to stop -- samah hadid, thank you so much. tuesda , -- samah hadid, thank you so much. tuesday. stay — -- samah hadid, thank you so much. tuesday, stay with _ -- samah hadid, thank you so much. tuesday, stay with us, _ -- samah hadid, thank you so much. tuesday, stay with us, because - -- samah hadid, thank you so much. tuesday, stay with us, because we i tuesday, stay with us, because we are going to get views from elsewhere. british officials will be travelling this sunday to france to meet with their french counterparts in order to come with something more constructive than we have had in recent weeks. president emmanuel macron wants more cooperation but says by the time people arrive at france's northern coast, he feels it's too late. translation: when these men and women arrive at the coast, l it's already too late. this morning, our prime minister held a special meeting where they considered all our operational options, including, of course, maximum presence, using drones and mobilising the reservists and asking for the british to increase their efforts. because, remember, in a way, we are guarding
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this borderfor the british. these men and women don't want to claim asylum in france. we have offered that. and if they do, we have centres for them near calais and dunkirk. president mcgraw don't act micron in zagreb earlier today —— president macron speaking earlier today. let's head now to paris, where i'm joined by nathalie loiseau, a french mep who previously served as emmanuel macron's europe minister. thank you for sparing us the time. i want to refer to a letter released in the last hour, and in it, boris johnson urged the french take back all migrants... your reaction to that, nathalie loiseau? i all migrants. .. your reaction to that, nathalie loiseau?- all migrants... your reaction to that, nathalie loiseau? iwill not turn to a blame _ that, nathalie loiseau? iwill not turn to a blame game, _ that, nathalie loiseau? iwill not turn to a blame game, because i that, nathalie loiseau? i will not- turn to a blame game, because we are talking about a tragedy, we are talking about a tragedy, we are talking about a tragedy, we are talking about human lives which were lost yesterday in the channel, so i
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will not engage in the sort of "deal with my problem yourself," which i do not like, but obviously the question is not who is responsible, who is to blame. what is to blame — misery, war, tyrannies which have people risking their lives to try a better life, and these are things that we have to deal with together. is at the british prime minster saying "deal with my problem"? or is it the british prime ministers trying to stop the pull factor? j it the british prime ministers trying to stop the pull factor? i do trying to stop the pull factor? i do not know what _ trying to stop the pull factor? j cf not know what you're talking about. what sort of pull factor do you imagine there is? but what sort of pull factor do you imagine there is?— what sort of pull factor do you imagine there is? but if you remove the incentive _ imagine there is? but if you remove the incentive for _ imagine there is? but if you remove the incentive for people _ imagine there is? but if you remove the incentive for people to - imagine there is? but if you remove the incentive for people to take - the incentive for people to take this very dangerous journey to the uk, don't you dissuade people from trying to make this journey all the way through france to the coast? that would be fine to remove the real incentive, that is misery, war
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or tyrannies, real incentive, that is misery, war ortyrannies, but real incentive, that is misery, war or tyrannies, but do you think that because the united kingdom left the european union, it left the planet earth? their movements of people everywhere. what is taking place is something that has taken place throughout europe, throughout the developing world as well. we are talking about 25,000 people asking for refugee status in the uk, you know how many did the same thing in france during the same period of time? �* ., , ., time? but there are short-term, constructive _ time? but there are short-term, constructive solutions _ time? but there are short-term, constructive solutions and - time? but there are short-term, constructive solutions and there | time? but there are short-term, i constructive solutions and there are the longer—term solutions that you're talking about. he short—term solution is clearly to stop people leaving the beaches and dying in the water, and what the government said today is, we are prepared to help you with that, the president has asked for cooperation and the british government has said, we are prepared to help with that by
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providing patrols for the beaches. are they welcoming that? he. providing patrols for the beaches. are they welcoming that? no, no, and no. it is a problem _ are they welcoming that? no, no, and no. it is a problem of— are they welcoming that? no, no, and no. it is a problem of sovereignty - no. it is a problem of sovereignty and efficiency. you cannot put a patrol every mile or every kilometre. the coast is extremely long and more and more people are taking more risks... what taking more risks... what cooperation, _ taking more risks... what cooperation, then, - taking more risks... what cooperation, then, when| taking more risks... what. cooperation, then, when he taking more risks... what- cooperation, then, when he speaks taking more risks... what cooperation, then, when he speaks of cooperation, then, when he speaks of cooperation, does president macron want? �* , cooperation, does president macron want? 3 , ., , cooperation, does president macron want? �*, , ., _ ., ., want? let's start by the cooperation we're having — want? let's start by the cooperation we're having right _ want? let's start by the cooperation we're having right now, _ want? let's start by the cooperation we're having right now, 20,000 - we're having right now, 20,000 migrants stopped in france because we're doing it for the united kingdom, since the beginning of the year, 1000 boats stopped before the crossing the channel. there is much less people trying to cross through the channel or taking ships to the united kingdom then there were five
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years ago. this is a huge cooperation that we are dealing with. and there is exchange of information between france and the uk on networks of smugglers... damian green, the conservative mp in kent today, said the british side... it is impractical to police the entire coastline, it is way too long, but president macron has talked about putting drones in the air, gathering intelligence and responding to where there are numbers of people heading to the water, that is where i thing the british government is saying, look, we can help we do that and run these joint patrols and help with the intelligence. i joint patrols and help with the intelligence.— joint patrols and help with the intelligence. i would laugh that there is more _ intelligence. i would laugh that there is more intelligence - intelligence. i would laugh that i there is more intelligence sharing from the british side, because what i am aware of is that there are exchanges of information, the french site is giving everything it has, about networks of smugglers, but
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there is uncertainty if there are networks of smugglers, part of them in the united kingdom, and that would be even more efficient if the uk was providing information from what they know, what is taking place in the united kingdom, because of people cross the channel, it is because he know that they are going to be hosted and welcomed in the uk as well. we have to track down the smugglers networks. we have to address the problems in origin countries. we have to do it together. i rather happy to... there is a need to work in cooperation with the european union, with the sort of challenges which no no border, migration is one of them. there should be definitely an agreement on migration between the uk and de you. there was not in the trade agreement. it is not a reason to not make progress right now.—
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make progress right now. nathalie loiseau, always _ make progress right now. nathalie loiseau, always grateful _ make progress right now. nathalie loiseau, always grateful for - make progress right now. nathalie loiseau, always grateful for your l loiseau, always grateful for your time. tuesday reitano, let me come back to you with some of that? nathalie loiseau did not like the idea you would return all the migrants to the french side, nor indeed thejoint migrants to the french side, nor indeed the joint patrols, but what kind of cooperation could the british government offer? i kind of cooperation could the british government offer? i actually thick there is _ british government offer? i actually thick there is some _ british government offer? i actually thick there is some merit _ british government offer? i actually thick there is some merit to - british government offer? i actually thick there is some merit to the - thick there is some merit to the argument that returning migrants can be a powerful disincentive. it is the same strategy the eu used with turkey. a system was set up by which only those migrants who had applied for legal asylum in turkey would be granted refugee status in the european union. and who crossed illegally reset back. if you want to talk about a solution of that kind, it does have that advantage. people rescued, taking to safe harbour, but
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if they came illegally they were returned, but it has to be partnered with a legal option to continue to move, this is essentially the underpinning of this network, so as long as there is no legal option, they will always be illegal alternatives offered by criminal groups. if you can put in a system by which there are legal alternatives and the deterrence to illegal activities, you will see it... illegal activities, you will see it. . . ., illegal activities, you will see it... ., ., ., illegal activities, you will see it... ok, we are going to talk about both of those _ it... ok, we are going to talk about both of those issues, _ it... ok, we are going to talk about both of those issues, we are - it... ok, we are going to talk about both of those issues, we are going| both of those issues, we are going to focus on the legal option and i want to talk about the deterrent, though. the government is reforming the asylum system to penalise those who choose illegal routes. they have already introduced rules of inadmissibility for people deemed to have come from a safe country like france. despite that, figures out today show asylum applications at their highest level for six years, at 37,000. they also show the home office has notified 6,500 people that they will face deportation because of these inadmissability
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rules, though only a third of the cases have yet been resolved, and of 48 people ruled inadmissible — just ten have been removed thus far. tuesdayis tuesday is still with us. and alsojoining us, peter walsh from the migration observatory at oxford university. peter, it is good to have you with us. i want to talk but the legal routes first of all, because as we are hearing, it is very difficult if you're in a camp in the middle east to find a route to the uk because, i am right in saying, mi, that you can on the ashley pifer asylum once you get here? == on the ashley pifer asylum once you aet here? ., ,, , on the ashley pifer asylum once you aet here? . ,, , ., on the ashley pifer asylum once you aet here? . ,_ ., ., _ get here? -- apply for asylum? that is riuht. get here? -- apply for asylum? that is right- you — get here? -- apply for asylum? that is right. you have _ get here? -- apply for asylum? that is right. you have to _ get here? -- apply for asylum? that is right. you have to physically - get here? -- apply for asylum? that is right. you have to physically be i is right. you have to physically be on uk _ is right. you have to physically be on uk territory to apply for asylum in the _ on uk territory to apply for asylum in the uk — on uk territory to apply for asylum in the uk and it is not possible to apply— in the uk and it is not possible to apply for— in the uk and it is not possible to apply for asylum abroad, say, in a british— apply for asylum abroad, say, in a british embassy or consulate, and there's— british embassy or consulate, and there's also no visa to come to the uk with— there's also no visa to come to the uk with a — there's also no visa to come to the uk with a specific purpose of claiming _ uk with a specific purpose of claiming asylum, so if you want to
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claim_ claiming asylum, so if you want to claim asylum in the uk, you're compelled to take these irregular and dangerous routes. there is another— and dangerous routes. there is another legal route, the government talk a _ another legal route, the government taik a lot— another legal route, the government talk a lot about, that is refugee resettlement, but there is no way to apply— resettlement, but there is no way to apply for— resettlement, but there is no way to apply for refugee resettlement. one is simply— apply for refugee resettlement. one is simply in a refugee camp and is selected, — is simply in a refugee camp and is selected, a — is simply in a refugee camp and is selected, a fraction of 1%, or selected _ selected, a fraction of 1%, or selected or identified and transferred to participate in countries, so that is a lottery and there _ countries, so that is a lottery and there is— countries, so that is a lottery and there is no— countries, so that is a lottery and there is no way to join. countries, so that is a lottery and there is no way tojoin. how countries, so that is a lottery and there is no way to join.— countries, so that is a lottery and there is no way to join. there is no way to “oin. how do we com are there is no way to “oin. how do we compare with — there is no way to join. how do we compare with france _ there is no way to join. how do we compare with france and - compare with france and other european countries when it comes to granting and processing asylum? those other countries perceive usually — those other countries perceive usually many tens of thousands more applications than the uk. we have seen _ applications than the uk. we have seen the _ applications than the uk. we have seen the uk's experiencing allegedly hi-h seen the uk's experiencing allegedly high levels of asylum applications, 30,000 _ high levels of asylum applications, 30,000 in — high levels of asylum applications, 30,000 in total this year, but i compared — 30,000 in total this year, but i compared with 80,000 for germany and
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70,000 _ compared with 80,000 for germany and 70,000 france, spain and italy also receiving _ 70,000 france, spain and italy also receiving tens of thousands more, in terms _ receiving tens of thousands more, in terms of— receiving tens of thousands more, in terms of the — receiving tens of thousands more, in terms of the success rate of applications and all these countries, actually, there's not very— countries, actually, there's not very much— countries, actually, there's not very much between them, only a little _ very much between them, only a little variation in recent years, around — little variation in recent years, around 15 _ little variation in recent years, around 15 and 60% of that applications —— 50 and six he percent — applications —— 50 and six he percent full but amongst channel migrants, — percent full but amongst channel migrants, given what we know that where _ migrants, given what we know that where they — migrants, given what we know that where they come from, the percentages are likely to be considerable higher.- percentages are likely to be considerable higher. ivory want to rattle through _ considerable higher. ivory want to rattle through some _ considerable higher. ivory want to rattle through some questions - rattle through some questions quickly. is there betty —— i really want to. is there a better legal route we can construct that would give them an option?— route we can construct that would give them an option? potentially for stubb bi give them an option? potentially for stubby big one _ give them an option? potentially for stubby big one is — give them an option? potentially for stubby big one is allow— give them an option? potentially for stubby big one is allow people - give them an option? potentially for stubby big one is allow people to . stubby big one is allow people to claim _ stubby big one is allow people to claim asylum abroad, at british embassies for some the only issue there _ embassies for some the only issue there is— embassies for some the only issue there is the — embassies for some the only issue there is the british government have said they— there is the british government have said they do not support that, nor do any— said they do not support that, nor do any other governments around the world, _ do any other governments around the world, and _ do any other governments around the world, and that is for a variety of reasons — world, and that is for a variety of reasons. they believe it would lead to more _ reasons. they believe it would lead to more asylum applications and that is a quite _
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to more asylum applications and that is a quite credible concerned. and arain, is a quite credible concerned. and again. turning _ is a quite credible concerned. fific again, turning back to the deterrent issue, why does france deport four times more in the uk? why in the uk is its low? ., times more in the uk? why in the uk is its low? . , ., ., is its low? that is to do with the diplomacy- _ is its low? that is to do with the diplomacy- it — is its low? that is to do with the diplomacy. it is _ is its low? that is to do with the diplomacy. it is also _ is its low? that is to do with the diplomacy. it is also to - is its low? that is to do with the diplomacy. it is also to do - is its low? that is to do with the diplomacy. it is also to do with i diplomacy. it is also to do with arrangements with european union. they used _ arrangements with european union. they used to be a part of a system that allowed us to transfer asylum—seekers to the first country they arrived and in the eu, but since _ they arrived and in the eu, but since brexit, no longer a part of that, _ since brexit, no longer a part of that, so— since brexit, no longer a part of that, so to _ since brexit, no longer a part of that, so to transfer to other countries, _ that, so to transfer to other countries, we need bilateral agreements with those countries or with agreements with the eu as a whole _ with agreements with the eu as a whole no— with agreements with the eu as a whole. no progress in hammering out a grievance _ whole. no progress in hammering out a grievance of that kind. andy french point _ a grievance of that kind. andy french point of— a grievance of that kind. andy french point of view - a grievance of that kind. andy french point of view it - a grievance of that kind. andy french point of view it is - a grievance of that kind. andyi french point of view it is easier a grievance of that kind. if french point of view it is easier to get work illegally here in the uk, is there anything in the nationality and borders bill which is slowly, very slowly, making its way through the house of commons that is going to address that issue?— to address that issue? know, and is not clear there _ to address that issue? know, and is not clear there is _ to address that issue? know, and is not clear there is an _ to address that issue? know, and is not clear there is an issue, - to address that issue? know, and is not clear there is an issue, to be . not clear there is an issue, to be addressed — not clear there is an issue, to be addressed i_ not clear there is an issue, to be
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addressed. i have not seen any evidence — addressed. i have not seen any evidence to support that claim. if you're _ evidence to support that claim. if you're in— evidence to support that claim. if you're in the uk and want to work, then— you're in the uk and want to work, then the _ you're in the uk and want to work, then the employer is compelled by then the employer is compelled by the law— then the employer is compelled by the law to — then the employer is compelled by the law to check the immigration status— the law to check the immigration status of— the law to check the immigration status of all workers. perhaps you want _ status of all workers. perhaps you want to _ status of all workers. perhaps you want to work in the black economy, actually— want to work in the black economy, actually france's legal employment law system very bureaucratic and that is _ law system very bureaucratic and that is why, actually, the black economy— that is why, actually, the black economy contributes more to their gdp then— economy contributes more to their gdp then does the uk, so i'm just not aware — gdp then does the uk, so i'm just not aware of the evidential basis for that— not aware of the evidential basis for that claim of the uk's lacks employment law is a critical factor support— employment law is a critical factor support peter, for very useful. —— that is very useful. tuesday, turning back to you, when we were talking of smashing these human smuggling gangs, the mafia boss, the people running these rackets, here in london — is that true? i people running these rackets, here in london - is that true?— in london - is that true? i don't think we know _ in london - is that true? i don't think we know that _ in london - is that true? i don't think we know that for -
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in london - is that true? i don't think we know that for certain, | in london - is that true? i don't i think we know that for certain, but we can say confidently and others have said in the programme today, there's no way... the level of crossing of the channel cannot be going had without a group of smugglers in the uk. the connections would have to be there or else it would have to be there or else it would not work at the scale that it doesn't. �* , , ., , doesn't. and when these people arrived in dover _ doesn't. and when these people arrived in dover or _ doesn't. and when these people arrived in dover or on _ doesn't. and when these people arrived in dover or on the - doesn't. and when these people | arrived in dover or on the british side of the channel, presumably, they are interviewed. is that intelligence fed back into the european domain? talking about the difficulties posed... has there been human occasion and intelligence? == human occasion and intelligence? » communication. i don't believe so. it was a core part of the brexit agreement to share intelligence. europe has a very strong migrant smuggling centre, and as far as i'm aware, that's being shared at the
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same rate. some breaking news in the last half an hour — the uk is imposing a travel ban on south africa and five other nations on the continent, amid concerns over a new variant of the covid—19 virus. the british health secretary, sajid javid, has said that the existing vaccines might be less effective against this newly identified variant of the coronavirus. health officials are calling it the worst they'd seen so far. it has twice as many mutations as the delta variant and is harder for the immune system to detect. we are going to get much more on that in the next half hour. just to say, thanks to tuesday reitano and peter walsh for all your expertise on that issue. we covered a lot of ground in that half—hour. grateful for your time. ground in that half—hour. grateful foryourtime. stay ground in that half—hour. grateful for your time. stay with us. hello again. i would really describe today as the calm before the storm because the first named storm of the season is heading to the uk at the moment. and that's going to sweep stronger winds down across the uk later friday, into saturday. some snow mainly over northern hills
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but disruption is expected. now the storm is yet to really develop, but already ahead of it, we're pushing down this cloud. some of it is quite thin, high cloud. for southern areas, it's still cold — temperatures close to freezing perhaps. but the thicker cloud, strengthening winds and rain will sweep its way southwards overnight, followed by some clear spells and some showers. but even by the end of the night, we've got temperatures close to freezing across some parts of the south—east of england. we've got cloud and rain to move down across england and wales early on friday morning, then sunshine follows — showers will continue, mind you. those could turn wintry in northern ireland. going to find a spell of snow arriving over the higher ground in northern scotland, blizzards as well because the winds are really starting to pick up by this stage. temperatures may be a degree higher than today, but there will be a stronger wind. and this is where we are expecting the strongest winds to be. this is where we've got the amber wind warning from the met office, winds could be gusting 75 miles an hour near coastal areas. now, on the face of it, storm arwen doesn't look that impressive.
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we've got some rain and snow wrapped around it but it's round the back edge of that storm that we've got the really strong winds picking up. those will sweep their way southwards overnight and into saturday across much of the uk. so it's a windy picture for saturday. notjust across the north—east, but some very strong winds running through the irish sea onto some western coasts as well for awhile. and further east across england, we've got cloud, we've got some mainly rain but a bit of sleet and snow possible over the hills, and it will stay a bit damp and wet here through the afternoon. elsewhere, it brightens up as the showers become fewer, but it is going to be a cold day — temperature struggling up to four or 5 degrees. but when you add on the strength of the wind, this is where it feels quite a lot colder. second half of the weekend, things start to calm down. storm arwen weakens and moves away into continental europe, a weak weather front approaches northern ireland, threatening some cloud and a little rain. it's still going to be windy first thing across eastern parts of england, we may well keep a few more wintry showers going here.
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some wintry showers also in scotland, but otherwise dry with some sunshine. still cold but not as windy.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the uk puts in place a temporary ban on flights from south africa and five more countries, after officials there identified a concerning new coronavirus variant the uk and france call for greater cooperation
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to stop human traffickers, after 27 people died in the english channel. we'll bring you the story of the american man who's been detained in a chinese prison, accused of spying. his family say the charges are politically motivated. plus, the remarkable discovery of a roman mosaic on farm land, in the east midlands. hear in the uk. a worrying new variant of the covid—19 virus first identified in botswana has prompted the uk to impose a temporary travel ban on south africa and five other nations on the continent. the variant was first identified earlier this month on the 11th november, and in south africa the following day. the variation has more than 50 mutations and 30 of them are on the virus's spike protein.
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scientists are describing it as "the worst one we've seen so far". here's the uk health secretary, sajid javid speaking a little earlier. we have made great progress with our national vaccination programme, against covid—19, but we have always been clear that we won't hesitate to act should new threats are rudge —— emerge. earliertoday, the act should new threats are rudge —— emerge. earlier today, the south african government held a press conference and they talked about a new variance that they have found called b11529. i have been updated on this variant by the uk health security agency and they have now designated it as a variant under investigation. the early indications we have of this variant is that it may be more transmissible than the delta variance, and the vaccines that we currently have may be less effective against it. now, to be clear, we have not detected any of this new variant in the uk at this
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point in time, but we have always been clear that we will take action to protect the progress that we have made. so what we will be doing is, from midday tomorrow, we will be suspending all flights from six african countries and we will add in those countries to the travel red list. those countries are south africa, namibia, listo to, s martini and zimbabwe and botswana. desha soto. we'll be requiring anyone that arrives from those countries, from thorium on sunday to quarantine in hotels. —— lesotho. if anyone arrives before then, they should then self—isolate at home and take a pcr test on day two and they ate. if anyone has arrived from any of those countries over the last ten days, we would ask them to take pcr tests.
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now, we know, we can tell from this, it is a reminder to us all that this pandemic is not over, but this government will not hesitate to protect the progress that we have made. ,, ., protect the progress that we have made. ., i. ,. . made. some of your scientific advisers think _ made. some of your scientific advisers think this _ made. some of your scientific advisers think this is - made. some of your scientific advisers think this is the - made. some of your scientific| advisers think this is the worst strain they have seen so far. it is a concern you share? bur strain they have seen so far. it is a concern you share? our scientists are deeply — a concern you share? our scientists are deeply concerned _ a concern you share? our scientists are deeply concerned about - a concern you share? our scientists are deeply concerned about this. i a concern you share? our scientistsl are deeply concerned about this. i'm concerned, of course, and that is one of the reasons we have taken this action today. i will say we do not know enough about this variant, not know enough about this variant, no one does, i think probably the uk knows more than at most because of the excellent work we do on surveillance, but i think it is right that we take this approach and we remain cautious. that right that we take this approach and we remain cautious.— we remain cautious. that was the british health — we remain cautious. that was the british health secretary _ we remain cautious. that was the british health secretary speaking| british health secretary speaking just a short time ago. dr luke evans is a conservative mp who's also a gp and he's in his bosworth constituency. and we did bookie to speak about something entirely different, which we will come to, promise! —— we did
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bulky. but speaking on the breaking news from the health secretary, i want to get your view, clearly as a gp, you might be able to explain is a bit of it to us. this is a new variant, so we have no idea at this stage how it is going to behave in practice, but clearly, the scientists in south africa think it is spreading quickly. the government are left with little option but to take the action it has taken this evening. t take the action it has taken this evenina. ~' ,, �* take the action it has taken this evenina. ~ ,, �* , evening. i think you're right, it is riaht to evening. i think you're right, it is right to be _ evening. i think you're right, it is right to be taking _ evening. i think you're right, it is right to be taking precautions i evening. i think you're right, it is i right to be taking precautions when it comes to dealing with viruses. whenever any virus, the common cold virus, for example, can mutate, there is what viruses do. there is what is so important that people do get the jabs to protect them. we have seen it previously with how jabs, taking the vaccine has made a real difference, to reducing the chance of you ending up in hospital in the west is dying, so it is really important we take heed about this, and the best thing about the uk is that we are the world leader is identifying these variants, and every time someone has a pcr test, they are able to be able to set off to the lab and checked so we can
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keep a tab on it. it is fantastic news we keep these things up early. but the proof is in the planning of what this looks like and how worrying it is. j what this looks like and how worrying it is— what this looks like and how worrying it is. what this looks like and how wor in itis. ., , worrying it is. i don't want to push ou ast worrying it is. i don't want to push you past your _ worrying it is. i don't want to push you past your expertise _ worrying it is. i don't want to push you past your expertise as - worrying it is. i don't want to push you past your expertise as a i worrying it is. i don't want to push l you past your expertise as a general practitioner, i know you are not a virologist, but when it mutates and these mutations are on the spike protein of a virus, what does that actually mean in layman terms? viruses can change in very different ways, so to answer that question you would have to speak to i virologist. in practice, when it means that all the same roles apply, washing your hands, keeping distance, being cautious, and the key thing is to get the test if you have symptoms, especially coming from those countries that have been on that list. there is really, really important. lots of people are getting mild symptoms at the moment because they have had the jab, but if you're getting that losing a sense of smell, getting a temperature, feeling a bit unwell, it is really, really important to get a test and there is still plenty of space in any testing centre on the cover website to get yourself
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booked up. let the cover website to get yourself booked up— the cover website to get yourself booked up. let me turn to what i know you're _ booked up. let me turn to what i know you're coming _ booked up. let me turn to what i know you're coming on _ booked up. let me turn to what i know you're coming on to - booked up. let me turn to what i know you're coming on to talk. know you're coming on to talk about. we want to talk about body image and of course at the moment, there is an online harm is a bill that is going through the house of commons, lots of debate about it. you think that this is a real opportunity to press social media organisations to start labelling photographs more accurately. so that we know when photographs have been altered, so that our children don't get the wrong impression of what they're at. can you explain what you think can be done and is it being done anywhere else in the world? absolutely. my campaign is to hashtag recognised body image, basically to say that they should be a legal standing of body image, to be looked at as a risk, so you are right to point at the online harm still, a world leading bill put forward by the uk, it is quite tough because it is trying to put in a framework across the internet to be able to look at things that may cause potential harm. body image i
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believe, is one of those things, and lots of people spend lots of time on social media, looking at images, and if they are doctored or changed with filters or changed the size or proportion of so your biceps or your waist, the worry is repeated, seeing these repeated images create a warped sense of reality. there are two parts my campaign, one is to make sure it is recognised in law, the other is to actually have an aspect where there is labelling put in. you could do... i don't want to be stopping people getting rid of a blemish from their wedding photo, but if you are actually making your biceps bigger, your waist and smaller, it should carry a little logo in the bottom corner because i was, what we have seen is that there are 1.25 million people in the uk suffering with anorexia and bellini, and actually, 1 million people using steroids for performing —— improving a sports performance, and to bulk up, this is where i'm coming from, and i've seen in my clinic as a gp, this is why i worried. about!
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and i've seen in my clinic as a gp, this is why i worried.— this is why i worried. and so when ou look this is why i worried. and so when you look at _ this is why i worried. and so when you look at the — this is why i worried. and so when you look at the survey _ this is why i worried. and so when you look at the survey that - this is why i worried. and so when you look at the survey that has i this is why i worried. and so when i you look at the survey that has been conducted by this group of uk mps that are concerned about this, of which you are one, like you say, there are 60% of adults who say they feel negatively or very negative about their body most of the time, and among them, children, and that proportion increases to two thirds when you ask children specifically. no one disagrees that this is an image issue, but there is a debate over whether this is one for the governance to be involved in a how it should weigh in? are you meeting resistance in the house of commons over what you have put forward? in over what you have put forward? u“! the online harm spill, we've got to remember that this is that framework to try and work out how we could —— where they could be risk, so ofcom will be the ones overseeing us. i'm asking them to have a priority of looking at body image because you are absolutely right, one single body image is not going to push someone into an eating disorder. repeatedly being bombarded with these kinds of images is what i'm most concerned about. people spend lots of time online. when it comes
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to meeting resistance in the house of commons, no, lots of people see the problem is that it, the debate is how is best to enforce it. when it comes to labelling, i would argue it comes to labelling, i would argue it is bit like if you went to rent a room in a house, you could paint the walls, you could put in new carpets, you can play nice lighting, but what you fundamentally could not do is on the advertising pictures is make the kitchen bigger or the ceiling taller, because what we are doing is creating a false advertising aspect to this, a warped sense of reality, and that is the key harm but i'm concerned about. bud and that is the key harm but i'm concerned about.— and that is the key harm but i'm concerned about. and lots of parents like m self concerned about. and lots of parents like myself who _ concerned about. and lots of parents like myself who have _ concerned about. and lots of parents like myself who have daughters i concerned about. and lots of parents like myself who have daughters are i like myself who have daughters are concerned about this, and i'm sure they understand what you're talking about. we do lots of things in this programme about facebook and of course the facebook leaks we have covered extensively but we do not see from facebook is an instinct to go first and what we have said before is that national governments are going to have to pass their own laws. we cannot wait, can we, for
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silicon valley to take action on our behalf? j silicon valley to take action on our behalf? ~ , silicon valley to take action on our behalf? ~' , ., silicon valley to take action on our behalf? ~' , . ., ~ silicon valley to take action on our behalf? ~ , . ., ,, , behalf? i think they are waking up to the fact that _ behalf? i think they are waking up to the fact that there _ behalf? i think they are waking up to the fact that there is _ behalf? i think they are waking up to the fact that there is a - behalf? i think they are waking up| to the fact that there is a problem, i have met with all the big social media plays and they talk about their educational platform and tools that they can use, and this is not one silver bullet. it comes from parental responsibility, making sure that we scale up people who are social media, but of course when people are under this platform can they do have a duty of care to the people that are using that platform, and if they are not following that, we need to have the rules and the team to be able to enforce them. the countries —— there are countries looking at this, israel and france have some laws around body images in the media and most recently norway are looking at a very similar bill proposal that i am proposing, around body images, so something will break down. we know something is definitely no this is a problem, and the best way to deal with is the problem. the online harm spell is how to deal with it. ms e; problem. the online harm spell is how to deal with it.— how to deal with it. is a really important. — how to deal with it. is a really important, interesting - how to deal with it. is a really important, interesting topic. | how to deal with it. is a really i important, interesting topic. thank you very much for lending us a
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expertise on the coronavirus, luke evans, much appreciated. three days after being sentenced to prison for 11 years in a myanmar military court, the us journalist danny fenster was released, but only thanks to the intervention of the former american ambassador to the country bill richardson, who negotiated with the country's junta to release fenster on "humanitarian grounds". for the families of other american hostages whose loved ones are being held or wrongfully detained in other parts of the world, it was bittersweet — a reminder that when the us government wants to, it has incredible leverage to negotiate the release of its citizens abroad. according to the james foley foundation, there are currently 64 us citizens or permanent residents who are being held hostage in 16 countries. and for many of these families, the biden administration isn't doing enough. last month, 23 family members wrote to the white house urging the president to do more to bring their loved ones home. earlier, i spoke to one of the signatories of that letter — harrison li, whose father kai li
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is being wrongfully detained in china. harrison, tell me about your father, what was he doing in china and how long has he been detained?- what was he doing in china and how long has he been detained? soaked my father is a us — long has he been detained? soaked my father is a us citizen, _ long has he been detained? soaked my father is a us citizen, he _ long has he been detained? soaked my father is a us citizen, he spent - long has he been detained? soaked my father is a us citizen, he spent 25 i father is a us citizen, he spent 25 years running his own single person business which functioned as a sales and marketing representative for a subsidiary of boeing here in the united states. he had spent 25 years facilitating transactions between the subsidiary and various clients in china. in 2016, my father was suddenly taken away by state security agents and he has been arrested since then, so he spent more than five years behind bars and this will be his sixth thanksgiving. do you know where he is? yes. this will be his sixth thanksgiving. do you know where he is? yes, he is currently being _
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do you know where he is? yes, he is currently being held _ do you know where he is? yes, he is currently being held in _ do you know where he is? yes, he is currently being held in a _ do you know where he is? yes, he is currently being held in a prison in i currently being held in a prison in china. ~ ., ., currently being held in a prison in china. ., ., ., china. what sort of contact have you had with him? _ china. what sort of contact have you had with him? for _ china. what sort of contact have you had with him? for the _ china. what sort of contact have you had with him? for the first - china. what sort of contact have you had with him? for the first three i had with him? for the first three ears of had with him? for the first three years of his _ had with him? for the first three years of his arrest, _ had with him? for the first three years of his arrest, before i had with him? for the first three years of his arrest, before he i had with him? for the first three | years of his arrest, before he was transferred to the actual prison, he was only allowed to write letters to the outside world. these were completely adequate because all of the letters were routinely screened and delayed by the chinese authorities. in many cases there were delayed several months at a time. they would often reject letters talking about the case, many letters talking about the case, many letters got lost, never to be found, both incoming and outgoing letters, and he has been there for more than five years now. which is longer than anybody under the exit plans, and he has had his freedom completely restricted. he spends all of his time in a crowded cell with 11 other prisoners at the prison, there is no
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climate control even though shanghai is an extremely hot and humid climate in the summer, and it is really a travesty. i know that they are trying their best, but they need to find more creative ways to get my father home. find to find more creative ways to get my father home-— to find more creative ways to get my father home. and there has been lots of interaction — father home. and there has been lots of interaction with _ father home. and there has been lots of interaction with the _ father home. and there has been lots of interaction with the chinese - father home. and there has been lots of interaction with the chinese side i of interaction with the chinese side in the last two weeks. another member was with his opposite member, and then there was also the meeting with the president of china and pregnant biden as well. you know with your father's case was race? —— pregnant biden. j’m with your father's case was race? -- pregnant l“den-— pregnant biden. i'm aware that president biden. .. _ pregnant biden. i'm aware that president biden. .. that - pregnant biden. i'm aware that president biden. .. that there i pregnant biden. i'm aware that i president biden. .. that there were president biden... that there were some cases that they were concerned about, but i don't think he raised my father's case by name, and that of course is quite upsetting. i don't think president biden has mentioned my father's name ever. during his administration. and i
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would urge him to rectify that and to make sure the next time... ittrui’hat to make sure the next time... what specifically — to make sure the next time... what specifically would _ to make sure the next time... what specifically would you _ to make sure the next time... what specifically would you want - to make sure the next time... what specifically would you want the administration to do? j’m specifically would you want the administration to do?— specifically would you want the administration to do? i'm not a oli administration to do? i'm not a policy experts. _ administration to do? i'm not a policy experts, are _ administration to do? i'm not a policy experts, are not - administration to do? i'm not a policy experts, are not going i administration to do? i'm not a j policy experts, are not going to speak to the best way to get my father out, but whenever it is, the administration a way to put a high cost on china for retaining my father because it is an arbitrary detention, notjust me saying that, the united nations working group has ruled in a landmark decision that my father's detention is in fact in contravention of numerous human rights agreements, and the administration needs to make that clear to the chinese government that they will not stand to have one of its citizens spending more time behind bars for arbitrary reasons and they need to impose stricter costs on china. what those costs might be, i don't know. i don't know
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what the best method is, it is very difficult and a delicate situation but obviously, they need to do more. harrison campaigning for his father. the sick frank thanksgiving that he has been without him. —— six thanksgiving. let's look at some of the day's other news. a general from the united arab emirates, accused of complicity in torture, has been elected as president of the global police agency interpol. ahmed nasser al—raisi, inspector general of the uae�*s interior ministry, will serve a four—year term in the unpaid role. human rights groups had lobbied against his candidacy, accusing him of failing to investigate complaints of torture against uae security forces. mr raisi rejects the allegations. reports from russia say 52 people are now known to have died in a siberian coal mine where a fire broke out, trapping dozens underground. some of the victims were rescuers.
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stay with us on bbc news, still to come: after decades of excavation — egypt reopens the 3000 —year—old avenue of the sphinxes. devon and cornwall police have given an update on their investigation into the disappearance of 18—year—old bobbi—anne mcleod. the teenager was reported missing on saturday, after she left home, to catch a bus into plymouth town centre, to meet friends, but never arrived. police found a woman's body on tuesday, in nearby bovisand, but formal identification is yet to take place. hundreds of people attended a candle—lit vigil earlier this evening close to the bus stop where mcleod was last seen. a 24—year—old man remains in custody. police say he was not known to her. a significant number of enquiries and searches have been carried out in relation to the ongoing murder investigation in plymouth. earlier today, a 26—year—old man, who was arrested on suspicion
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of murder, was released from police custody, having been eliminated from the enquiry. a 24—year—old man remains in police custody at this time, on suspicion of murder, under a warrant of further detention. this warrant was granted by plymouth magistrates court and allows officers to detain the man for an additional 21t hours. i can confirm that, at this time, there is no known link between the suspect and bobbi—anne, and i would like to reassure the public that at this time we are not seeking anyone else in relation to this matter. the family of bobbi—anne continue to be supported by specialist officers. this remains a live and active case, and, as such, we would remind everyone the importance of not speculating in relation this matter. everyone the importance of not speculating in relation to this matter. it is crucial that we uphold the integrity of this investigation at all times. once again, i give my utmost thanks to the communities
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and the public in plymouth. we have their continued support in our enquiries. specialist resources are supporting officers on the ground as we carry out enquiries at a number of locations. in a farmer's field in rutland, in the east midlands, they have just made one of the most exciting archaeological discoveries in, maybe 100 years. in this country, that is. it is a mosaic, a roman mosaic, which they think dates to the third or the fourth century. and is in extraordinary condition. it depicts the epic battle between achilles and the trojan hero, hector, in homer's �*the iliad.�* it's the first of its kind to be found here in the uk. and the undisclosed location has just been granted special protection, to preserve the site.
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it was discovered by the landowner�*s son and investigated by archaeologists. john thomas is the deputy director of the university of leicester's archaeological services and joins me now. what an exciting find, what do we think it is? the what an exciting find, what do we think it is? ,_, , , think it is? the discovery itself than a mosaic— think it is? the discovery itself than a mosaic we _ think it is? the discovery itself than a mosaic we found - think it is? the discovery itself than a mosaic we found a i think it is? the discovery itself- than a mosaic we found a complete villa complex within the fields where the original discovery was made and we know this because we have carried out extensive geopolitical surveys, picks out a whole range of buildings within a large ditched enclosure, and it is one of these buildings which we think is the main domestic property in the villa, where this wonderful mosaic has been found. 50 in the villa, where this wonderful mosaic has been found.— in the villa, where this wonderful mosaic has been found. so this is the only piece _ mosaic has been found. so this is the only piece you _ mosaic has been found. so this is the only piece you have _ mosaic has been found. so this is the only piece you have fully i the only piece you have fully excavated and are you proposing to go back and dig it all out? he. go back and dig it all out? no, because of— go back and dig it all out? no, because of the _ go back and dig it all out? tip, because of the protection that is no ground to the site beca visits ——
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because of its national significance, they won't be an awful lot of chance to do much more work, but we are intending to go back one more time next year with the... in conjunction with a team from historic england, and we are hoping to do more work on different buildings in the complex. 50 to do more work on different buildings in the complex. so who would own _ buildings in the complex. so who would own a _ buildings in the complex. so who would own a mosaic _ buildings in the complex. so who would own a mosaic like - buildings in the complex. so who would own a mosaic like this? it| would own a mosaic like this? it been someone rich? absolutely, this is uuite been someone rich? absolutely, this is quite possibly _ been someone rich? absolutely, this is quite possibly one _ been someone rich? absolutely, this is quite possibly one of _ been someone rich? absolutely, this is quite possibly one of the _ been someone rich? absolutely, this is quite possibly one of the most i is quite possibly one of the most impressive... and was associated kind of finds that we have seen in this part of the world. it is kind of finds that we have seen in this part of the world.— this part of the world. it is in immaculate condition. it i this part of the world. it is in i immaculate condition. it really this part of the world. it is in - immaculate condition. it really good condition. , ., , ., condition. yes, really good. you have to think— condition. yes, really good. you have to think that _ condition. yes, really good. you have to think that this _ condition. yes, really good. you have to think that this is - condition. yes, really good. you i have to think that this is someone who is pretty wealthy, influential in the area, the subject matter of the mosaic indicates that this person was classically educated, had a very good understanding of what even then it would have been ancient
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literature to them and they wanted to show that off to their friends and guests that came to the villa. j and guests that came to the villa. i would have been very impressed as a guest! what do we know about the romans in your neck of the woods? it romans in your neck of the woods? ut is an interesting question because we know a lot about roman life in leicester, which is that, obviously, the main city in the county, that has a fantastic early roman history and is seen as one of the finest examples of early roman settlement —— settlement in the east midlands, but in the countryside we have not had much of a look previously in terms of finding much to do with rural settlement in leicestershire and rutland. there is about 60, 62, 63 now known at mosaics in the county, in both counties, but only about one third of those have seen any kind of excavation work and so
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this is a really good example of a modern excavation with up—to—date techniques being used to record the archaeology that we have. previously, the interventions that have taken place on the mosaic that we know about have been largely antiquarian excavations and they have only focused on things like the mosaics. they knew where to look at what they would find, so they have gone straight for those. but with... better understanding we have now of archaeology and the range of techniques that we have, we can really throw everything at this site, and it is all there to explore. and to learn much more about. ~ ., ., explore. and to learn much more about. ., ., ., about. well done to you john, and our about. well done to you john, and your team- _ about. well done to you john, and your team. best _ about. well done to you john, and your team. best of _ about. well done to you john, and your team. best of luck _ about. well done to you john, and your team. best of luck with i about. well done to you john, and your team. best of luck with the l your team. best of luck with the research you are carrying out. thank you for coming on the programme. thank you, pleasure to talk to you. but if you think that's cool, how about this? egypt — my former patch — has just opened to the public a 3,000—year—old
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avenue of sphinxes in luxor. it's been 70 years of stop—start excavation, to prepare this three—kilometre long ancient walkway, which connects the two great temples of karnak and luxor. the opening ceremony incorporated elements of the ancient festival — as you can see — which travelled on that route each year. and the music they played, i'm told, was inspired by the detailed stories written on the walls of the temples in hieroglyphics. the egyptian are hoping the event will breath new life into its their long suffering tourist sector. which has taken another hit during the pandemic. and that would certainly entice me to go back. thanks for watching, will see you next week. hello. thursday was a quiet cold day, but the first named storm of the season is heading to the uk right now. this is heading to the uk right now. this is storm arwen and it will sweet gale sound from the north late on friday into saturday, some snow
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mainly over northern hills as well. some disruption is expected. this is how we start friday though with the overnight rain and clearing away, leaving us with sunshine and showers, they could be heavy, tiny wintry northern ireland, some snow in northern parts of scotland over the mountains, pleasant as well because winds are really picking up later on in the day. —— blizzards as well. the winds are going to be stronger. this is where we have the amber went warning from the met office, and eastern scotland and north—east england, with gusts of 75 miles maximum. it doesn't look like a lot, storm arwen, but on the back edge of the storm is when we have the strongest of the winds, those will their way southwards overnight, into saturday across many parts of the uk. it is notjust very windy in the uk. it is notjust very windy in the north—east of the uk, but around these western coasts and through the irish sea, it is also going to be very windy for a while during saturday. there is still some rain, may be a bit of sleet and snow over
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the hills, that will linger across eastern parts england, many other areas becoming brighter as the showers become fewer, but still going to be a windy day, these are the temperatures, struggling up to four or 5 degrees in some cases, and when you add on the strength of the wind, it is going to feel significantly colder. as you move into the second half of the weekend, storm arwen is moving away, so the weather starts to come down, the winds are easing, the week with a front threatens some cloud and patchy rain into northern ireland, a windy start to the day across eastern england, some wintry showers continuing near coastal areas, and also pushing into scotland but away from here, lots of dry weather and some sunshine, still a cold day on sunday, but it is not as windy. we look into the beginning of next week and we start to see our weather coming in from the atlantic. this eventually is going to drag in some milder air. the first weather front approaching, that will bring more cloud in from the west, bringing with it some pockets of mainly light rain or drizzle, for many eastern parts of a it will still be dry, but
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after a cold start with that advancing cloud, temperatures are only going to be four or 5 degrees whereas further west, we have the first signs of that milder air. that milder air will make further inroads into the uk during tuesday, we have this area of low pressure up towards iceland, and that will push down some weather fronts from the north—west, and maybe strengthening the wind is a bit through tuesday. the wettest weather from north—western areas of the uk, particularly across the north—west of scotland but some showery rain into england and wales but it is drier towards the south—east. temperatures up back up to nine or 10 degrees here, maybe 12 in belfast and cardiff and plymouth. further ahead, the outlook remains fairly unsettled, you can see everything is coming in from the atlantic, showers, longer spells of rain, brief ridges of high pressure as well, and put on the jet stream and the air mass, and you can see how we have such a mild start, eventually we may tuck into something a little colder later on in the outlook and thatis
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colder later on in the outlook and that is because we get more amplification of the jet. generally speaking, temperatures are going to be higher, near normal, perhaps a bit above normalfor the be higher, near normal, perhaps a bit above normal for the outlook but it remains very unsettled, often windy with some showers or even some longer spells. windy with some showers or even some longerspells. —— windy with some showers or even some longer spells. —— longer spells of rain.
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tonight at ten, the uk suspends flights from six african countries after the discovery of a new variant of coronavirus. the countries — including south africa — will be placed on the travel red and the current vaccines list, amid fears the new mutation may be the most dangerous yet. scientists are deeply concerned about this variant.
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it may well be more transmissible

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