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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 25, 2021 2:00am-2:31am GMT

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welcome to bbc news. i'm lewis vaughan jones. our top stories: tragedy in the english channel as 27 people drown trying to reach the uk. it's the worst incident of its kind, since the migrant crisis began. the british prime minster calls forjoint patrols with france to stop the crossings — as four suspected traffickers are arrested. the migrant who have been coming from their country spending months and months to come to hear and they are so close to their dream. with such a rough sea, they are martyrs. guilty. whoo! ajury in the us finds all three defendants guilty of murdering ahmaud
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arbery, a black man out jogging in the state of georgia. president biden welcomes the verdict. new relevations about jeffrey epstein�*s final hours before his death — we talk to the inmate who monitored and spoke to epstein in his last days. a new coalition government in germany, led by social democrat olaf scholz, pledges to make climate change its top priority. and remembering amy winehouse ten years after her death. the singer's notebooks and stage outfits, go on display in london. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. 27 people including a child have drowned while trying to reach the uk. the dinghy carrying the migrants sank.
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it's the deadliest incident since the channel between england and france became a major route for migrants. the french coastguard said a fisherman had alerted the authorities after seeing the capsized vessel and bodies in the water near the port of calais. two people have been rescued. lucy williamson reports from calais. this is a tragedy that began with hope. where are you going now? the uk. the water nothing to be afraid of yet. several boats set off from this coast at first light this morning. this one reached british shores without disaster. but a flimsy boat, dozens of desperate people, the warning signs have always been there. and today, one of these boats never arrived. translation: as far as we know, 33 people capsized off— dunkirk in calais.
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as of now, 31 people died, but were not resuscitated and there are two survivors who are currently being treated and whose lives are also unfortunately in danger. a local fisherman spotted the passengers floating motionless in the water. helicopters and boats were scrambled to the scene for a rescue operation, but many had already drowned. this disaster underscores how dangerous it is to cross the channel in this way, and it also shows how vital it is that we now step up our efforts to break the business model of the gangsters who are sending people to sea in this way. there are questions already being raised in the local media the rescue and recovery operation has been going on here into the no but there are very few notes about who the victims are or why there boat sank. there are questions already
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being raised in the local media here about whether it was simply bad weather, high waves or whether it may have been hit by something like a container ship. no confirmed details as yet. but people here in this calais migrant camp are so determined to reach the uk that no—one we met tonight said they would change their plans. this man tried crossing yesterday, but gave up because the waves were too high. france's coastline has never been as simple to secure as the eurotunnel or the calais port. smugglers have made the most of that. these poor migrants who have been coming from their country and they have spent months and months to come here. but with such a rough seas they are murdered. many more migrants arrived in the uk today, good publicity for the people smuggling rings. but it often takes many attempts, and those who have capsized before have told me what it's like waiting in the water for help to arrive. one thought in their minds
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as the minutes tick by — what if it doesn't get here in time? president biden has hailed the verdict of a court in the us state of georgia which found three white men guilty of murdering a young black man, ahmaud arbery, while he was outjogging. the three men claimed they were defending themselves while trying to perform a citizens' arrest on mr arbery — who they said �*looked like a burglar�*. our correspondent, aleem maqbool has been following the trial in georgia. 0-4-3-3. there have been times when this moment seemed a very distant prospect. we the jury find the defendant, travis mcmichael, guilty. oh, woo! the shout of relief came from the father of ahmaud arbery, who was shot dead in february of last year. two others were also found guilty of murder. they had all seen 25—year—old
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ahmaud running through their neighbourhood and claimed he'd fitted the description of a crime suspect. they chased him and killed him. during the trial, the man who fired the fatal shots, travis mcmichael, was the only one of the three to take to the witness stand. ishot him. why? he... he had my gun. he struck me. it was obvious that he was... it was obvious that he was attacking me. that if he would've got the shotgun from me, then it was a life or death situation. his justification was that he killed in self—defence, but of course that was only after he, his father and a neighbour had chased ahmaud arbery in their pick—up trucks for five minutes. ahmaud's family waited more than ten weeks and had to rely on public pressure for the police to even make any arrests. i never thought this
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day would come. but god is good. yes, he is. and i just want to tell everybody, thank you, thank you, for those who marched, those who prayed, most of all the ones who prayed. yes, lord. thank you, god. thank you. there may still be questions about the way the police behaved after this killing. questions about the underlying issues surrounding race in this society that contributed to the killing. but for now at least, all of those who for months have been calling forjustice for ahmaud arbery, there is just a huge sense of relief. aleem maqbool, bbc news, in brunswick, georgia. we can now speak to sonia gipson rankin, a law professor at the university of new mexico and former president of the new mexico black lawyers association. thank you for coming on the programme. thank you for coming on the programme-— thank you for coming on the rouramme. . ~ i. ., ., programme. thank you for having me. even programme. thank you for having me- even the _ programme. thank you for having me. even the current climate - programme. thank you for having me. even the current climate in i me. even the current climate in the united states and the justice system under the
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spotlight, what is your reaction to this verdict? my reaction to this verdict? my reaction is _ reaction to this verdict? m reaction is that this reaction to this verdict? mg reaction is that this was the right decision and i am really grateful that thejury right decision and i am really grateful that the jury took the time to go through the evidence very carefully and to appropriately married out justice. appropriately married out 'ustice. �* ., ., ~ justice. and what do you think the role here _ justice. and what do you think the role here that _ justice. and what do you think the role here that race - justice. and what do you think the role here that race played| the role here that race played when it comes to the prosecution, how do you think they mentioned it, not mentioned it in this specific case? , . ., mentioned it in this specific case? . ., case? the prosecutor here was purposeful _ case? the prosecutor here was purposeful in _ case? the prosecutor here was purposeful in her _ case? the prosecutor here was purposeful in her efforts - case? the prosecutor here was purposeful in her efforts to - purposeful in her efforts to try this case on the fact is presented. she knew that in some instances presentations of race were were being used purposely by the defence to muddy the facts, two enter this idea of doubt about the role of the victim. but i prosecutor was purposeful and purposely raided with the selection of the jury but the judge in the
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prosecutor made sure that the focus was on the facts so that justice could be handed out. and that has taken place in this case, the jury reached their decision in the process is now at an end. but there are other court cases pending. could you explain that to us? absolutely. we have now completed what was happening from a state charge. there was malice murder, felony murder, assault, aggravated assault while imprisonment —— false imprisonment. these were state charges against the defendants. now we are looking towards what will happen in federal trials and federal charges have been raised against the defendants and in february we will see and we will focus on how his constitutional rights were violated, looking at if these were hate crimes.— violated, looking at if these were hate crimes. thank you for clearin: were hate crimes. thank you for clearing that _ were hate crimes. thank you for clearing that up. _ were hate crimes. thank you for clearing that up. returning - were hate crimes. thank you for clearing that up. returning to i clearing that up. returning to the state where this took place and we saw the reaction of the
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family outside. what has been the reaction as far as you can tell in the state and in the united states to this decision? the reaction has really been, particularly in the black community and the faith community and the faith community that it is imperative that each person stand up and speak out. the fact that charges were not raised for over ten weeks after what had occurred to the this man was the indication of the role that is father played in making sure that there was continue public pressure and that everyone would be tasked and will continue to want to make sure that people are brought to justice. thank you very much for coming on the programme and talking to us. thank you. let's get some of the day's other news. sweden's first female prime minister, magdalena andersson, has resigned, hours after being voted into office. it follows the collapse of her tentative coalition government after one of its members, the green party, said it was withdrawing
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its support. ms andersson said she was ready to be appointed as prime minister again, but at the head of a single party government. the us state department has designated three leaders of the islamic state group's afghanistan branch, known as 'isis—k', as specially designated global terrorists. this makes it illegal to have any financial or business transactions with the men. the move is part of us efforts to prevent afghanistan becoming once again a base for international terrorism. the british government has urged all its nationals to leave ethiopia immediately saying the conflict is deteriorating quickly. the uk has warned that the fighting may move closer to the capital addis ababa in the coming days. the united states, france, germany and turkey have also urged their nationals to leave. the un is evacuating families of international staff. the french international footballer, karim benzema, has been found guilty of involvement in attempted blackmail, over a sex tape.
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six years ago, benzema was part of a conspiracy which attempted to extort money from a former france teammate, mathieu valbuena. mr benzema has been given a one year suspended prison sentence and a fine of more than $80,000. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: ten years after her death — lyrics, notebooks and stage outfits — from the much—missed british singer, amy winehouse, go on display in london. president kennedy was shot down and died almost immediately. the murder ofjohn kennedy is a disaster for the whole free world. he caught the imagination of the world, the first of a new generation of leaders. margaret thatcher is resigning as leader of the conservative party and prime minister. before leaving number ten to see the queen, she told her cabinet,
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"it's a funny old world." angela merkel is germany's first woman chancellor, easily securing the majority she needed. attempts to fly a hot air balloon had to be abandoned after a few minutes, but nobody seemed to mind very much. as one local comic put it, "it's not hot air we need, it's hard cash." cuba has declared nine days of mourning following the death of fidel castro at the age of 90. castro developed close ties with the soviet union in the 19605. it was an alliance that brought the world to the brink of nuclear war with the cuban missile crisis. this is bbc world news, the latest headlines: at least 27 migrants have drowned in the english channel, after their dinghy capsized near the french port of calais.
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ajury in the us finds all three defendants guilty of murdering ahmaud arbery, a black man outjogging in the state of georgia. president biden has welcomed the verdict. new documents have been published documenting the last days of the disgraced financierjeffrey epstein's life in prison, before he was found dead in his cell in 2019. the records from the bureau of prisons have been published by the new york times. they reveal that epstein lied and told prison psychologists that he had no interest in killing himself, and claimed to be living a wonderful life. the night he killed himself, he lied to prison officers that he wanted to phone his mother — she died in 200a. epstein phoned his girlfriend instead. the new york times also reveal that on the night of his death, the inmate in the cell next to epstein's heard him tearing up his sheet before committing suicide.
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that last revelation has now been traced back to an email sent by william mersey, he was imprisoned for tax fraud between january and november 2019, and worked as an inmate companion, monitoring other inmates including jeffrey esptein and joins me now. thank you for coming on the programme. you spoke to him in his final days. what kind of things was he saying to you and what was his mental state? he was mostly _ what was his mental state? he: was mostly concerned with how to handle prison life and especially prisoners who might threaten him or distort him. did you get the feeling at all that he wanted to and his life? not really. sometimes he would drift off when i was talking to him and i could tell he was
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floating back to reality. i tried to keep him entertained and interested in the conversation. that wasn't my job but the last night i spent with him. —— that was myjob. he was sitting on the floor eating his dinner and decidedly not energetic. i said, what are you doing under the floor? he said it was easier that way. i knew it was the last night i was going to see because he was going back to their special housing unit. psychiatrists had decided he was no longer suicidal and we all knew that was the love shift with jeffrey. i said goodbye and said maybe we would see each other in the future because that was my role to keep his spirits up. what was your reaction? i was kind of sad and i was a little bit angry
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because we got locked in which meant we were eating baloney sandwiches instead of going to the breakfast line and eating much better food. the breakfast line and eating much betterfood. when you the breakfast line and eating much better food. when you are locked in 50 — 60 square feet, evenif locked in 50 — 60 square feet, even if you love your punky, you want to get out. == you want to get out. -- cellmate. _ you want to get out. -- cellmate. when - you want to get out. -- cellmate. when he - you want to get out. —— cellmate. when he took his own life, were you surprised? there have been conspiracy theories that it did not happen. we are surprised now, that you saw things that would lead him to do that? l things that would lead him to do that? ., ., ,._ things that would lead him to do that? ., ., _ .,, do that? i would not say i was surprised- _ do that? i would not say i was surprised- i— do that? i would not say i was surprised. i was _ do that? i would not say i was surprised. i was kind - do that? i would not say i was surprised. i was kind of- surprised. i was kind of disappointed because i sort of like the guy. it is pretty difficult that you find somebody you get along with intellectually in prison if you have an education and are not violent criminal which i am not
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which most of the people surrounding us away. i liked jeffrey. and he was not really a perverted guy. he was not the perverted guy you would assume, at least not dealing with him. — me. you were aware of the allegations. you're sitting there saying he seemed a good guy, some people might find that odd. l guy, some people might find that odd. , ., guy, some people might find that odd. , . ., that odd. i understand that the allegations _ that odd. i understand that the allegations and _ that odd. i understand that the allegations and i _ that odd. i understand that the allegations and i understand i allegations and i understand that he had a fetish that led him to kill himself. i knew a little bit about him. when people mention jeffrey little bit about him. when people mentionjeffrey epstein was coming to the prison, i said i thought i knew something about this guy. said i thought i knew something about this guy-— about this guy. people would not have had _ about this guy. people would not have had about _ about this guy. people would not have had about this - about this guy. people would l not have had about this inmate companion role. you described it as yourjob...
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companion role. you described it as yourjob. . ._ it as your 'ob. .. what was the role? it as yourjob. .. what was the role? the _ it as yourjob. .. what was the role? the role _ it as yourjob. .. what was the role? the role is, _ it as yourjob. .. what was the role? the role is, prisons - it as yourjob. .. what was the role? the role is, prisons can| role? the role is, prisons can hire trained psychologist and pay them to watch suicidal inmates or they can train prisoners for 4 cents an hour and do the same thing. as soon as i got that, i knew ijust wanted to work constantly so i signed up. the library was very decent. that was the first job i could sign up for and so the job was, you worked for our ships and every 15 minutes you made notes as to what the person you were watching was doing. — — four hour shifts. how would you report back?
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jeffrey is sleeping, jeffrey is eating his dinner. jeffrey and i are discussing investments. whatever was going on in that particular point in time. x�*t�*aur particular point in time. your overall thought _ particular point in time. your overall thought of _ particular point in time. your overall thought of the - particular point in time. your overall thought of the prison | overall thought of the prison which has received some criticism? aha, which has received some criticism?— which has received some criticism? ., ., . ., criticism? a lot of mice and roaches _ criticism? a lot of mice and roaches and _ criticism? a lot of mice and roaches and very _ criticism? a lot of mice and roaches and very confining. j criticism? a lot of mice and - roaches and very confining. we really did not go out. there was no yard to speak of that was no yard to speak of that was very restrictive but it wasn't threatening. you did not feel like you were going to get up feel like you were going to get up every morning and someone was going to punch you in the mouth. some of the other units were pretty rowdy but my unit was sentenced units that everybody knew that out of date so people did not want to get into trouble and extent that out date into nothing. there were not a lot of fights in my
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unit. it was not threatening. fascinating to get your insides. thank you for talking to us. �* , , . ., we did reach out to the bureau of prisons for comment — they are yet to get back to us, but they did tell the new york times that — "the safe, secure and humane housing of inmates is bop's highest priority" and that they are "continuing to train bop staff on suicide prevention, risk assessment and emergency responses." in germany, three political parties have struck a deal to form the next government, putting the environment center stage. the social democrats, greens and free democrats have unveiled their coalition agreement, which marks the end of the chancellor angela merkel era. damien mcguinness has the latest from berlin. the end of an era in germany. after 16 years of conservative—led government under angela merkel,
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germany's new leaders are younger and more radical, and they want to modernise the country. it's an unusual alliance — a left—wing social democrat chancellor, olaf scholz, in government with the greens and the business—friendly liberals. in germany, it's called a "traffic light coalition" — after the colours of each party. mr scholz drew parallels between the incoming coalition and germany's first—ever real traffic lights on potsdamer platz in berlin in 192a. translation: my aspiration j as chancellor is to make sure that this traffic light coalition can play a similarly ground—breaking role in germany. the climate change measures are ambitious — by 2030, coal will be phased out and 80% of germany's electricity will come from renewable sources. tackling social inequality is also a top priority.
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healthcare workers will get a bonus, and the minimum wage will be increased. but with germany seeing record covid infection and death rates, for many voters, the biggest challenge right now is how the incoming government will fight the pandemic. translation: the first thing should _ be to sort out the pandemic. it cannot stay like this. that's the top priority for me. translation: i think the most important thing at the moment| is the covid crisis. there's nothing else, as far as i'm concerned. and how will we proceed with vaccinations? what are the new regulations? the leaders of the new coalition appear to have energy, ambition, and confidence — qualities they will need given they are taking over in a time of crisis. damien mcguinness, bbc news, berlin. from her unmistakable voice to her signature beehive, british singer, amy winehouse is being remembered in a new exhibition,
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a decade after her death. tarah welsh has been to see it. this is the most magical part of the exhibition. amy winehouse — her voice, her style, her presence, recreated through animation. just part of this exhibition about her life and career at the design museum. there's things you'd expect from an exhibition, like magazine covers and her grammy awards. and there are really personal touches here, as well, like amy's notes and notepads, talking about her dreams and her ambitions for the future. having access to so much of amy's handwritten material was extremely moving. like, i've read maybe hundreds of pages of amy's notebooks and diary entries and lyric pages. and it'sjust a real insight into who she was as a person and how she worked, and how incredibly clean her copy was when she was writing these poems that turned into songs.
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so that was probably, yeah, the most amazing part of the process for me. amy beyond the stage celebrates her creativity, her music, her style and her inspirations. there's so much that would be of interest to her. you know, the stuff about billie holliday and sarah vaughan and ella fitzgerald. this exhibition would bejust up her alley. this is the sort of exhibition that she would go and pay to see, so, yeah, ithink she would be happy. what i hope they take away is to see a very positive side of amy. you know, everyone knows what happened. everyone has seen the horrible tabloid stuff. this is, from start to finish, positivity and it's superb, you know, and i'm loving it. i'm really loving it. amy winehouse died ten years ago, but her influence on the world of music goes on — an insight into where it all started opens to the public here in kensington on friday. tarah welsh, bbc london.
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that's it from me. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @l vaughan jones i'm lewis vaughn jones. i'm lewis vaugthones. this is bbc news. hello. some pretty lively weather conditions on the way to us later in the week and into the start of the weekend. we could see some severe gales develop quite widely, particularly through friday into saturday. and to go with it, a realfeel of winter in the air — much, much colder with more of you seeing a little bit of sleet or even snow. that colder air pushing southwards overnight into the start of thursday, and that really makes for the chill for the first of the commutes of the day, temperatures widely at or just above freezing. so, frost in places, maybe just frost—free in the south—east corner where the overnight cloud and patchy drizzle just about to clear, and in the far north of scotland overnight, heavy showers continuing with sleet and snow, even down to sea level. they'll continue throughout the day, a few showers down across eastern coastal
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counties of england, one or two to the west of wales, cornwall and across northern ireland. but for most of you, thursday is one of those crisp, clear days, good visibility, but a chilly feel in the breeze, temperatures around 5 to 8 degrees. now, as we go into thursday night, temperatures actually lift a little bit. outbreaks of rain spreading their way in, from the north and the west, but strengthening winds across the board. that will stop temperatures from falling to freezing here, but there could be a frost to start friday, east anglia and the south—east in particular. but even here, we'll see rain push through on friday. this is the area of low pressure that's going to cause us all sorts of problems. the exact track will dictate who sees the strongest of the winds and who will see a bit of snow. to begin friday, it's outbreaks of rain spreading southwards and eastwards. the strongest of the winds to the north and the west of the country could touch damaging 70, maybe 80mph for one or two later in the day, and blizzard conditions developing across parts of higher ground of scotland. and this is where we'll see the strongest of the winds really late friday and into friday night, pushing down the western side of this area of low pressure. cold air with it, so a mixture of rain, sleet and snow
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notjust to the hills, one or two to lower levels, but it's going to be a difficult mix to get exactly right. keep checking the forecast. but it could be a night of disruption into the start of saturday with strong winds. more wintry showers around on saturday, an icy wind and an added wind chill too. so, whilst temperatures on the thermometers saturday afternoon say 4 to 7 degrees, already lower than normally expected at this stage of november, it will feel closer to freezing, if not below for many of you. things will turn quieter, though, through saturday night into sunday. widespread frost to begin the day, but for most, it'll be a dry day with some spells of hazy sunshine. keep up to date with the latest forecast details here on bbc news.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the leaders of france and britain say they will increase efforts to prevent migrant crossings the english channel after at least 27 people drowned when their boat capsized off the coast of northern france. four suspected traffickers have been arrested on suspicion of being linked to the sinking. president biden has welcomed the verdict of a court in the us state of georgia, which found three white men guilty of murdering a young black man, ahmaud arbery, while he was outjogging. the defendants chased mr arbery before one of them shot him three times. the incoming coalition government in germany is to be led by a social democrat for the first time in 16 years. olaf scholz, who will replace angela merkel as chancellor, has pledged to make climate change his top priority.
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one of the crucial aspects of national life is the future of the scottish highlands.

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