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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 24, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news i'm christian fraser. justice for ahmaud aubery. three white men who chased down and killed the young black man, as he jogged through a white neighbourhood, are convicted of murder. relieved that she reframed the defendants guilty. the jury rejected the mcmichaels claim of self—defense in a trial that once again brought race and guns to the forefront of life in america. at least 31 migrants trying to cross the english channel have drowned after their boat capsized on the perilous journey to the uk. olaf scholz will be germany's new chancellor. he'll lead a three—party coalition committed to the fight against climate change. and nft is named word of the year by collins dictionary. don't know what that means? well we willjog your memory.
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hello — ahmaud arbery was murdered in february last year, while running in a predominantly white neighbourhood of satilla shores in georgia s glynn county. he was black and 25—years—old. some weeks later a video appeared of ahmauds last moments. and in it, travis mcmicheal, and his father, greg were seen hunting down their victim as he ran for his life near their parked pick—up truck. travis mcmichael shot him three times, twice in the chest, with a pump action shot gun. the man who took the video was their neighbour william roddie bryan, who unwittingly had just handed the prosecution the most valuable piece of evidence. today after 11 hours of deliberation,
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and having three times come back to watch that video, thejury found all three men guilty of murder. this was the moment the verdict was read for travis mcmichael, who had pulled the trigger. cou nts counts one, malice murder. we've had jerry find the defendant travis mcmichael guilty. guilty on all nine counts, including malice murder and felony murder. greg mcmichael his father was also convicted on eight of the nine counts including felony murder and bryan, who pursued arbery in a separate vehicle and was not carrying a firearm, was convicted on six of the nine counts, also including the charge of felony murder. ahmaud's mother, who has shown some incredible dignity through this trial, was in court to hear the verdict and visibly emotional. tonight a crowd of supporters is outside the courthouse celebrating. our correspondent
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aleem maqbool is there. 25,000 migrants have crossed the english channel from france this year, in flimsy boats, and in dangerous seas. it is one of the worlds busiest shipping channels. many had warned of the untold risk that desperate migrants were taking, today an almost inevitable tragedy unfolded. not far from calais a boat carrying 50 people, some of them children, capsized in freezing cold waters. at least 30 of them are known have drowned, maybe more. it is by far the biggest loss of life in a single incident on that route. but with thousands more coming it might not be the last. our home editor mark easton reports. cold, but calm seas encourage dozens of migrants, including many small children, to head down the beaches of calais this morning, preparing to make the journey across the channel. where are you going now?
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we're going to uk! a number of small boats are understood to have pushed off around dawn, but it now appears at least one vessel capsized, with reports of around 30 deaths. a french fisherman reported seeing an empty dinghy with a number of bodies floating motionless nearby, unconscious or dead. the french interior minister, gerald darmanin, headed to the scene, tweeting... as news of the tragedy broke, the prime minister, borisjohnson, announced he would chair a meeting of the cobra emergency committee in response. and my thoughts and sympathies are first of all with the victims and theirfamilies, and it's an appalling thing that they have suffered. but i also want to say that this
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disaster underscores how dangerous it is to cross the channel in this way. french patrol vessels and three helicopters have been deployed in the area as part of a search, with the port authority suggesting the tragedy may be the largest single loss of life in the channel for many years. these people are murderers. and the poor migrants have been coming from their country are spending months and months to get to here, and they are close to their dream. a number of migrants did make it to the kent coast, having crossed one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world. no one should underestimate the risks involved. the seas are incredibly dangerous all of the year, but particularly as winter approaches, and that's why i've been calling for some time to say that we must make sure that those boats are not leaving the french shores. the un's international organisation for migration says between eight and 30 people have died in the english channel each year since 2014.
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before today, the figure for 2021 was already at 15. record numbers of migrants have crossed the channel in small boats this year, more than 25,000 since january. the home secretary promised last year to make the route unviable and put the people smugglers out of business. today, before news of the tragedy, the immigration minister explained why the numbers were still so high. well, we obviously have challenges. we have a system which is based on outdated legislation, much of it from the late �*90s, which we are looking to change with the nationality and borders bill, due to come back to the commons for its report stage imminently, and that is where we are looking to try and make changes, to make a difference the search has continued into the night, with french emergency services continued to look for any victims and support the survivors, a grim end to a grim day. mark easton, bbc news. i'm joined now by ta—hid pasha uk s
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head of office at iom, the un migration agency. the french president has said tonight that 1500 people smugglers have been arrested in northern france since the start of the year. he said border checks will be reinforced in the wake of this. and he called for more financial support from the agency protecting the eu's exterior border. where do you think the problem first stems from? let’s the problem first stems from? let's ut the the problem first stems from? let's put the figures _ the problem first stems from? let's put the figures into _ the problem first stems from? let�*s put the figures into context. there are more than 22 million refugees worldwide. 86 million people displaced. a number of people trying to cross into france and then into the uk is a drop in the ocean compared to that. and the loss of life today is the single biggest loss of life this year and since our
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records started in 2014. this gain is the extent of one half thousand people dying each year, 45,000 people dying each year, 45,000 people since 2014. so it's notjust about ramping up the barriers and putting up the restrictions. what we need is a comprehensive international response and we need corporation on base. last week, last wednesday 75 people lost their lives crossing from about from libya across the mediterranean. that was not reported in the news and we need that international cooperation and one of the main answers to this is to increase the access to safe legal pathways. we need to give alternative options for people to be able to seek protection. fin
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alternative options for people to be able to seek protection.— able to seek protection. on the wider context _ able to seek protection. on the wider context clearly _ able to seek protection. on the wider context clearly we - able to seek protection. on the wider context clearly we are . able to seek protection. on the - wider context clearly we are focused on this route because what appears to have happened to the pandemic is the other route via a lorry or plane closed down and this became the default route such that 25,000 people have attempted to crossing this year. so, explain to me cooperation and collaboration between the french and british governments and i'm not sure that collaboration is there at the moment because politics between the two governments is not that clever. it’s governments is not that clever. it's not 'ust governments is not that clever. it�*s not just about the two governments, this is notjust a channel issue, this is notjust a channel issue, this is notjust a channel issue, this is a global issue. i was talking about their deaths last week people are dying in this sequencing as well in south asia so this requires an international comprehensive response and one of those responses has to be to open up alternative safer options. if you
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alternative safer options. if you are suggesting _ alternative safer options. if you are suggesting we _ alternative safer options. if you are suggesting we turn - alternative safer options. if you are suggesting we turn it - alternative safer options. if you are suggesting we turn it on - alternative safer options. if you are suggesting we turn it on its| are suggesting we turn it on its head and reopen of places around the web or on the african coast where people can apply safety for asylum, there will still be economic migrants. there will still be thousands of people who don't qualify for asylum and they will still come. so that's not the solution, is it?— still come. so that's not the solution, is it? people flee for a vast variety _ solution, is it? people flee for a vast variety of _ solution, is it? people flee for a vast variety of reasons. - solution, is it? people flee for a vast variety of reasons. but - solution, is it? people flee for a vast variety of reasons. but if i solution, is it? people flee for a l vast variety of reasons. but if you look at the steps of the nationalities who are coming into the uk iraqis, syrians, eritreans, sudanese and most recently afghans are in the top five nationalities said that shows that most are not feeling from conflict but they were also say they are seeking a better life and seeking the opportunity to feed their children, for better education, and basically to earn their livelihoods. so recognising that we need to be creative about how we can open up these pathways.
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the uk is in need of more people from a labour migration purpose but at the same time in terms of international protection it can open up international protection it can open up more spaces. if you look at the figures this year the numbers that have been cleaning asylum have been at their lowest. the peak was in 2012 and so if you think about it in that context they were far more people claiming asylum in the uk at that time. in the numbers of people that time. in the numbers of people that can seek protection in the uk can be increased. that does not have to be people coming legally to the uk. it means taking those people that you rightly talk about who are living in refugee camps and giving and accommodation. this is a fair solution. let's head over to our correspondent aleem maqbool who's outside the courthouse.
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apologies for not making contact. let's start with the verdict. it seems to me thatjury today really zeroed in on that video that we should at the top of the programme. he wanted to see if i watched it three times in high definition. and it clearly was central to the verdict that been handed down. i wonder what would have happened had that video not been taken? we wonder what would have happened had that video not been taken?— that video not been taken? we know riaht that video not been taken? we know ri . ht from that video not been taken? we know right from the _ that video not been taken? we know right from the beginning _ that video not been taken? we know right from the beginning that - that video not been taken? we know right from the beginning that it - right from the beginning that it certainly would not have led to the rest of the three men because it was ten weeks after the killing that these men were finally arrested and it was only once that video had gone viral. the video taken by one of the three men who published it online thinking it would show him in a good light for being a hero. so until that point we have been seeing a
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buddy cam footage of police officers arriving on the scene with ahmaud arbery still dying, still alive in pain where the parties provide comfort to the three men who had just chased him and one of whom just shot him. we hear the officers offering them water saying they can't even imagine what those three men are going through. and as i say it was only after that video came tonight that people locally and across the nation and that of protesting and finally the pressure built up such that the police eventually arrested the three men. but it meant because that had happened and so much else seems the family had certainly felt that perhaps this was a verdict that would not go their way and it's why you have this real sense of relief both inside the courtroom and here outside the courtroom when those verdicts were announced.- outside the courtroom when those verdicts were announced. there was concern as — verdicts were announced. there was concern as you _ verdicts were announced. there was concern as you said _ verdicts were announced. there was concern as you said because - verdicts were announced. there was concern as you said because of - verdicts were announced. there was concern as you said because of the i concern as you said because of the geography and because of that makeup of the jury, there were 11 white
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people on the jury and one african—american, that maybe this would be a hung jury and maybe they would be a hung jury and maybe they would not get the verdict they want to. but when you look at what was handed down and where they went with the verdict, it was well thought out committee clearly sends to the case that the prosecution had set out. so that the prosecution had set out. sr much that the prosecution had set out. 5r much speculation about hell because they were southern white people and how they would interpret the facts of the case and also the tactics that were used by the defence lawyers through this case somehow portraying ahmaud arbery as a man who had done something wrong here for choosing to run, for choosing to fight, even some distasteful tactics in the eyes of many in, for example, one of the defence lawyers in her closing arguments talking about ahmaud arbery�*s deli 7 dirty feet for example the fact that they had
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objected to veterans and for get 7 al sharpton being in the courtroom saying that having prominent african—americans in the courtroom was putting pressure on the jury. african—americans in the courtroom was putting pressure on thejury. so all those things that people to speculate on the defenceless to that white jerry speculate on the defenceless to that whitejerry and speculate on the defenceless to that white jerry and ultimately as you say they looked at what had been presented and as you say ifjust one juror had felt otherwise in this would have been a hung jury or 12 jurors had to come up with a unanimous decision when it comes to murder. but they looked at the three people, they gave the first of the man, travis mcmichael who actually fired the shots, found him guilty in all nine counts. there were differing decisions for the other two but all of them were found guilty of at least one felony murder count and that has a minimum sentence of life in prison. had it one the sentence of life in prison. had it gone the wrong _ sentence of life in prison. had it gone the wrong way, _
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sentence of life in prison. had it gone the wrong way, you - sentence of life in prison. had it gone the wrong way, you talked j sentence of life in prison. had it gone the wrong way, you talked about what might have unfolded that's how fragile and american society is at the moment. fragile and american society is at the moment-— the moment. there was a lot of tension here, _ the moment. there was a lot of tension here, the _ the moment. there was a lot of tension here, the police - tension here, the police helicopters, there was lots of police presence here. we never really thought the sense on the ground that it was going to be violence per se but certainly there would have been anger here. it is a verdict that was being watched right across this country. and it was one of those cases, last year we saw a summer of introspection of race in this country and it was notjust about george floyd. it was other high—profile cases as well and this was one of them. they would have been a reaction if not violence on the streets here but it was certainly incredibly tense and that has turned although as ahmaud arbery�*s father said here has not turned intojubilation but certainly anti—reflection over ahmaud arbery
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and what he went through and how perhaps this might help change things in the future. we perhaps this might help change things in the future.— perhaps this might help change things in the future. we will get more reaction _ things in the future. we will get more reaction from _ things in the future. we will get more reaction from brunswick l things in the future. we will get - more reaction from brunswick georgia later in the future. angela merkel chaired her last cabinet meeting today as her successor 0laf sholz finally agreed a deal with coalition partners to form a new government. it will will be the first to be led by a social democrat in sixteen years and fighting climate change will be at the centrepiece of government policy. i'm joined now by david herszenhorn, chief brussels correspondent for politico. it's a very interesting coalition today, there were two parties that aren't natural bedfellows as it's but what do you see in the makeup of the government and where ministries have gone? it’s the government and where ministries have one? �*, ., , the government and where ministries have one? 3 ., , , ., have gone? it's not 'ust unusual, it's have gone? it's not 'ust unusual, in historic. h have gone? it's notjust unusual, it's historic. there's _ have gone? it's notjust unusual, it's historic. there's never - have gone? it's notjust unusual, it's historic. there's never been i have gone? it's notjust unusual, | it's historic. there's never been a three party coalition in german history. this is the first. as you point out, the greens and the liberals coming together is quite odd but what we see is that left
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scholz, the centreleft social democrats in the lead as chancellor and interesting that the greens have one newly created economy and a super climate ministry they will head up along with the foreign ministry and then the finance ministry fighting to christianity and there as expected. presented beekeeping germany on theory type fiscal path. beekeeping germany on theory type fiscal ath. , ., fiscal path. interesting that the ureens fiscal path. interesting that the greens have — fiscal path. interesting that the greens have got _ fiscal path. interesting that the greens have got the _ fiscal path. interesting that the greens have got the climate . greens have got the climate ministry. when i was in glasgow a few weeks ago people said to me that the germans have never really taken a leave in europe when it comes to climate change or to fighting climate change or to fighting climate change or to fighting climate change by these three parties have made a very much the centrepiece of their platform. what are we collect ip to get? we centrepiece of their platform. what are we collect ip to get?— are we collect ip to get? we see that they're _ are we collect ip to get? we see that they're talking _ are we collect ip to get? we see that they're talking about - are we collect ip to get? we see that they're talking about in - are we collect ip to get? we see| that they're talking about in their coalition agreement which runs 170 pages more ambition in germany reaching its own targets. including very ambitious for the country known for its automobile manufacturing and
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phasing out combustion engines faster than have been anticipated. there is no question that they're looking to leave now and the greens going into government and this is a truly big moment for europe at a time when finding climate change has moved really to the centre stage and the mainstream of european politics. this also gets the eu back in motion because if you can imagine germany being the biggest most influential member country and a lot has been on pause as they waited for the final outcome of these coalition talks and get a for 16 years now the most influential leader in the eu finally had the end of her term. thea;r influential leader in the eu finally had the end of her term. they have not to had the end of her term. they have got to latest _ had the end of her term. they have got to latest government _ had the end of her term. they have got to latest government in - had the end of her term. they have got to latest government in in - had the end of her term. they have got to latest government in in a - got to latest government in in a couple of weeks' time. 0bviously got to latest government in in a couple of weeks' time. obviously the end of an era but maybe not the way she would want to go out. they are right in the middle of a crisis with the fourth covid—19 wave. right in the middle of a crisis with the fourth covid-19 wave.- right in the middle of a crisis with the fourth covid-19 wave. there is no question _ the fourth covid-19 wave. there is no question that _ the fourth covid-19 wave. there is no question that pandemic- the fourth covid-19 wave. there is no question that pandemic is - the fourth covid-19 wave. there is no question that pandemic is a - no question that pandemic is a crisis for everyone. it was an electoral defeat for her party and for her centre—right partnership and
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that might be expected after 16 years in office normally the voters look for a bit of change right there but certainly that a miracle has been doing it around europe and is no doubt there may be some vaccine mandates coming in that germany recognises i'm still very much in the midst of this pandemic emergency as is most of europe now. it’s as is most of europe now. it's alwa s as is most of europe now. it's always good _ as is most of europe now. it's always good to _ as is most of europe now. it's always good to have you on the programme, thank you. if you are thinking to yourself, i recognise we left schultz, i can't place him, then i should warn you as the president of the eurasia group stayed today on twitter that it might not be who you are thinking of. because that gentleman on the left is of course senator chris coons, a regular on this programme. and he says they have been seen in the same room together. and i'll remind you that doppelganger is a
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german word and highly applicable in this particular instance. still to come. americans will soon be serving up come. americans will soon be serving up the most expensive thanksgiving dinner on record. we will look at what that means for families up and down the country. here, anyone convicted of killing an on—duty member of the emergency services while committing a crime in england and wales will automatically receive a life sentence, under government plans. the proposed change in the law follows a campaign by the widow of pc andrew harper, who died trying to stop a burglary in 2019. his teenage killers were convicted of manslaughter. lissie harper spoke of her relief at the changes. i remember sitting in the garden having a conversation about why we needed to do this. and it started with a sense of a feeling of injustice,
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a feeling of anger and this isn't right, and something needs to change. and throughout this process, i received an immense amount of support from the public and, you know, those close to me, but also strangers who want something different for our country, and i think we want to look at our laws and to be proud of it and to be able to say, yeah, that's, you know, that's what should be happening. about this time tomorrow, millions of families up and down the united states will be sitting down to a thanksgiving dinner. a more expensive dinner than it was last year. with inflation at a 30—year high, this thanksgiving is predicted to be the most expensive in history. most of the ingredients on the dinner plate will be 5% more expensive than they were last year and that has real consequences for a large number of american families. let's bring in priya fielding—singh,
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assistant professor of family and consumer studies at the university of utah and author of how the other half eats: the untold story of food and inequality in america. it's lovely to have you on the programme. it will be tougher for american families this year. thank ou for american families this year. thank you for having _ american families this year. thank you for having me. _ american families this year. thank you for having me. what _ american families this year. thank you for having me. what is - american families this year. thank you for having me. what is the - you for having me. what is the im act you for having me. what is the impact of _ you for having me. what is the impact of inflation? _ you for having me. what is the impact of inflation? what - you for having me. what is the impact of inflation? what are l impact of inflation? what are american families facing at the moment? ., ., , ., ., ;;:: , ., moment? inflation is at a 30 year hiuh, moment? inflation is at a 30 year high. food — moment? inflation is at a 30 year high, food prices _ moment? inflation is at a 30 year high, food prices on _ moment? inflation is at a 30 year high, food prices on average - moment? inflation is at a 30 year high, food prices on average are i moment? inflation is at a 30 year i high, food prices on average are up about 5% and what we're seeing is that average really differs in those costs differ depending on the food. so for thanksgiving, turkeys are the prices are up about 24%. a lot of meat, eggs, dairy, thanksgiving is projected to be the most expensive day in the history of the holiday and what this means is more american
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families are going to be pinched on the prices of those foods but particularly low income families, black families, if you have families who have already been hit economically so much harder during the pandemic are really going to bear disproportionately the harms of those increased food prices. in the 'ob fi . ure those increased food prices. in the job figure status _ those increased food prices. in the job figure status of _ those increased food prices. in the job figure status of them _ those increased food prices. in the job figure status of them are - those increased food prices. in the job figure status of them are still i job figure status of them are still out of work and some of them don't want to go back to work yet. has the support they were getting through the covid—19 months been withdrawn and does that make things even more difficult? ~ ., ,, ., , difficult? when we talk about rising food rices difficult? when we talk about rising food prices it's _ difficult? when we talk about rising food prices it's really _ difficult? when we talk about rising food prices it's really important - difficult? when we talk about rising food prices it's really important to i food prices it's really important to frame this within a part of conversation about food insecurity and hunger in america during the pandemic. while we saw that hunger rates largely thanks to the egg you mentioned actually remained pretty steady on average between 2019 and 2020 and we actually saw in equities hunger widening the us and now black
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and latino families are three times and latino families are three times and places likely as white families to experience hunger and while that it went a long way in helping buffer against the economic shocks of the pandemic not all families really benefited the same and a lot of families faced barriers in accessing those benefits and a lot of families had not an adequate amount of savings or wealth that they could draw on during the pandemic self and number of benefits of course are expiring. it is a number of benefits that are continuing that will continue to not all families are equally poised to take advantage of those. pa. equally poised to take advantage of those. �* ' . ., ., those. a difficult thanksgiving for some families _ those. a difficult thanksgiving for some families in _ those. a difficult thanksgiving for some families in america - those. a difficult thanksgiving for i some families in america tomorrow. thank you. we will focus on 100 days of their taliban, are our series from couple
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will continue. we will hear about the rise of isis k and the threat it poses to taliban control. it isa it is a cold feel to the weather as we head towards the end of this week. not only cold weather, and some turbulent weather is on the way as well. spells of rain, sleet, and knowing the forecast and the risk of severe gales through friday night and into the start of the weekend. as we go through this evening and tonight we have got this area of cloud and patchy rain continuing to sync its way south and behind that the sky is clear with some cold air filtering down from the north with some showers a night in ireland and northern scotland and the showers will be when terry expressed to be reined with gusts of 50 mph or more in the most exposed spots in the far north and temperatures getting close to freezing and below freezing in place so frost will tomorrow morning. all of us will feel the
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effects of this cold air. when you're exposed to the brisk wind around the coastal areas there is a potential for some showers and went to showers in northern scotland especially over the high ground but even low levels and look can see some snow mixing. a lot of sunshine and it's a bright, crisp day. a
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it's a bright, crisp day, a cold day with top temperatures between 5—9 degrees. maybe just getting up to ten there in the channel islands. now, as we head into friday, this area of low pressure dives its way into the picture. that'll strengthen the winds. it'll bring outbreaks of rain southwards through friday morning, and with cold air continuing to tuck in from the north, well, there is a potential for some wintry showers across the north and the west and this curl of a weather front bringing some quite significant snow to parts of northern scotland through the day. a cold day, a windy day, in fact increasingly windy as we get into the evening.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a jury in the us state of georgia has found three white men guilty of murdering a black man who was jogging in the city of brunswick last year. the bbc speaks exclusively to one of the leaders of the haqqani network — who says all sides, including the united states, need to come to a peaceful agreement with the taliban. william and kate decide they want to show their carol concert on another channel — following a controversial royal documentary broadcast by the bbc. nd after two years of shut borders — new zealand unveils plans to welcome back visitors from next year.
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let's return to our top story. the verdict in the ahmaud aubery case in georgia. justice for the family, accountability for three men who took part in a modern day lynching. for thats what it was. the video shows arbery trying to escape from the men in the truck chasing him, then struggling with travis mcmichael as two shots are fired. and after a third gunshot, arbery falling to the ground, his white shirt covered in blood.the video released some weeks later brought a level of attention that the murder had not attracted, until then. and it also sparked national anger. people were furious that an arrest had taken so long, that police appeared to have empowered one of these suspects to act as a vigilante, and that locally a small and interconnected criminaljustice community, had appeared uninterested in a full investigation. it has been a long road for the family. here's chelsea bailey, ahmauds sister talking to the bbc.
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ahmaud was easy going. he didn't like problems with anyone. we laughed a lot. i am ahmaud's older sister. i put emphasis on "older" because we are a year apart, and a lot of people thought we were twins. the family calls him quez, this is actually the most i've ever called him ahmaud in my entire life. his middle name is marquez it's for short, wejust called him quez. he knew that i loved to laugh, so when i was feeling sad or upset or something, you can't be mad at him, he's going to tell a joke, and we are going to chuckle about it later. we took it really hard when we lost quez, because he was our little baby, basically. he would've hated that i called him back, but...
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——he would've hated that i called him that, but... even though the world moves on, some people don't get to move on, and though some people mean the family members. i believe race is the biggest issue in this case. we had three white men chasing a black man, and it doesn't take a rocket scientist to look at it and say that race wasn't something that played a part in this. i want the world to know that ahmaud was so much more than what happened to him that day. he mattered to us, his family members. they had taken someone who was wonderful in every way, no matter his mistakes or his successful stories, he was a human and we loved him as such. ahmaud arbery�*s sister talking to the bbc. i'm joined now by abra lattany—reed — a pastor at the harper chapel united methodist church in baxley, georgia.
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pastor, lovely a too happy with us on the programme. your reaction this evening? i on the programme. your reaction this evenin: ? . . on the programme. your reaction this evenin: ? ., . ., ~ evening? i am excited. thankful, raisin evening? i am excited. thankful, praising god _ evening? i am excited. thankful, praising god for— evening? i am excited. thankful, praising god for him _ evening? i am excited. thankful, praising god for him answering . evening? i am excited. thankful, i praising god for him answering our prayers and thanking you all for shedding light and making sure that the world knows that there are still praying people in the world. there was some really _ praying people in the world. there was some really worrying - praying people in the world. there was some really worrying racial undertones to the way the defendants ran this case. i want to play a part of the trial, the point that the defendants attorney made to the judge about black pastors sitting in court. have a listen. haifa judge about black pastors sitting in court. have a listen.— court. have a listen. how many astors court. have a listen. how many pastors does — court. have a listen. how many pastors does the _ court. have a listen. how many pastors does the ahmaud - court. have a listen. how many. pastors does the ahmaud arbery family— pastors does the ahmaud arbery family have? we had the reverend al sharpton— family have? we had the reverend al sharpton here earlier last week. i'm not keeping track, i think the court has indicated, the court doesn't intend _ has indicated, the court doesn't intend to — has indicated, the court doesn't intend to ask anyone to keep track of who— intend to ask anyone to keep track of who was— intend to ask anyone to keep track of who was in the gallery, but i don't _ of who was in the gallery, but i don't know_ of who was in the gallery, but i don't know who misterjackson, reverend — don't know who misterjackson, reverend jackson's pastor is here.
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aside _ reverend jackson's pastor is here. aside from — reverend jackson's pastor is here. aside from that, they tried to dehumanise ahmaud arbery. they talked about his long dirty toenails, they talked about him running through this white neighbourhood without socks on. what sort of damage did that due to relations in the community? it struck a chord to the humanity part of who we are as a community in brunswick, whether you are black or white, to even go to the extremes that were made to make comments, not on the about african—american black pastors, but to point out someone's dirty toenails, and just to that, it just struck a nerve that every member of this community did not appreciate and felt that it was not warranted. . , appreciate and felt that it was not warranted. ., , . ., , ., warranted. there was clearly an imbalance _ warranted. there was clearly an imbalance in — warranted. there was clearly an imbalance in the _ warranted. there was clearly an imbalance in the jury, _ warranted. there was clearly an imbalance in the jury, there - warranted. there was clearly an i imbalance in the jury, there were warranted. there was clearly an - imbalance in the jury, there were 11 whitejurors and one white jurors and one african—american, whitejurors and one african—american, which white jurors and one african—american, which reflected the imbalance that there is in brunswick society. what did you make of the length of time it took for
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that police and the district attorney to take up this case? i was fortunate enough _ attorney to take up this case? i was fortunate enough to _ attorney to take up this case? i was fortunate enough to be _ attorney to take up this case? i was fortunate enough to be one - attorney to take up this case? i —" fortunate enough to be one of those pastors that was a part of some of their early conversation and setting a framework for leadership and for justice, and the outcry was it took too long for an arrest to be made, any attention toward it at all, when we initially heard about the details of the case, i understood that ms. cooperjones, ahmaud arbery�*s mother was told that he had done something wrong for me that he had stolen something, and it wasn't any interest injustice even being paramount in that issue at all. so that spoke to the length and time, the community was outraged. what that spoke to the length and time, the community was outraged. what did ou make of the community was outraged. what did you make of ms- _ the community was outraged. what did you make of ms. cooper— the community was outraged. what did you make of ms. cooperjones - you make of ms. cooperjones behaviour in court chris maxey sat through all of this over weeks, she listened to the defence paint her
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son in a terrible light after everything she had been through, and yet every night, would come out and speak to the press. with and with such dignity. she speak to the press. with and with such dignity-— such dignity. she is a pillar of race, such dignity. she is a pillar of grace. in _ such dignity. she is a pillar of grace. in my _ such dignity. she is a pillar of grace, in my opinion. - such dignity. she is a pillar of grace, in my opinion. she - such dignity. she is a pillar of- grace, in my opinion. she conducted herself with composure, 89, any member of society has to valued the grace and great that that woman showed and demonstrated under some of the most horrific circumstances and having to hear things that no mom, no individual would like to hear about their loved one or family member. i truly admire her grace, and she has to be a woman of great faith. i and she has to be a woman of great faith. ., , and she has to be a woman of great faith. .,, , , ., ~ ., ., faith. i was speaking to our correspondent _ faith. i was speaking to our correspondent outside - faith. i was speaking to our correspondent outside the | faith. i was speaking to our— correspondent outside the courthouse a little earlier, what might have happened had this gone the wrong way. does it heal in any way? does it in another way underlined for you just how dangerous things can be for young black man in america and how
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difficult that is for young black men to getjust as. indie difficult that is for young black men to getjust as.— men to getjust as. we were encouraging, _ men to getjust as. we were encouraging, at _ men to getjust as. we were encouraging, at least - men to getjust as. we were encouraging, at least i - men to getjust as. we were encouraging, at least i was. men to getjust as. we were i encouraging, at least i was as a person of faith, as a clergy person to keep your eyes on your lord, on yourfaith in what to keep your eyes on your lord, on your faith in what the word of god says. this could have done in any different direction had the verdict been different, but we have been praying is a community and my clergy colleagues and i have been coming together day in and day out to praying for our community, notjust praying for our community, not just for this praying for our community, notjust for this particular situation, but so that we can direct our community toward some reconciliation and healing. here we are in 2021, still talking about race to the degree that we are in this particular case of the fact that actually happen, but we also recognise that it wasn't just the justice system that was on trial or just the just the justice system that was on trial orjust the inadequacies of injustice on our community, but humanity, so praying together and rallying together with other
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community member is, it was ourjob as leader is to make sure that we keep the focus on what it needed to be on, which was peace and unity. i'm happy to report that that is actually what has happened. that we are praying together, we have come together and we have gotten to this point. the community was celebratory about it, but also there is a part of our community that is despondent and a part that does not understand, so this is where my work as a person of faith and along with other clergy colleagues playing a very important role because going forward, we are going to be having some conversation about transformation in our community beyond our skin colour and what is actually needed. we are hoping that the response to the verdict will give even more fuel to that conversation and disgrace for the first time in a very long time, we are notjust talking selfishly
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about reconciliation and race issues, we are now talking about issues, we are now talking about issues of the heart and community and what that looks like and seeing each brother and sister as each other�*s keeper. this trial, while it had a lot to do with race, and had more to do with a matter of heart and humanity. more to do with a matter of heart and humanity-— and humanity. thank you for coming on the programme. _ and humanity. thank you for coming on the programme. thank— and humanity. thank you for coming on the programme. thank you - and humanity. thank you for coming on the programme. thank you for i on the programme. thank you for invitin: on the programme. thank you for inviting me- _ this week to mark 100 days of the taliban's control of afghanistan we have been bringing you special reports from kabul. and today we are focusing on the terrorist threat that is resurgent. and the growing presence of isis—k — that is now threatening the taliban's hold on power. today the us state department added 3 isis—k leaders to its list of specially designated global terrorists — citing concerns that the country will again becoming a global exporter of terrorism. my colleague yalda hakim who is in afghanistan — she spoke to senior taliban leader anas haqqani — who was calling for a new relationship with the west after 20 years of war with the american led coalition.
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translation: regarding the fight against the invaders, _ it's true that we were involved, we accept that. every afghan is proud of it. it's because of this fight that we ended the occupation. it is natural that there will be casualties in war. it happened to both sides, and everyone is sorry for that. we are not happy about it, and we ask all sides in a conflict to forgive each other. it's part of warfare. we were not the main cause of this war, however, the united states was. no one is defected to isis, except for maybe a few people who are getting a government salary under the old regime. the rest of us have been working without pay for the last two decades, fighting on empty stomachs. we are not worried about our fighters defecting to isis k, as they have been through hard times of us. it is only those who are getting paid a lot by nato that are worried about money. those poor guys are upset because they've lost
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their luxurious lifestyles. let's pick up some of that from lord dannatt — who served as chief of the general staff of the british army from 2006 to 2009. a tabby with us on the programme. he spent a lot of time in afghanistan. we are way to ice skate find support? is it all about money or about ideological religious reasons as well? i about ideological religious reasons as well? ~' ., about ideological religious reasons as well? ~ ., ., , as well? i think one has to put i asked k and _ as well? i think one has to put i asked k and the _ as well? i think one has to put i asked k and the wider- as well? i think one has to put i asked k and the wider context i asked k and the wider context of islamic state generally, which was a famine i'm in and we didn't know much about until 2014— 2015 when it burst upon the scene in syria and iraq. and 0k, they were thought to the ground in that part of the world, but like any phenomena of that sort, it will pop up elsewhere, and now we have seen and taking advantage and opportunity in afghanistan. i mean, ithink this poses a much bigger question for the west, as to really how we are going
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to respond now and fairly urgently to respond now and fairly urgently to what is going on in afghanistan against a backdrop of, yes, all right, you can say the west was defeated, i would question that, this summer in afghanistan, but there is a real humanitarian crisis amongst the majority of the population in afghanistan. that is something that i think that we are going to struggle to turn our face away from, which we have got to address. �* , ., ., , ., ., address. it's an odd situation. almost my — address. it's an odd situation. almost my enemy's _ address. it's an odd situation. almost my enemy's enemy i address. it's an odd situation. almost my enemy's enemy is| address. it's an odd situation. i almost my enemy's enemy is the address. it's an odd situation. - almost my enemy's enemy is the new focus, and does this get to a situation where the americans have to start thinking about picking aside in afghanistan and maybe army the taliban to fight a k? —— taliban. the taliban to fight a k? -- taliban. ~ , the taliban to fight a k? -- talihan-_ the taliban to fight a k? -- taliban. ~ , , , , the taliban to fight a k? -- taliban. y , , , , taliban. my enemies enemy is my friend is the _ taliban. my enemies enemy is my friend is the phrase _ taliban. my enemies enemy is my friend is the phrase going - taliban. my enemies enemy is my friend is the phrase going throughj friend is the phrase going through my mind as well. i think the common enemy undoubtedly is isis k, where it's pops up, and currently it's trying to make a presence of some
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such sense in afghanistan. i think the west has really got to stop and consider, yes, of course on the one hand, we are bruised, i would argue self bruised by our withdrawal from afghanistan this summer. but that has actually left the majority of the afghan people who we where trying to help, and of course up until this summer, afghan civil society had been developing pretty well. so that majority of the population that we where trying to help has now been left in crisis, or be a crisis, a crisis of notjust being paid, they haven't got anything to eat. food is a real issue. there is a huge proportion 90 plus % of the population in afghanistan facing a real crisis of just staying alive this winter. the west is going to decide really quickly. us—led, what are you going
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to be towards the town band? we don't like the historic approach to human rights, but which is the worst evil here? is it to allow a country who spent 20 years trying to help struggle, orare who spent 20 years trying to help struggle, or are we going to come to some pragmatic compromise on the basis of my enemies enemy is our friend to help the afghan people and to an extent help the afghan military at least a part time with arms or whatever it is an issue too far, but isis k is definitely on the wrong side of the argument, but we have got to support the afghan people, after all, after 20 years we do have to try to help them. we don't have _ do have to try to help them. we don't have resources on the ground, and i think the americans knew that the threat would metastasize and that they would have to look at new ways of fighting isis can the ground. given that some of the early membership of that group included a contingent of pakistani militants did they have to look to islamabad as well for some help?—
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as well for some help? indeed. we have always _ as well for some help? indeed. we have always said _ as well for some help? indeed. we have always said and _ as well for some help? indeed. we have always said and recognised i have always said and recognised that afghanistan is important in its own right, but afghanistan is important for its significance in the region and more widely connects notjust the region, actually, it's the world, but in terms of this current immediate crisis, i think conversations with islam are extraordinarily important. to an extent by extension with new delhi as well, reports recently he that imran khan of pakistan has allowed a very large shipment of wheat to come through pakistan and india, and that is hopeful. we've got to be pragmatic. we've got to be quick about it, because we are staring down the barrel of a humanitarian crisis of the enormous proportions, and we have some responsibility for that. i thinkjoe biden should not sleep too comfortably in his bed as a result of the decisions that he took earlier this year, which has
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left the most unfortunate situation in afghanistan, which was avoidable. we are always grateful for your expertise. thank you for coming on the programme. stay with some bbc news. still to come... new zealand opens its borders to vaccinated visitors for the first time in two years. a cross—party group of mps has called for the home office to be stripped of responsibility — for the scheme which is meant to compensate thousands of people — who came to britain from the caribbean from the end of the 1940s to the early 1970s. known as the windrush generation they're owed compensation because they were wrongly classed as illegal immigrants. only 5% of those eligible have so far received any money. daniel sandford reports. some three decades ago, fitzroy came to britain as a 14—year—old boy. he came here legally. he never left but, in 2008, his life was turned upside down when the home office declared
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that he was an illegal immigrant. it had an effect that made me homeless, made me have no money, made me have to beg. made me have to eat people's leftovers. it's even had an effect on me today. the empire windrush brings to britain... the windrush scandal, named after one of the first ships to bring workers to britain from the caribbean after the war, led to thousands of people being wrongly classed as illegal immigrants, meaning they couldn't work, find a home or access the nhs. some were deported. a committee of mps has said the compensation scheme for those affected has put daunting obstacles in the way of applicants and paid out to less
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than 6% of those eligible. the injustices of the windrush scandal are being compounded by the delays, the bureaucratic insensitivities and problems in the compensation scheme. that is deeply wrong. the mps suggested the compensation scheme should be taken out of the hands of the home office, ministers are resisting that. taking it away from the department with the most expertise in this area the duke and duchess of cambridge have chosen itv rather than the bbc — to broadcast a special christmas carol concert. the choice was apparently made after the bbc broadcast a controversial documentary on royal life. the first part of "the princes and the press" was shown on monday — and led to the bbc being criticised by the royal households for giving credibility to what they called "overblown and unfounded claims". 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. it was billed as an examination of the relationship between the princes and the press.
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it's resulted in a sharp falling out between one prince in particular and the bbc. to understand why, we need to go back to another bbc programme, the panorama interview with diana, princess of wales. in a report earlier this year, the bbc�*s handling of the whole matter was strongly criticised. the anger of diana's eldest son, william, was palpable. it brings indescribable sadness to know that the bbc�*s failures contributed significantly to herfear, paranoia and isolation that i remember from those final years with her. and so when the bbc�*s media editor, amol rajan, began to look at a more recent family episode, the painful falling out between william and harry, the results induced royal indignation. in particular the hints, so far unsubstantiated, that royal officials may have leaked unflattering stories about harry and his wife meghan to the press.
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in a joint statement at the end of monday's first episode of the programme, buckingham palace, clarence house and kensington palace said... today, as the duchess of cambridge visited a school in north london, the royals removed from the bbc the right to transmit a christmas concert which the duchess will introduce from westminster abbey. the bbc will make the programme, but now itv will broadcast it. the bbc�*s chairman, richard sharp, was asked about the row over a conference video link. we have tremendous respect for all aspects of the royal family in all they undertake and do. one thing we can say, the circumstances which lie behind the breach between the brothers remain painful to all concerned. nicholas witchell, bbc news.
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it is two years sionce new zealand pulled down the shutters but the government has finally unveiled plans to welcome back the shutters but foreigners will finally be allowed back in next year as long as you're fully vaccinated. and the good news for new zealanders who have been seperated from family outside the country is that they will be allowed to travel home from january, next year under similar rules. let's speak to lloyd burr, a radio host for magic talk in new zealand. lovely to have you on the programme. finally, cause for celebration. how is this going to work? it’s finally, cause for celebration. how is this going to work?— is this going to work? it's quite complicated — is this going to work? it's quite complicated it's _ is this going to work? it's quite complicated it's been - is this going to work? it's quite complicated it's been months i is this going to work? it's quite i complicated it's been months and months not really having any dates at all and the government having to give us clarity, give us dates, give us something to work towards, and in a space of a couple of weeks, they've given us a whole lot of dates directorates, in terms of opening the borders come i think it was back in april last year that they close the border us, no foreigners unless you've got some super exemption, they haven't been allowed to comment, but they will
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give some dates for when you guys are finally allowed to come, and if you are a qb living in australia, you are a qb living in australia, you are a qb living in australia, you are allowed to come from january the 17th, that means you don't have to go into the government and iq hotel system to meet and go to your parents house or go to the house if you own one or abbey and beacon if you own one or abbey and beacon if you don't have that much money, go to a campsite, get a tent, and i the air, seven days command if you get a negative test on your last day, then you are allowed out. they open up to kiwis living in the rest of the world, so let slaving over in the uk. they will be allowed to come in from february the 14th and everyone else from papa new guinea, they are on a black list because of their low vaccination rates, but everyone else in the world can come here from april the 30th.— in the world can come here from arilthe 30th. , , ,., april the 30th. there must be some relief from those _ april the 30th. there must be some relief from those new _ april the 30th. there must be some relief from those new zealanders i april the 30th. there must be some l relief from those new zealanders who have been locked out of the country for months at great expense, and the emotional toll that it's taken on families there in new zealand. there have been people — families there in new zealand. there have been people who _ families there in new zealand. there have been people who have - have been people who have been trying to get back, because it's been this horrific voucher system,
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essentially a lottery, a lottery of misery i think the opposition parties they are calling it where you sit in this online digital lobby, and it's tens of thousands of tv sitting there, and it's like a lucky duck, it's a lottery in which your name gets called out of a hat. you get a place in a facility and you go there, it's all run by the government and you are there for two weeks. it'sjust been government and you are there for two weeks. it's just been a lucky duck scenario, so people since the beginning of this pandemic who have not seen their loved ones, so this news is huge for them, particularly those living in australia, because there is no bubble at the moment, so those living in australia, they will not be home for christmas, but at least they will be home for the end of summer. aha, least they will be home for the end of summer-— of summer. a quick one, 30 seconds left, is it of summer. a quick one, 30 seconds left. is it a — of summer. a quick one, 30 seconds left, is it a curious _ of summer. a quick one, 30 seconds left, is it a curious time _ of summer. a quick one, 30 seconds left, is it a curious time to _ of summer. a quick one, 30 seconds left, is it a curious time to take - of summer. a quick one, 30 seconds left, is it a curious time to take a - left, is it a curious time to take a decision like this when the rates are going appearagain decision like this when the rates are going appear again in europe? yeah, they are sort of worried come every six months behind you guys are we six months ahead? so, it's will be interesting to see what you guys go through if you have some are lockdowns, we will certainly keep an eye on that.
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lockdowns, we will certainly keep an eye on that-— eye on that. nice that we can come back to new _ eye on that. nice that we can come back to new zealand. _ eye on that. nice that we can come back to new zealand. we _ eye on that. nice that we can come back to new zealand. we are - eye on that. nice that we can come i back to new zealand. we are looking forward to that. i ve to talk to you. thank you so much for getting up you. thank you so much for getting up for us. i think it's about ten to 11, so it's probably that she is probably at work. we will be back at the same time tomorrow. do join us for that. hello. there is a lot going on with our weather over the next few days. certainly it will feel cold, but at times, conditions are likely to be quite turbulent, with rain, sleet and snow in the forecast, and the risk of severe gales, particularly through friday and into the start of the weekend. thursday, though, is looking like a relatively dry and bright day with this ridge of high pressure trying to build its way in from the west. lots of sunshine, some showers, especially around the coasts, driven in on a cold northerly wind — all of us into the cold air for thursday. but expect blue skies and sunshine overhead for many areas, the wind feeding showers particularly into coastal areas, the showers in northern scotland likely to be wintry over high ground, yes, but even to relatively low levels at times through the day.
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temperatures, well, they will struggle. 5 to 9 degrees, maybe 10 there for the channel islands. and then as we move out of thursday into friday, well, this is where the weather starts to get quite turbulent. low pressure diving down from the north, outbreaks of rain pushing southwards, but with cold air continuing to feed in, it's likely that we will see some wintry showers, especially over high ground in the west, and this curl of a weather front could bring some quite significant snow into northern scotland, especially over the hills and mountains, but even to relatively low levels. it's a cold day, it's an increasingly windy day, and talking of the winds, as we go through friday night, depending slightly upon the exact shape of this area of low pressure, we are expecting a swathe of really strong winds. gales or severe gales likely across northern and western areas, but perhaps getting down into parts of wales, the south—west, parts of north—east england as well. one or two spots could see gusts of around 80mph, so the winds could be disruptive and damaging.
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the blustery and wintry weather continues into saturday, only slowly calming down, really, from the west. we keep those strong winds through the day. there could well be some rain, sleet and snow showers here and there, and when we factor in the strength of that northerly wind, well, temperatures on the thermometer are going to struggle, but stand in the winds, it is going to feel more like this. it will feel sub—zero for many places on saturday afternoon. now, what about the second half of the weekend? well, our area of low pressure is likely to slowly drift away eastwards. we've got another weather system pushing in from the west, but there is something of a gap in between. so while i think it will still be quite breezy on sunday, the winds won't be as strong. there'll be a lot of dry weather and some spells of sunshine, perhaps more cloud and some patchy rain into the west later on. but it is going to be a really cold day. temperatures on sunday afternoon between 2 and 8 degrees. now for monday, it's likely we'll see cloud and outbreaks of rain, perhaps preceded by a little bit of snow working eastwards.
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but as this weather system works in from the west, it is going to start to introduce some milder air. so cardiff, belfast, plymouth likely to get up into double digits, and that's a sign of things to come, actually, into next week. now if you've been watching our week ahead forecast through this week, you'll have heard me talking about this cold air never being too far away to the north. well, it looks at this stage like mild air is most likely to win out for most of the time, but that cold air is not far away, so this forecast certainly isn't nailed on. it does look likely, though, to turn a little milder for a time next week, and with that, there will be some spells of wind and rain.
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tonight at ten, tragedy in the english channel — at least 31 migrants have drowned trying to reach the uk. it's the worst incident of its kind since the migrant crisis started in the channel. a rescue operation is still going on. the french authorities say those who died are victims of "criminal smugglers". britain says it's a terrible tragedy and a warning to others. it's an appalling thing that they have suffered, but i also want to say that this disaster underscores how dangerous it is to cross the channel in this way. i'm live in calais, where the french president— i'm live in calais, where the french president emmanuel macron has said he won't _ president emmanuel macron has said he won't let the channel become a cemetery —
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we'll have the latest on the emergency operation.

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