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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  November 24, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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only a fraction of the people caught up in the windrush scandal have received the financial compensation they are due. thousands of people were wrongly classed as illegal immigrants, and are still struggling with the system that is meant to be making amends. the people you're dealing with really don't understand where you're coming from. i don't think so, anyway. they treat you like you're nobody, and it's the same circle, non—stop. mps have called for the system to be taken out of government control. we'll have the latest. also this lunchtime: after the death of pc andrew harper, a mandatory life sentence is proposed for anyone who kills a member of the emergency services while committing a crime in england and wales. the disappearance of 18 year old bobbi—anne mcleod in plymouth — two men are arrested on suspicion
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of murder, after police find a body. labour accuses borisjohnson of breaking promises about the funding of social care — and questions his recent performance. is everything 0k, prime minister? prime minister. well, mr speaker, itell you what's not working, is that line of attack. and, lift—off on a nasa mission to find out how to protect earth from asteroids. and coming up on the bbc news channel, should amateurs play in professional tournaments? shaun murphy doesn't think so, after being knocked out of the uk championships in the first round.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. only 5% of people from the windrush generation who were wrongly classed as illegal immigrants in the uk, have received the compensation they are due, more than three years after the scandal was revealed. a scheme was set up in 2018, to help thousands of people who were denied healthcare, housing, the right to work, and in some cases were detained or deported, even though they'd lived in britain for decades. 23 people who were affected have died before receiving any payment. now a report by mps has called for the scheme to be taken out of government control, warning that it's causing further trauma. our home affairs editor, mark easton, reports. the empire windrush brings to britain 500 jamaicans. many are ex—servicemen who know england. the windrush compensation scheme
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was supposed to right the wrongs of a scandal that rocked the government and the nation. thousands of british residents, mostly of caribbean heritage, had been wrongly classed as illegal immigrants by the home office, denied the right to work, health care and housing. others were held in immigration detention or deported. but now, an all—party committee of mps has concluded the scheme itself has actually compounded the injustice. to be in a situation where, four years on from the windrush scandal, only 30% of those applying have received anything, only 5% of those eligible have received anything, is simply wrong. and it really doesn't recognise that this is an ageing generation who were so badly wronged by home office failures. the home affairs committee's report refers to the excessive burden on claimants, inadequate staffing and long delays, with concerns that many are still too fearful of the home office to apply at all.
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four years on from the windrush scandal, the committee notes the vast majority of people who applied for compensation have yet to receive a penny. what is this, what's going on? are you anthony brian? yes? what's this about? anthony brian, i'm arresting you on suspicion of being an illegal resident. what you talking about, illegal? this tv drama tells the story of one windrush victim, anthony brian, who was almost deported, and his wife janet mckay, who spent her life savings fighting to keep her husband in the uk. i just think they're a headache, stressful. and the people you're dealing with really don't understand where you're coming from. i don't think so, anyway. they treat you like you're nobody. and it's the same circle non—stop. responding to the mps' damning report, the home office said the home secretary and the department remained steadfast in their commitment to ensure that members of the windrush generation received
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every penny of compensation that they were entitled to. adding, that they continue to make improvements to the scheme. mark easton, bbc news. mark eastonjoins me now. mps are calling for the home office to relinquish control of this scheme. how likely is that and how quickly could that be done, given time is of the essence? well, as you say, perhaps one of the most shocking things about this report is the fact that so many of those who would be entitled to compensation potentially have not even applied. and that, the committee concludes, is because they are fearful of the home office. as one windrush victim told me today, it is as though the offender, the home office in this case, is also thejudge and jury. i think home office in this case, is also the judge and jury. i think for an awful lot of people who have obviously been deeply, deeply affected by what happened as a result of the windrush scandal, they
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simply don't trust the home office. the mps would like to see an independent body, perhaps led by a judge, reviewing each of those cases. the home office has said they don't think that is a good idea because that would risk significantly delaying vital payments to those affected and the delays are already substantial, of course. and the home office goes on to say that they have already made significant improvements to the scheme and they've paid out £31.6 million with a further 5.6 million having been offered. nevertheless, this is a scandal that i think the home office had hoped they would be able to draw a line under. it is far from that now.— able to draw a line under. it is far from that now. mark easton. thank ou. anyone convicted of killing an on—duty member of the emergency services while committing a crime in england and wales, will automatically receive a life sentence, under government plans. the proposed change in the law follows a campaign by the widow of pc andrew harper, who died trying to stop a burglary in berkshire in 2019.
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his teenage killers were convicted of manslaughter. the national police chiefs council is among those who've welcomed the proposals, as our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. lissie harper's campaign has taken her to the heart of government. today she was back in london to meet the justice secretary, today she was back in london to meet thejustice secretary, dominic raab. the call by pc harper's family for a new law has been supported by the police federation of england and wales. just four weeks after his wedding in 2019, pc andrew harper was killed. ministers have now announced there will be a mandatory life sentence for anyone convicted of killing an emergency worker while committing a crime. we think as we come through this pandemic and we build back stronger, fairer, in all sorts of ways, we should increase the sentences for those attacks and murders, or unlawful killings, i should say, of emergency workers. and we want them to know that we've got their back.
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pc harper was chasing a group of suspects when he became caught in the tow rope of the getaway car. he was dragged for over a mile at speeds of more than a0 mph. teenagers henry long, albert bowers and jesse cole were convicted of his manslaughter. they were cleared of murder, so could not automatically be given a lifetime. —— a life term. the proposed law change won't affect them, and some lawyers are concerned about the consequences for future cases. i think it blurs the distinction between murder and manslaughter. murder requires an intent to kill, or to cause really serious injury. manslaughter can be committed with, well, it normally is committed, without any such content. i think to remove all discretion from judges in cases of manslaughter of emergency workers would be quite wrong. lissie harper says emergency workers deserve special protection
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because they go into the depths of danger on behalf of society. ministers are planning for harper's law to come into force next year. june kelly, bbc news. police are questioning two men on suspicion of murder, following the death of an 18 year old woman from plymouth. officers searching for bobbi—anne mcleod say they found a woman's body six miles from the city centre yesterday. she had been reported missing after failing to meet friends on saturday. andrew plant is in plymouth. just 300 metres, that is how far bobbi—anne mcleod had walked from herfamily home on bobbi—anne mcleod had walked from her family home on saturday night to get to this bus stop. then she completely vanished. the huge search to find her ended like yesterday evening and police said they had found a body. bobbi—anne mcleod had left home for a night out in plymouth.
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but the 18—year—old never arrived. today at the bus stop where it's thought she disappeared, people have been laying flowers. everyone here had been following the search for bobbi—anne, everyone hoping she would be found alive. i think it has hit the whole city, really. but to me, growing up here, i used to walk up that hill by myself all the time, you know. i think it is truly heartbreaking. it has really affected me. i've been following it through obviously all the facebook posts and stuff like that. just hearing that she passed away and had been left out in the cold and stuff like that, it'sjust heartbreaking. bobbi—anne's brother paid tribute to her on facebook today saying, "until we meet again, sis. i love you." after three days of searching, police said last night a body had been found in a wood near a beach on the south coastjust a few miles away from bobbi—anne's home. this is weighing heavy on the people of plymouth tonight, it really is. and i would like tojust send my thoughts to the friends and family of bobbi—anne.
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that actually feels like it is a relatively inadequate thing to say at such a time, but we are doing our utmost and will continue to do everything we can to understand exactly what has happened. forensic teams have been searching this area today. police say two men from plymouth aged 2a and 26 are still being questioned on suspicion of murder. and tonight the whole of this city will pay its respects to bobbi—anne. the buildings at the harbour—side will be laid up in a gesture of solidarity to show that everybody here is grieving for bobbi—anne alongside herfriends here is grieving for bobbi—anne alongside her friends and family. andrew plant, thank you. a child who was injured when a car ploughed through a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin, has died, taking the death toll in the incident to six. eight—year—old jackson sparks was hit on sunday alongside his 12—year—old brother tucker, who remains in hospital. the suspect in the crash, darrell brooks, has appeared in court charged with multiple counts of murder. about 50 other people were injured.
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sir keir starmer has accused the prime minister of breaking promises about the social care system, accusing borisjohnson of devising a "working class dementia tax". the prime minister defended the changes, saying the government was fixing the system labour hadn't. speaking at prime minister's questions, the labour leader also brought up borisjohnson�*s performance at this week's cbi conference. it follows a difficult period for the prime minister, who has been criticised for a u—turn on standards reform and the cancellation of part of hs2. our political correspondent damian grammaticas reports. are your mps behind you, prime minister? have you lost the support of your backbenchers, prime minister?— of your backbenchers, prime minister? ., , ., , minister? uncomfortable questions after an uncomfortable _ minister? uncomfortable questions after an uncomfortable few - minister? uncomfortable questions after an uncomfortable few weeks. | after an uncomfortable few weeks. borisjohnson has seemed discontent and had his authority queried. last week there were empty spaces on the
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conservative benches. keir week there were empty spaces on the conservative benches.— conservative benches. keir starmer drew attention _ conservative benches. keir starmer drew attention to _ conservative benches. keir starmer drew attention to it. _ conservative benches. keir starmer drew attention to it. i _ conservative benches. keir starmer drew attention to it. i see - conservative benches. keir starmer drew attention to it. i see they've l drew attention to it. i see they've turned up this week, prime minister. the cheering came from tories showing support for the prime minister. but sir keir starmer attacked him for not delivering on promises he made. just attacked him for not delivering on promises he made.— promises he made. just like he romised promises he made. just like he promised he — promises he made. just like he promised he wouldn't - promises he made. just like he promised he wouldn't put - promises he made. just like he promised he wouldn't put up i promises he made. just like he l promised he wouldn't put up tax. just like he promised a0 new hospitals. just like he promised a real revolution in the north. prime minister,... real revolution in the north. prime minister,..-_ real revolution in the north. prime minister,... yet again he raises the real revolution _ minister,... yet again he raises the real revolution in _ minister,... yet again he raises the real revolution in the _ minister,... yet again he raises the real revolution in the north. - minister,... yet again he raises the real revolution in the north. three l real revolution in the north. three new high— real revolution in the north. three new high speed lines, mr speaker, 96, 90 _ new high speed lines, mr speaker, 96, 90 £6 — new high speed lines, mr speaker, 96, 90 £6 billion. again, nothing like it _ 96, 90 £6 billion. again, nothing like it. nothing like it, mr speaker, nothing like it for a century _ speaker, nothing like it for a centu . ~ ~ century. mr speaker i think he has lost his place _ century. mr speaker i think he has lost his place in _ century. mr speaker i think he has lost his place in his _ century. mr speaker i think he has lost his place in his notes - century. mr speaker i think he has lost his place in his notes again! i lost his place in his notes again! labour is my key attack was in the way social care costs will fall on the poorest homeowners. he has icked the poorest homeowners. he has picked the _ the poorest homeowners. he has picked the pockets _ the poorest homeowners. he has picked the pockets of _ the poorest homeowners. he has picked the pockets of working - the poorest homeowners. he has-
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picked the pockets of working people to protect the estates of the pantheist. how could he possibly have managed to devise a working—class dementia tax? this working-class dementia tax? this does more _ working-class dementia tax? this does more for _ working—class dementia tax? this does more for working people up and down _ does more for working people up and down the _ does more for working people up and down the country than labour ever did, because we are actually solving the problem they failed to address. we are _ the problem they failed to address. we are disregarding your housing as it all together, mr speaker, while you are _ it all together, mr speaker, while you are in — it all together, mr speaker, while you are in it. it it all together, mr speaker, while you are in it— you are in it. it ended with sir keir starmer _ you are in it. it ended with sir keir starmer poking _ you are in it. it ended with sir keir starmer poking no - you are in it. it ended with sir keir starmer poking no fun i you are in it. it ended with sir keir starmer poking no fun at| you are in it. it ended with sir - keir starmer poking no fun at boris johnson. ,, ., keir starmer poking no fun at boris johnson, ,, ., , .,, keir starmer poking no fun at boris johnson. ,, ., , .,, johnson. senior people in downing street tell the _ johnson. senior people in downing street tell the bbc _ johnson. senior people in downing street tell the bbc it _ johnson. senior people in downing street tell the bbc it is _ johnson. senior people in downing street tell the bbc it is just - johnson. senior people in downing street tell the bbc it is just not. street tell the bbc it is just not working. is everything ok, prime minister? working. is everything 0k, prime minister? ~ , working. is everything 0k, prime minister?_ mr - minister? prime minister. mr speaker. _ minister? prime minister. mr speaker. i— minister? prime minister. mr speaker, itell— minister? prime minister. mr speaker, i tell you _ minister? prime minister. mr speaker, i tell you what - minister? prime minister. mr speaker, i tell you what is i minister? prime minister. mr| speaker, i tell you what is not working. — speaker, i tell you what is not working, is that line of attack. the prime working, is that line of attack. tue: prime minister working, is that line of attack. tte: prime minister still working, is that line of attack. t"t;e: prime minister still drawing working, is that line of attack. the: prime minister still drawing cheers but still under pressure. damian grammaticas, bbc news, westminster. an mp has been told she cannot sit in the commons with her three—month—old son. labour's stella creasy has been
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informed it's against the rules to bring a child to a debate, after doing so on tuesday. the mp for walthamstow has attended debates with a baby in the past and called for a review. here's our political correspondent helen catt. there are strongly held views on all sides. stella creasy often took her eldest daughter hetty into the commons after she was born in 2019. and she has been doing the same with her son, pip, who is now 13 weeks old. so she says she was baffled to get an e—mail saying it is not allowed. i use the creche for my elder child because i certainly wouldn't want to take a toddler who is capable of finding everything breakable or spreadable in a room within five minutes into the parliamentary chamber. but this little chap is very young, he is being fed, and itjust simply would not work to put him into the nursery right now. it is why we really need proper maternity cover. in the absence of that, i don't want to let my constituents down and leave them not represented. so something has to change. because mps are elected, not employed, they can't take maternity leave in quite the same way as other people.
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so they can take paid time off from parliament and they can get someone else in do some bits theirjob. but not all of it. because only an elected person can do things like speaking in the commons chamber. stella creasy is not the first mp to take their baby into the chamber. this was the former lib demsjo swinson in 2018. and this, a former conservative minister, being sworn in in 2019 with her daughter. the speaker said he recognised times were changing, but... this house has to be able to function professionally and without disturbance. however, sometimes there may be occasions when the chair can exercise discretion assuming that business is not to be disturbed. i accept there are differing views on this matter. indeed, i have been contacted by honourable members who have babies with a range of views. there are also likely to be some consequential matters. therefore i have asked the chair of the procedure committee if she and her committee would look into this matter and bring forward recommendations. whether or not to allow babies
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in the chamber is one of many questions facing parliament in its long—running challenge of balancing procedures developed over hundreds of years, with being a workplace fit for the 21st century. our top story this lunchtime. only a fraction of the people caught up in the windrush scandal have recieved the financial compensation they are due. hope for couples who've experienced miscarriages, as the health watchdog recommends a treatment that may prevent early pregnancy loss. coming up on the bbc news channel. mauricio pochettino is in manchester — but he's not headed to old trafford this time. amid specualtion around the vacancy there, his paris st germain side take on manchester city tonight in the champions league. they've been dubbed "lgbt free zones" — large swathes of poland where local
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governments declared they were against campaigns for rights for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people, which they viewed as an attack on catholic values. in response, the eu said it would freeze more than 100 million euros in funding for five provinces — and in recent months, larger regions have started to backtrack on some of their anti—lgbt policies. our europe correspondent, jessica parker, reports from poland's holy cross province. early evening in kielce in poland's holy cross province. tomic is from here, a gay man living his life — but with limits. i'm too scared to show affection to my boyfriend in the street, for example, and i would never do that for the fear of being either mocked or attack. five provinces, including holy cross, were among areas to declare they were against lgbt ideology or ideologies that undermined the family.
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then... music plays ..a shift in tone. regions started to backtrack after the eu said it would withhold millions in funding. even though the resolution has been repealed, personally i don't feel any change and i don't feel that the atmosphere in poland has changed because of that. into the offices of a leading local politician, the holy cross province assembly revoked its resolution, andre says that wasn't mainly about getting eu money, although they decided to be conciliatory. do you accept you have caused or added to distress felt by lgbt people living in your region? translation: | don't feel bad | about it, because towards those people i'm being fair. i have often explained to them it's not about their personal views or behaviours, but about the general values of our society. and that if you undermine those values it's going to end badly for society, for the families,
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and especially for the children. so we're driving further south, to a town. some young people through our contacts have said they want to speak to us. in this predominantly catholic country, what happens in schools is all part of the debate. these teenagers spoke to us anonymously. teachers, they don't. .. they are totally not telling you about lgbtq. they are ignoring. how does that make you feel? sad. because it's not fair for me. i'm not happy about it, because i am lgbtq, and i want to learn more about it. a protest outside parliament in warsaw against a campaign to try and ban pride parades. tensions on this issue have not gone away. shared eu money is one thing, shared values another. jessica parker, bbc news, in poland.
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bbc sport has confirmed michael vaughan will not be part of its coverage of the ashes, after it was alleged he made a racist comment when he played at yorkshire cricket club in 2009. the former england captain has denied the allegation, but bbc sport said his involvement in the ongoing situation at yorkshire represents a conflict of interest. our senior sports news reporter laura scott has the latest. what laura scott has the latest. more can you tell us? t relates what more can you tell us? this relates to an allegation that the former england captain michael vaughan made a racist remark during his time at yorkshire. it was alleged by azeem rafiq and two other asian players that in 2009 michael vaughan told them, too many of you lot, we need to do something about it. michael vaughan has denied making the comments and said six other players on the team have no recollection of it. he said his reputation was being unfairly trashed. his radio show with x
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cricketer phil tufnell has not since been aired and discussions have been ongoing about his role on test match special. to date the bbc announced that he will not be part of the team covering the ashes series in australia which begins in two weeks' time or write a coverage of cricket at the moment due to what it called editorial reasons. in a statement the bbc explained it did not feel it would be appropriate while he was involved in a significant story in cricket. the corporation said contributors are required to discuss relevant topics and his involvement in the yorkshire story represents a conflict of interest.— conflict of interest. laura scott, thank you- _ women who experience bleeding in early pregnancy and have previously lost a baby should be given the hormone progesterone, to help avoid a miscarriage — that's the new recommendation from the health watchdog nice. a study found the treatment was more effective the more miscarriages a woman had had.
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researchers have hailed the guidance as �*a significant moment', which could lead to more than 8,000 further births a year in the uk. tulip mazumdar has more. as you know, it will be a little bit quiet. and then as soon as i can see anything i'll show you exactly what we're looking at. is that all right? these seconds pass slowly. and then... there's your beautiful baby's heart beating. josie has been pregnant five times before. she experienced bleeding early on in all of those pregnancies, leading to a loss each time. that's really lovely. and the baby is starting to wriggle about now. this time, though, she has been put on progesterone, and all seems to be going well. we had definitely got to the point where we really thought we wouldn't become parents. and after five losses, to get this far and actually start
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to believe it might happen, isjust incredible. progesterone is naturally secreted during early pregnancy and we know that the hormone supports that pregnancy in the early stages and is vital for the continuation of that pregnancy. the research that this new guidance is based on shows that the more miscarriages a woman suffered, the more effective progesterone treatment was. it didn't make any difference to women who had had no losses, though. some doctors do already prescribe progesterone, but today's change in recommendations means it will be much more widely available. i think it is tremendous that we have an effective treatment that has been recommended by nice. we estimate that in the uk alone about 8000 miscarriages would be prevented from this treatment. but it is really important to appreciate that only some miscarriages can be prevented by progesterone. one, two, three, go!
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faye is proud mum to five—year—old leila. they took part in the tommy's charity prism trial which led to today's changing guidance. it was a relief that we were doing something different during that pregnancy and obviously it was a happy ending. tulip mazumdar, bbc news. there's been a further development in the row between the bbc and the royal family over the documentary, the princes and the press. the first part of which aired on monday. our royal correspondent nicholas witchelljoins me now. what is going on? for a bit of context there is undoubtedly irritation in the royal household but especially at kensington palace and especially on the part of prince
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william. he still feels of course quite aggrieved at the bbc over the panorama interview with his mother and of course the bbc was roundly condemned in the dyson report. these feelings have been exaggerated by these programmes, the princes and these programmes, the princes and the press. the palace is indignant, it appears partly because the bbc refused to show in the programmes in advance. these programmes are made from bbc news and bbc news does not do that. they are angry at what they call overblown and unfounded claims being presented as facts. that seems to revolve around the suggestion in the programme but members of the royal household is briefed against harry and megan in the fallout from the falling out between the cambridge and sussex households. so to the developments, it appears the bbc is to be punished. a christmas concert which is being fronted by the duke and duchess of cambridge and made by the bbc is it would
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appear now to be transmitted by itv. the bbc chairman richard sharpe has said this morning from time to time we produce programmes which may or may not meet with full agreement with different parts of the establishment. he went on, we have tremendous respect for all aspects of the royal family in what they undertake and do.— new zealand will begin to allow tourists to enter the country from the end of april, more than two years after closing its borders due to the pandemic. fully vaccinated visitors will be the last group allowed into the country in a phased reopening, with some citizens and residents welcomed back from january. all those arriving will be tested for covid and will have to self isolate for seven days. it's the stuff of hollywood blockbusters — an asteroid hurtling towards earth, threatening devastation.
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so this morning, nasa began an attempt to ensure that risk doesn't become a reality. the agency is targeting a harmless space rock to see whether it can be nudged off course, testing technology that could divert an asteroid. our science correspondent rebecca morelle explains. three, two, one... and lift off of the falcon 9... blasting off into space for a mission like no other. at the end of the first stage you could see those engines coming to life. this is the start of a 7 million mile journey for nasa's first ever test of technology to defend the planet. on board is the dart spacecraft, and it is heading for an asteroid, to crash into it and knock it off course. this rock doesn't pose any danger to our planet, but the mission could help with any future threats. the reason we are doing this is in case we ever discover
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an asteroid actually headed towards the earth. we want to know that we can use this technique to change its orbit so it does not impact earth. nasa is targeting a small asteroid called dimorphos which is orbiting around a larger space rock. the spacecraft, travelling at 13,000 miles an hour, will fly into the small asteroid, leaving an impact crater up to 20 metres wide. but this should also give the rock a kick which will speed up its orbit and this can be monitored from the earth to see if it has worked. all you really need is a nudge. because the distances you are going and the speeds you are going, a tiny change in direction can result in a huge change in how far it is going to miss the earth. and that could be vital. a 160 metres wide rock like dimorphos could be catastrophic for populated areas. bigger asteroids that are kilometres across have the potential to devastate the planet. the hope is this mission will show us if it is possible to stop future collisions.
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and this was the moment the dart spacecraft was deployed. it faces a long journey ahead before it arrives at its destination next autumn. rebecca morelle, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. then rich is here. i might bring you right back down to earth because the weather is set to become colder and a lot more turbulent with some rain, sleet and even snow in the forecast and the risk of severe gales for the end of the week. for the moment things are relatively quiet. the cold are already moving down from the north behind this weather front. ahead of that a lot of cloud and behind that brighter showers with

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