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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 23, 2021 11:30pm-12:00am GMT

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after 100 days of taliban rule in afghanistan, there are warnings the country is on the brink of a humanitarian catastrophe. the un says more than half of the population is at risk of going hungry in the coming months. president biden has announced a coordinated global action plan to tackle rising petrol prices. under the plan, 50 million barrels of oil will be released from emergency reserves to help lower fuel prices for americans. nearly 50 people, several of them children, have been killed after a bus crash in bulgaria. most of the victims are thought to be tourists from north macedonia. nasa is set to launch a mission to deliberately slam a spacecraft into an asteroid to try to alter its course. they're testing technology that could stop an asteroid colliding with earth.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are our guestsjoining me tonight arejournalist and times radio presenter jenny kleeman and martin lipton, chief sports reporter at the sun. hello again. quickly through some of those front pages. the daily telegraph tomorrow looks at coronavirus vaccines, reporting the astrazeneca jab may give longer lasting immunity than other vaccines. the guardian reports of treasury frustration at number ten's handling of major political decisions following what it calls a series of botched announcements. trouble at the top — the i says a number ten spokesperson has insisted the prime minister is not unwell and he has not lost his grip. meanwhile, the metro's
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front page has the news of a couple found stabbed to death in their home, allegedly due to a dispute over parking. killing a police officer or 999 worker is to be punished with a mandatory life sentence, reports the daily mail, after the government confirmed that �*harper�*s law', named after pc andrew harper, will go on the statute book. the ft reports that the former prime minister, david cameron, lobbied a conservative on the board lloyds banking group who he'd given a title to, to reverse a decision to cut ties with the ailing greensill capital. and will and kate bin bbc. the sun reports that the royals have banned the bbc from screening their christmas carol concert over reported �*fury�* over a documentary about harry and meghan.
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let's begin our chat. martin and jenny, lovely to see you again. martin, we're going to start off with the guardian. one of the stories�*s headlines, victims of still unpaid after four years of. victims of still unpaid after four ears of. , , . victims of still unpaid after four earsof. , , .,, victims of still unpaid after four earsof. , , ., ., years of. this is a story from a re ort years of. this is a story from a report by _ years of. this is a story from a report by the _ years of. this is a story from a report by the home _ years of. this is a story from a report by the home affairs - years of. this is a story from a i report by the home affairs select committee into the compensation payments from the windrush scandal, the thousands of legal residents that were sent back to their initial islands. it says that so far, only 864 people have received a pay—out. it's expected 15,000 would
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86a people have received a pay—out. it's expected 15,000 would qualify. it's expected 15,000 would qualify. it's a very small number, and others died before receiving a payment. this whole scheme should be transferred to the home office in order to promote trust. to those affected by the policy. it has been affected by the policy. it has been a source of considerable embarrassment to the government. i think rightly so. the home office in particular was forcing... forcing people to leave their homes and their livelihoods and their families systems. they would no longer
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welcome live in this country, and there was a promise the conversation would be met, and it doesn't appear has, not know enough places. jenny, before i get — has, not know enough places. jenny, before i get your _ has, not know enough places. jenny, before i get your thoughts, - has, not know enough places. jenny, before i get your thoughts, let - before i get your thoughts, let me read the statement from the home office. on the point that it goes to an independent committee when it comes to the compensation scheme, the home office and said "we firmly believe moving the operation out of the home office would risk significantly delaying vital payments to those affected, but the other point, the home secretary and the department remain steadfast in our commitment to ensure members receive every penny of compensation they're entitled to." the scheme was overhauled to make sure more money was paid more quickly. since then, the amount has risen from... there
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is no on the amount of compensation. and yet, 23 have died before getting payment _ and yet, 23 have died before getting payment because they were eligible, yet this_ payment because they were eligible, yet this has taken so long. this is four years — yet this has taken so long. this is four years since this story was on the front— four years since this story was on the front of— four years since this story was on the front of the guardian. it is a shocking period in our history. it was shocking back to the time. you would _ was shocking back to the time. you would think— was shocking back to the time. you would think every effort would be made _ would think every effort would be made to— would think every effort would be made to make good for the trauma caused _ made to make good for the trauma caused to— made to make good for the trauma caused to be people who are legally allowed _ caused to be people who are legally allowed in _ caused to be people who are legally allowed in this country. they were variously — allowed in this country. they were variously classified as being here illegally — variously classified as being here illegally. they went through incredible pain and their trauma and pain is_ incredible pain and their trauma and pain is being prolonged because they are not— pain is being prolonged because they are not being compensated from the potitcised _ are not being compensated from the politcised nation of immigration. this desire by successive
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governments to be seen to be tough on migration, and illegal immigration, and these people who have been— immigration, and these people who have been —— deserve to be compensated. have been -- deserve to be compensated.— have been -- deserve to be compensated. have been -- deserve to be comensated. ~ �* ., ., , compensated. we're going to stay with the guardian. _ compensated. we're going to stay with the guardian. "frustration . compensated. we're going to stayi with the guardian. "frustration for the treasury." with the guardian. �*frustration for the treasury- "— the treasury." this is, i think, the most damaging... _ the treasury." this is, i think, the most damaging... we _ the treasury.�* this is, i think, the most damaging... we know- the treasury." this is, i think, the i most damaging... we know there's been issues between borisjohnson and rishi sunak. we have lord frost appearing to side with the chancellor ahead of the prime minister's speech yesterday. this is a clear briefing from either the treasurer really on number 11, on the state of number 10, complaints about the lack of clarity of thought from the prime minister, and
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pointing out the mess that was made. the care crisis which we know is ongoing. some mps are blaming johnson for dashing expectations, which saw a lot of people coming together. to condemn and criticise the government. it doesn't look clever if the chancellor is briefing the prime minister, and even if this is not directly from the chancellor — i'm sure he denies any involvement — the people are briefing around the prime minister. this is a squabble which has the capacity and potential to force a change in government, change in leadership of the
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conservative party and the country. that's pretty serious, and this comes on the back of the peppa pig fiasco speech, which had reminiscent of the theresa may conference speech. the wording behind her falling down in the middle of it. sometimes events take care of themselves, and an organisation can never get back its control of the agenda, and you start to wonder now that thisjohnson government is in this moment, which is the tipping point. it gets a grip back or it never gets up grip again. it's a crisis that has enveloped a government. it should be able to do whatever it wants to force through
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whatever it wants to force through what the majority of conservative mps would call solid tory policy. jenny, same subject. obviously, you can talk about what is on the front page of the guardian, but i also want to link to the other story on the front page of the telegraph, just picking up on what martin is saying. we've also got a cartoon there. in terms of a change of leadership, everybody is talking about rishi sunak. ~ , , ., ,, sunak. well, everybody is talking about whether _ sunak. well, everybody is talking about whether or _ sunak. well, everybody is talking about whether or not _ sunak. well, everybody is talking about whether or not the - sunak. well, everybody is talking about whether or not the prime l about whether or not the prime minister— about whether or not the prime minister was losing his grip or was unwell— minister was losing his grip or was unwell yesterday. number ten having to rebuff _ unwell yesterday. number ten having to rebuff the situation that he'd lost his— to rebuff the situation that he'd lost his grip or was not in controtp _ lost his grip or was not in control,. these accusations that boris _ control,. these accusations that borisjohnson, that's control,. these accusations that boris johnson, that's what control,. these accusations that borisjohnson, that's what people want _
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borisjohnson, that's what people want yet — borisjohnson, that's what people want. yet this was an awkward failing — want. yet this was an awkward failing speech, a speech that was meant _ failing speech, a speech that was meant to— failing speech, a speech that was meant to be delivered as an off—the—cuff after dinner speech. he lost his_ off—the—cuff after dinner speech. he lost his place. "hands up if you've ever_ lost his place. "hands up if you've ever been— lost his place. "hands up if you've ever been to _ lost his place. "hands up if you've ever been to peppa pig world." it was very— ever been to peppa pig world." it was very excruciating to watch. this is very _ was very excruciating to watch. this is very strange. the idea that boris johnson — is very strange. the idea that boris johnson i— is very strange. the idea that boris johnson... i don't think there is any time — johnson... i don't think there is any time that he integrated —— deeper— any time that he integrated —— deeper integrated plan could have been announced. it was a scrapping of major— been announced. it was a scrapping of major parts of h52. it will be very— of major parts of h52. it will be very disappointing for people in the north— very disappointing for people in the north or— very disappointing for people in the north or the northern newspapers covering _ north or the northern newspapers covering it — north or the northern newspapers covering it. they were extremely disappointed by it. there are people whose _ disappointed by it. there are people whose lives have been overturned and uprooted _ whose lives have been overturned and uprooted because of a track that won't _ uprooted because of a track that won't be — uprooted because of a track that won't be built. the idea that there was a _ won't be built. the idea that there was a time — won't be built. the idea that there was a time when this news would have been received well is quite
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ridiculous. it is interesting that rishi _ ridiculous. it is interesting that rishi sunak is seeking to exploit the fact— rishi sunak is seeking to exploit the fact that boris johnson rishi sunak is seeking to exploit the fact that borisjohnson is on shaky— the fact that borisjohnson is on shaky ground in the wake of the owen patterson _ shaky ground in the wake of the owen patterson scandal, in the wake of the conservative mps rebelling and not voting — the conservative mps rebelling and not voting with the government today~ — not voting with the government today. and yet, the issue is not rishi _ today. and yet, the issue is not rishi sunak, the problem is boris johnson, — rishi sunak, the problem is boris johnson, and the things that won people _ johnson, and the things that won people over in the past about him are just _ people over in the past about him are just not — people over in the past about him are just not working any more. you need _ are just not working any more. you need to— are just not working any more. you need to see — are just not working any more. you need to see positive action from the prime _ need to see positive action from the prime minister, bringing his mps behind _ prime minister, bringing his mps behind him. he's in a unique opportunity to actually do something positive, _ opportunity to actually do something positive, to do something definite and say— positive, to do something definite and say this is what he stands for. at the _ and say this is what he stands for. at the moment, he seems to be failing — at the moment, he seems to be failing |— at the moment, he seems to be failina. ~ , .,, at the moment, he seems to be failina. ~ ., failing. i think peppa pig has a lot of free advertising. _ failing. i think peppa pig has a lot of free advertising. i didn't - failing. i think peppa pig has a lot of free advertising. i didn't knowl of free advertising. i didn't know it existed. though you must have done! laughter
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let's turn to the scottish daily mail. giving an update as to her planned reaction. it's been described as a climb—down on the front of the scottish daily mail. i climb-down on the front of the scottish daily mail.— climb-down on the front of the scottish daily mail. i don't think it's a huge _ scottish daily mail. i don't think it's a huge supporter— scottish daily mail. i don't think it's a huge supporter of- scottish daily mail. i don't think it's a huge supporter of the - scottish daily mail. i don't think| it's a huge supporter of the snp. there appears to be an abrupt u—turn. having talked up the prospect of covid vaccine passports, that won't be happening, and indeed, unvaccinated people will be able to enter nightclubs and bars as long as they can provide evidence of a need negative recent lateral flow test.
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the idea of the passports seem to go into obedience. the reason is that the first minister faced into obedience. the reason is that the first ministerfaced by/ into obedience. the reason is that the first minister faced by/ from businesses as the s&p ramped up this prospect. we also heard an announcement about restrictions and northern ireland today. this is a time when austria went into lockdown. where covid patients have been fairly... because of a lack of hospital beds. it was pretty apocalyptic. we are still nowhere near the end of this. we are nearly two years in to the pandemic. we are
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now nearly a week away from december 2021, and it's still going. both the vaccine has been a huge —— whilst the vaccine has been a huge positive for many, i wouldn't say there is an end in sight. for many, i wouldn't say there is an end in sight-— end in sight. nicola sturgeon did sa it's a end in sight. nicola sturgeon did say it's a very — end in sight. nicola sturgeon did say it's a very finely _ end in sight. nicola sturgeon did say it's a very finely balanced - say it's a very finely balanced decision. i imagine there will be lots of leaders trying to strike that balance.— lots of leaders trying to strike that balance. ~ ., �* , , , that balance. what's interesting is her take, that _ that balance. what's interesting is her take, that cases _ that balance. what's interesting is her take, that cases have - that balance. what's interesting is| her take, that cases have stabilise. there _ her take, that cases have stabilise. there will— her take, that cases have stabilise. there will be vaccine price and nightclubs. same time as many countries — nightclubs. same time as many countries are going back into a state _ countries are going back into a state of— countries are going back into a state of compulsion. if you look at austria. _ state of compulsion. if you look at austria, from the ist of february, they are — austria, from the ist of february, they are saying vaccination will be mandatory. how they will be able to enforce _ mandatory. how they will be able to enforce that remains to be seen. what's _ enforce that remains to be seen. what's interesting is that we in the
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united _ what's interesting is that we in the united kingdom, whilst the rest of europe _ united kingdom, whilst the rest of europe is— united kingdom, whilst the rest of europe is going back into lockdown and putting in stringent measures, we are _ and putting in stringent measures, we are once — and putting in stringent measures, we are once again relying on people to be _ we are once again relying on people to be good — we are once again relying on people to be good citizens, wear a mask. it's to be good citizens, wear a mask. it's not _ to be good citizens, wear a mask. it's not mandatory, but please take a iaterai— it's not mandatory, but please take a lateral flow chest. i don't think anything — a lateral flow chest. i don't think anything is — a lateral flow chest. i don't think anything is going to change in this country— anything is going to change in this country until there is more definite guidance, — country until there is more definite guidance, to make definite guidance. let's turn to the front page of the times. a proposal to travel for treatment. that's going to be interesting if you're ill. it’s interesting if you're ill. it's interesting _ interesting if you're ill. it�*s interesting because we're talking about an attempt to perhaps the waiting list at 528 million england up waiting list at 528 million england up from 4 million before the pandemic. the concept appeared to be
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a review from sirjim mackey from northumbria health care, slashing the number of follow—up appointments of the treatments. rather than having mandatory checks every few days or weeks, the patient should only now contact doctors if they have a problem which should mean that the doctors who would otherwise spend time dealing with these patients post treatment would be able to deal with other patients, and the idea is that whereas those a productive 8.4 million, which is a staggering number. they could get it down to 2 million, and the fear is that two patients who had treatment will not want to bother the doctor, as it were, even though they probably should. they have those
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follow—up sessions, and any issues will be more likely to be i've been to provide. we've all got booking systems. to provide. we've all got booking s stems. , , , systems. very quickly, the paper also sa s systems. very quickly, the paper also says mr _ systems. very quickly, the paper also says mrjohnson _ systems. very quickly, the paper also says mrjohnson is - systems. very quickly, the paper l also says mrjohnson is understood to be concerned that this backlog is one of the main threats of his hope of reelection. one of the main threats of his hope of reelection-— of reelection. you've got to think about it into _ of reelection. you've got to think about it into years, _ of reelection. you've got to think about it into years, it _ of reelection. you've got to think about it into years, it is - of reelection. you've got to think about it into years, it is this - about it into years, it is this backlog _ about it into years, it is this backlog that will up and bite him —— in two _ backlog that will up and bite him —— in two years — backlog that will up and bite him —— in two years. we are in a wave of cancelled — in two years. we are in a wave of cancelled operations. things like heart _ cancelled operations. things like heart surgery not happening for people — heart surgery not happening for people. it's going to be even more of a problem people. it's going to be even more ofa problem in people. it's going to be even more of a problem in two years if it persists _ of a problem in two years if it persists i_ of a problem in two years if it persists. i think people make of a problem in two years if it persists. ithink people make —— would _ persists. ithink people make —— would you — persists. ithink people make —— would you want to go in and have heart _ would you want to go in and have heart surgery far away from your family— heart surgery far away from your family and — heart surgery far away from your family and your loved ones? i'm sure you would _ family and your loved ones? i'm sure you would want to do whatever it takes _ you would want to do whatever it takes to — you would want to do whatever it
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takes to get the operation, but is not conducive... i'm going to stay with you. take us to the front page of the yorkshire post. i have been following this figure. kevin sinfield pictured with rob bro. it'sjust wonderful. he figure. kevin sinfield pictured with rob bro. it'sjust wonderful. rob bro. it's 'ust wonderful. he has run on rob bro. it'sjust wonderful. he has run on hundred _ rob bro. it'sjust wonderful. he has run on hundred one _ rob bro. it'sjust wonderful. he has run on hundred one miles _ rob bro. it'sjust wonderful. he has run on hundred one miles in - rob bro. it'sjust wonderful. he has run on hundred one miles in less. run on hundred one miles in less than _ run on hundred one miles in less than 24 — run on hundred one miles in less than 24 hours to raise money for motor— than 24 hours to raise money for motor neuron disease research. his team-mate — motor neuron disease research. his team—mate there with him. i saw the moment— team—mate there with him. i saw the moment that he crossed the finish line _ moment that he crossed the finish line it's _ moment that he crossed the finish line. it's incredibly moving. it is a very— line. it's incredibly moving. it is a very cruel— line. it's incredibly moving. it is a very cruel disease, i have lost a friend _ a very cruel disease, i have lost a friend to — a very cruel disease, i have lost a friend to it— a very cruel disease, i have lost a friend to it and i have seen it myself _ friend to it and i have seen it myself. the amount of money he's raised _ myself. the amount of money he's raised and — myself. the amount of money he's raised and the amount of profile and
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attention— raised and the amount of profile and attention he has given is incredibly important — attention he has given is incredibly important. this disease is not as rare _ important. this disease is not as rare as _ important. this disease is not as rare as it— important. this disease is not as rare as it should be. entire families— rare as it should be. entire families are affected, and it's remarkable to see kevin's incredible achievement. remarkable to see kevin's incredible achievement-— achievement. when you're talking about something, _ achievement. when you're talking about something, that's _ achievement. when you're talking about something, that's always i achievement. when you're talking about something, that's always a | about something, that's always a good thing?— good thing? absolutely. this will raise the profile _ good thing? absolutely. this will raise the profile of _ good thing? absolutely. this will raise the profile of the _ good thing? absolutely. this will raise the profile of the need - good thing? absolutely. this will raise the profile of the need for i raise the profile of the need for increased research and development to try to find a cure for what is a horrifically debilitating disease. i think we've all known sadly people who have succumbed to motor neuron disease, and have seen people who are fit and healthy disappear before our eyes. it can be horrific to see what happens. so, if any of this research, through the money that comes in, can help to find a potential solution, even just a way
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of staving off the effects of this, that would be hugely beneficial for many people. at both ends, an incredibly popular fellow. this will only increase his popularity, and rightly so. i'm sure there will be accolades coming his way over the months and years to come. i'm just going to give the viewer is an update on how much has been raise. this evening it was at 1.4. £13,000 off £1.5 million. what an achievement. kevin sinfield. martin and jenny, thank you very much. and thank you forjoining us here on bbc. from myself and the team, a very good night. bye—bye.
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good evening. this is the latest from the bbc sport centre. manchester united are through to the knockout stages of the champions league after beating spanish side villareal 2—0. it was the first game in charge for caretaker manager michael carrick, who made four changes to the side that lost at watford over the weekend — the match that saw ole gunnar solskjaer sacked. cristiano ronaldo made the breakthrough with a goal after 78 minutes before jadon sancho made sure in the final minute, with his first goal for the club. carrick, who won the champions league as a player with united in 2008, has been promoted from first team coach to look after the team until a full—time appointment is made. former barcelona coach ernesto valverde has been sounded out by the club about taking thejob on an interim basis, but the man seen as a permanent replacement for solskjaer. paris saint germain coach mauricio pochettino has said he's really happy in france. speaking ahead of his side's champions league game at manchester city tomorrow, the former tottenham boss said he was used to rumours in football
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and would not be distracted by reports that he's open to taking over at old trafford. i say to you all, my contract is 2023. you know, this is only one season more. i don't say nothing different. and then, i am really happy in paris saint germain, this is a fact. it's not to think or to... the fact is i am happy in paris. chelsea qualified for the knockout stage, thumping juventus 4—0 in an impressive display at stamford bridge. thomas tuchel�*s side dominated the match, and trevoh chalobah put them ahead in his first start of the competition. reece james doubled chelsea's lead in the second half before a superb series of passes ended with callum hudson—odoi making it 3—0. deep into injury time, timo werner rounded off a terrific evening for the european champions.
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they top the group with one game to spare. chelsea defender millie bright will captain england for their upcoming world cup qualifiers, stepping into the role with steph houghton and leah williamson out injured. the lionesses face austria and latvia later this month. the match against latvia will be hosted in doncaster, where bright used to play for the doncaster belles before moving to chelsea — a fact which hasn't been lost on bright. it's crazy, especially going back to a place that's very close to my heart and somewhere where it all began for me, really. so, yeah, to go and be able to go back there and for my family to be in the crowd and just to be given that opportunity is one that i'm very proud of. the tottenham chairman, daniel levy, says the club has to improve its business in the transfer window. but spending could prove tough for new manager, antonio conte, on new players. the club has published its financial results for the year ending injune, and they've made pre—tax losses of £80 million as a result of the pandemic. since opening the new stadium over
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two years ago, the club spent almost £400 million on players, and in a statement alongside the results, levy said, "player spending is no guarantee of success, "and ourfocus must be on improved recruitment, coaching, "fitness and a competitive mindset." the body set up to examine discrimination in cricket says that more than 2000 people have come forward in the past two weeks to share their experiences. the independent commission for equity in cricket launched its call for evidence from anyone connected to the sport earlier this month. the county game has seen a number of former players come forward, following azeem rafiq's testimony of the racist abuse he suffered at yorkshire. jahid ahmed has become the third former essex player to claim that he was the victim of racism at the club. he said he was bullied by a senior coach and his accent was mocked during his four years at the county. essex said they are disheartened to hear of his allegations and are investigating. england's netballers will host australia, new zealand and south africa in the quad—series injanuary at the copper box arena in london.
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it'll be an chance for preparation for england ahead of the defence of their commonwealth games title in birmingham next summer. they're ranked third in the world, behind the australians and the kiwis. each side will play four games. history will be made at snooker�*s uk championship in york tomorrow when reanne evans plays england's world number 14 barry hawkins. it will be the 12—time world women's champion's debut at the tournament. she and hong kong's ng on—yee will be the first women to play at the event in its 44—year history. i've had a few chances to compete against these girls on tv - and qualify, but it's only been hit or miss, here or there. _ to do it on a regular. basis and seeing more women in other sports,| it's just fantastic to see, and obviously, it spurs every person on, let alone just women. _ hopefully we can do it i on tv in snooker and get more people playing. earlier today, it was the perfect start for world number—five kyren wilson. the englishman recorded the 299th century break of his career, as he beat iran's soheil vahedi
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by six frames to two. and that is all the sport from us for now. hello there. scotla nd scotland and northern ireland, the side. before clearing and some of those showers heavy. the weather front pushes with rain into northwest england during the morning, early afternoon, and across the afternoon in parts of wales. much of england and wales will stay fairly cloudy, still fairly cool. some of the coldest conditions will be further north, the strongest of winds in scotland through the night and into thursday.
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but the cold air will be flooding its way southwards, allowing a fresh, bright, but frosty start to thursday morning and an added wind—chill. in fact, the rest of the week will feel much colder for all of us — but it's through friday night into saturday, one period of time we have to give a close eye on, potential for some stormy weather developing with widespread gales. we'll keep you updated.
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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... as a humanitarian crisis continues to unfold in afghanistan — we have a special report on how the taliban have handled their first 100 days in power. national days of mourning declared, after the deaths of 46 tourists when a bus caught fire in bulgaria. as americans prepare for their thanksgiving holidays, the chief medical adviser warns of a surge in covid infections and nasa on a mission to save the earth — from collisions with dangerous asteroids. live from our studio in singapore.

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