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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 23, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news with me christian fraser. the war bringing chaos and new famine to ethopia. the united states warns the country is desperately close to the edge. embassies are on standby to begin evacuating their staff, as the ethopian prime minister heads off to the front line, to take charge of the war himself. afghanistan is the model the united states does not want ethiopia to follow. 100 days on from the taliban taking control we have a special day of reporting from the capital kabul. new subpoenas from the jan sixth congressional committee, two of them for the husband and wife team us media this week described as the bonnie and clyde of maga politics. and straight from the script of armagaddon — the new nasa expedition in which life imitates holywood. can we, could we, alter the path of an asteroid that might one day
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be headed for earth. in october 1984 the bbc went to ethiopia to report on a forgotten war. and a famine in which tens of thousands died of starvation. dawn, and as the sun breaks to the piercing chill of night through the piercing chill of night on the plain outside korem, it lights up a biblicalfamine, now in the 20th century. this place, say workers here, is the closest thing to hell on earth. the live aid concerts inspired by that report by bbc correspondent michael burke were supposed to consign the suffering to history, but today another civil war is raging in ethiopia and the foreign embassies in addis ababba are again
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sounding the alarm. in the past year, over two million people in ethiopia have been forced from their homes. the un says some four million people in northern ethiopia are at risk of starvation if they don't get humanitarian aid soon. it is a civil war that's been running since november last year, when the ethiopian prime minister abiy ahmed ordered an offensive against regionalforces in tigray, northern ethopia. but in his attempts to reign in seperatist forces in tigray, the prime minister has unleashed a far away war that now looks to be in danger of arriving in the capital, addis ababba. we can't show you where the front line or how it has advanced over the last few months because reliable news is scarce, and the government has ensured there is very little reliable information on how the battle is progressing. but it it does appear forces from tigray have moved south — to shewa robit, some 220km from addis ababa and on a crucial supply line that links the capital to the north. the rebels claim to be advancing on at least four fronts. the prime minister today announced
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he will personally lead the defence of the country from the front line ethiopia's existence is at stake. meanwhile, the foreigners are being told by their embassies to leave. on monday the us state department urged all american citizens to leave ethiopia immediately, while commercial flight options are still available. i'm joined now by former ambassador michelle gavin, who is now senior fellow for africa at the council on foreign relations. lovely to have you with us. the prime minister said he would personally lead the defence of the country today. he says that the rebels are being contained, but you don't need from the front unless you are concerned things are about to implode. is that a fair assessment? i think so. it is very hard to read the prime minister's statement as anything other than a kind of last—ditch efforts to rally support around the cause. now, that does not mean that the rebels will
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necessarily advance on the capital, but obviously the military calculus is not a terribly good one for at the federal forces.— is not a terribly good one for at the federal forces. when you talk to our the federal forces. when you talk to your colleagues. — the federal forces. when you talk to your colleagues, former _ the federal forces. when you talk to your colleagues, former colleagues | your colleagues, former colleagues in the state department, how concerned is the united states that ethiopia is about to go the way of afghanistan?— afghanistan? well, there is a tremendous, _ afghanistan? well, there is a tremendous, there _ afghanistan? well, there is a tremendous, there has - afghanistan? well, there is a tremendous, there has been | afghanistan? well, there is a l tremendous, there has been a tremendous, there has been a tremendous amount of concern what's happening in ethiopia in the past year, and the situation does seem to continue to get worse, as long as the antagonist in this conflict continue to pursue a military solution, which seems unlikely to ever deliver peace on anybody�*s terms, the situation will continue to deteriorate at great cost to the ethiopian ppl — people and ethiopian stability. i ethiopian ppl - people and ethiopian stabili . ~ ., ., ., , .,, stability. i think a lot of people will be aware _ stability. i think a lot of people will be aware of _ stability. i think a lot of people will be aware of this _ stability. i think a lot of people will be aware of this new - stability. i think a lot of people | will be aware of this new prime minister and the peace that he brought to every tree. he won the nobel peace prize in 2019 for the
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work he did with every tree out. here he appears to have open pandora's vaccine seems unable to find a solution to it.— find a solution to it. indeed, and the every _ find a solution to it. indeed, and the every themselves _ find a solution to it. indeed, and the every themselves have - find a solution to it. indeed, and l the every themselves have played find a solution to it. indeed, and - the every themselves have played an immensely problematic role in this conflict, you are right, there has been a dramatic change in certainly the international community's perception of prime minister as an exciting reformer, and now, you know, a lot of concern, urgent concern about his unwillingness to move this conflict into a political negotiation track at his insistence on trying to pursue these military solutions. his responsibility for the humanitarian siege in tigre. it seems the african union is unable to mediate, and there is a new form of anti— americanism i'm told in the capital, largely because the government wants its own sovereignty to be respected. so if they are not
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listening to the african union and they are not listening to the united states, who does have leverage over the government? that states, who does have leverage over the government?— the government? that is a great cuestion. the government? that is a great question- i _ the government? that is a great question. i don't _ the government? that is a great question. i don't think _ the government? that is a great question. i don't think it's - question. i don't think it's necessarily the case that the au is completely a nonfactor. their special mediator of nigeria has been continuing to lead tax, the president of kenya has stepped up his efforts to try to prevent the worst case scenario in his neighbourhood, so there are important african leader is working to address this, but it's very difficult to see who has sufficient influence to turn this around. we are reminding people of what happened some 30 years ago, are we at risk of that repeating? weill. happened some 30 years ago, are we at risk of that repeating?— at risk of that repeating? well, you know, at risk of that repeating? well, you know. there _ at risk of that repeating? well, you know, there are _ at risk of that repeating? well, you know, there are a _ at risk of that repeating? well, you know, there are a lot _ at risk of that repeating? well, you know, there are a lot of _ at risk of that repeating? well, you know, there are a lot of different i know, there are a lot of different dynamics to this conflict from what
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was happening then, but certainly, you know, the scale of the humanitarian crisis is vast, the powder cake that has been created through some very toxic media narratives in ethiopia is explosive, so, you know, are the stakes extraordinarily high? absolutely. michelle, thank you very much for your expertise. good to talk to you. the united states do not want ethopia to go the same way as afghanistan. today marks 100 days since the taliban took control of kabul — after 20 years of war with the us—led coalition. 0n the 15 august the western backed government crumbled as taliban forces rolled into the capital largely unchallenged. so how much has changed since then? the democratically—elected government was replaced by an unelected, caretaker cabinet made up exclusively of senior taliban figures. several of them remain are on a un sanctions list. despite taliban assurances about access to education, only male students were able to return to secondary schools in september.
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the taliban have said they are working on a way of allowing girls to go back to high schools. a month into the taliban s rule, the un warned the country was at risk of universal poverty. the un s migration chief says 80% from almost 4,000 communities, said they have lost their livelihoods. in october, the un s world food programme warned 22.8 million people in afghanistan will face acute hunger this winter, with 8.7 million already in urgent need of food aid. drought, displacement, the collapse of public services and an economic crisis are pushing the country towards a precipice. the red cross is urging international donors to find creative ways to send funds to the country to stave off severe malnutrition. but many countries are concerned that risks funding terrorism, and propping up a brutal taliban regime. my colleague yalda hakim is in kabulfor us.
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christian, thank you so much, and as he summed it up, how much has actually changed in this country in the last hundred days and from your summary, a huge amount. this is a nation in crisis, and dealing and grappling with an economic crisis, and humanitarian crisis and of course all of the uncertainty surrounding the security of this nation which will no doubt have an impact on the wider region and the international community. joining me now is masoud andarabi. this is a changed nation and they are dealing with a number of issues. the taliban and say that this is not something that they have brought on the afghan people. this is a result of the previous government fleeing and the taliban and having no choice but to take over because of the power vacuum that was created. do
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they have a point? i power vacuum that was created. do they have a point?— they have a point? i think that caliban would _ they have a point? i think that caliban would have _ they have a point? i think that caliban would have had - they have a point? i think that caliban would have had a - they have a point? i think that| caliban would have had a point they have a point? i think that i caliban would have had a point if they were — caliban would have had a point if they were serious about negotiations during _ they were serious about negotiations during the _ they were serious about negotiations during the period that the afghans negotiated in delhi. the taliban always— negotiated in delhi. the taliban always has been rejecting discussions. they spend six months on the _ discussions. they spend six months on the agenda, apparently with the afghan— on the agenda, apparently with the afghan side too, but they were not very serious, and all the reports are indicating that they where planning _ are indicating that they where planning a for a small—cap chair of the country. — planning a for a small—cap chair of the country, and certainly it was very— the country, and certainly it was very clear— the country, and certainly it was very clear in the us agreement that if you _ very clear in the us agreement that if you capture the country by force, there _ if you capture the country by force, there is_ if you capture the country by force, there is going to be consequences if it is not— there is going to be consequences if it is not settled, so i think the situation — it is not settled, so i think the situation was not going very well, there _ situation was not going very well, there were — situation was not going very well, there were issues, but i think it's there were issues, but i think it's the tatihan— there were issues, but i think it's the taliban and to be blamed for putting _ the taliban and to be blamed for putting the country into such a chaotic— putting the country into such a chaotic situation. find putting the country into such a chaotic situation.— putting the country into such a chaotic situation. and the taliban
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are seeinr chaotic situation. and the taliban are seeing the — chaotic situation. and the taliban are seeing the consequences - chaotic situation. and the taliban are seeing the consequences of. chaotic situation. and the taliban i are seeing the consequences of that now. they are calling on the international community to assist them, to international community to assist them. to come — international community to assist them, to come to _ international community to assist them, to come to the _ international community to assist them, to come to the aid - international community to assist them, to come to the aid of - international community to assist them, to come to the aid of the l them, to come to the aid of the afghan people, because, of course, the situation here is incredibly desperate, it is everywhere. you can see the famine, the starvation, the hunger, in all corners of this country, in kabul, it is seen in the youngest of victims. but as you say, the united states made it clear that should they take over militarily, they would pay for it. do you think ultimately it is the afghan people who are paying? the ultimately it is the afghan people who are paying?— ultimately it is the afghan people who are paying? the afghan people were paying — who are paying? the afghan people were paying during _ who are paying? the afghan people were paying during the _ who are paying? the afghan people were paying during the last - who are paying? the afghan people were paying during the last regime | were paying during the last regime is well— were paying during the last regime is well with the attacks of the taliban — is well with the attacks of the taliban. thousands of people were losing _ taliban. thousands of people were losing their lives within the government or the normal people during _ government or the normal people during the — government or the normal people during the suicide attacks. i think this is— during the suicide attacks. i think this is their— during the suicide attacks. i think this is their continuation of that efforts— this is their continuation of that efforts and that caliban has to realise — efforts and that caliban has to realise that they can no longer
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govern— realise that they can no longer govern the country as they have been doing _ govern the country as they have been doing it _ govern the country as they have been doing it 20 _ govern the country as they have been doing it 20 years ago with the lack of the _ doing it 20 years ago with the lack of the situation that afghanistan was: _ of the situation that afghanistan was, and — of the situation that afghanistan was, and that delegation is to tell them _ was, and that delegation is to tell them different efforts. — taliban. this is— them different efforts. — taliban. this is a — them different efforts. — taliban. this is a different afghanistan which — this is a different afghanistan which requires different type of government, and i think until taliban— government, and i think until taliban fundamentally does not change — taliban fundamentally does not change their strategy in serving the afghan— change their strategy in serving the afghan people, that they would continue — afghan people, that they would continue harassing the afghan people and the _ continue harassing the afghan people and the afghans will continue to suffer— and the afghans will continue to suffer as — and the afghans will continue to suffer as they have been suffering based _ suffer as they have been suffering based on — suffer as they have been suffering based on their attacks before they have the _ based on their attacks before they have the power.— based on their attacks before they have the power. thank you very much for our have the power. thank you very much for your time. — have the power. thank you very much for your time. as _ have the power. thank you very much for your time, as you _ have the power. thank you very much for your time, as you can _ have the power. thank you very much for your time, as you can see - have the power. thank you very much for your time, as you can see and - for your time, as you can see and hear, christian, the situation on the ground remains uncertain. the afghan people continue to live in fear, fear of starvation, fear of what the future holds in terms of what their
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new rulers are likely to impose on them. many here tell me that it is notjust them. many here tell me that it is not just about what happens over the next few months would be economic and humanitarian crisis, but once the taliban have a thought told of it this country and start implementing their lies, they are not quite sure what that is likely to look like. will it be a softer version of the taliban, or will it be what many fear the hardliner caliban that this country new and experienced in the �*90s. yes. caliban that this country new and experienced in the '90s. yes, such wor in: experienced in the '90s. yes, such worrying times _ experienced in the '90s. yes, such worrying times for _ experienced in the '90s. yes, such worrying times for millions - experienced in the '90s. yes, such worrying times for millions of - worrying times for millions of people in afghanistan. it's been a fascinating day of reporting. so get to have you there in kabul. thank you very much indeed. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: the illegal trade in harmful greenhouse gases — how highly polluting hfc's — are being smuggling into the uk
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for use in cooling systems. people in northern ireland are being urged by stormont ministers to work from home "where possible" in a bid to curb the spread of covid—19. here's first minister paul giva. we are all very much united and asking the public in asking the public to play its part, along with us as politicians, that we can take every effort to try and minimise the transmission rate of the coronavirus, and so we appeal again to redouble our efforts whenever it comes to the trying to minimise some of those contacts whenever it comes to having good ventilation where you are meeting indoors, try and meet outdoors more often, and of course, we are emphasising again that need to just work from home where you can and for employers to support that. we recognise that in some circumstances that isn't possible and practically people do need to be in their workplace, but we are just making that appeal again that way you can, again that where you can, try and work from home and for
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employers to try to facilitate that. a bbc investigation has found that highly polluting greenhouse gases, are being smuggled into the uk from eastern europe — to be used in cooling systems, air conditioning units and fridges. the gases are called hfc's — they're heavily regulated and restricted. and they're now being phased out in the uk and the eu. but older machinery still runs on them and it's resulting in a thriving underground trade. angus crawford reports. it's an illegal trade you've probably never heard of, in gases that harm the environment. that should not be on the market in the uk? absolutely not. that one there is about 4,000 times worse than carbon dioxide. they are called hfcs, hydrofluorocarbons, used in air—conditioning systems, shop fridges and the aircon in older cars.
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0nly approved and licensed companies like this one can import, sell and use them. there are meant to be strict quotas. here's the thing. these old hfcs are powerful greenhouse gases. the government is phasing them out and wants us to use cleaner, greener alternatives. but that means upgrading with more modern kit, which is expensive. the result, a thriving black market in old gases worth millions. we're heading to the centre of that black market in northern romania. i've arranged to meet a smuggler. he's nervous, so we find a quiet back road. he thinks we're buyers from the uk. 0k. that looks good. this is just a sample, he's selling in bulk. i ask about shipment to the uk.
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despite checks by customs officers, the border is porous and huge amounts of hfcs are brought in illegally. these gases are smuggled from ukraine, just up the road there, into romania and then shipped across europe and on into the uk — where we found them advertised on facebook marketplace. this one's in north london. what have you got for me? unlicensed and selling illegally to small firms and aircon engineers who don't care about the rules. can you get more in? yeah. so why does this matter? so, there we go, we've picked these up, bought this morning. yikes. there's no way that should have come into the uk. there's a huge profit to be made, and if you are caught,
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which in itself is rare, often the penalties are very low, so we really need to see customs and enforcement agencies recognise that climate crime is a serious crime and this might be an invisible gas, but it has a huge impact on global warming. another illegal trader. remember, anyone selling or buying hfcs has to be properly licensed but here, again, no questions asked. great stuff, thank you. legal suppliers say it is something we should all think about when we turn on the aircon. if a car gets cold then maybe they are not so worried. the air—conditioning is working and that is fine. but whilst products are brought in illegally, then they are going to weaken the effect of that regulation, which ultimately means more global warming can take place. we made sure the bottles we bought illegally were emptied and recycled, but our investigation shows laws passed to protect the planet can be exploited by criminals who just want to make money. angus crawford, bbc news.
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the house select committee investigating the capitol riot onjanuary sixth has issued five new subpoenas. among them, several well know trump associates, roger stone and the far—right media star alex jones. but among that list are two names you may not be as familiar with. dustin stockton and his wife, jennifer lawrence. this week they were described by politico magazine as the bonnie and clyde of maga world. for a decade they had travelled the country, surfing a rising tide of populist politics, like few others in america. they'd turn up to lend support to political campaigns, they would raise funds, they would start facebook pages. and then camejanuary 6th. the culmination of their work on the fringes of the maga movement. the author of that piece is david freelander. hejoins us. lovely he joins us. lovely tabby on the programme. a fascinating account that you paint of the life of this
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husband and wife team who were effectively dropouts touring around the country. they were never quite in the spotlight. so how influential do you think they wear when it comes to january six?— to january six? well, january six i think in a funny _ to january six? well, january six i think in a funny way _ to january six? well, january six i think in a funny way was - to january six? well, january six i think in a funny way was kind - to january six? well, january six i think in a funny way was kind of. to january six? well, january six i think in a funny way was kind of a j think in a funny way was kind of a combination of their decade—long career in republican and fire rights politics in new york. they had gone on a bus to air holding rallies around the country in the weeks prior to january six, i think they were called march for tromp rallies and they were with other far right figures and they would set out all around the country and come back to dc for rallies and set out again. they helped in the planning for part of the rally on january six. they helped in the planning for part of the rally onjanuary six. so on that part, they were quite central. they say that there plan for that rally didn't include the kind of move to the capital and of course the siege on the capital that
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happened with some of the participants there, but that was a big part of their career in any way. they knew steve bannon, they inflate and for various roles, they were connected to the gulf on the website for that wall that they were building on the mexican border. clearly i think that rolodex was used to plan that stopped the steel facebook page, emailing out to the same contacts, the same people, but somehow, along the way, they were detached from the organising of the january six rally, and they seem to have grown disillusioned. so does that make them fertile ground for the committee? filth. that make them fertile ground for the committee?— that make them fertile ground for the committee? . , , , the committee? 0h, absolutely. they are an: . the committee? 0h, absolutely. they are angry- they _ the committee? 0h, absolutely. they are angry- they had — the committee? 0h, absolutely. they are angry. they had been _ the committee? 0h, absolutely. they are angry. they had been hoping - the committee? 0h, absolutely. they are angry. they had been hoping for l are angry. they had been hoping for pardons from donald trump for this go find me at the wall of the southern border, which are investigation by the department of justice and the fbi, those parts never came. then all these rival
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factions within the movements, they are feeling is that some of those actually ended up taking control of the rally onjanuary six, got to the president, orat least the rally onjanuary six, got to the president, or at least out to people close to the president which led to president trump encouraging the rally goers to go march and the capital where the electrode found the neck vote count was taking place. they really feel betrayed by what happens, and i think they very much want to tell their side of the story. much want to tell their side of the sto . �* ., ~ , . story. breaking news which i will dro on story. breaking news which i will drop on you. _ story. breaking news which i will drop on you, because _ story. breaking news which i will drop on you, because i'm - story. breaking news which i will. drop on you, because i'm interested to get your reaction to this, another five subpoenas have just come out, and this time for far right extremist groups that backed former president donald trump. among them, subpoenas for the chairman of them, subpoenas for the chairman of the proud blaze, henry enrique and terrio as well as the ot present its president. what do you think is going on here? what are they doing
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with the five subpoenas that we cite yesterday, close associates, and is far right groups that have been issued today?— issued today? well, what the committee — issued today? well, what the committee tells _ issued today? well, what the committee tells me - issued today? well, what the committee tells me what - issued today? well, what the | committee tells me what they issued today? well, what the - committee tells me what they are trying to do as they are sort of spreading it as wide a net as possible on this thing to really find out exactly what happened and how far up the food chain did the planning and this whole event though? a lot of the steak areas, you know, people like alexjones, steve bannon, these guys like running militia groups here in the united states like the proud blaze camino, whether or not they are going to testify and how fruitful that testimony would be would remain to be seen. a property at hundreds of people who have testified on this thing. and it seems like it will be a detailed and thorough report when it is all over. you a detailed and thorough report when it is all over-— it is all over. you said in this article that _ it is all over. you said in this article that you _ it is all over. you said in this article that you wrote - it is all over. you said in this article that you wrote this i it is all over. you said in this i article that you wrote this week with regards to this couple that they had been in contact with eric trump who called them to make sure
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everything was going 0k trump who called them to make sure everything was going ok with the planning forjanuary six. so would you expect that in the days, maybe weeks ahead, we will see subpoenas issued for family members? i weeks ahead, we will see subpoenas issued for family members?- weeks ahead, we will see subpoenas issued for family members? i mean i think they are _ issued for family members? i mean i think they are going _ issued for family members? i mean i think they are going to _ issued for family members? i mean i think they are going to get _ issued for family members? i mean i think they are going to get to - issued for family members? i mean i think they are going to get to that. i think they are going to get to that. we have already seen that where text messages with a right—wing media personality who is donald trump junior�*s girlfriend, and how she was involved with some of the fundraising and some of the planning of this event, whether or not that well gets quite apt to the trump children, i think that remains to be seen. that phone call in the article that you alluded to a think that was more of a check in with the planning stages sort of thing really before it came to become what it did become in the end. ., it came to become what it did become in the end. . . ,. ., in the end. david, a fascinating article, thank _ in the end. david, a fascinating article, thank you _ in the end. david, a fascinating article, thank you very - in the end. david, a fascinating article, thank you very much i in the end. david, a fascinating| article, thank you very much for coming on the programme, more subpoenas coming today from the house select committee, five further
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subpoenas issued to the far right groups. let me quickly take you through some of the day's other headlines. the man convicted of murdering the british exchange student, meredith kercher, has been released from jail early and says he wants to be forgotten. rudy guede was jailed in 2007 for the sexual assault and murder of ms kercher. he was due to be freed injanuary. the jury has begun deliberations — in the trial of three men — accused of murdering ahmaud arbery, a 25 year old african american man, from georgia. in february last year — travis mcmichael, his father, greg, and william bryan — who are all white men — persued ahmaud arbery in their vehicles, while he was out jogging, before travis mcmichael shot him dead. the prosecution say, they attacked him because he was a black man running down the street. the defense say, the three suspected he was a burglar, and were attempting a citizens arrest. thatjerry has that jerry has gone thatjerry has gone out to consider a verdict in that trial. we will bring you any news if we get it. to stay with us here on bbc news. after the break, we will talk to doctor
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anthony 0uchi. — anthony fauci. good evening. some places saw more sunshine than others today. a few spots got stuck with a lot of cloud, mist, and murk. but generally, it was a quiet day compared with some of what is to come. the rest of the week looks colder, rain in the forecast, yes, but some sleet and snow at times, as well, and potentially some stormy weather through friday and into the weekend. things, though, relatively quiet through tonight — quite windy across scotland, and here, we will see outbreaks of rain starting to move in from the northwest, eventually getting into northern ireland, as well. elsewhere, a lot of cloud, some mist and fog patches down towards the south, and temperatures for the majority holding just above freezing — but, if you do see clear skies overhead for any length of time, well, you mayjust get that touch of frost. into tomorrow, this frontal system will be pushing its way south—eastwards, taking outbreaks of rain with it. it is a cold front —
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as the name suggests, behind the front, the air will be turning colder as a northerly wind develops. ahead of the weather front, a lot of cloud, some mist and fog here and there. 0urfrontal system bringing rain southwards across northern england into wales. and then, behind it, for scotland and northern ireland, the skies will brighten — there'll be lots of sunshine but some showers, which will start to turn wintry over ground in scotland, the winds will pick up, and it will start to turn colder from the north. and by thursday, we will all be in the grip of the cold air. a frosty start for many, plenty of sunshine through the day, but some showers especially for coastal areas — some of these wintry over high ground, and potentially to low levels in northern scotland. temperatures staying in the single digits. and then, we get the friday — and this deep area of low pressure is expected to dive its way into the picture. some strong winds and heavy rain, but also crucially, some cold air
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wrapping into this weather system and, depending onjust how much of this cold air we bring into the mix, well, there's the potential for not only rain, but some sleet and snow to develop. so wet weather pushing southwards, potentially some wintry weather across western areas over higher ground, then to low levels later across northern parts of scotland. it is going to feel cold on friday and it will be windy — particularly windy weather expected on friday night, especially for northern and eastern areas where damaging winds are possible. there's more wintry weather in the forecast, too. it is worth staying tuned with all the details over the next few days.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. ethiopia's prime minister says he'll go to the front line himself to face tigray rebels. after a year long conflict the rebels are reported to be inching closer to the capital. coronavirus cases are heading up again in the united states —president biden's chief medical advisor —dr anthony fauci tells us that he backs the use of mandates when you make it very clear that there is a consequence for them not getting vaccinated, you have an overwhelmingly positive response of people getting vaccinated. bottom line, they do work to the requirements. the man accused of ramming his car into a busy christmas parade
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in wisconsin will appear in court shortly —— we'll have a live report. and straight from the script of armagaddon — the new nasa expedition in which life imitates holywood. can we, could we, alter the path of an asteroid that might one day be headed for earth. hello, welcome back. the great getaway is beginning in the united states, one of the biggest movements of people in the calendar year, as people head off for the thanksgiving celebrations. 0n the covid front, things are obviously better than they were at this stage last year. but still there is cause for concern. the seven day rolling average of new cases is ticking upwards. antony fauci, the chief medical advisor to presidentjoe biden has warned of a surge of infections if people don't take proper precaution. for his part the president is trying to get ahead of a fourth wave by introducing mandates where he can
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— monday was the deadline for 3.5 million federal workers to get the just and reports suggest 90% have complied. but the us court of appeal has for the time being suspended a mandate for those companies with more than 100 employees. and at a time when 60 million americans remain unvaccinated. doctors warned yesterday the courts decision will cause severe irreprable harm. the white house might well be studying the situation in austria which is now well into a fourth wave and a nationwide lockdown. austria of the lowest vaccination rates in europe but you'll see in these pictures from vienna lines of people at vaccination clinics. many of them unvaccinated — who have relented because of the vaccine mandate the government has introduced. the chancellor said this week the unvaccinated would be on indefinite lockdown going forward. so is that the way. before we came on air, i spoke to dr fauci. i've been speaking to dr antony fauci — chief medical advisor
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to presidentjoe biden ten times as many since they put the strict mandates in place earlier in the week, scott evans the mandates were? i the week, scott evans the mandates were? ., , �* , the week, scott evans the mandates were? .,, �*, , were? i do believe it's compelling evidence that _ were? i do believe it's compelling evidence that mandates _ were? i do believe it's compelling evidence that mandates work. in | evidence that mandates work. in the united states we have instituted requirements of the the government level, we look at the industry such as united airlines that requirements, there up to the vaccination and houston method it's in the health systems, 90 plus %, 90 plus %, there is no doubt that although we don't want to have to tell people that they really do need to have a requirement to get vaccinated, it clearly does work because there are people who are reluctant when you make it very clear that there is a consequence to not getting vaccinated, you have an
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overwhelmingly positive response of people getting vaccinated. bottom line, they do have the requirements. very clearly european leaders are tiring of the misinformation and the vaccine hesitancy, which is push them into a fourth wave. does that concern you? as consider that unless we put mandates in place, were not going to get out of this? i we put mandates in place, were not going to get out of this?— going to get out of this? i believe that is correct _ going to get out of this? i believe that is correct and _ going to get out of this? i believe that is correct and if _ going to get out of this? i believe that is correct and if you - going to get out of this? i believe that is correct and if you look i going to get out of this? i believe that is correct and if you look at l that is correct and if you look at what we're seeing in our own country, we have about 60,000,000 adults were eligible to be vaccinated who have not gotten vaccinated. and colder weather now and we're starting to see a search. the summer search is around 60 to 50,000 cases a day would go up to 6070, 80 and 90. and there was 100,000 cases a day. we have to get not been vaccinated and also
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boosting. we know very well that it really does enhance and optimise the protection. so, we want to make sure that people minimally did vaccinated with the standard vaccinations and we encourage people to get the booster roof was already been vaccinated. in booster roof was already been vaccinated.— booster roof was already been vaccinated. �* , . . vaccinated. in austria, people are not vaccinated. in austria, people are rrot allowed _ vaccinated. in austria, people are not allowed to _ vaccinated. in austria, people are not allowed to going _ vaccinated. in austria, people are not allowed to going to _ vaccinated. in austria, people are not allowed to going to bars - vaccinated. in austria, people are not allowed to going to bars and i not allowed to going to bars and restaurants a a vaccine in the chancellor says, those were unvaccinated will be and locked down. what might happen if president biden were to introduce a system like that in the united states in the midst of the political divide there, they'll be like gasoline on there, they'll be like gasoline on the fire, when did? that there, they'll be like gasoline on the fire, when did?— there, they'll be like gasoline on the fire, when did? that would be unsustainable. _ the fire, when did? that would be unsustainable. i— the fire, when did? that would be unsustainable. i don't _ the fire, when did? that would be unsustainable. i don't think- the fire, when did? that would be unsustainable. i don't think that'sj unsustainable. i don't think that's in the picture here the united states and very correct. we do have a profound degree of divisiveness in the country and we really do need to pull together as a nation to get this virus, which is the common enemy under control. i think
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something that you just described would only make things worse. so we're going to try and do our best but the requirements and hopefully the respond responded thankfully, we are seeing these requirements are indeed working. iq’s are seeing these requirements are indeed working.— indeed working. 19% of all vaccinated _ indeed working. 19% of all vaccinated adults - indeed working. 1996 of all vaccinated adults in - indeed working. 1996 of all vaccinated adults in the i indeed working. 1996 of all i vaccinated adults in the united states have had their booster. but looking at the infection rate you just described, it started to take upwards again and protection clearly is on the way. do you think the cdc and the fda were too cautious. did they wait too long to make booster jobs available to the entire adult population? the jobs available to the entire adult population?— jobs available to the entire adult --oulation? , ., population? the purpose was to get the data to underscore _ population? the purpose was to get the data to underscore the - population? the purpose was to get the data to underscore the need i population? the purpose was to get the data to underscore the need for| the data to underscore the need for this as you know, probably if you've been following and i've been very much in favour of being much more bullish on getting people boosted. but i think you have to be understanding of the united states advisory committee which are a bit concerned about the possibility of
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adverse events in younger individuals but the data was very clear that the benefit of the booster, even in the younger population of men who might in uncertain circumstances have a very rare possibility of this as an adverse event, i think the advantage and surely the advantage of getting vaccinated far outweighs the risk and that is where we are all right now. and that is where we are all right now, ., ., ., and that is where we are all right now. ., ., ., ., , now. some data from northwestern universities — now. some data from northwestern universities which _ now. some data from northwestern universities which i _ now. some data from northwestern universities which i want _ now. some data from northwestern universities which i want to - now. some data from northwestern universities which i want to show i universities which i want to show our viewers. universities which i want to show ourviewers. forthose universities which i want to show our viewers. for those of the booster, they had 25 times the antibody level of this vaccinated twice. 50 times higher than those with natural alone. is this in fact, the three shot vaccine, this is how we should see it? it the three shot vaccine, this is how we should see it?— the three shot vaccine, this is how we should see it? it conceivably is. we need to — we should see it? it conceivably is. we need to find _ we should see it? it conceivably is. we need to find out _ we should see it? it conceivably is. we need to find out does _ we should see it? it conceivably is. we need to find out does the i we need to find out does the durability of the protection, both the antibody level and the clinical
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protection have a more durable effect following the third dose, mainly it goes well beyond the five and six months but we see the waning with the two. if that is in fact the case, it might well turn out to be a three shot vaccine and a two shot, it may not be but we're certainly following the individuals if that is indeed the case. it is fully vaccinated, set about to change? it certainly under consideration and certainly under consideration and certainly the minimum vaccination that you need is going to be will be talking about, mainly the two dose. and it has been an optimum approach to protection and all of that now is being examined and we have the data and the science to guide these types of decisions. and the science to guide these types of decisions-— of decisions. because the united states is just _ of decisions. because the united states isjust reopening - of decisions. because the united states isjust reopening the i of decisions. because the united | states isjust reopening the doors states is just reopening the doors to european travellers and we have
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to european travellers and we have to have both jobs to come to the us but clearly, there is high level of infection here and they've warned against travelling to denmark. and you're going to need the booster? i'm not going to get ahead of our state department, ijust think i'm not going to get ahead of our state department, i just think we need to look at the data and appropriate decision. i don't think it would be appropriate for me to speculate about that right now. i speculate about that right now. i want you look at the graph of the seven day rolling average because we are looking at the seven day week after the holiday period. this graph, austria is of their right of the top of the curve at the moment. highest infection rate in europe and there is that curve that you are talking about, the united states starting to go upwards. there's a poll out today, two out of three americans say they will be with friends and family and most likely away from home in about half of those saved their heavy gatherings
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that could be with unvaccinated people. are you worried that that uptake in the graph could be further exacerbated by the thanksgiving travel was yellow as i've said in the past, of course i have a concern when it comes to unvaccinated people when it comes to unvaccinated people when it comes to unvaccinated people when it comes to a situation without masks. there was to mitigate that they would prefer that everyone be vaccinated, but we know that is not the case and you can mitigate when you have indoor situations we have congregate settings that you wear a mask whenever possible but also to get tested. i mask whenever possible but also to net tested. ~ , ., , . get tested. i think we should put a bit more emphasis _ get tested. i think we should put a bit more emphasis on _ get tested. i think we should put a bit more emphasis on getting i bit more emphasis on getting people tested very soon before they go into a situation where it may be themselves, not vaccinated or other people in the congregate settings that are not vaccinated. so, there are multiple ways to prevent infection. of women vaccination is the number one at best, but there's
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also a mask wearing and testing. clearly, we are in a better place this year because of the vaccination programme that we were last year, but high levels the infection rate, what are you advising people going away from the holidays for the next few days. i'm advising that it is too late if people are unvaccinated right now, but i'm telling people to right now, but i'm telling people tr: be very careful and have your meetings and your dinners your congregate vaccinations. holiday cheer as it were, particularly of the thanksgiving holiday which is several weeks before, a few weeks before the christmas holiday. and we have to get people who are vaccinated indoors so they can enjoy themselves for the thanksgiving meal. someone is not vaccinated in a group like a relative who wants to join, i think we should ask that individual to get tested before they come into the home with vaccinated
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people if they are unvaccinated. that is one of the things we can do. that is one of the things we can do. that is one of the things we can do. that is why say other mitigation issues besides testing. myself and my family, my family is vaccinated and will have dinner with friends were vaccinated. that is the best way to go. were vaccinated. that is the best way to go-_ were vaccinated. that is the best wa to no. , , ., way to go. the president said that the priority. _ way to go. the president said that the priority. the — way to go. the president said that the priority, the top _ way to go. the president said that the priority, the top priority i way to go. the president said that the priority, the top priority of i the priority, the top priority of the priority, the top priority of the administration is getting covid—19 under control and other problems, the supply chain problems, the inflation problems that are linked to that, all of that is packed to covid—19. are you under significant pressure now if we are staring down the barrel of a fourth wave? are you suddenly feeling the pressure that may be all of the good work that have been done through the summer, it is starting to unravel? i summer, it is starting to unravel? i would not say feeling the pressure. i have done myjob in almost two years, you do yourjob and you focus
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on what your goal is and you do everything you can to do that. i don't think you considered pressure, it is part of the job and that is what i do. it is part of the “0b and that is what i do._ it is part of the “0b and that is what t «to._ it is part of the “0b and that is whatldo.~ , . what i do. we wish her a happy thanksgiving — what i do. we wish her a happy thanksgiving with _ what i do. we wish her a happy thanksgiving with your- what i do. we wish her a happy thanksgiving with your family. | what i do. we wish her a happy i thanksgiving with your family. thank ou ve thanksgiving with your family. thank you very much- _ thanksgiving with your family. thank you very much- i— thanksgiving with your family. thank you very much. i appreciate - thanksgiving with your family. thank you very much. i appreciate it. i darrell brooker — the driver who ploughed through a christmas parade in waukesha, wisconsin — is expected to make his first a court appearance in the next half an hourorso. five people were killed and dozens more injured on sunday night as they were out enjoying the city s annual holiday celebrations. brooks faces charges of intentional homicide and police have ruled out terrorism as a motive. let's head over to waukesha and speak to the bbc�*s barbara plett usher. questions being asked because he was only recently released on bail following a domestic incident. in the bail that he paid was remarkably
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low. �* , ., the bail that he paid was remarkably low. �* , , low. darrell brooks is two cases atendin low. darrell brooks is two cases pending in _ low. darrell brooks is two cases pending in the _ low. darrell brooks is two cases pending in the courts _ low. darrell brooks is two cases pending in the courts and i low. darrell brooks is two cases pending in the courts and one i low. darrell brooks is two cases| pending in the courts and one of which accuses him of deliberately running into a woman trying to drive for over and this is the mother of his child and he was released on bail on friday in those cases on $1000 bond which is now being looked at to see if whether or not there was too low given the circumstances of what is being alleged against him and whether changes should be made. i have to say that it is very unlikely to get bail in this case because the police have recommended that he be charged with five counts of intentional homicide. five people killed when he ran through the christmas parade and the may be other churches as well but the intentional bit it's really important because police are quite clear that he had been fleeing domestic disturbance incident, and
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altercation of some kind which may have totes to make said something by the state of his mind but he intentionally ploughed into people and had broken through, he deliberately broke through police barriers and that is going to be the focus of the charges although there may be others as well. i focus of the charges although there may be others as well.— may be others as well. i know you have been — may be others as well. i know you have been out _ may be others as well. i know you have been out and _ may be others as well. i know you have been out and waukesha, i may be others as well. i know you i have been out and waukesha, speaking to people who took part in the parade who knew people who had taken part in the parade. what sort of things have you been hearing was yellow well, we went to the waukesha high school because one of the groups into which darrell brooks ran his car into was the marching band from that school and some of the kids there, they're still in hospital. so, the school is closed but there are counsellors there and we were told they arranged a special session for the band members at midday and their welcoming anybody want to come and speak about what
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happened with a number of people going, adults as well as children so parents as well as children. we also spoke to family counselling centres that have counsellors and all of the different schools, 60 schools i went to emergency floating on sunday night trying to prepare the people to deal with the trauma. notjust in these two days since the event happened but in the coming weeks and months because they said people deal with drama and a very different way 7 with drama and a very different way ? trauma and having someone be hit or hit by the front of a car can play itself out in different ways over time. they're stealing themselves as a to deal with this as themselves as a to deal with this as the weeks and months go forward. another group that was hit was a group called the dancing grannies, four of the five, two elderly women, a 52 —year—old woman and an elderly man was helping them. that is a big
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hit for all elderly people.— hit for all elderly people. those of the kinds of _ hit for all elderly people. those of the kinds of stories _ hit for all elderly people. those of the kinds of stories that _ hit for all elderly people. those of the kinds of stories that we i hit for all elderly people. those of the kinds of stories that we are i the kinds of stories that we are getting more and more information on. ~ ., ,': f, getting more and more information on. ~ ., g; i: , stay with us on bbc news, still to come: nasa is set to launch a mission to deliberately slam a spacecraft into an asteroid to try to alter its orbit. the government has admitted for the first time, that parliament and the public have been misled for more than 30 years, about a british airways flight that landed in kuwait, in 1990, as the iraqi invasion was underway. more than 350 passengers and crew were on board — most were taken hostage for months. now files have been released, which reveal that the british ambassador in kuwait, had warned the foreign office — before the flight landed — but the message was not passed onto the airline. the government kept the warning secret for three decades. foreign secretary liz truss reiterated earlier denials
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that the flight was being used for a secret intelligence mission. 0ur security correspondent, gordon corera, is at the foreign office. went back and apology and admission because for 30 years, successive government has a warning that might have been able to stop a group of britons being able to prevent being taken hostage when the flight 149 took off from london, heading to asia for making a stop over in kuwait and iraq invaded kuwait in the play was unable to take off and passengers and crew were taken hostage. many of them were badly mistreated over the coming months. what is a merge today in files is that the british ambassador made a phone call, as the invasion was starting and as the plane was in the air and circulated around whitehall that this was happening, bills never
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passed on to british airways and as a result, the plane landed. passengers and crew have welcomed that admission. but, they remain angry because they believe there's another secret that they think there were a group of undercover intelligence operatives on board who said they saw get off the flight. today, the government has stuck by its denial that the flight was exploited for some kind of intelligence mission and run 149 remains despite today's admission and apology. forty—six people have died after a bus crashed and burst into flames in western bulgaria. it's thought only seven people managed to escape alive from the vehicle. (map)many of the passengers — including children — had been travelling through bulgaria
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on their way back to north macedonia after a weekend trip to istanbul — when the bus crashed. 0ur europe correspondent bethany bell sent this report from bulgaria... a catastrophic crash. the bus rammed a barrier on the motorway south—west of sofia. it tore away a 50—metre section, and then burst into flames. on board were tourists, mostly from north macedonia. they were returning from a trip to istanbul, in turkey. the victims have not yet been officially named. a cause has yet to be determined, but witnesses reported hearing a blast. translation: the question is, what caused this blast? - if it was an explosion inside the bus, or a blast caused by the bus hitting the guard rails? this brings us back to the main leads in the probe — if it was a technical fault of the vehicle or a human error that caused the crash? seven people escaped from the wreckage.
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the survivors were brought here to this emergency hospital in sofia. they've been treated for burns and other injuries. it seems they only managed to escape by breaking through the windows of the bus. for relatives and friends, this is an agonising time. this man said he hadn't heard from his nephew. translation: i saw information i about the crash at 6am this morning. i saw it on the internet and on facebook, to be more precise. as my nephew was in turkey, i started searching for more information on the internet. i called the company's phone numberfor 3—4 hours — and we did not have any information from them, nor are they answering the phone. locals say accidents are common on this stretch of motorway. as the authorities continue their investigations, the families mourn their dead. bethany bell, bbc news, sofia. tomorrow nasa is set to launch
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a mission to deliberately slam a spacecraft into an asteroid to try to alter its orbit. the idea is to test out technology that may one day be needed to push a dangerous asteroid off course if one was ever headed for earth. our science correspondent, rebecca morelle, has more. until now, it's been the stuff of hollywood blockbusters like armageddon. an asteroid heading for earth and a mission to stop it. but science fiction is becoming science fact. for the first time, nasa is sending up a spacecraft to knock an asteroid off course. this one is not a danger to the earth, but the dart mission as a trial of technology for the future. normally when we are talking about a mission to go to space, we are going to explore some new world, but in this case we are literally going to crash a spaceship into an asteroid and change the direction and speed at which it moves through space, and we are doing that to basically test the technique to save the planet if there was ever a killer asteroid coming towards earth.
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nasa is targeting a small asteroid called dimorphos, which is orbiting around a larger space rock. the spacecraft travelling at around 13,000 miles an hour will fly into into the small asteroid leaving an impact crater up to 20 metres wide. but this should also give the rock a kick, which will speed up its orbit, and this can be monitored from the earth to see if it has worked. onboard is also a mini satellite that will film the crash. even a small nudge can make a big difference to an asteroid's path, and that could be vital. a 160—metre—wide rock like dimorphos could devastate populous areas, but smaller ones are a problem too. anything bigger than the 20 metre asteroid that broke up over russia in 2013 and injured hundreds of people are a concern. even the smaller objects can cause quite a lot of damage. a 25—metre asteroid, they will be really hard to spot with telescopes, so we are always pushing
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the technology and the science we can do and then we will try to detect where every single object is so we know what is coming in the future. the spacecraft will take nearly a year to travel the 7 million miles to its destination. no one has ever tried anything like this before, but it could be the best chance of defending our planet if an asteroid is ever on a disastrous collision course. rebecca morrelle, bbc news. let's bring you some live pictures now from the waukesha court house in wisconsin where darrell brooker is expected to appear, he ploughed his car into a christmas parade on sunday, killing five people and injuring 48 others. police say he was fleeing a domestic dispute when he mowed into the crowd. waukesha police also said the incident was not an act of terrorism.
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several school children and grandparents were among the victims. hello there. tuesday is likely to be remembered as one of the column are milder days of this week. certainly compared with what is to come over the next few days. it's going to turn colder is rain in the forecast but also the potential for some sleet and snow. and the possibility of some really stormy weather for the end of the week. more on that to come. start with wednesday's force cast which brings this out with the week. more on that to come. start with wednesday's force cast which brings this out with them to the bricks of rain but that but the front is a court front and so as implies, the airsee front is a court front and so as implies, the air see a northerly wind and out of our weather fronts, the odd shower in the mist and work with some sunny spells, a frontal
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system bringing in the mist and work with some sunny spells, a frontal system bringing rain when three of her high ground in scotland and increasingly windy and cold field to the weather in those northern areas by thursday, all of us will be in the grip of that cord air. a lot of sunshine around and some showers for coastal areas and some wintry showers and low levels of more scotland later in the day with temperatures in the single digits with just about all of us and then we get to friday. we get the potential for some storming weather and the steep area of pressure dropping down to the north and strong winds and heavy rain, but with cold air talking into this weather system, a real potentialfor some of the rain to turn to sleet and snow. itjust depends on whether how cold the weather being and how much of it we draw into this area of the pressure and so, rain, yes but sleet and snow of the high ground of
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the west and low levels of scotland and a court field to the weather and very windy itself. through friday night, damaging winds are likely particularly towards the north—east of the uk but we will have to keep a close eye that can cost a euro disruption and the potential for some real disruption with a wraparound whether frontier running down across eastern parts through saturday morning. and sleet and snow, very windy through eastern parts and further west, some sunshine and some further winter showers but you can see the potential that there will be some very strong wind gusts as we go through saturday. so, the temperatures on the thermometer will struggle but factor in the strength of that keen wind, this is just an idea of what it might feel like if you're out and about on saturday afternoon. many places may feel like it is sub—zero. and there's a very cool at night on saturday night because there could be some ice around with the winds are light
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enough. it will stay quite blustery for some in evening to sunday, some pressure still close body. and generally speaking thing should be coming down some sprite ? 7? ? ? bright weather. and at the moment, there will be some fronts sliding their way and there will be dismissed on the leading edge for a time but beyond the frontal system, the winds briefly turning around to westerlies and bringing something milder. however, the court there will never be too far away and set to return later next week. before we get there, the potentialfor winter and windy weather will be there.
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tighter covid restrictions in northern ireland — with a rise in case numbers and people in hospital. caution in the run—up to christmas — ministers are urging people to work from home and to limit social contacts. now�*s the time for action and if we want to achieve the best possible outcome right now, then now is the time to act. northern ireland has the highest infection rate in the uk — but all four nations are watching closely the worsening situation in parts of europe. also tonight... a couple found dead in their home in somerset as their children slept upstairs. police have named them as stephen and jennifer chapple. a public inquiry is opened after undercoverfilming by the bbc at a migrant—removal centre at gatwick airport showed abuse of detainees.

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