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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 23, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 8pm... people in northern ireland are being asked to work from home "where possible", to help curb the spread of coronavirus. it is about acting now to keep our families safe, it is about acting now to protect our health service and prevent our hospitals from collapsing. in scotland and england, people are now being urged to do a lateral flow test before every social occasion or visit to a crowded place. the couple killed in a somerset village while their two young children slept upstairs have been named as stephen and jennifer chapple. the government has admitted that parliament and the public have been misled about a british airways flight that landed in kuwait, in 1990 during an iraqi invasion.
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at least 46 people are dead after a coach crashed and burst into flames in bulgaria — 12 of those killed were children. and a requiem mass at westminster cathedral for the late mp sir david amess — who was stabbed to death last month. good evening and welcome to bbc news. people in northern ireland are being asked to work from home again — where possible — as covid measures are tightened with leaders at stormont declaring that "now is the time to act". from today, face coverings should be worn in northern ireland in all inside settings — and meetings should take place outside where possible.
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northern ireland is the first nation in the uk to take precautionary measures in the face of rising cases across europe. our health editor, hugh pym reports. there is a stronger message on working from home in northern ireland, so businesses like this restaurant in belfast fear they will lose out, with fewer people going into the city centre each day. we've worked really, really hard, and now it seems to be that people are cancelling. we are getting all of our stock in, getting ready to... we have all of our staff organised, and unfortunately now it may
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look lit�*s it's not going to be happening. northern ireland's covid infection rate is now the highest in the uk. hospital admissions are expected to rise, and ministers said intervention was required, including advising people to limit social contacts as well as working from home. there certainly are uncertain times, but now is the time for action. if we want to achieve the best possible outcome right now, then now is the time to act. case rates have fallen slightly in scotland, and nicola sturgeon announced that the vaccine passport system would not be extended to more venues. but she said taking a lateral flow test before socialising over the christmas period was vital to slow the spread of the virus. our situation is definitely more positive than we might have expected it to be at this point, but it is still precarious. we need to get the r number back below one, and that means having in place a range of proportionate protections to keep the country as safe as possible while we continue to live as freely as possible. at this pub in perth, they were relieved that vaccine passports would not be required for customers at this stage, but concerned at the possibility that tighter rules may yet be introduced.
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you never know one day to the next what is going to be coming in next. and whether we are going to be a viable business at the end of it. we feel quite lucky that we have managed to get this far, but whether we make it through christmas if they change things is a different matter. while uk case rates are relatively high, they are not surging as has happened in austria, the netherlands and germany, where a range of lockdown measures are being introduced. the uk has also moved ahead of many other european countries with boosterjabs, though israel started earlier and has done more. but the guidance in england on lateral flow tests is being widened to include those planning to mix with others in crowded indoor spaces. in all parts of the uk, the authorities want people to know that covid is still out there and they shouldn't relax their guard. hugh pym, bbc news. our ireland correspondent, chris page, has been explaining why restrictions have been tightened across northern ireland, despite the number of covid cases falling over the last week.
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it's true that the case numbers have stabilised somewhat over the last few days, but a few weeks prior to that, there was a sustained increase in the infection rate bringing it to levels not seen here since the height of the pandemic back injanuary. some ministers in the devolved governments here at stormont hope that by strengthening their message, they will avoid the need to tighten the law. the advice to businesses, to prepare their staff to come back into the office has been scrapped, and instead, and employers are now being asked to help employees work from home. hospitality venues have been pointing out that with public health advice being strengthened around, for example, people being advised to limit the number of people they socialise with, well, that is leading to christmas parties being cancelled, so even though they will be allowed to remain open at this time of year, they fear their trade is going to be well down. likewise, some retailers have expressed concern that their trade might be ahead,
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for example, there won't be as many people out and about doing some shopping during their lunch break. however, when you talk to people in northern ireland, they do recognise that there is an issue around the infection rate, that something needs to be done to try to bring it down again. health care workers are warning that hospitals are under considerable pressure, even though hospitalisations, the number of people being admitted to hospital isn't anywhere near the level it was back in the depths of last winter. joining me now is the robert bell, managing director of s.d bells — a coffee and tea business that's been passed down four generations. well, yes. i'm impressed. thank you forjoining us. fourth generation business, you have survived two world wars. have you survived the coronavirus pandemic? we world wars. have you survived the coronavirus pandemic?— world wars. have you survived the coronavirus pandemic? we have. we are luc , coronavirus pandemic? we have. we are lucky. in — coronavirus pandemic? we have. we are lucky. in a _ coronavirus pandemic? we have. we are lucky, in a sense, _ coronavirus pandemic? we have. we are lucky, in a sense, the _
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coronavirus pandemic? we have. we are lucky, in a sense, the business l are lucky, in a sense, the business has evolved over generations and continues to do so, so there are elements of the firm that allow some areas to underperform while others take up the slack. certainly during lockdown 18 months ago and up until now, the online site and our business to business relationships that we also fell into other food shops, hotels, restaurants and delicatessens have really helped keep the place alive because the coffee shop, went retailers, as i would term it, has been very unstable for the last 18 months. roberts, wejust unstable for the last 18 months. roberts, we just heard there are correspondence saying that yes, the numbers in northern ireland have stabilised. what do you think the end of this new guidance that has been announced today?— end of this new guidance that has been announced today? well, i'm not sure it's happening _ been announced today? well, i'm not sure it's happening in _ been announced today? well, i'm not sure it's happening in the _ sure it's happening in the workplace, to be quite honest. i think everyone was surprised when they let everything go on halloween and they all went mad, goodness me, we have a high infection rate. i
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don't think it's necessary to do with people in the workplace, i think it's much more socially and infecting people you know rather than people you are working with. it's much more of a social thing. so, to be honest, i don't know if the working from home thing will have that much of a difference. if they were to shut things down, then that might make a difference, whether it makes a difference to us or not as a business, yes, certainly there will be some who will stay at home rather than come out and socialise in a coffee shop like ours. we have a sizeable place, 100 seats, it's a busy place, and maybe it will affect us to a degree, but other elements of the business will help us to survive, i think. it’s help us to survive, i think. it's more the _ help us to survive, i think. it's more the customers rather than that business and the partners and that things going on behind the scenes that would be affected by this, is it? i that would be affected by this, is it? 4' that would be affected by this, is it? ~ y , that would be affected by this, is it? y, , a, it? i think so, yes. if people are workin: it? i think so, yes. if people are working from — it? i think so, yes. if people are working from home, _ it? i think so, yes. if people are working from home, they - it? i think so, yes. if people are working from home, they may l it? i think so, yes. if people are i working from home, they may well also have their business meetings at an unusual than you like a local coffee shop rather than meeting in a
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busier office environments, in which case, companies like ours well wayne. it's hard to know how it will pan out, but it doesn't seem to be to be particularly coherent in terms of the help that we may be given if we do have to close or if businesses are affected. i don't think there will be any money coming from the stormont assembly, so would have to come from westminster, and i don't see that happening step what would be more coherent, as he put it, that would help in terms of letting you know exactly what is expected of you and what is going to happen and allow you to plan effectively. it's allow you to plan effectively. it's a complex situation. as i say, certainly we would need, if a business is going to be affected, we need to know that there is going to be somehow coming down the line. furlough is generous, but it has ended now. so i think it's going to be very, very difficult if we have to let people go, which i don't suspect we're well. 0thers to let people go, which i don't suspect we're well. others may do, if we didn't have the breath of business that we had come if for regular coffee shop season dropped,
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or a restaurant is expecting big sales in december, if that sort of thing doesn't happen, then he think we could be in big trouble. roberts, thank ou we could be in big trouble. roberts, thank you very _ we could be in big trouble. roberts, thank you very much _ we could be in big trouble. roberts, thank you very much for _ we could be in big trouble. roberts, thank you very much for your - we could be in big trouble. roberts, thank you very much for your time l thank you very much for your time and good luck. thank you.- thank you very much for your time and good luck. thank you. thank you very much- — well, let's look at the situation in the uk in more detail, with the latest government coronavirus figures. they show there were nearly 42,500 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. that's over 5,000 more cases than last tuesday. on average, there were just over 42,500 new cases reported per day in the last week. 165 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 140 related deaths were recorded every day. and on vaccinations, more than 15.6 million people have now had their booster injection. a murder investigation is underway
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after a couple in their 30s were found dead in their home near taunton in somerset on sunday. this afternoon police have named them as stephen and jennifer chapple. their two young children — who are five and six—years old — were asleep upstairs. 0ur correspondent, jon kay reports from the scene. jennifer and stephen chapple. she was 33, he was 36. the married couple were found dying from their injuries at home on sunday evening, then police found their two young children asleep upstairs. sky lives down the road and came to pay her respects. those poor children are now left by themselves without their parents at christmas, and it is just, i couldn't imagine it, know what i mean? a postmortem examination has confirmed thatjennifer chapple died of multiple stab wounds. police have been searching two
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properties and clearing out drains looking for potential evidence. it's quite frightening, actually, knowing it is so close. teresa heard tonight that the couple's five and six—year—olds are being cared for by relatives. we all talk to each other, and it's the children i can't forget, what they have seen? it's scary. absolutely scary for them. so young as well. a 34—year—old man is being questioned on suspicion of murder. another man in his 60s has been released under investigation. avon—on—somerset police won't comment on social media reports that there had been an ongoing dispute about parking on the estate, but they have confirmed that officers had contact in the past with those involved. local people have been told this was an isolated incident. heartbreaking, you know, and to look at the situation
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that this community sees, as i say, i don't want anyone speculating. our thoughts are with the families, and my officers are supporting that process. jennifer chapple worked in a garden centre coffee shop, stephen chapple was a teacher. theirfamilies have asked for privacy. john kay, bbc news, somerset. detectives investigating the disappearance of a missing teenagerfrom plymouth have launched a murder investigation after the discovery of a body. 18—year old bobbi—anne mcleod hasn't been seen since saturday evening. a facebook page set up to help find her has now attracted more than 10,000 members. devon and cornwall police say two men aged 24 and 26 have been arrested, but formal identification of the body has not yet been carried out. 46 people have died after a bus crashed and burst into flames in western bulgaria. it's thought only seven people managed to escape alive from the vehicle. many of the passengers — including children —
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had been travelling through bulgaria on their way back to north macedonia after a weekend trip to istanbul — when the bus crashed. 0ur europe correspondent bethany bell sent this report from bulgaria. a catastrophic crash. the bus rammed a barrier on the motorway south—west of sofia. it tore away a 50—metre section, and then burst into flames. on board were tourists, mostly from north macedonia. they were returning from a trip to istanbul, in turkey. the victims have not yet been officially named. a cause has yet to be determined, but witnesses reported hearing a blast. translation: the question is, what caused this blast? - if it was an explosion inside the bus, or a blast caused by the bus hitting the guard rails?
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this brings us back to the main leads in the probe — if it was a technical fault of the vehicle or a human error that caused the crash? seven people escaped from the wreckage. the survivors were brought here to this emergency hospital in sofia. they've been treated for burns and other injuries. it seems they only managed to escape by breaking through the windows of the bus. for relatives and friends, this is an agonising time. this man said he hadn't heard from his nephew. translation: i saw information - about the crash at 6am this morning. i saw it on the internet and on facebook, to be more precise. as my nephew was in turkey, i started searching for more information on the internet. i called the company's phone numberfor 3—4 hours — and we did not have any information from them, nor are they answering the phone. locals say accidents are common on this stretch of motorway.
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as the authorities continue their investigations, the families mourn their dead. bethany bell, bbc news, sofia. the headlines on bbc news... people in northern ireland are being asked to work from home where possible to help curb the spread of coronavirus. in scotland and england, people are now being urged to do a lateral flow test, before every social occasion or visit to a crowded place. the couple killed in a somerset village while their 2 young children slept upstairs have been named as stephen and jennifer chapple. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, sport centre, here's gavin. good evening. manchester united are through to the knockout stages of the champions league after beating spanish side villareal 2—0. it was a first game in charge for caretaker manager
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michael carrick, who made four changes to the side that lost at watford over the weekend. the match that saw 0le gunnar solskjaer sacked. cristiano ronaldo made the breakthrough with a goal after 78 minutes before jadon sancho made sure in the final minute, with his first goal for the club. carrick, who won the champions league as a player with united in 2008, has been promoted from first team coach to look after the team until a full—time appointment is made. former barcelona coach ernesto valverde has ben sounded out by the club about taking the job on an interim basis but the man seen as a permanent replac ement for solskjaer — paris saint germain coach mauricio pochettino — has said he is really happy in france. speaking ahead of his side's champions league game at manchester city tomorrow, the former tottenham boss said he was used to rumours in football and would not be distracted by reports that he's open to taking over at manchester united. i say to you all, my contract is 2023, you know? this is one season
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or more. nothing different. i am really happy in paris st. germain. it's a fact. it's nothing to think that make the fact is i'm happy in paris. chelsea are also in champions league action tonight. their game againstjuventus at stamford bridge kicked off at 8 o clock. the blues need just a point againstjuventus to make it through to the last 16. the italians have already qualified but will want to stay top of the group with the potential of an easier knockout tie. it's currently goalless at 25 minutes or so left in the first half. chelsea defender millie bright will captain england for their upcoming world cup qualifiers — stepping into the role with steph houghton and leah williamson out injured. the lionesses face austria and latvia later this month. the match against latvia will be hosted in doncaster, where bright used to play for the doncaster belles before moving to chelsea. a fact which hasnt been lost on bright. it's crazy, especially going back to a place that's very close to my
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heart, somewhere where it all began for me, really. so to go and be able to go back there and, you know, for my family to be in the crowd and to be given that opportunity is, yeah, it's one that i'm very proud of. the tottenham chairman daniel lee says the club has to improve its business in the transfer window, but that might not be a sign that new manager antonio conte will be gifted a war—chest for new players. but spending could prove tough, for new manager antonio conte on new players. the club has published its financial results for the year ending injune and they've made pretax losses of 80 million pounds as a result of the pandemic. since opening the new stadium over two years ago, the club spent almost 400 million pounds on players and in a statement alongside the results levy said... "player spending is no guarantee of success, and ourfocus must be on improved recruitment, coaching, fitness and a competitive mind—set." the body set up to examine discrimination in cricket says that more than two thousand people have come forward in the past 2 weeks to share their experiences. the independent comission for equity in cricket launched its call for evidence from anyone connected to the sport earlier this month.
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the county game has seen a number of former players come forward, following azeem rafiq's testimony of the racist abuse he suffered at yorkshire. jahid ahmed has become the third former essex player to claim that he was the victim of racism at the club. he said he was bullied by a senior coach and his accent was mocked during his four years at the county. essex said they are disheartened to hear of his allegations and are investigating. england's netballers will host australia, new zealand and south africa in the quad series injanuary at the copper box arena in london. it'll be an chance for preparation for england ahead of the defence of their commonwealth games title in birmingham next summer. they're ranked third in the world, behind the australians and the kiwis. each side will play four games that's all the sport for now. we'll have more for you on the bbc news channel later on. 0k, look forward to that. thank you very much. mps have backed a ban on virginity testing in the uk. the amendments were passed in the health and social care bill. let's speak to our
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correspondent at westminster, rajdeep sandhu. good to see you. can you just tell us why this is being banned. 50. good to see you. can you just tell us why this is being banned. so, the government — us why this is being banned. so, the government had indicated _ us why this is being banned. so, the government had indicated for- us why this is being banned. so, the government had indicated for a - us why this is being banned. so, the government had indicated for a fewl government had indicated for a few months now that it wanted to ban virginity testing within the uk. they have said previously back in the summer as part of their violence against women and girls strategy that they wanted to find the earliest legislative opportunity to do that. they found that within the health and social care bell, which is being voted on in the commons throughout the day today and as part of that, the government put down two minutes, two changes to the bell, which said that they wanted to ban virginity testing. now, that was supported by mps, and then it was all voted through the veil as amended, all about it there at the end of the day command that will go the lords. if the bill continues and there aren't any issues, and this is taken out, then this will end up becoming law, and what it would mean
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that anyone doing virginity tests or helping someone to do it a virginity test on somebody here in the uk or if that person is a uk national land is taken abroad to do that virginity test, that would be a criminal offence, and it would be punishable by five years in jail. now, offence, and it would be punishable by five years injail. now, the minister, edward argyle, who was talking about this by the government called the whole thing in defence they said it was a regressive practice, and that it was misogynistic. and you may be wondering, you know, what is a virginity test? why does it happen? it happens in some cultures to kind of see if a woman is a virgin before she is married. it's quite an invasive procedure to see if the amen is still intact. now come the world health organisation says that this is a violation of human rights, and they also make the point that there is no real test to check if a woman is a virgin because he or heinen can tearfrom doing sports,
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from using tampons, you know, there is no real test to do this, and it's an aberrant practice, so with the bell and the changes made to the health and social care bell, that's what ban it. the minister also said that this would apply to the uk, the whole of the uk, the health and social care bell only really applies to england, because health matters are devolved, but he said that he had been talking to health ministers from the devolved governments to try and get a uk wide outcome on this. it's been welcomed by campaigners who have been talking about this for many, many years now. so they are quite pleased that this has happened today. it seems to have been quite a long—running issue, and today the government has managed to put that in the veil and has been supported by mps. i understand that there are also calls for a procedure called jaime and a plasty to be banned. what is that? it's not an easy way to say, is a?
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i'm going to pronounce as heinen plasty, and i think that's correct, and that's up as siege that campaigners say is going to virginity testing and they also want this procedure band. it's a cosmetic procedure which basically tries to repair the heinen or create a new heinen if the heinen is broken. therefore a woman is seen as not being a virgin. and — are one. and thatis being a virgin. and — are one. and that is also a procedure that campaigners want to see banned. the government has indicated they would like to ban you. — amen. there is an independent panel assessing best, and they will report back before christmas, and the government will look at that report and, you know, make its decision. — hymen. i understand there is a lot of cross party support on both of these issues, which is why the virginity testing was knotted through today. a lot of cross party support on trying to ban this cosmetic procedure as
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well, and there is a kind of high expectation that would potentially be banned come the new year when that veil continues its passage through the houses of parliament. that's another issue that campaigners say needs to be looked at. ., ~ campaigners say needs to be looked at. . ~' , ., campaigners say needs to be looked at. ., ~ , ., , . campaigners say needs to be looked at. ., ~ ,, , . ., at. 0k, thank you very much for that- thank _ at. 0k, thank you very much for that. thank you. _ the government has admitted for the first time, that parliament and the public have been misled for more than 30 years, about a british airways flight that landed in kuwait, in 1990, as the iraqi invasion was underway. more than 350 passengers and crew were on board — most were taken hostage for months. now files have been released, which reveal that the british ambassador in kuwait, had warned the foreign office — before the flight landed — but the message was not passed onto the airline. 0ur security correspondent, gordon corera, is at the foreign office. an apology and admission because for 30 years,
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successive governments have hidden the fact that there was a warning which might have been able to stop a group of britons being taken hostage. it all goes back to august 1991 ba flight 149 took off from london heading to asia about making a stop over in kuwait, and it was that night that iraq invaded kuwait. the plane was unable to take off and passengers and crew were taken hostage. many of them badly mistreated over the coming months. what's emerged today in files is that the british ambassador in kuwait made a phone call as the invasion was starting and as the plane was in the air, and it was circulated around whitehall that this was happening, but it was never passed on to british airways, and as a result, the plane landed. now, passengers and crew have welcomed that admission, but they remain angry because they believe there is another secret to ba 149, which is that they think they are a group of undercover
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intelligence operatives on board who they say they saw get off the flight. today, though, the government has stuck by its denial that the flight was exploited for some kind of intelligence mission, so the controversy around ba 149 remains, despite today's admission and apology. an inquest has heard how a teenage boy died, afterjumping off tower bridge in april — minutes after getting off the bus on his way to school. zaheid ali, who was 13, was pulled from the river thames, 8 days later. passers—by tried to help but only managed to find his schoolbag and coat. the inquest has been adjourned. the man convicted of the murder of the british student, meredith kercher, in italy in 2007, has been released from jail early. 34—year old, rudy ged—ay, from ivory coast, was jailed in 2007, for sexually assualting and murdering the 21—year—old. he was due to be freed injanuary. meredith kercher�*s american flatmate, amanda knox, and her italian boyfriend,
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were also initially convicted. their case ran through the courts for years, before they were eventually acquitted on appeal. the funeral has taken place at westminster cathedral for the murdered mp sir david amess. hundreds of politicians joined his family and friends to pay their respects to the 69—year—old who was stabbed to death last month. a message was read out from pope francis praising sir david for years of devoted service. from westminster our political correspondent damian grammaticas reports. in the heart of westminster, they gathered today. prime ministers past, along with cabinet members, friends and colleagues, all mourning their loss. yesterday in southend, it was sir david's private family
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service, here it's the political world turns out to say goodbye to a man liked by those on all sides. a silence fell. sir david amess's coffin arrived and on the steps of westminster cathedral was an honour guard of house of commons staff. their respect, a mark of the man sir david amess was — genuine and kind to all, no matter their station. a committed catholic, the pope, who he had met, sent a personal message, saying sir david was an example to follow. commending sir david's soul to the loving mercy ofjesus christ our saviour, the holy father prays that all who honour his memory will be confirmed in the resolve to reject the ways of violence,
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to combat evil with good and to help build a society of ever greater justice, fraternity and solidarity. an mp for almost 40 years, sir david never became a minister or a party grandee — he was a politician driven not by ambition but a desire to make a difference, his passions often local and personal. all of us are feeling very, very sad, but on the other hand we are also celebrating today. we are celebrating a life. and i feel very strongly that we must remember david not for how he died, but for how he lived and for the causes he fought for. sir david amess, mourned and missed. on a day that was about honouring a decent man and the many lives he touched. damian grammaticas, westminster. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good evening. it's been a pretty calm day of weather across most parts of the uk.
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sunshine for some, a lot of cloud for others — i think as we go through tonight, we will see extensive cloud cover in most places. some patches of mist and especially down towards the south. and then, through the second half of the night, this band of rain will sink southwards across scotland, eventually into northern ireland. temperatures for most hovering just above freezing — we could drop just below if we see clear spells for any length of time. now tomorrow, for england and wales, we'll start off with a lot of cloud, a bit of mist and fog around. this band of rain, though, will sink out of scotland and northern ireland in the parts of northern england and wales through the day. and then, behind that, brighter skies and sunshine, but also some showers. starting to turn wintry over high ground in scotland. it'll be turning windy and colderfrom the north — and that is a sign of things to come. as we head towards the end of the week, it will be turning colder. we'll see some rain, yes, but also some sleet and snow at times, and potentially some stormy weather during friday.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. people in northern ireland are being asked to work from home "where possible", to help curb the spread of coronavirus. in scotland and england, people are now being urged to do a lateral flow test, before every social occasion or visit to a crowded place. the couple killed in a somerset village while their 2 young children slept upstairs have been named as stephen and jennifer chapple. the government has admitted that parliament and the public have been misled about a british airways flight that landed in kuwait, in 1990 during an iraqi invasion. at least 46 people are dead after a coach crashed and burst into flames in bulgaria — 12 of those killed were children. ethiopia's prime minister abiy ahmed says he's heading to the front line,
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in person, to defend his country as the fighting between government troops and rebel forces continues. the anti—government forces — led by fighters from the northern region of tigreye — are reported to be advancing on the capital, addis ababa. the government denies that the rebels are making progress in a conflict that's lasted over a year and that has led to a humanitarian crisis. the rebels appear to be continuing their march south, controlling strategic towns and cities as they go. their latest gain, is the town of — shewa robit, some 220 kilometres from addis ababa — and is on the main road linking the capital and the north. the bbc s emmanuel igunza, has more from nairobi. it isa it is a startling moment. just two years ago, he won the nobel peace prize describing war is the epitome
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of hell. today, he is threatening to march in person to the battlefront to join his troops march in person to the battlefront tojoin his troops in march in person to the battlefront to join his troops in the year—long war against the fighters. they have joined forces with the rebel group and have dismissed the statement and claim to have captured key towns and cities as the events south towards the capital. the government denies this. supporters of the prime ministers of cheered him on, calling them brave, but critics say it is just a publicity stunt for a man who once served in the military. this is been a devastating war and there have been casualties. thousands of being killed and displaced by the conflict, a clear state of emergency at the beginning of november and the agency has nearly half million people and their living under rough conditions, it workers have been targeted. 30 have been killed since the fighting broke out. groups of accused both sides that amount to
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war crimes. the un has calls for the release of human workers and cemented drivers earlier this month. no reason was given for their arrest. �* ., , ., , ., arrest. and ethiopia, it is a fluctuating _ arrest. and ethiopia, it is a fluctuating picture - arrest. and ethiopia, it is a fluctuating picture with - arrest. and ethiopia, it is a fluctuating picture with the j arrest. and ethiopia, it is a - fluctuating picture with the latest numbers i'vejust fluctuating picture with the latest numbers i've just received with five un staff and to win custody. six staff as mentioned released yesterday and one was released today. however, one un staff member added dependent work detained today. might make efforts for an end to the fighting but neither side is committed to talks.- fighting but neither side is committed to talks. , . ., committed to talks. they warned that out and out conflict _ committed to talks. they warned that out and out conflict would _ committed to talks. they warned that out and out conflict would be - out and out conflict would be disastrous for the people and also for the region. at the war, three decades divided the whole country. it interrupted into war 12 months
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ago when two great forces were accused of attacking army bases and federal government responded. they came into power, bringing with them reforms and promising to heal old wounds. today, the country is torn apart by bitter ethnic ensigns that leads many to question how things got so wrong for a country that held so much. let's speak now with samuel getachew, a journalist based in addis ababa. is this just is thisjust a is this just a publicity stunt? is thisjust a publicity stunt? we is this 'ust a publicity stunt? we do is thisjust a publicity stunt? we do not is this just a publicity stunt? - do not know. you have to understand the foundation of the prime minister. he involved himself as a soldier during the ethiopian conflict 25 years ago and he also took part in the peacekeeping efforts in rwanda. so he obviously is the foundation but we have not
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been able to confirm if you did indeed go to the battleground as he said. but again, many people are following in his footsteps, including famous ethiopians, including famous ethiopians, including a famous 0lympian who in 2016, went to brazil as part of the ethiopian 0lympics team and really defied what was going on and then, including fighting or raising his arms in the name of the protesters that really brought this prime minister to power in 2018. i was wondering _ minister to power in 2018. i was wondering if _ minister to power in 2018. i was wondering if you _ minister to power in 2018. i was wondering if you could - minister to power in 2018. i was wondering if you could give - minister to power in 2018. i was wondering if you could give us l minister to power in 2018. i was wondering if you could give us an idea of how desperate the situation is? is a desperate for the prime minister to make a rallying call like this. he is talking about sacrifice when he spoke about heading to the front line. the country is in the state of emergency, what is everyday life
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like? , ., , ., emergency, what is everyday life like? , .,, .,, ,,. like? give to put into perspective the fact that _ like? give to put into perspective the fact that many _ like? give to put into perspective the fact that many people - like? give to put into perspective the fact that many people are - like? give to put into perspective| the fact that many people are still displaced. there is a sense of ethiopian famine those famous in the 19805 ethiopian famine those famous in the 1980s coming back to ethiopian becoming a reality. there are killings, the un report said that all parties were involved and this goes to show you how desperate the situation has become but in terms of the daytime, it's as normal as it gets it at night, there are entertainments that are taking place in neighbourhoods as part of the state of emergency that is happening in ethiopia and that is closer to what happened in the us during the george w. bush era after september 11. george w. bush era after september 11. ., george w. bush era after september 11. . , ., george w. bush era after september 11. . y ., , george w. bush era after september 11. . _, , ., george w. bush era after september 11. . , ., ., george w. bush era after september 11. can you give us an idea of 'ust how much — 11. can you give us an idea of 'ust how much progress i 11. can you give us an idea of 'ust how much progress or i 11. can you give us an idea of 'ust how much progress or howh 11. can you give us an idea ofjust - how much progress or how much ground have the rebels made because we are there heading south, towards the capital, how worried are people?
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people are concerned. the local government came out and said, ethiopians need to register their weapons, take up arms to defend themselves against what they might do to them. you might know that they have been declared as a terrorist organisation by the ethiopian government by the ethiopian parliament. so, people are concerned and obviously, i don't recall the last time this happened to ethiopia when people have been asked to take up when people have been asked to take up arms and it is really concerning but you also have to acknowledge the fact that many people are fleeing ethiopia, foreigners mostly, going elsewhere and suspecting that this conflict is at the home stretch and it may be some kind of conflicts happening in the capital.- it may be some kind of conflicts happening in the capital. we've had a lot of international _ happening in the capital. we've had a lot of international outcry - happening in the capital. we've had a lot of international outcry about i a lot of international outcry about this but the humanitarian crisis, kenya has been visiting the country.
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the secretary of state was calling for people to get around the table to talk. this pressure that this is resolved and just what is at stake because we know ethiopia is at risk of losing a very lucrative trade deal with the us. to of losing a very lucrative trade deal with the us.— of losing a very lucrative trade dealwith the us. ., , deal with the us. to begin with, the us is showing _ deal with the us. to begin with, the us is showing solidarity _ deal with the us. to begin with, the us is showing solidarity among - deal with the us. to begin with, the us is showing solidarity among the l us is showing solidarity among the ethiopians. they are accused of siding with the left and thejoe biden administration since the ethiopian sized has been accusing them of providing weapons to the other group but going back to the african union, and envoy has been saying that he is willing to work with all actors, he has been visiting the capital of turok right in speaking to the prime minister, he sees a small window of opportunity to end this and so, there is an interest to end this because many people are being impacted by this the negotiation and the ceasefire, the potential of the
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ceasefire is compromised because the parties are still accusing each other of all kinds of crimes and there does not seem to be an end in sight and that is what is unfortunate about this conflict that has been defined by women exploitation.— has been defined by women exploitation. has been defined by women exloitation. ., ~ , ., , . exploitation. thank you very much for this. i apologise _ exploitation. thank you very much for this. i apologise for _ for this. i apologise for interrupting. we are going to go to cornwall police and hear the latest statement. let's cross to plymouth where police are giving an update in the search for the missing teenager bobbi—anne mcleod some arrests have taken place in the body also found but not identified.
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but we are showing you here is the scene live from plymouth and we are hoping to get a statement or we expecting a statement from devon and cornwall police and this concerns the disappearance of an 18 —year—old who has not been seen since saturday evening. there was a facebook page set up to help find her and the police service of said two men aged 24 and 26 have been arrested. a body has been found and connection to this case although there has not been a formal identification yet and i wonder if the police officer, we can see on the screen is about to start talking. there he is. hopefully getting the latest on this
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case. what we do know is that detectives in this investigation have launched a murder investigation and she was reported missing. i am a murder investigation and she was reported missing.— reported missing. i am the police commander _ reported missing. i am the police commander here _ reported missing. i am the police commander here plymouth - reported missing. i am the police commander here plymouth and i reported missing. i am the police i commander here plymouth and first reported missing. i am the police - commander here plymouth and first of all, i like to thank you for coming out short notice later in the evening and it is with great sadness that i speak to you tonight and it's particularly in relation to the extensive efforts that have gone over the past few days to try and find the whereabouts of 18 —year—old macleod. i hope you'll forgive me for this but early today, the body of a woman was located by police
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officers and the discovery was made during searches for missing bobbi—anne mcleod. she had been missing from her home in plymouth and the formal identification is not been carried out, but herfamily have been made aware of this development. being treated by investigations at this time after bobbi—anne mcleod was reported missing on the 20th of november and having failed to meet friends in town. since then, police officers and staff have been engaged in inquiries of members of the public inquiries of members of the public in searches that i would like to take this opportunity to see a huge thank you for the dedication and efforts of my teams and the public will work hand—in—hand, tirelessly of the past few days to tried to find the location of bobbi—anne mcleod. two men from plymouth, age 24 and 26 have been arrested on suspicion of murder and remain in police custody at this time. our inquiries are ongoing and we continue to appeal to anyone with
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information which may assist in the ongoing investigation and to contact the police either by ringing 101 or emailing you to this website porting log 706 on the 22nd of november. i will close by saying this is weighing heavy on the people of plymouth tonight. it really is. and i would like to send my thoughts to friends and family, we are doing their utmost and continue to do everything we can to understand exactly what is going on in this event and if i have any details i can share, we will do that and i want to think people and encourage the city to get behind us with any inquiries they can and will wear at that point, bring the offenders to justice. thank you for your time this evening. i justice. thank you for your time this evening-— this evening. i will clarify his osition this evening. i will clarify his position and _ this evening. i will clarify his position and a _ this evening. i will clarify his position and a minute. -
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this evening. i will clarify his position and a minute. fromj this evening. i will clarify his - position and a minute. from devon and cornwall police, does the chief superintendent and just to give you a couple of pointers confirming with great sadness that the body of a woman was located in southhampton by police officers. carried out by police officers. carried out by police and they must stress that there's been no formal identification yet. but he did say that the family has been informed. he also went on to remind us that bobbi—anne mcleod was reported missing on saturday after she failed to meet up with friends in plymouth. police officers and staff of being engaged with members of the public and have been completing searches since concerns for bobbi—anne mcleod were first raised. the other development is that two men, age 24 and 26 from plymouth have been arrested on suspicion of murder and they remain in police custody at
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this time. inquiries remain ongoing. and hejust concluded this time. inquiries remain ongoing. and he just concluded that statement by saying this case is weighing heavy on all the people of plymouth. that is what we have the latest there in the details for 18 —year—old bobbi—anne mcleod. the suspect in the wisconsin attack, in which a car ploughed through a christmas parade in waukesha is due to make a first court appearance. five people were killed and dozens more injured on sunday night as they were out enjoying the city s annual holiday celebrations. darrell brooksjunior faces charges of intentional homicide and police have ruled out terrorism as a motive. let's speak to our correspondent barbara plett usher. just to list the latest and what we can expect to take place today. yes.
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can expect to take place today. yes, the court hearing _ can expect to take place today. yes, the court hearing is _ can expect to take place today. 1a: the court hearing is expected to take place just a little bit today and will be mister brooks, the suspects first appearance where he is expected to hear the charges ready against them and we know police have recommended that he faced five charges of intentional homicide but there may be others as well. five people were killed in that christmas parade hit—and—run of a police have said about mister brooks is a he appeared to have been fleeing from a domestic disturbance when he got into his car and drove at full speed into the parade. they say that he was acting alone and that it was not a terrorist incident, but he was acting intentionally. he drove past a police barricade and drove through a barricade in that intentional parties would be very key in terms of the charges in case goes forward. we know that mister brooks as a criminal history, a lengthy criminal record and has two cases pending in
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front of the courts even now. one of which involves allegations that he deliberately drove into a woman, the mother of his child. so, that is in his record and pending in this case and he had just been freed on bail on friday at $1000 bond. but according to the district attorney's office, it seems very unlikely that office, it seems very unlikely that he will be freed on bail and this case given the charges are so serious. people from hong kong have been describing their difficulty resettling in the west midlands. since a new national security law was passed there earlier this year — which restricts their rights and freedoms — thousands of people from the former british colony have been granted a visa to live, study and work the uk. but many say they re struggling to secure employment and accommodation. yvonne brissett reports.
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she has been looking forward to this for months. she says finding somewhere to live has been difficult since moving to solihull from hong kong with her husband injune, she left a good career in banking and now the lives off her savings while struggling to find a job. we don't have any employment history, we do not have any bank accounts here and so, the cannot have any reference track of ourselves. despite this, she says staying in hong kong was not an option. the atmosphere is very tense and everything has changed. we cannot talk freely in the office, in the schools, on the street. hong kong saw protests early this year after china introduced the new security law. as a former british colony, the uk government criticised the restrictions on people's rights and freedoms. it went on to create a new british national overseas visa, allowing hong kong citizens to live and work here for five years and ultimately, apply for citizenship. in a statement, the home office says
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more than 47,000 people have been granted visas under the new scheme up until the end ofjune this year. this figure represents 73% of those who applied. this solihull estate agent recognises there is a real problem. we found that a major issues coming out of hong kong, the language barrier and the buying and rental process is so different. is that this company up to deal with this, to make this much more efficient. he has employed cantonese speaking staff to bridge the gap. vivian wong spent months living in air b&bs. i understand how the hong kong - people are feeling and how uncertain they are about the whole thing, the whole setup. _ and so, i think i'm - in a better position to help them to go through this hurdle. she says more needs to be done. i think the government have to do | more education and let the locals| l know what's happening right now, i
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why hong kong people are interested i in the country and why they come, l who they are, what they are and so, tojust integrate this into the society. - tojust integrate us into the society. i families moving into the west midlands say they're hoping the changes they've made will give them a safe and secure future. two women say they've been left traumatised after calling 999 to help their elderly neighbour, but couln't get through and were forced to listen to recorded messages. the east of england ambulance service is urging people who call the emergency number to stay on the line until they get through. nikki fox reports kathleen and her friend were both getting on with life and they got a call to check on their elderly neighbour. the fund are in distress with chest pains and so kathleen called 111. the call centre was busy. with the recorded holding message. irate busy. with the recorded holding messaue. ~ . busy. with the recorded holding messaue. . ., ., busy. with the recorded holding messaue. ~ ., ., ., busy. with the recorded holding messaue. ., ., ., , busy. with the recorded holding messaue. ., ., ., message. we are told to use that as an alternative _ message. we are told to use that as an alternative to _ message. we are told to use that as an alternative to going _ message. we are told to use that as an alternative to going to _ message. we are told to use that as an alternative to going to andy, - an alternative to going to andy, going to gp, to use 111 and you
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can't get through in an emergency, it is very distressing. so can't get through in an emergency, it is very distressing.— it is very distressing. so what happened _ it is very distressing. so what happened next _ it is very distressing. so what happened next was _ it is very distressing. so what happened next was mac - it is very distressing. so what happened next was mac she i it is very distressing. so what - happened next was mac she phoned it is very distressing. so what _ happened next was mac she phoned 999 and got a recorded holding message with four phones on the go, they kept trying 999 and 111, rushing back to her seriously ill neighbour, she tripped over a raised piece of concrete in the garden and knocked himself unconscious. i concrete in the garden and knocked himself unconscious.— himself unconscious. i took a short cut himself unconscious. i took a short out across — himself unconscious. i took a short cut across the _ himself unconscious. i took a short cut across the gardens _ himself unconscious. i took a short cut across the gardens and - himself unconscious. i took a short cut across the gardens and in the l cut across the gardens and in the next _ cut across the gardens and in the next minute, bang, i'm on the floor. i've next minute, bang, i'm on the floor. we had _ next minute, bang, i'm on the floor. we had the — next minute, bang, i'm on the floor. i've had the wall of my house and i'm i've had the wall of my house and i'm on— i've had the wall of my house and i'm on the — i've had the wall of my house and i'm on the floor and ijust thought, what _ i'm on the floor and ijust thought, what else — i'm on the floor and ijust thought, what else could go wrong? the}r i'm on the floor and i just thought, what else could go wrong? they ring the gp who after _ what else could go wrong? they ring the gp who after a _ what else could go wrong? they ring the gp who after a few— what else could go wrong? they ring the gp who after a few attempts - what else could go wrong? they ring the gp who after a few attempts got | the gp who after a few attempts got through to the ambulance service on priority line. the lady was brought into the hospital, their ambulances cute outside this a&e department and she was taken inside for three hours but once inside, herfamily
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she was taken inside for three hours but once inside, her family says she received good care. the ambulance seen 9,000 more calls in the past month and at one point on friday night, 150 calls were waiting to be answered. the ambulance services people must stay on the line and not hang up. it’s people must stay on the line and not han. u, �*, ., people must stay on the line and not hanu u-. �*, , people must stay on the line and not hanuu. , ., people must stay on the line and not hanhu, , hang up. it's asking people to say look, we hang up. it's asking people to say look. we will _ hang up. it's asking people to say look, we will get _ hang up. it's asking people to say look, we will get to _ hang up. it's asking people to say look, we will get to you, - hang up. it's asking people to say look, we will get to you, please l look, we will get to you, please stay with us and please stay on the line. ,., stay with us and please stay on the line. , , line. the pair says they 'ust needed reassurance. you h line. the pair says they 'ust needed reassurance. you don't _ line. the pair says they just needed reassurance. you don't have - line. the pair says they just needed reassurance. you don't have to - line. the pair says they just needed reassurance. you don't have to be i reassurance. you don't have to be trained to answer— reassurance. you don't have to be trained to answer a _ reassurance. you don't have to be trained to answer a telephone - reassurance. you don't have to be trained to answer a telephone if i trained to answer a telephone if youhe _ trained to answer a telephone if youhe a — trained to answer a telephone if you're a sensible person must over the public— you're a sensible person must over the public before start byjust a reassurance on the inch end of the phone _ reassurance on the inch end of the phone would change things? absolutely. its phone would change things? absolutely-— phone would change things? absolutely. phone would change things? absolutel . �* ., , ., absolutely. a human being to machine her set, absolutely. a human being to machine her set. take — absolutely. a human being to machine her set, take me _ absolutely. a human being to machine her set, take me on _ absolutely. a human being to machine her set, take me on board _ absolutely. a human being to machine her set, take me on board and - absolutely. a human being to machine her set, take me on board and are - her set, take me on board and are passing _ her set, take me on board and are passing that — her set, take me on board and are passing that information on and it is being _ passing that information on and it is being dealt with, the whole situation _ is being dealt with, the whole situation becomes call. the pair were confused _
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situation becomes call. the pair were confused they _ situation becomes call. the pair were confused they did - situation becomes call. the pair were confused they did not - situation becomes call. the pair were confused they did not get | situation becomes call. the pair i were confused they did not get to speak to a human being straight away when 999 is an emergency service. they say this is what happened that will stay with them for a long time. the rugby league legend, kevin sinfield, has raised more than a million pounds by running 101 miles in 24 hours. he's raising money for research into motor neurone disease, after his teammate and friend rob burrow was diagnosed with the incurable disease in 2019. sally nugent has the story. kevin sinfield, finishing an epic challenge. he has run 101 miles in 24 hours. at the finish line, his former team—mate and best friend, rugby league legend rob burrow. rob was diagnosed with motor neurone disease back in 2019. don't make me cry.
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no, i'm not going to make you cry. you've done it. yeah, he knows how much we love and care about him. that was certainly a battle. we wanted a battle and we got one. three, two, one, go! cheering the challenge started in leicester. all along the route, members of the public encouraged their hero on. he's done a wonderful thing. really, really wonderful. i've not come across anybody so inspiring in a very, - very long time, and i wish him all the very best. _ kev is raising money for the motor neurone disease association and leeds hospitals charity. mnd is a degenerative brain disorder. there is no effective treatment and no cure. rob's got the same strain of motor neurone as my sister had, who passed away last year, and it's just so... just so damn horrible. as day turned into night
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and the temperature dropped, this gruelling run, mile after mile, started to take its toll. obviously he's running on fumes, he's very emotional, very tired, but we are just all so proud of him. kevin sinfield entered the leeds rhinos stadium to a standing ovation, and this message from his best friend. recorded voice: the money raised . will help people to get a great. facility for a new care centre and to help the mndf find a cure. today is an amazing day for the whole community, and it will benefit every sufferer. lastly, to my amazing friend kev, you don't realise the impact you have had on me and the whole mnd community. a remarkable feat of endurance which will help fund treatments and research into a cure for mnd. sally nugent, bbc news. this is the donation page and you
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can see the figure there of £1.4 million raised so far. fantastic. and the nominees for next year's grammy awards have been announced. us singer 0livia rodrigo has emerged as the front—runner with nominations in all four of the main categories — best album, best new artist, record of the year and song of the year. she faces competition from billie eilish and lil nas x in all of those categories, except best new artist. abba also received their first ever grammy nomination for their comeback single after 40 years away. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good evening. sunshine for some a lot of cloud for this as we go through tonight. we will see extensive cloud cover in most places and patches of mist and fog especially dealt with the south and then to the second half of the
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night, the spend of them will sink southwards and eventually into northern ireland. temperatures for most hovering just above freezing and we could drop just below if we see clear any length of time and tomorrow, for england and wales, will see a lot of cloud a bit distant fog and the span of rain will sink out into parts of northern england and wales that the day in the behind the behind the greater sky, sunshine and also sunshine and showers turns wintry in scotland and returning wendy into will be turning colder from the north and that is a sign of things to come as we head towards the end of the week, it will be turning colder it ran and some sleet and snow at times and potentially some stormy weather during friday.
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this is bbc news with me christian fraser. the war bringing chaos and new famine to ethopia. the united states warns the country is desperately close to the edge. embassies are on standby to begin evacuating their staff, as the ethopian prime minister heads off to the front line, to take charge of the war himself. afghanistan is the model the united states does not want ethiopia to follow. 100 days on from the taliban taking control we have a special day of reporting from the capital kabul. new subpoenas from the jan sixth congressional committee, two of them for the husband and wife team us media this week described as the bonnie and clyde of maga politics. and straight from the script of armagaddon — the new nasa expedition in which life imitates holywood. can we, could we, alter the path of an asteroid that might one day
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be headed for earth.

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