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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  November 23, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

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at six: people in northern ireland are told to work from home again in a bid to curb the spread of coronavirus. with christmas fast approaching, leaders at stormont say act now or risk much tighter measures. it is about acting now to keep our families safe, it is about acting now to protect our health service and prevent our hospitals from collapsing. in scotland and england people are now being urged to do a lateral flow test before every social occasion or visit to an enclosed, crowded place. as covid cases continue to rise sharply on the continent, we'll be looking at the situation in the uk. also tonight: a murder investigation in somerset after a couple are found dead in their home — their two young children were asleep upstairs. a tourist bus crashes in bulgaria —
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46 people are killed, among them 12 children. and rugby league's kevin sinfield raises more than a million by running 101 miles in just 2a hours for his former team mate rob burrow, who has motor neurone disease. coming up on the bbc news channel: the post—ole gunnar solskjaer era begins at manchester united, in their first game under caretaker manager michael carrick in the champions league. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. people in northern ireland are being asked to work from home again where possible as covid measures are tightened with leaders at stormont declaring that �*now is the time to act'. from today, face coverings should be
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worn in northern ireland in all inside settings — and meetings should take place outside where possible. northern ireland is the first nation in the uk to take precautionary measures in the face of rising cases across europe. our health editor, hugh pym reports. there is a stronger message on working from home in northern ireland, so businesses like this restaurant in belfast fear they will lose out, with fewer people going into the city centre each day. we've worked really _ into the city centre each day. we've worked really hard, _ into the city centre each day. we've worked really hard, and _ into the city centre each day. we've worked really hard, and now- into the city centre each day. we've worked really hard, and now it - into the city centre each day. we've l worked really hard, and now it seems to be that people are cancelling. we are getting all of our stock in, getting ready to stop we have all of our staff organised, and unfortunately now it may not look like sorting things are happening. northern ireland's covid infection rate is now the highest in the uk. hospital admissions are expected to rise, and ministers said intervention was required, including
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advising people to limit social contacts as well as working from home. . . , contacts as well as working from home. . ., , ., contacts as well as working from home. . . , ., . ., home. there certainly are uncertain times, but home. there certainly are uncertain times. but now _ home. there certainly are uncertain times, but now is _ home. there certainly are uncertain times, but now is the _ home. there certainly are uncertain times, but now is the time - home. there certainly are uncertain times, but now is the time for - times, but now is the time for action. if we want to achieve the best possible outcome right now, then now is the time to act. ease then now is the time to act. case rates have _ then now is the time to act. case rates have fallen _ then now is the time to act. case rates have fallen slightly - then now is the time to act. case rates have fallen slightly in - rates have fallen slightly in scotland, and nicola sturgeon announced that the vaccine passport system would not be extended to more venues. she said taking a lateral flow test before socialising over the christmas period was vital to slow the spread of the virus. fiur slow the spread of the virus. our situation is _ slow the spread of the virus. oi" situation is definitely more positive than we might have expected it to be at this point, but it is still precarious. we need to get the r number back below one, and that means having in place a range of proportionate protections to keep the country as safe as possible while we continue to live as freely as possible. fist while we continue to live as freely as possible-— as possible. at this pub in perth, they were _ as possible. at this pub in perth, they were relieved _ as possible. at this pub in perth, they were relieved that _ as possible. at this pub in perth, they were relieved that vaccine i they were relieved that vaccine passport would not be required for customers at this stage, but
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concerned at the possibility that tighter rules may yet be introduced. you never know one day to the next what _ you never know one day to the next what is _ you never know one day to the next what is going to be coming in next. and whether we are going to be a viable _ and whether we are going to be a viable business at the end of it. we feel quite _ viable business at the end of it. we feel quite lucky we have managed to -et feel quite lucky we have managed to get this— feel quite lucky we have managed to get this far, but whether we make it through— get this far, but whether we make it through christmas if they change things— through christmas if they change things is— through christmas if they change things is a — through christmas if they change things is a different matter. while uk case rates _ things is a different matter. while uk case rates are _ things is a different matter. while uk case rates are relatively - things is a different matter. izfzi�*u is: uk case rates are relatively high, they are not surging as has happened in austria, the netherlands and germany, where a range of lockdown measures are being introduced. the uk has also moved ahead of many other european countries with boosterjabs, though israel started booster jabs, though israel started earlier and boosterjabs, though israel started earlier and has done more. but the guidance in england on lateralflow tests is being widened to include those planning to mix with others in crowded indoor spaces. in all parts of the uk, the authorities want people to know that covid is still out there and they shouldn't relax their guard. hugh pym, bbc news. well, let's look at the situation in the uk in more
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detail, with the latest government coronavirus figures. they show there were nearly 42,500 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. that's over 5000 more cases than last tuesday. on average, there werejust over 42,500 new cases reported per day in the last week. 165 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 140 covid—related deaths were recorded every day. and on vaccinations, more than 15.6 million people have now had their booster injection. let's nowjoin our ireland correspondent chris page who's in belfast this evening. cases compared to this time last week are slightly down, so why are these restrictions being brought in now? , , ., now? sophie, it is true that the case numbers _ now? sophie, it is true that the case numbers have _ now? sophie, it is true that the case numbers have stabilised i case numbers have stabilised somewhat over the last few days, but
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in the few weeks prior to that, there was a sustained increase in there was a sustained increase in the infection rate, bringing it to levels not seen here since the height of the pandemic back in january. ministers in the devolved government here at stormont hoped that by strengthening their message they will avoid the need to tighten they will avoid the need to tighten the law. the advice to businesses to prepare staff to come back into the office has been scrapped and instead employers are being asked to help employees work from home. hospitality venues have been pointing out that with public health advice being strengthened around, for example, people being advised to limit the number of people they socialise with, that is leading to a christmas party is being cancelled, so although they will be allowed to remain open at this time of year, they fear their trade will be well down. likewise, retailers have expressed concern that their trade might be hit, for example, there won't be as many people out and about doing shopping during their lunch break. but when you talk to people in northern ireland, they do
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recognise that there is an issue around the infection rate, that something needs to be done to try to bring it down again. health care workers are warning that hospitals are under considerable pressure, even though hospitalisations, the number of people being admitted, isn't anywhere near the level it was backin isn't anywhere near the level it was back in the depths of last winter. chris, thank you. a murder investigation is under way after a couple in their 30s were found dead in their home near taunton in somerset on sunday. this afternoon police have named them as stephen and jennifer chapple. their young children — who are five and six — were asleep upstairs. 0ur correspondent, jon kay is at the scene. jennifer and stephen chapple. she was 33, he was 36. the married couple were found dying from their injuries at home on sunday evening, then police found their two young children asleep upstairs. sky lives
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down the road and came to pay her respects. down the road and came to pay her resects. .,, ,., ., down the road and came to pay her resects. . respects. those poor children are now left themselves _ respects. those poor children are now left themselves without - respects. those poor children are| now left themselves without their parents at christmas, and it is just, i couldn't imagine it, know what i mean? aha, just, i couldn't imagine it, know what i mean?— what i mean? a postmortem examination _ what i mean? a postmortem examination has _ what i mean? a postmortem examination has confirmed l what i mean? a postmortem i examination has confirmed that jennifer chapple died of multiple stab wounds. police have been searching two properties and clearing out drains looking for potential evidence. it’s clearing out drains looking for potential evidence.— potential evidence. it's quite frightening. _ potential evidence. it's quite frightening, actually, - potential evidence. it's quite l frightening, actually, knowing potential evidence. it's quite . frightening, actually, knowing it potential evidence. it's quite - frightening, actually, knowing it is so close. ., ., ., so close. teresa heard tonight that the couple's _ so close. teresa heard tonight that the couple's five _ so close. teresa heard tonight that the couple's five and _ so close. teresa heard tonight that the couple's five and six-year-oldsj the couple's five and six—year—olds are being cared for by relatives. irate are being cared for by relatives. we all talk are being cared for by relatives. - all talk to each other, and it's the children i can't forget, what they have seen. it's scary. absolutely scary for them. so young as well. a34—year—old man is being questioned on suspicion of murder. another man in his 60s has been released under investigation. even in somerset
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police won't comment on social media reports that there had been an ongoing dispute about parking on the estate, but they have confirmed that officers had contact in the past with those involved. local people have been told this was an isolated incident. ., , ., ~ have been told this was an isolated incident. ., , ., ,, , ., have been told this was an isolated incident. ., , .,~ ~ ., incident. heartbreaking, you know, and to look — incident. heartbreaking, you know, and to look at _ incident. heartbreaking, you know, and to look at the _ incident. heartbreaking, you know, and to look at the situation - incident. heartbreaking, you know, and to look at the situation that. and to look at the situation that this community sees, as i say, i don't want anyone speculating. 0ur don't want anyone speculating. our thoughts are with the families, and my officers are supporting that process. my officers are supporting that rocess. , my officers are supporting that rocess. ., , , ., ~ process. jennifer chapple worked in a carden process. jennifer chapple worked in a garden centre _ process. jennifer chapple worked in a garden centre coffee _ process. jennifer chapple worked in a garden centre coffee shop, - process. jennifer chapple worked in l a garden centre coffee shop, stephen chapple was a teacher. their families have asked for privacy. john kay, bbc news, somerset. 46 people have died after a bus crashed and burst into flames in western bulgaria. it's thought only seven people managed to escape alive from the vehicle. many of the passengers, including children, had been travelling through bulgaria on their way back to north macedonia after a weekend trip to istanbul when the bus crashed. 0ur europe correspondent bethany bell sent this report from bulgaria.
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a catastrophic crash. the bus rammed a barrier on the motorway south—west of sofia. it tore away a 50 metre section and then burst into flames. 0n section and then burst into flames. on board were tourists, mostly from north macedonia. they were returning from a trip to istanbul in turkey. the victims have not yet been officially named. a cause has yet to be determined, but witnesses reported hearing a blast. translation:— reported hearing a blast. translation: , ., , ., translation: the question is, what caused this blast _ translation: the question is, what caused this blast? _ translation: the question is, what caused this blast? if _ translation: the question is, what caused this blast? if it _ translation: the question is, what caused this blast? if it was _ translation: the question is, what caused this blast? if it was an - caused this blast? if it was an explosion inside the bus or a blast caused by the bus hitting the guard rails. this brings us back to the main leads in the probe. if it was that technicalfault of main leads in the probe. if it was that technical fault of the vehicle or a human error that caused the crash. ,, , ., , or a human error that caused the crash. ,, , .,, , ., crash. seven people escaped from the wreckaae. crash. seven people escaped from the wreckage- the — crash. seven people escaped from the wreckage. the survivors _ crash. seven people escaped from the wreckage. the survivors were - crash. seven people escaped from the
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wreckage. the survivors were brought| wreckage. the survivors were brought here to this emergency hospital in sofia. they have been treated for burns and other injuries. it seems they only managed to escape by breaking through the windows of the bus. for relatives and friends, this is an agonising time. this man said he hadn't heard from his nephew. translation:— he hadn't heard from his nephew. translation: ., ., ., ., translation: iso- information about the crash at 6am _ translation: iso- information about the crash at 6am this _ translation: iso- information about the crash at 6am this morning. - translation: iso- information about the crash at 6am this morning. i - translation: iso- information about the crash at 6am this morning. i saw. the crash at 6am this morning. i saw it on the internet and on facebook. as my nephew was in turkey, i started searching for more information on the internet. i called the company's phone number for three or four hours and called the company's phone number for three orfour hours and did not have any information from them. nor are they answering the phone.- are they answering the phone. locals say accidents — are they answering the phone. locals say accidents are _ are they answering the phone. locals say accidents are common _ are they answering the phone. locals say accidents are common on - are they answering the phone. locals say accidents are common on this - say accidents are common on this stretch of motorway. as the authorities continue their investigations, the families mourn their dead. bethany bell, bbc news, sofia. the government has admitted for the first time that parliament
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and the public have been misled for more than 30 years about a british airways flight that landed in kuwait in 1990 as the iraqi invasion was under way. more than 350 passengers and crew were on board — most were taken hostage for months. now files have been released which reveal that the british ambassador in kuwait had warned the foreign office before the flight landed, but the message was not passed on to the airline. 0ur security correspondent gordon corera is at the foreign office. yes, an apology and admission because for 30 years successive governments have hidden the fact that there was a warning which might have been able to stop a group of british people being taken hostage. it goes back to august 1990, when ba flight 149 took off from london, heading to asia but making a stopover in kuwait, and it was that night that iraq invaded kuwait. the plane was unable to take off and passengers and crew were taken
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hostage, many of them badly mistreated over the coming months. what has emerged today in files is that the british ambassador in kuwait made a phone call as the invasion was starting, and as the plane was in the air, and it was circulated around whitehall that this was happening but it was never passed on to british airways, and as a result, the plane landed. now, passengers and crew have welcomed that admission, but they remain angry because they believe there is another secret to be a 149, which is that they think there was a group of undercover intelligence operatives on board whom they saw get off the flight. today, the government has stuck by its denial that the flight was exploited for some kind of intelligence mission, so the controversy around ba 149 remains, despite today's admission and apology. gordon, thank you. a public inquiry has opened into the mistreatment of people at an immigration removal centre at gatwick airport. it comes after bbc panorama
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broadcast undercover footage in 2017 showing alleged assaults, humiliation and verbal abuse of detainees by officers at brook house in sussex. this report from our home affairs correspondent tom symonds contains distresing images from the start. brook house, where ex prisoners and asylum seekers are held before they are deported. in 2017, a custody officer went undercover here for the bbc�*s panorama, filming incidents like this. a man who has taken the drug spice, mocked. and much more, including physical abuse by staff, and detainees suffering mental health breakdowns. that is still a concern, even last year, according
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to this former detainee whom we have agreed not to name. i to this former detainee whom we have agreed not to name.— agreed not to name. i was stuck in there, agreed not to name. i was stuck in there. i didn't _ agreed not to name. i was stuck in there, i didn't know— agreed not to name. i was stuck in there, i didn't know when - agreed not to name. i was stuck in there, i didn't know when i - agreed not to name. i was stuck in there, i didn't know when i was - there, i didn't know when i was coming out, and plus, iwas there, i didn't know when i was coming out, and plus, i was sick, sick in my head. when i came out, it took me one year to recover. the bbc investigation — took me one year to recover. the bbc investigation has _ took me one year to recover. the bbc investigation has finally _ took me one year to recover. the bbc investigation has finally led _ took me one year to recover. the bbc investigation has finally led to - took me one year to recover. the bbc investigation has finally led to a - investigation has finally led to a public enquiry, which opened today. the treatment revealed in the panorama documentary was shocking, and has _ panorama documentary was shocking, and has no _ panorama documentary was shocking, and has no place in a decent and humane — and has no place in a decent and humane immigration detention system. in humane immigration detention system. in charge, _ humane immigration detention system. in charge, the senior prisons inspector, kate eves. she will investigate the way private firm g4 s run this place, the way the home office oversaw its work, and what 0ffice oversaw its work, and what has happened since the bbc investigation. what is it like inside brook house right now? it is not a prison, they do have phones and they have access to skype. i have spoken to a series of detained people inside the walls are broke out over the last week. a major
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concern, the time it takes to decide if they will be removed from the uk. some just want to get out. how many do you think are actually happy to leave the uk right now? maybe 20. 20 people out of 70 would leave? yeah. people out of 70 would leave? yeah, 20, ma people out of 70 would leave? yeah, 20. may more- _ people out of 70 would leave? yeah, 20, may more. wider _ people out of 70 would leave? yeah, 20, may more. wider questions - people out of 70 would leave? yeah, l 20, may more. wider questions about immigration — 20, may more. wider questions about immigration are _ 20, may more. wider questions about immigration are beyond _ 20, may more. wider questions about immigration are beyond the _ 20, may more. wider questions about immigration are beyond the remit - 20, may more. wider questions about immigration are beyond the remit of. immigration are beyond the remit of this enquiry, but the man who blew the whistle because of his concerns, now a bbcjournalist, believes it must succeed. i now a bbcjournalist, believes it must succeed.— now a bbcjournalist, believes it must succeed. ., ~ ., �* must succeed. i was working at brook house for three _ must succeed. i was working at brook house for three years _ must succeed. i was working at brook house for three years and _ must succeed. i was working at brook house for three years and some - must succeed. i was working at brook house for three years and some of. house for three years and some of the abuse delete my abusive members of staff left only to be replaced by others, and that is because there was a problem with the system, and i hope the enquiry brings about some changes to that system. the enquiry will be . in changes to that system. the enquiry will begin taking _ changes to that system. the enquiry will begin taking evidence _ changes to that system. the enquiry will begin taking evidence later - will begin taking evidence later this week. tom assignments, bbc news. the time is 6:16pm. our top story this evening: in the run—up to christmas, people in northern ireland are told to work from home again — in a bid to curb the spread of coronavirus.
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and tomorrow, nasa is set to launch a mission to deliberately slam a spacecraft into an asteroid to try to alter its orbit. coming up in sportsday on the bbc news channel. china responds to the controversy surrounding tennis star peng shuai, as the international olympic committee dismisses criticism of their involvement in her reappearance as complete nonsense . the funeral has taken place at westminster cathedral for the murdered mp sir david amess. hundred of politicians joined his family and friends to pay their respects to the 69—year old who was stabbed to death last month. a message was read out from pope francis praising sir david for years of devoted service. from westminster, our political corespondent damian grammaticas reports. in the heart of westminster, they gathered today. prime ministers past, along with cabinet members, friends and colleagues, all mourning their loss.
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yesterday in southend it was sir david's private family service, here the political world turns out to say goodbye to a man liked by those on all sides. a silence fell. sir david amess's coffin arrived and on the steps of westminster cathedral was an honour guard of house of commons staff. their respect, a mark of the man sir david amess was — genuine and kind to all, no matter their station. a committed catholic, the pope, who he had met, sent a personal message, saying sir david was an example to follow. commending sir david's soul to the loving mercy ofjesus christ our saviour, the holy father prays that all who honour his memory will be
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confirmed in the resolve to reject the ways of violence, to combat evil with good and to help build a society of ever greater justice, fraternity and solidarity. an mp for almost 40 years, sir david never became a minister or a party grandee — he was a politician driven not by ambition but a desire to make a difference, his passions often local and personal. all of us are feeling very, very sad, but on the other hand we are also celebrating today. we are celebrating a life. and i feel very strongly that we must remember david not for how he died, but for how he lived and for the causes he fought for. sir david amess, mourned and missed. on a day that was about honouring a decent man and the many lives he touched. damian grammaticas, westminster.
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a bbc investigation has found that highly polluting greenhouse gases are being smuggled into the uk from eastern europe to be used in cooling systems, air conditioning units and fridges. the gases are called hfcs — they're heavily regulated and restricted. and they're now being phased out in the uk and the european union. but older machinery still runs on them and it's resulting in a thriving underground trade, as angus crawford reports. it's an illegal trade you've probably never heard of, in gases that harm the environment. that should not be on the market in the uk? absolutely not. that one there is about 4,000 times worse than carbon dioxide. they are called hfcs, hydrofluorocarbons, used in air—conditioning systems, shop fridges and the aircon in older cars. 0nly approved and licensed companies like this one can import, sell and use them.
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there are meant to be strict quotas. here's the thing. these old hfcs are powerful greenhouse gases. the government is phasing them out and wants us to use cleaner, greener alternatives. but that means upgrading with more modern kit, which is expensive. the result, a thriving black market in old gases worth millions. we're heading to the centre of that black market in northern romania. i've arranged to meet a smuggler. he's nervous, so we find a quiet back road. he thinks we're buyers from the uk. 0k. that looks good. this is just a sample, he's selling in bulk. i ask about shipment to the uk.
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despite checks by customs officers, the border is porous and huge amounts of hfcs are brought in illegally. these gases are smuggled from ukraine, just up the road there, into romania and then shipped across europe and on into the uk — where we found them advertised on facebook marketplace. this one's in north london. what have you got for me? unlicensed and selling illegally to small firms and aircon engineers who don't care about the rules. can you get more in? yeah. so why does this matter? so, there we go, we've picked these up, bought this morning. yikes. there's no way that should have come into the uk. there's a huge profit to be made, and if you are caught, which in itself is rare, often the penalties are very low, so we really need to see customs
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and enforcement agencies recognise that climate crime is a serious crime and this might be an invisible gas, but it has a huge impact on global warming. another illegal trader. remember, anyone selling or buying hfcs has to be properly licensed but here, again, no questions asked. great stuff, thank you. legal suppliers say it is something we should all think about when we turn on the aircon. if a car gets cold then maybe they are not so worried. the air—conditioning is working and that is fine. but whilst products are brought in illegally, then they are going to weaken the effect of that regulation, which ultimately means more global warming can take place. we made sure the bottles we bought illegally were emptied and recycled, but our investigation shows laws passed to protect the planet can be exploited by criminals who just want to make money. angus crawford, bbc news.
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the man convicted of the murder of the british student meredith kercher in italy in 2007 has been released from jail early. 34—year old rudy guede, from ivory coast, was jailed in 2007 for sexually assualting and murdering the 21—year—old. he was due to be freed injanuary. meredith kercher�*s american flatmate amanda knox and her italian boyfriend were also initially convicted but were later released. tomorrow nasa is set to launch a mission to deliberately slam a spacecraft into an asteroid to try to alter its orbit. the idea is to test out technology that may one day be needed to push a dangerous asteroid off course if it's headed for earth. 0ur science correspondent, rebecca morelle, has more. until now, it's been the stuff of hollywood blockbusters like armageddon. an asteroid heading for earth and a mission to stop it.
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but science fiction is becoming science fact. for the first time, nasa is sending up a spacecraft to knock an asteroid off course. this one is not a danger to the earth, but the dart mission as a trial of technology for the future. normally when we are talking about a mission to go to space, we are going to explore some new world, but in this case we are literally going to crash a spaceship into an asteroid and change the direction and speed at which it moves through space, and we are doing that to basically test the technique to save the planet if there was ever a killer asteroid coming towards earth. nasa is targeting a small asteroid called dimorphos, which is orbiting around a larger space rock. the spacecraft travelling at around 13,000 miles an hour will fly into into the small asteroid leaving an impact crater up to 20 metres wide. but this should also give the rock a kick, which will speed up its orbit, and this can be monitored from
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the earth to see if it has worked. 0nboard is also a mini satellite that will film the crash. even a small nudge can make a big difference to an asteroid's path, and that could be vital. a 160—metre—wide rock like dimorphos could devastate populous areas, but smaller ones are a problem too. anything bigger than the 20 metre asteroid that broke up over russia in 2013 and injured hundreds of people are a concern. even the smaller objects can cause quite a lot of damage. a 25—metre asteroid, they will be really hard to spot with telescopes, so we are always pushing the technology and the science we can do and then we will try to detect where every single object is so we know what is coming in the future. the spacecraft will take nearly a year to travel the 7 million miles to its destination. no one has ever tried anything like this before, but it could be the best chance of defending our planet if an asteroid is ever on a disastrous collision course. rebecca morrelle, bbc news. the rugby league legend
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kevin sinfield has just raised more than £1 million by running 101 miles in 24 hours. he's raising money for research into motor neurone disease after his team mate and friend rob burrow was diagnosed with the incurable disease in 2019. sally nugent has the story. kevin sinfield, finishing an epic challenge. he has run 101 miles in 24 hours. at the finish line, his former team—mate and best friend, rugby league legend rob burrow. rob was diagnosed with motor neurone disease back in 2019. don't make me cry. no, i'm not going to make you cry. you've done it. yeah, he knows how much we love and care about him. that was certainly a battle. we wanted a battle and we got one. three, two, one, go! cheering
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the challenge started in leicester. all along the route, members of the public encouraged their hero on. he's done a wonderful thing. really, really wonderful. i've not come across - anybody so inspiring in a very, very long time, _ and i wish him all the very best. kev is raising money for the motor neurone disease association and leeds hospitals charity. mnd is a degenerative brain disorder. there is no effective treatment and no cure. rob's got the same strain of motor neurone as my sister had, who passed away last year, and it'sjust so... just so damn horrible. as day turned into night and the temperature dropped, this gruelling run, mile after mile, started to take its toll. obviously he's running on fumes, he's very emotional, very tired, but we are just all so proud of him.
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kevin sinfield entered the leeds rhinos stadium to a standing ovation, and this message from his best friend. recorded voice: the money raised will help people to get a great facility for a new care centre and to help the mndf find a cure. today is an amazing day for the whole community, and it will benefit every sufferer. lastly, to my amazing friend kev, you don't realise the impact you have had on me and the whole mnd community. a remarkable feat of endurance which will help fund treatments and research into a cure for mnd. sally nugent, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here's matt taylor. we will take you to the end of the week first of all and let's jump ahead. the picture behind show some cold conditions and there will be some snow for some but perhaps of wider concern across the country is this area of low pressure on friday night into saturday, working its way down through the north sea and it is the strength of the wind. we could
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see potentially damaging gusts of wind to take some to the start of the weekend and that will have some impact, and it will be a colder field, and yes, some of the rain will turn increasingly to snow, even further south than we have been used to and more details on that in the next few days but tonight, relative calm compared to that which will lead to mist and fog in places, particularly across the south, east anglia and the south—east particularly, but with more breeze in scotland and northern ireland there won't be fog but outbreaks of rain starting to bring this first signs of change. in the morning south—east northern ireland has breaks that turn into sunshine and showers but a cold front pushes into north and west wales for the afternoon and it separates what will be a murky day with patchy drizzle towards the south and east towards the brighter and clearer conditions where the showers could turn wintry over the hills. a surge of colder works its way through the evening and with lively windsor and shetland, those work their way into
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thursday but it will be

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