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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 22, 2021 9:00pm-10:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news with me, samantha simmonds. austria becomes the first european country to reimposes austria becomes the first european country to reimpose a nationwide lockdown. the government is also making vaccinations mandatory — we hear from austria's chancellor. prosecutors make their closing arguments in the trial over the killing of ahmaud arbery, the black man who was shot dead last year while outjogging in georgia. in chile, december�*s presidential election will be a run—off between candidates from opposite ends of the political spectrum. and learning the hard way — why you should always do your prep. as a reporter found out when he flew round the world to interview adele without listening to her new album.
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hello and welcome. we start with europe's response to a surge in covid cases. tough new restrictions are being imposed in some countries, together with stern political warnings. the protests, though, are also spreading. austria has reintroduced a nationwide lockdown today. germany's health minister said that by the end of the winter, most germans would be vaccinated, cured or dead, while the dutch prime minister condemned a third night of unrest as pure violence by idiots opposed to covid restrictions. let's take a look in more detail. in austria, people are only allowed to leave their homes for essentials such as work, exercise and food shopping. the daily average is nearly m00 new cases. "14,000. germany's chancellor, angela merkel, has said the measures in place are not sufficient. almost a8,000 new infections have been reported there. in belgium's capital, brussels,
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demonstrators clashed with police after tens of thousands of people marched through the city centre. over 13,000 cases have been reported each day. in the netherlands, the daily average is around 21,000 new cases. this report from bethany bell in vienna. the lockdown will last forjust under three weeks. it comes after record numbers of new covid infections in recent days. last night, this market was full of people out enjoying themselves, eating gingerbread and drinking mulled wine. but now, everything is closed. the government says the lockdown will go on for almost three weeks. it all depends on the infection rates. the number of infections have been rising exponentially. at the moment we have about 1% of the population being infected every week, with some regions being infected even more severely. and yes, i think one major factor is the low vaccine coverage we have in austria. this is also coupled
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with the delta wave. last week, austria introduced a lockdown for the unvaccinated. but cases continued to soar and the government decided to impose even tougher measures. the chancellor, alexander schallenberg, said covid vaccinations will become mandatory as of february. the move is controversial. several european countries saw angry protests against tougher restrictions this weekend. some of them turned violent. in brussels, police used water cannon against demonstrators. across the border in the netherlands, rioting took place for the third night in a row. in austria, thousands of people took to the streets in protest at the plans for compulsory jabs. around two thirds of austrians are fully vaccinated, one of the lowest rates in western europe. well, bethany bell, who you heard from there, has been speaking
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to austria's chancellor, alexander schallenburg, about his decision to bring in a nationwide vaccine mandate. many countries have mandatory vaccinations on different types of vaccines, other countries have installed it for covid—19 vaccines for certain areas. simply we have 66% of the population so far which has got the vaccine. this is too little, too late, and we want to break out of this vicious circle of virus waves and discussions about lockdowns and the only way, the only exit ticket we have, is the vaccine. are compulsory vaccinations actually legal? yes, it is legal. we had obligatory vaccinations in the past on different illnesses, so this is not a new legal instrument we are installing and i'm sorry to say that we have to go this way. i would rather have it another way. we have done ten months of campaigning, trying to persuade people, but still we have a certain
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share, nearly one third of the population, which is hesitant and we have a political force in this country, the freedom party, which is openly running against the vaccination plan saying, "this is bad for you, do not take it," so we have a very peculiar situation which brought us together with the biggest opposition party, the socialist party, together to say we want that and we need is that. i have spoken to a number of people, vaccinated and unvaccinated, who say it is my personal choice as to whether i get the jab or not. what would you say to them? i would agree, obviously, but we are together and it is a common body, so in a society you do not only have rights, you have obligations, and if you neglect those obligations ostensibly, then they become compulsory sooner or later. we have a higher good.
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this is, you could say, the healthcare of austria and nobody wants a situation where they do not get access to an intensive care unit because the beds are filled by those who have not got the vaccination and got covid—19. so in the end, everyone is suffering. if someone refuses to get vaccinated, what will the penalty be? the idea is to have an administrative fine, so it will not be prison or anything, it would be a fine, it would be a payment you have to do and it is rather about showing the people that it is serious. today was the deadline set by president biden for america's 3.5 million federal workers to be vaccinated by. and reports suggest at 90% of them have complied. and reports suggest at least 90% of them have complied. the white house is expected to release more details about the numbers later this week, but it seems like some departments where there had been a low uptake have seen a big boost to their vaccination rates since the mandate was announced in september. in fact, sincejoe biden first set out the plans for federal mandate the number of unvaccinated americans
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aged 12 and over has dropped from about 100 million to under 60 million. i'm joined now by adam galinsky, social psychologist and professor of leadership and ethics at columbia university. welcome, thank you very much for being with us. what is the psychology of this? is that the threat of something being lost or taken away, be it money, freedom of movement or a job, outweighs any concerns over the vaccine? i movement or a job, outweighs any concerns over the vaccine?- concerns over the vaccine? i think there are two _ concerns over the vaccine? i think there are two things _ concerns over the vaccine? i think there are two things going - concerns over the vaccine? i think there are two things going on, - concerns over the vaccine? i think| there are two things going on, one is people do not want to suffer the punishment but in taking the vaccine, people are incredibly afraid. i made a choice and let's say there are side effects from the vaccine, people will blame themselves. what mandates do is they also solve the psychology of anticipating problems, so if you put anticipating problems, so if you put a mandate in place it is no longer my decision, it is someone else's and it eliminates the potential to seize people if the vaccination side
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effects kick in. mit? seize people if the vaccination side effects kick in.— seize people if the vaccination side effects kick in. why does the carrot a- roach effects kick in. why does the carrot approach not _ effects kick in. why does the carrot approach not work? _ effects kick in. why does the carrot approach not work? we _ effects kick in. why does the carrot approach not work? we have - effects kick in. why does the carrot approach not work? we have seen| approach not work? we have seen countries offer things like free beer, lottery tickets, and it has not always have the desired result. why not? i not always have the desired result. wh not? �* u, , not always have the desired result. wh not? �* , ~ ., not always have the desired result. wh not? �* , ~' . . why not? i because think that a little bit of _ why not? i because think that a little bit of reward _ why not? i because think that a little bit of reward is _ why not? i because think that a little bit of reward is not - why not? i because think that a little bit of reward is not nearly| little bit of reward is not nearly enough to get people to overcome that anticipated regret and i think that anticipated regret and i think thatis that anticipated regret and i think that is one of the particular things. the other thing we know from 50 years of research is that although it is better to use positive reinforcement to motivate people, on average, when you are talking about the very simple behaviour of one such behaviour like getting a vaccine, sticks are the way to go. if you want to make people more motivated long term, thatis people more motivated long term, that is when carrots work. but we are talking about eliminating a very specific behaviour, sticks are
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effective. specific behaviour, sticks are effective-— specific behaviour, sticks are effective. �* , , ., effective. there's been a mixed reaction of _ effective. there's been a mixed reaction of the _ effective. there's been a mixed reaction of the fact _ effective. there's been a mixed reaction of the fact that - effective. there's been a mixed reaction of the fact that in - effective. there's been a mixed l reaction of the fact that in austria there will be compulsory vaccinations come the end of february, do you think it will actually work, forcing people to take the vaccine?— actually work, forcing people to take the vaccine? absolutely, it does work- _ take the vaccine? absolutely, it does work. the _ take the vaccine? absolutely, it does work. the new _ take the vaccine? absolutely, it does work. the new york - take the vaccine? absolutely, it does work. the new york city i take the vaccine? absolutely, it - does work. the new york city police department, 35,000 police officers, the union took the city to court and said 10,000 workers are going to quit and refused to get this and there is going to be a public health disaster. less than 36 people did not get the vaccine. that is less than... yes, people will whinge and whine, but when the deadline is there, people comply because it is easy and it overcomes an anticipated problem too. easy and it overcomes an anticipated problem too-— problem too. great to talk to you, thank ou problem too. great to talk to you, thank you for— problem too. great to talk to you, thank you for telling _ problem too. great to talk to you, thank you for telling us _ problem too. great to talk to you, thank you for telling us how - problem too. great to talk to you, thank you for telling us how the i thank you for telling us how the psychology of all of this works, thank you. psychology of all of this works, thank yon-— psychology of all of this works, thank you. let's look at some of the day's other news. stocks have hit record highs
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as wall street opened to news that president biden had picked jerome powell to lead the federal reserve for a second four—year term. the role includes managing inflation and regulating the financial system. mr biden said he had full confidence in mr powell. the women's tennis association has said that a call between peng shuai and the president of the international olympic committee does not address its concerns over the chinese player's well—being. an ioc statement after the call said peng appeared to be safe and well. the tennis star disappeared from the public eye for almost three weeks after she made sexual assault allegations against a senior chinese minister. the biggest awards ceremony in british music, the brits, has scrapped categories for different genders. it will no longer give out prizes for best male or best female, but instead choose one artist of the year. the brit award—winning singer, sam smith, who identifies as non—binary, has campaigned for the change. prosecutors in the trial of three white men charged over the killing of a black man in the us state
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of georgia last year have begun their closing arguments in the case. the men are accused of shooting dead ahmaud arbery while he was out jogging in the city of brunswick. with me now is tiffanyjeffers, associate professor of law at georgetown university. if you could tell us more about this trial, thank you for being with us, take us through the prosecution and defence cases here.— defence cases here. thank you so much for having _ defence cases here. thank you so much for having me _ defence cases here. thank you so much for having me today. - defence cases here. thank you so much for having me today. the i much for having me today. the defence is arguing two main points, one that the evidence for lawfully making a citizen's rest, and two that they were engaged in self defence at the time. both of those arguments are problematic, specifically because when you talk about citizen's arrest, there was not any direct knowledge of a crime, they are just making these assumptions, presumptions based on race really. and second, they were
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the primary aggressors here, so the self defence, it is really not applicable. their strategy is pretty problematic and i think the prosecution has really honed in on dismantling their arguments through cross and really closing arguments. how much has race been an issue in this case? m how much has race been an issue in this case? , . this case? race is the critical issue in this _ this case? race is the critical issue in this case, _ this case? race is the critical| issue in this case, particularly because of the american history associated with these types of vigilante and self defence laws. we can trace been to save catching days when there were slave laws enacted and giving individuals the right to try and catch enslaved people who ran from their captors. —— we can trace vigilantes back to slave catching days. when these
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individuals ran away from their captors, citizens around the united states, around the colonies, were given the ability to attempt to catch them and return them to their captors and we see that thread continue throughout american history, through reconstruction, through enacting policing, different policing strategies and really even today when i we have citizens who are not law enforcement really trying to capture black people and treat them as properties as if they were just criminal beings existing only criminal intent. —— when we have citizens. only criminal intent. -- when we have citizens.— only criminal intent. -- when we have citizens. why does a sit in the criminaljustice _ have citizens. why does a sit in the criminaljustice system _ have citizens. why does a sit in the criminaljustice system today? -- l criminaljustice system today? —— where does this sit? criminaljustice system today? -- where does this sit? unfortunately, it is a movement _ where does this sit? unfortunately, it is a movement where _ where does this sit? unfortunately, it is a movement where white - it is a movement where white supremacy has been empowered and emboldened in these individuals feel like they have the right to go and
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create their own... and we saw over the weekend how when these cases are coming to localjurisdiction and courts, courts and juries are telling these individuals you are not doing anything wrong, go and fight crime, stop individuals, go and do whatever you need to do to protect whiteness and it is a really dangerous position we are in as a society when these people are empowered in that way. thank you, go to net our empowered in that way. thank you, go to get your thoughts, _ empowered in that way. thank you, go to get your thoughts, and _ empowered in that way. thank you, go to get your thoughts, and when - empowered in that way. thank you, go to get your thoughts, and when there i to get your thoughts, and when there is a verdict in that trial we will bring it to our viewers. a private investigator has been describing the lengths he says he went to around 15 years ago to get information about prince harry and his then girlfriend chelsy davy. speaking for the first time, gavin burrows has told the bbc that he targeted her voicemails for a newspaper. prince harry is part of a group involved in ongoing legal action against the news of the world
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and the sun that could culminate in a trial. the private investigator is a witness in the legal case. his claims have yet to be heard in court and are strongly disputed by the publisher of both papers. news group newspapers has though previously accepted that some unlawful activity did occur at the news of the world but denies wrongdoing at the sun. here's our media editor amol rajan, and a warning, his report contains some flashing images. what's interminably referred to as the "invisible contract", behind closed doors, between the institution and the tabloids. the duke of sussex regularly speaks out about what he sees as the ills of modern media. his difficult relationship with the press goes back to his youth and the culture of tabloids in the mid—2000s, when subjects of interest to them included his then—girlfriend chelsy davy. harry had basically become the new diana. this private investigator is a witness in legal cases against the news of the world and the sun — brought by prince harry and others —
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which claim harry became a victim of media intrusion from his teens. the duke is also taking legal action against mirror group newspapers. gavin burrows says he targeted davy for the news of the world. there was a lot of voicemail hacking going on. there was a lot of surveillance went on on chelsy davy. on her phones, on her comms. chelsy would brag to her friends when she was going to see him. and so, her life became an object of obsession for you guys as well? yeah. medical records. had she had an abortion? sexual diseases. ex—boyfriends. vet 'em, check 'em. i basically was part of a group of people that robbed him of his normal teenage years. good to meet you, how are you? the lawyer representing the group of litigants which include prince harry says that while most victims of hacking have settled, some have not. certain claimants want to have their day in court and want to see there be a trial, so that newspapers are held
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to account for what they did. meghan markle's privacy case against the mail on sunday has generated plenty of recent headlines, but her husband's ongoing legal battle could be an even bigger moment. how big a moment in british public life do you think it could be, if prince harry gets his day in court, as he seems to want? i think it will be massive. because it's very striking, i isn't it, that he keeps going? all the other people, - up until now, have settled, a financial settlement, with no admission - of guilt on any side. over a thousand people have settled. over a thousand people have settled, and there's a few who haven't, and prince harry's one of those. yeah, he doesn't want to be a thousand and one. - prince harry says he wants reform of the media. this ongoing case, which could culminate in a trial, shows he intends to use the law as one tool to achieve his ends. amol rajan, bbc news. stay with us on bbc news, coming up in the next hour of the show: wisconsin police say yesterday's deadly car—ramming incident was not a terrorist incident. we'll be live in waukesha.
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one of the uk's biggest energy suppliers, bulb, is being saved from imminent collapse. it's the latest provider to be hit by rising wholesale gas prices but has too many customers to be taken over by another supplier. 1.7 million people will continue to have their energy supplied by bulb, while a special administrator considers how to deal with the situation. here's our business correspondent ben king. bulb was one of the most successful companies in taking on the big six energy suppliers which have dominated the uk market for the past couple of decades and i think what happened was that it got caught in the same bind that a lot of these other energy companies have got caught in. it says that energy prices were going up so fast and it could not pass those on to its customers. it said that a unit of gas that it paid 50p for a year ago was now
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costing £4 and the energy price cap met that its bills could not go up and that was the situation that proved to be unsustainable. here in the uk, a memorial service has been held for the conservative member of parliament sir david amess, who was killed last month. danjohnson has this report. sir david amess was an mp for nearly a0 years. first famously in basildon, winning the seats for the conservatives in the election of 1992, before going on to represent southend. last month, he was stabbed to death whilst holding a constituency surgery, where mps meet the people they represent. today, localfriends, family and colleagues are coming together to remember him. literally working with him on the streets, knocking on the doors, going to see people and he ran them, you had to be fit
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to keep up with him, because he ran the streets. the prime minister said his thoughts are with sir david amess's family today and he recounted how he got the news. i then got called out and got given the news, i had to go back in to the tell cabinet colleagues, many of whom had i had to go back in to tell cabinet colleagues, many of whom had known david for decades, and i'm afraid several colleagues broke down in tears, because it wasjust an appalling piece of news. i think he inspired real feelings of... ..affection and love, admiration for the causes he espoused and i think we were all very shaken by the implication of what had happened, the fact that his life had been tragically ended in the way it was. today's memorial service will be followed by a horse—drawn procession which will take sir david's coffin through southend, where members
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of the public are likely to line the streets to pay their respects. the bbc has learned the un has repeatedly ignored the un concerning the beirut explosion. letters were sent repeatedly to the un secretary general and none have had a response, even though the un itself had a prompt and independent investigation in the days after the blast. our correspondent reports. a city torn apart. but the people of beirut still don't know why. the investigation into last august's explosion has stalled, leaving a desperate search for answers.
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delia was killed instantly in the blast. her daughter, who was with her in herfinal moments, wasjust 16. i feel like my mother doesn't have a value to them. my mother's life doesn't have a value and my own health doesn't have a value to them. like, we are not humans. this is what i feel when i see this lack of responsibility. one week after the explosion the united nations called for a full investigation, but the bbc has learned that it consistently ignored a request to help that inquiry. the beirut bar association, which represents nearly 2000 families, sent three separate letters asking for satellite photos of the blast. they also wanted to know if the un should have stopped the explosive material entering lebanon in the first place. their final request in march noted unfortunately our letters remain unanswered and unacknowledged. lebanon is a founder member of the un and is asking for help. we are fighters.
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and we will continue fighting because we are responsible for 1800 people who have asked us to represent them and we will do everything by law to obtain justice and justice and justice. the un told me it is committed to supporting the lebanese people and is mobilised to help the victims, but it did not explain why it had not acknowledged any of those three vital letters asking for evidence. the international community has let down the survivors of the explosion. there are many tools at the disposal of the un and the international community they could have used but they have not done. the survivors and bereaved families say they deserve better than this, but while the lebanese authorities procrastinate and other countries do not help where they can
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the answers a nation needs will remain elusive. the presidential election in chile will be a run—off between candidates at the extremes of the political spectrum. let's get more on this. i'm joined now by cecilia barria from bbc mundo. tell us about the two front runners, who they are and what they stand for. .. who they are and what they stand for. , ., ., ., who they are and what they stand for. 1, , .. , ., ., ., ., for. basically, we have a hotline, a candidate whose _ for. basically, we have a hotline, a candidate whose campaign - for. basically, we have a hotline, a candidate whose campaign has - for. basically, we have a hotline, a. candidate whose campaign has been around key topics around border security and also fighting crime. —— we have a heart line. he is going back to what the country was some years ago and is trying to avoid all the big changes that the social unrest of two years ago, end of 2019, when people were pushing the structural changes. and then we have
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the other front runner, left—wing candidate, who is pushing a strong social agenda and once to change the social agenda and once to change the social network and is quite contentious because according to his point of view, there is a huge line dividing rich and poor in the country. it dividing rich and poor in the count . ., , , dividing rich and poor in the count . ., , dividing rich and poor in the count . . , , ., , country. it has been said that this election is — country. it has been said that this election is a _ country. it has been said that this election is a choice _ country. it has been said that this election is a choice between - country. it has been said that this. election is a choice between liberty and communism. is that how people are seeing it? that and communism. is that how people are seeing it?— are seeing it? that is one point of view, liberty _ are seeing it? that is one point of view, liberty against _ are seeing it? that is one point ofj view, liberty against communism, are seeing it? that is one point of - view, liberty against communism, but also the left—wing candidate he says is also a choice between the future stability and equality. so according to who do you go with, you may think what is the issue here? but to be honest, if we look at what the chileans have been saying, they are more worried about the economic situation, what will be the post—pandemic recovery. also related to immigration and security as well.
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but also what will happen in the future with a country that is more divided than ever. irate future with a country that is more divided than ever.— future with a country that is more divided than ever. we must leave it there, divided than ever. we must leave it there. thank— divided than ever. we must leave it there, thank you _ divided than ever. we must leave it there, thank you for _ divided than ever. we must leave it there, thank you forjoining - divided than ever. we must leave it there, thank you forjoining us. - there, thank you forjoining us. stay with us, i will be back shortly with more. monday turned into a cold but bright day for many, i can promise plenty more cold weather this week but tuesday may not be quite such a bright effort because on the earlier satellite picture you can see this big bank of cloud working down from the north and that cloud will become more extensive as we head through tonight. cloud it does become widespread across scotland, northern ireland and parts of northern england, it will hold the temperatures up so not as cold as last night for many spots here. the lowest temperatures further south through the midlands, because wales and southern england by the skies remain clear and we see values down to around —2. fog patches likely through parts of east wales and into the midlands, some fog slow to clear through tomorrow. generally speaking, southern areas, puzzling
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midlands, wales, south of england which was the best of this through the day, although some showers are still in parts of essex, kent and the channel islands put up further north, more cloud, odd spot of light rain or drizzle here and the air. temperatures if anything just a notch up from where they have been today, 9 or 10 degrees. into wednesday, band of rain are starting to push southward and eastward and this band of rain is associated with a cold front. behind it, the air will be turning colder. brightening through the afternoon for scotland and northern ireland but with a strengthening wind, some showers and an increasingly cold feel. as we move at a wednesday and thursday, that cold front continues to journey south eastwards, behind it follow the isobars all the way up to the north, the air will be coming from during thursday. a very chilly at feeling today, frosty starts lightly, but we should see brighter skies returning with lots of sunshine per stock scattered showers
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around coastal fringes that wintry over higher ground, could also be at lower levels in scotland. afternoon highs of 8 or 9 degrees at best. friday, stays cold, but also tends much more unsettled as this deep area of low pressure dies down from the north. that will bring some increasingly strong winds, particularly towards the north and west of the uk. showers or longer spells of rain, is a rain, there is the potential for spells of rain, is a rain, there is the potentialfor some spells of rain, is a rain, there is the potential for some sleet and snow to mix in with these showers, particularly over high ground in the west and it will feel very cold indeed.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk
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and around the world. austria becomes the first country in europe to re—impose a nationwide lockdown — they've also said — vaccinations will become mandatory. police in the us state of wisconsin say they've found no evidence of terrorism in the deaths of five people hit by a car during a christmas parade. scottish leaders visit a substance recovery group as the country continues to have the highest drug death rate in europe. and just why are an increasing number of americans saying no thanks to the prospect of having kids? we'll discuss. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon and the leader of the scottish conservativess have held a joint visit to a drugs recovery group in a "united effort" to tackle scotland's substance abuse death toll. the most recent figures show a record number of drug related deaths in scotland for the 7th year in a row. more than 13—hundred people died. scotland has by far the highest
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drug death rate recorded by any country in europe. our scotland editor, sarah smith, reports. drug abuse is killing more than 25 people per week in scotland and ruining the lives of many, many more. the figures are the worst in europe. were you worried ryan would end up in a long prison spell? yes. either prison or take his own life. his son struggled with life—threatening drug addiction for years, in trouble with the law but the family could not access rehab treatment until a charity the amy winehouse foundation volunteered to pay for it. begging for help, it was frustrating. i was trying to break it down and it cost less to put somebody in treatment than it does in prison, and treatment you give them a chance. ryan is now in recovery and has a full—time job. the dire drug problem has united the first
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minister and the scottish conservative leader at a drug recovery facility. the cross party cooperation is not easy. meeting with former addicts, douglas ross and nicola sturgeon agree urgent action is required. in a policy u—turn the tory leader said he may not support an official consumption facility which would allow people to use illegal class a drugs under supervision. there is a united effort to deal with this national scandal. the fact that so many lives had been lost means no one got monopoly on the solutions to this. we can come together from different political sides to come up with a solution that can make a difference. drug charities have advocated that there should be a right to recovery. the scottish tories are proposing a new law that would give a legal right to treatment to any addict who need it. nicola sturgeon said she is open to all ideas including those proposals from the conservatives,
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the problem is drastic. the death toll is unacceptable, it's shameful and we have got to turn it around so i am choosing not to be defensive about this and am choosing to be candid and say we have got to do much better. i have got to do much better, my government has to do much better and there is a serious determination to do that. boxing lessons are a part of the recovery programme at this community centre. it is what all parties say they want to see more of. and may be prepared to set aside the usual political punch ups to try and make it happen. india s bollywood films have been going strong for decades — but the global success of south korea's squid game has shown the global appeal of drama from east asia. it comes after the success of films like crazy rich asians and shang chi and the legend of the ten rings. sarah toms reports from singapore. think about all the people that have walked these floors.
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last madame is a surprisingly steamy singaporean tv drama that follows a fictitious female brothel owner in the 1940s. it won best asian drama at the busan internationalfilm festival last year and executive directorjean yeo says it does not hurt that last madame is now on netflix giving the series an international audience. i think content is a very important part of shedding the racism and the fear of each other�*s culture and i hope these platforms will be able to do that so we are able to show more asian content rather than the other way around. video streaming services are investing heavily in asian content. there's been a wave of financial and critical successes for productions in the region. south korean dramas are especially popular. tv series like squid games and the films parasite and minari have been huge hits
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as more realistic portrayals of asian safety than western movies. constance has seen both sides for the role in last madame after a small part in crazy rich asians, the us blockbuster with an all asian cast. since i was a little girl i always wanted to be in a hollywood movie but because i never saw anyone who is similar to me on screen except for mulan but she is a disney character, so i thought that was unachievable and now with all the new and diverse stories coming out all over the world i don't think a lot of us feel the need to just be in hollywood i think we can be everywhere now. with films like shang—chi and the legend of the ten rings hollywood has come a long way but despite the critical success marvel�*s first asian superhero movie is still another kung fu epic so there's plenty more room to break down the stereotypes. there's definitely
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an opportunity to tell a broader storyline asians who are not any of those. asians as mothers or fathers or working parents. asian audiences want realistic stories about real asian people and they're prepared to pay for it here at box office and on streaming services. that has film—makers, studios, and content platforms working to ensure that cameras keep rolling in asia and for asia. when former president donald trump questioned the legitimacy of the 2020 us election results many feared these false claims would undermine trust in democratic institutions. and now it seems we have the evidence that
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fear has come to pass. for the first time ever the us has been added to an annual list of so—called backsliding democracies according to the international idea thinktank. it says the visible deterioration began in 2019. and looking at the bigger picture the number of backsliding democracies globally has doubled in the past decade accounting for a quarter of the world s population. what to make of the claims? kevin casas—zamora is international idea's secretary general and joins me now from brussels. what is your definition of what a box writing democracy is? a backsliding democracy is one that is undergoing a particularly severe form of democratic emotion. the kind of situation where democratic activities and democratically elected governments subvert in a sustained and deliberate and strategic way if you want to call it that way basic tenants of democracy. the kind of thing that we are seeing in many places around the world from turkey to hungary to the
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philippines.— turkey to hungary to the philippines. turkey to hungary to the phili ines. ~ . . , philippines. what have we seen in the us specifically _ philippines. what have we seen in the us specifically which - philippines. what have we seen in the us specifically which means i the us specifically which means you've added it to this list? irate the us specifically which means you've added it to this list? we are seeinr a you've added it to this list? we are seeing a very _ you've added it to this list? we are seeing a very severe _ you've added it to this list? we are seeing a very severe deterioration | seeing a very severe deterioration in key tenets of democracy such as inclusive suffrage such as the effectiveness of congress to exercise its duties and began seeing a visible deterioration that is most prominent in the increasing tendency to question the credibility and legitimacy of electoral results without any kind of evidence of fraud. �* , , my without any kind of evidence of fraud. �* , , , without any kind of evidence of fraud. , , fraud. and presumably you lay the blame at the _ fraud. and presumably you lay the blame at the foot _ fraud. and presumably you lay the blame at the foot of _ fraud. and presumably you lay the blame at the foot of donald - fraud. and presumably you lay the i blame at the foot of donald trump? obviously the experience of the previous administration with a —1 in
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that respect but one thing we have learned since is the 2020 election did not change the fundamental aim driver of this process of deterioration. while we have seen is that far from resolving the issues that far from resolving the issues that are costing this deterioration of the 2020 election has exacerbated some key trends for instance the likelihood that election results will be contested without any kind of evidence of fraud. we have seen the proliferation of efforts to suppress political participation and we are seeing the venerated levels of political polarisation. none of this was resolved by the 2020 election. if anything all these things have been exacerbated since the election. things have been exacerbated since the election-— things have been exacerbated since the election. away from the us, the number of backsliding _ the election. away from the us, the number of backsliding democracy i the election. away from the us, the l number of backsliding democracy has doubled in the past decade. but if
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you put that down to?— doubled in the past decade. but if you put that down to? there are many drivers today — you put that down to? there are many drivers today to _ you put that down to? there are many drivers today to base, _ you put that down to? there are many drivers today to base, for _ you put that down to? there are many drivers today to base, for instance, i drivers today to base, for instance, the fact that democratic communities are being 20 part by defence invoices by misinformation and the misinformation campaign and a very high levels of polarisation and grotesque levels of inequality. all of those things we can the democratic communities. but also there is an increased sense on the part of citizens in any part of the world that democracies are proving unable to solve real problems for real issues and therefore people are more willing to give up on democracies and the autocrats that emerge when that kind of social attitude towards democracy exists, a venus of a price for the democratic
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transgressions that used to be the case 20 or 30 years ago.— transgressions that used to be the case 20 or 30 years ago. thank you very much- — stay with us on bbc news, still to come: the us the brick awards will scrap gendered awards and then have more on that. stay with us. ? the brick the brit awards will scrap gendered categories for the first time at next year's ceremony. the male and female awards for best artists will be combined into a single prize from 2022. artists like sam smith and will young had previously called for the change, saying the current system excludes non—binary artists. earlier gennaro castaldo, spokesperson for the brit awards spoke to the bbc. of course about promoting inclusivity and removing any barriers so that anybody can
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actually put their music forward however they identified but ultimately it's about seeing the artist exactly as that and defining them and judging them by their work rather than by how they identify and i think that's the most sensible way of doing it. if you are starting the brit awards from scratch or any other awards you would think about it in those terms so i think first and that is the key reason but obviously if it helps remove barriers it really makes it open and accessible to all and that has to be a positive thing as well. if as ifasa if as a result of these new measures it james a if as a result of these new measures itjames a spotlight on the fault lines that run through our industry i think that's also a positive thing. it i think that's also a positive thin. ., , i think that's also a positive thin _ ., , ., i think that's also a positive thing. it means that we as an industry of — thing. it means that we as an industry of which _ thing. it means that we as an industry of which runs - thing. it means that we as an industry of which runs this i thing. it means that we as an i industry of which runs this awards we have to acknowledge those issues and we have to on those issues and most crucially we have to act on them. keeping the status quo wants to change things in the long term
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but what will change to achieve real equality for women in artists of all backgrounds and selecting for that reason it's a very positive thing because if you're an actor what should it matter if you're a man or woman or identify some other way it should be about how you act or your body of work, the seem applies to music. it should be about your songs or albums are he an artist and how you create that body of work so why assuming they are nominated the likes of albert and ed sheeren be able to go head—to—head and be judged as artists? police in the american state of wisconsin say a car— ramming incident at a christmas parade on sunday was not a terrorist event. five people were killed and forty— eight others injured when darrell brooks drove into the crowd in the town of waukesha. police said the suspect was a local man who had fled a domestic disturbance and they are confident he acted alone. he will be charged with five counts of intentional homicide. here's the police chief
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speaking a short while ago. ijust i just received ijust received information that two of the 48 children are in critical condition. we have information that the suspect prior to the incident was involved in a domestic disturbance which just minutes prior and the suspect left that seems just prior to our arrival to the domestic disturbance. today marks six months since the eruption of mount nyiragongo in goma in the democratic republic of congo. 32 people died and hundreds of thousands were displaced ? many of whom are still living in temporary homes. whats more, local doctors say they fear the harmful gases and ash from the eruption have led to respiratory illnesses ? and that many people aren t aware they could still be affected. bbc africa s health correspondent rhoda odhiambo reports from goma.
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it looks calm now but whenever it rains, it spews a huge cloud of black smoke into the skies. within seconds, the smoke mixes with the air circulating across the city of goma and people here say it's affecting their health. i goma and people here say it's affecting their health.- affecting their health. i had a chest problem, _ affecting their health. i had a chest problem, i— affecting their health. i had a chest problem, i had - affecting their health. i had a chest problem, i had a i affecting their health. i had a chest problem, i had a lot i affecting their health. i had a chest problem, i had a lot of| affecting their health. i had a i chest problem, i had a lot of pain in my chest and stomach, it felt like the s ? as i inhaled were inside me. like the s ? as i inhaled were inside me— inside me. she is 62 and has witnessed — inside me. she is 62 and has witnessed three _ inside me. she is 62 and has witnessed three volcanic i inside me. she is 62 and has i witnessed three volcanic eruptions in her life. she lost her home in the election in may and now she lives in a temporary camp for people displaced by the eruption. the physical health is better she says but she remains traumatised. that but she remains traumatised. git night i stopped running and they heart starts beating faster and i am
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gripped by fear as i am always thinking that a volcano will explode again. thinking that a volcano will explode aaain. . , ., ., thinking that a volcano will explode aaain. . , thinking that a volcano will explode aaain. . ., again. the city of goma sits on to volcanic mountains _ again. the city of goma sits on to volcanic mountains that _ again. the city of goma sits on to volcanic mountains that can i again. the city of goma sits on to volcanic mountains that can erupt again. the city of goma sits on to i volcanic mountains that can erupt at any time. this is what's left after the recent interruption in may and as people rush back to rebuild in a place they once called home experts monitoring the mountains a air circulating here is not clean and people could be suffering without them knowing. this doctor heads the chemistry department at the volcano observatory. he monitors the volcano activity and that involves going up the mountain at least twice a month and he says his own health has been affected. i and he says his own health has been affected. ., ., , affected. i have gone up that mountain _ affected. i have gone up that mountain for _ affected. i have gone up that mountain for many _ affected. i have gone up that mountain for many times i affected. i have gone up that| mountain for many times and affected. i have gone up that i mountain for many times and when affected. i have gone up that - mountain for many times and when i went to the hospital for a checkup the doctors said i'm a smoker. every now and then that smoke moves towards the town and it smells like
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a rotten egg. towards the town and it smells like a rotten egg-— towards the town and it smells like a rotten egg. local doctors say that those inhaled _ a rotten egg. local doctors say that those inhaled air _ a rotten egg. local doctors say that those inhaled air risk _ a rotten egg. local doctors say that those inhaled air risk getting i those inhaled air risk getting respiratory and eye infections and the fairies many people in goma could have deposits of volcanic ash and other pollutants in their bodies without being aware of it. since management — without being aware of it. since management is _ without being aware of it. since management is not _ without being aware of it. since management is not limited i without being aware of it. since management is not limited to l without being aware of it. 5 “ice: management is not limited to the hospital it's always said prevention has been better than creative management so we advised them to reinforce hygienic and dietary measures by using masks or buying glasses because these are causing lesions on the eyes.— glasses because these are causing lesions on the eyes. aside from the toxic gases — lesions on the eyes. aside from the toxic gases from _ lesions on the eyes. aside from the toxic gases from the _ lesions on the eyes. aside from the toxic gases from the mountain, i lesions on the eyes. aside from the i toxic gases from the mountain, there are concerns about the level of dissolved carbon dioxide and methane in hot springs under that leak caused by volcanic eruptions could
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potentially lead to a massive explosion releasing those gases into the air. for now, the monitoring team same they need more resources particularly updated equipment so they can make audio predictions. their hope is quite permanent and safe home but the unpredictability of the mountain makes it hard to guarantee. 2021 marks the sixth year in a row that the us birth rate has declined. like many industrialised nations — adults are now choosing to have fewer children, and increasingly none at all. and it doesn't look like the trend will be reversing any time $0011. take a look at this new research from the research centre pew. this year — 44% of childless americans aged under 50 said they were unlikely to have any children. that's seven points higher than when pew asked the same question just three years ago — when 37% of americans said they were unlikely to have children
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i'm joined now by anna brown — a research associate at pew specialising in demographic and social trends. shejoins me now from washington. what reasons are people giving up for not wanting to have any children?— for not wanting to have any children? �* , ., ., , ., children? there's a variety of reasons but _ children? there's a variety of reasons but a _ children? there's a variety of reasons but a majority i children? there's a variety of reasons but a majority of- children? there's a variety of i reasons but a majority of people children? there's a variety of - reasons but a majority of people say it's because they want children. and among those who get some other reason there is a wide variety for medical reasons to being too old for their partner is too old, financial reasons, not having a partner or even the state of the world is a reason for not intending to have children. do reason for not intending to have children. ,, , reason for not intending to have children. , ., , , . children. do you see any difference in responses _ children. do you see any difference in responses between _ children. do you see any difference in responses between men - children. do you see any difference in responses between men and i children. do you see any difference i in responses between men and women? yes, we asked separately of people who already had kids and those who did not already have kids and among parents who said it was unlikely they would have any more children men and women gave different
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answers. fathers were more likely to say it was because they did not want to have more children or because they already had kids and mothers were more likely than fathers to say it was because of medical reasons. what about the response from different age brackets? did they different age brackets? did they differ as well? aha, different age brackets? did they differ as well?— different age brackets? did they differ as well? a lot more people who are in _ differ as well? a lot more people who are in their— differ as well? a lot more people who are in their 40s _ differ as well? a lot more people who are in their 40s say - differ as well? a lot more people who are in their 40s say it i differ as well? a lot more people who are in their 40s say it was i who are in their 40s say it was unlikely they would be happy kids or more kids because they were too old but because of medical reasons or because they were younger were more likely to say it was because they just did not want to.— likely to say it was because they just did not want to. when you look at the strand _ just did not want to. when you look at the strand of _ just did not want to. when you look at the strand of the _ just did not want to. when you look at the strand of the declining i just did not want to. when you look at the strand of the declining birthl at the strand of the declining birth rates over the past six years, is this something you have seen before in american statistics or is this something you foresee continuing? this has been a long trend in our survey findings follow along with that and in 2019 or before the pandemic started the birth rate with at an all—time low so it's too soon
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to say what would happen in the future but we will continue tracking this. ., , , future but we will continue tracking this. . , , ,., . this. has there been there pandemic cominu this. has there been there pandemic coming into — this. has there been there pandemic coming into the _ this. has there been there pandemic coming into the response _ this. has there been there pandemic coming into the response over- this. has there been there pandemic coming into the response over the i coming into the response over the past year as a reason for not having children at all? he past year as a reason for not having children at all?— children at all? he did not see a lot of people — children at all? he did not see a lot of people specifically - children at all? he did not see a lot of people specifically citing l lot of people specifically citing the pandemic in their answers. but of course it could be more indirect while playing into the reason people are seeing in their not having my children forfinancial are seeing in their not having my children for financial reasons or for health reasons.— children for financial reasons or for health reasons. what about the environment _ for health reasons. what about the environment of _ for health reasons. what about the environment of peoples _ for health reasons. what about the environment of peoples awareness j environment of peoples awareness around that? irate environment of peoples awareness around that?— environment of peoples awareness around that? ~ . . , ., , ., ., around that? we had a small share of --eole around that? we had a small share of eo - le who around that? we had a small share of people who said _ around that? we had a small share of people who said the _ around that? we had a small share of people who said the state _ around that? we had a small share of people who said the state of- around that? we had a small share of people who said the state of the i people who said the state of the world or climate change for the environment was a reason why they did not think they would have kids and a lot of people were saying things like they did not think it was ethical to bring a child into the world because of the environment and things like that.—
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the electoral authorities in venezuela say the ruling socialist party has secured a sweeping victory in regional elections. it won twenty state governorships, against three for the opposition. the official turnout was forty— one percent. it's the first time in nearly four years that venezuela's opposition have taken part in an election; they boycotted the last legislative and presidential polls, saying there was no chance of a fair vote under president nicolas maduro. our south america correspondent katy watson now reports from the oil capital, maracaibo. in ode to venezuela and an overture to the world. president nicolas madero pulled out all the spots to look good in the elections. this week winning a guinness world record for the largest orchestra. this in a country better known for its record inflation. this is a clear display of soft power. a message to the world that it's feeling pretty
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confident about these elections. but few musicians here in venezuela and share that confidence. daniel worked for the renowned national orchestra school. and with so many government jobs he never got paid. it school. and with so many government jobs he never got paid.— jobs he never got paid. it has been for ears jobs he never got paid. it has been for years and _ jobs he never got paid. it has been for years and i _ jobs he never got paid. it has been for years and i can't _ jobs he never got paid. it has been for years and i can't afford - jobs he never got paid. it has been for years and i can't afford a i for years and i can't afford a piano. there are other parities like eating and day—to—day living here in venezuela and we have a huge responsibility especially today. team to shaky status as international pariah, he impacted the eu to observe the boats. for many they provide reassurance. hind the eu to observe the boats. for many they provide reassurance. find i many they provide reassurance. and i a- reciate many they provide reassurance. and i appreciate our— many they provide reassurance. and i appreciate our presence _ many they provide reassurance. if. i appreciate our presence and they think telepresence would make the whole process more transparent. and finally a very very bad day in the office for one australian journalist.
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you've got a big interview with adele — for her new album, and you've been sent from sydney to london to do it. but you come back empty handed. that's what's happened to an australian tv host who's said he is "mortified" over an error, that cost his network, an interview with the superstar singer. matt doran — from channel 7 — met adele for her only australian interview. but after admitting, that he had not listened to the album, sony withheld the interview footage. doran apologised and said he had missed an email with a preview copy of the songs. it was an oversight but not a deliberate snub, he told the australian newspaper. "this is the most important email i have ever missed." you can reach me on twitter — i'm @ samantha tv news. cold weather has taken it's time to
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arrive this autumn. the season has been generally mild. things have turned colder and they are set to stay colder. in the short term some relatively cold air is in place but we also have some cold air duct away to the north of the jet stream and we will be tapping into that at times through the next week or ten days. but tuesday a lot of cloud in the mix. it will filter down from the mix. it will filter down from the north and the west. we will have a cloudy start across the northern half of the uk. the coldest weather on tuesday morning where we have clear skies towards the south with fog patches and into the midlands which could linger for a fog patches and into the midlands which could lingerfor a while fog patches and into the midlands which could linger for a while and generally speaking the best of the sunshine will be in the south. in the north more cloud with rain and drizzle and temperatures just a degree or so up on monday. towards the middle part of the week the frontal system works into the picture and it's a cold front. it will bring outbreaks of rain south and east and ahead had a bit cloudy
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start to wednesday and behind of a cold front the air turns cold there. we will see sunshine returning from the northwest and a scattering of showers and the wind will pick up for a time and it will start to feel quite chilly. the cold front will continue its progress south and east as we move through wednesday night into thursday. we will develop a brisk and northern winds and we will start to tap into some of the cold air. thursday is a really cold day with frost to start. we will see sunshine in many areas. showers around coastal districts and showers could turn wintry at low levels for a time in northern scotland and afternoon highs in single digits for just about all of us. a cold into the week and with the jet stream pretty much overhead there is the potential for a unsettled weather because the strong jet stream looks like it will spin up a area of low
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pressure. a lot of white lines on this chart. some strong winds with showers and long spells of rain but also with the cold air feeding in there is there potential for also with the cold air feeding in there is there potentialfor some sleet and snow. especially over high ground. there is confirmation of the chance of some windy weather developing especially up to the northwest and the strength of the wind and showers and it will feel very, very cold. with highs of five, six, seven, or8 very, very cold. with highs of five, six, seven, or 8 degrees. very, very cold. with highs of five, six, seven, or8 degrees. into very, very cold. with highs of five, six, seven, or 8 degrees. into the weekend the low pressure will number slowly south with showers and long spells of rain and sleet and snow second eating around and could wealthy smell at low levels across the northern half of scotland as we head into saturday. they will be sunshine as well that temperatures will be disappointing into the afternoon and saturday night will be cold and fussy for many. into next week that jet stream will not cold and fussy for many. into next week thatjet stream will not be too far away so we will see some
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unsettled weather and mild air will try to push him from the last but it looks like cold air will always wind out. next week generally speaking it will stay cold. we will see some wind and rain at times. and when the air is cold enough that if the potential for snow. air is cold enough that if the potentialfor snow. we air is cold enough that if the potential for snow. we will keep you up—to—date.
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tonight at ten: the house of commons votes on the future funding of social care in england. the vote was called a few seconds ago. mps have been debating whether the plans are "generous", as borisjohnson says, or "daylight robbery" in labour's opinion. the amended plans, according to some charities, will be especially unfair to the less well off. concerns over ca re concerns over care comes from boi’is concerns over care comes from boris johnson's own side too. the government faces anxiety on many different fronts. we'll be back with laura for the latest. also tonight... a less than straightforward day for the prime minister... ..with fantastic broadband, er... er... mrjohnson loses his way, in a speech to the uk's business leaders about his "levelling up strategy."
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forgive me...

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