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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  November 22, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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a car is driven at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin, killing five people and injuring more than a0. police are holding the driver in custody but they don't believe there was a terrorist motive. today, our community faced horror and tragedy in what should have been and tragedy in what should have been a community celebration. i am deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went to a parade but ended up community went to a parade but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. children are thought to be among the victims. we'll be live with our correspondent in the united states also this lunchtime... mps vote today on the government's controversial plans to overhaul social care in england with a cap of £86,000.
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we're finally tackling a problem that has bedevilled this country for decades, been very, very unfair on people who have got dementia or alzheimer's. iii people who have got dementia or alzheimer's-_ people who have got dementia or alzheimer's. , ., ., ., ., alzheimer's. if you are unfortunate enou:h to alzheimer's. if you are unfortunate enough to need — alzheimer's. if you are unfortunate enough to need social _ alzheimer's. if you are unfortunate enough to need social care - alzheimer's. if you are unfortunate enough to need social care and - alzheimer's. if you are unfortunate j enough to need social care and you lived _ enough to need social care and you lived in _ enough to need social care and you lived in an— enough to need social care and you lived in an £80,000 terraced house in barrow, _ lived in an £80,000 terraced house in barrow, hartlepool or mansfield, you lose _ in barrow, hartlepool or mansfield, you lose nearly everything. the number of migrants making the dangerous journey across the channel in small boats this year is already three times the total for last year. empty streets as austria becomes the first country in europe to reimpose a lockdown amid a surge in covid cases. and going the extra mile — rugby league legend kevin sinfield attempts to run 101 miles in a day for motor neurone disease research. and coming up on the bbc news channel... former tottenham manager mauricio pochettino says he's open to the possibility of taking over at manchester united, should they make an approach.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. five people have been killed and more than a0 injured after a car was driven at high speed into a christmas parade in the american state of wisconsin. children are among the victims. police in the town of waukesha have arrested the driver of the vehicle. they say it does not appear to be an act of terrorism, and that the suspect may have been fleeing a crime scene. this report from peter bowes. this was the scene seconds before the holiday parade in waukesha descended into chaos and mayhem. all of a sudden, a red sports utility vehicle ploughed at high speed into a school marching band
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that was entertaining the crowd. the sequence of events was captured on video by the city's live stream of the parade, and on the mobile phones of the people there in person. much of it was quickly shared in social media. oh, my god! horrified and screaming, the onlookers, families with children, fled for their lives as the suv sped off. the vehicle struck more than 20 individuals. some of the individuals were children, and there are some fatalities as a result of this incident. we will not be releasing information on fatalities at this time, while we are working on notifying the family members of the deceased. police say an officer fired his gun at the vehicle to try to stop it. officials say no bystanders were injured as a result. the car has since been recovered and one person is in custody. today, our community faced horror and tragedy in what should have been a community celebration. i'm deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went
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to a parade but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. the white house says it's monitoring the situation and the fbi is helping the local authorities with their investigation. reports suggest the suspect was fleeing another scene, possibly a knife fight, when he ran into people at the parade. this was the town's first holiday parade after months of restrictions because of covid, but it ended in tragedy. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. gary 0'donohue is our washington correspondent. what's the latest? well, we are expecting an update from the local police in the next couple of hours, ben, but as of now, we know that five people lost their lives yesterday, more than a0 were injured, and no real sense at this stage of what the motive might have been for that red ford and its
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drivers to plough through those bands and those marching young people. we don't know whether or not he is talking to the police at the moment. they've described him as a person of interest. i think it's worth saying that at this moment, local police are still leading the investigation, they've been advised by the fbi and otherfederal institutions. that suggests to me that they don't think at this stage that they don't think at this stage that there is a terrorist connection, because if it was going in that direction, the fbi would take over. but at this moment in time, the city of waukesha is trying to come to terms with something that was billed as an event to bring comfort and joy, and all it ended up bringing was mayhem and death. gard; bringing was mayhem and death. gary o'donoghue. — bringing was mayhem and death. gary 0'donoghue, ourwashington correspondent, thank you very much. austria has gone back into lockdown today amid sharply rising rates of coronavirus.
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across europe, new restrictions in the run up to christmas have brought protests in countries such as switzerland, italy, belgium and the netherlands, with rioting in some places. from vienna, bethany bell sent this report. the lockdown will last forjust under three weeks. it comes after record numbers of new covid infections in recent days. last night, this market was full of people out enjoying themselves, eating gingerbread and drinking mulled wine, but now everything's closed. the government says the lockdown will go on for almost three weeks, but it all depends on the infection rates. the number of infections have been rising exponentially. at the moment we have i% of the population being infected every week with some regions being infected even more severely. yes, i think one major factor is the low vaccine coverage we have in austria, but this is also coupled with the delta wave. last week, austria introduced
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a lockdown for the unvaccinated. but cases continued to soar and the government decided to impose even tougher measures. the chancellor said covid vaccinations will become mandatory as of february. the move is controversial. several european countries saw angry protests against tougher restrictions this weekend. some of them turned violent. in brussels, police used water cannon against demonstrators. across the border in the netherlands, rioting took place for the third night in a row. in austria, thousands of people took to the streets in protest at the plans for compulsory jabs. around two thirds of austrians are fully vaccinated, one of lowest rates in western europe. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna. people in england aged over a0 can now book their coronavirus booster vaccine.
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almost 500,000 people in their a0s are currently eligible for the booster, having received their second jab at least six months ago, according to nhs england. 16— and i7—year—olds are now also able to book their second dose after scientists concluded it was safe and effective for this age group. mps are expected to vote today on the government's plans to overhaul social care in england. the changes will see a cap of £86,000 on the amount people have to pay towards their own care. but labour says home owners in poorer parts of the country will end up losing a larger proportion of their assets than those in more affluent areas. ben wright is in westminster. not only labour, but some conservatives are unhappy with these proposals? yes, that's right, ben, and we will get a gauge of the depth of tory
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unhappiness when there is a vote in the house of commons on this later this evening. as you said it was backin this evening. as you said it was back in september that the government announced that for the first time, from 2023, there will be a cap, a limit, on how much anybody will have to pay towards their care costs in england. that cap will be £86,000. but it's not quite as simple as that, because last week, the government remains means—tested support from the government's calculation of that cap. —— the government removed means—tested government removed mea ns—tested support. government removed means—tested support. in practice, that means that it will be less generous than originally thought, for some people, with assets of less than £185,000, who require long—term care, and it is that which has caused irritation on tory benches and anger within labour. this morning borisjohnson was asked about it and he insisted that the plan was generous. this is massively more generous than anything _ this is massively more generous than anything previously. previously, you had to— anything previously. previously, you had to pay— anything previously. previously, you had to pay for the cost of your care until— had to pay for the cost of your care until you _ had to pay for the cost of your care until you were done, to £23,000.
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now, _ until you were done, to £23,000. now. we're — until you were done, to £23,000. now, we're saying, if you have got £100,000, — now, we're saying, if you have got £100,000, or less, we will help you, and that_ £100,000, or less, we will help you, and that doesn't include your housing _ and that doesn't include your housing asset, your home. the former health secretary, _ housing asset, your home. the former health secretary, the _ housing asset, your home. the former health secretary, the conservative - health secretary, the conservative jeremy hunt said that the proposal is less generous than he would have hoped for but urged tory mps to back it in the commons. labour says this simply cements and helps the wealth of wealthier homeowners in the south of wealthier homeowners in the south of england. it is actually a care con because if you need social care and you are fortunate to own a £1 million house, say in the home counties, then 90% of your assets will be protected. but if you are unfortunate enough to need social care and you live in an £80,000 terraced house in barrow, hartlepool or mansfield, you will lose nearly everything. that is manifestly unfair. it's not levelling up, it's frankly daylight robbery.
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this question about capping care costs is just this question about capping care costs isjust one this question about capping care costs is just one part of the very complex picture of how to reform social care in england but it is a contentious part, and even if the government wins the vote tonight, as is expected, this will then go to the house of lords, where it may be picked over and changed in the weeks ahead. ben wright, our political correspondent at westminster, thank you. the number of migrants reaching the uk by small boats this year is now three times the level recorded for the whole of last year. the home office has confirmed that 886 people arrived on saturday, taking the total number of people who ve reached the uk by boat this year to more than 25,700. our home editor mark easton is with me. mark, this is a huge rise on last year? it mark, this is a huge rise on last ear? . . mark, this is a huge rise on last ear? , , �* , , mark, this is a huge rise on last ear? , , �*, , . ., year? it is, but let's be clear about what _ year? it is, but let's be clear about what we _ year? it is, but let's be clear about what we are _ year? it is, but let's be clear about what we are counting l year? it is, but let's be clear - about what we are counting here. this is that specific group of people who have crossed the channel in small boats, that is the way they have come. as you say, three times as many this year have used that perilous route as the whole of last
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year. i mentioned the route, because what appears to have happened is that migrants have switched their tactics, in the past they might have tried to come here by plane or in the back of a lorry, but those roots, partly as a result of increased security, partly as a result of covid, have become less viable and they have been forced to adapt and that is why they are coming in small boats. worth noting that the most recent overall asylum claim figures actually show a a% fall year—on—year, fewer people are requesting century in the year to june 2021. despite that, the government says that britain is, and i quote, facing a global migration crisis, and the number of illegal migrants we have seen departing from france is unacceptable. worth saying that the un refugee agency says there is no such thing as an illegal migrant, and it is not actually currently illegal to enter the uk in order to claim asylum. the problem for the government is getting people to be sent home. since brexit, the
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country has no return arrangements with any eu country, making it very difficult to send migrants back. in the whole of this year, of those 25,000 people who have arrived in small boats, just five have been returned to france.— small boats, just five have been returned to france. mark easton, our home editor. — returned to france. mark easton, our home editor, thank _ returned to france. mark easton, our home editor, thank you _ returned to france. mark easton, our home editor, thank you very - returned to france. mark easton, our home editor, thank you very much. l drug—related deaths in scotland last year reached a record high for the seventh year in a row. latest figures show there were more than 1,300 deaths in 2020. it has prompted the first minister to visit a centre which helps addicts and works to divert young people away from drugs. scotland has by far the highest drug death rate recorded by any country in europe. and its rate is more than 3.5 times that of england and wales. the number of children in care in england could reach almost 100,000 by 2025, up by more than a third in a decade. the figures come from new research commissioned by county councils. local authorities say the increase is creating unprecedented pressure on their budgets.
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here's our political correspondent chris mason. this is eastbourne in east sussex. joe and joanne have been foster carers for nine years. when the children come to us and they look so down, they look like they're carrying so much baggage and then after a few weeks sometimes, you start to see their face light up, i mean the fact of the matter is there's more children who need our help than there is carers who can help. yeah, but i also thing people have a misconception about fostering. i think it is, "am i qualified enough to be a foster carer?" and it is at the end of the day it is about your personality, about your character, about your heart. england's county council leaders are getting together today for their conference in marlow in buckinghamshire. they are worried the overall number of children in care is going up and the number in children's homes is going up, too, partly, because there are aren't
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enough foster carers. addressing them today, this man, who is chairing an independent review of children's social care in england. there is no future for children's | social care that is not going to| cost the country, - england, more money. we just need to accept that. the choice is, do we put more money into a flawed system that doesn't - work well enough for children - and their families, or do we put it into a programme of reform that's actually going to address the - fundamental issues that have been highlighted through this _ report today? this is the lighthouse, the idea is it is a beacon for light for the young people going through their journey. in warrington in cheshire, a trial scheme and a chance to see what a new children's home looks like inside. there is an emphasis here on what the independent reviewer and councils want to see more of — doing everything possible to nip issues in the bud straight away. they're addressing the brutal truth that a quarter of the adult prison population in england used to be in care and so have a police
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officer on site. imagine if i was coming into work in a full uniform? the young people, firstly, it just wouldn't sit right. me not wearing uniform, it breaks down those barriers straightaway. policing cannot fix everything on their own, so we do a lot ofjoined up work with obviously with social care, with parents, with carers, with education, with health and we are realising one of the other terminologies, you can't arrest your way out of this. there's got to be another approach and that's where i am 100% believing in this system. plenty argue how society helps the next generations most in need has to change. the government says it is providing new funding to help maintain children's social care. chris mason, bbc news. borisjohnson has said his levelling up agenda is a moral mission and that the older he gets, the more idealistic he becomes. he was speaking at the annual conference of the employers' organisation the cbi.
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our business correspondent theo leggett is here. theo, what was big business's message to the prime minister? basically that they want words turned into action. the cbi conference is an opportunity for big business to speak directly and publicly to the government and prime minister. this year the director—general set out his message, which was that investment is needed in growing sectors like biotechnology, cybersecurity, climate friendly business and this sort of thing, and that this could lead to a second kind of industrial revolution and bring new wealth to poorer parts of the country. but he said business could not do this its own. this might be a new line from the head of the cbi, but simply saying the market will fix these things is not good enough. there are free marketeers in the debate who say that government should never play an active role like this, but i don't know a country
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in the world, including and especially the united states, where governments aren't active in economic geography. the prime minister was next up on stage and it was an unusual speech. at one point he was lost for words, he seemed to lose his place in his notes. he also later launched into a lengthy anecdote about the children's theme park, peppa pig world, a long way from where he was speaking. he defended his levelling up speaking. he defended his levelling up agenda, and questions have been raised about that agenda, for example, last week's decision to scale back major rail projects, like the northern powerhouse rail scheme. but he was insistent that he remains very committed to this. it is a moral mission, and as you get older, the funny thing is, you get more idealistic and less cynical. it's a moral thing, but it's also an economic imperative, because if this country could achieve the same kind of geographical balance and dispersion of growth and wealth
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that you find in most of our most successful economic comparators, and if all our businesses could reach more balance in their levels of productivity, then there would be absolutely no stopping us, and we would achieve what i believe we can, and become the biggest and most successful economy in europe. the labour leader sir keir starmer is due to address the conference later and spoke of the skills shortage, what labour would do about giving a firm grip on spending. see le aett, giving a firm grip on spending. see leggett, our business correspondence. our top story this lunchtime... a car is driven at high speed in to a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin, killing five people and injuring more than forty. police don't believe there was a terrorist motive. also in the programme, in the last few minutes a memorial service has begun for the mp david amess who was stabbed to death last month.
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coming up on the bbc news channel... the former manchester united midfielder bryan robson tells us the club needs a new approach after sacking 0le gunnar solskjaer, theirfourth manager in the eight years since sir alex ferguson retired. a new analysis has found that only a small number of people — less than 1% — are behind more than 16% of all visits to accident and emergency departments in england. a study by the british red cross shows that some of the people in this group — so called high intensity users — go to emergency departments more than 300 times a year. with more, here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. accident and emergency departments across the uk are busier than some patients facing long wait for treatment. now a study of six years
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of nhs data reveals how a small number of people, known as high—intensity users, are returning time and time again. high—intensity use of an a&e department is defined as more than five visits in a year. why let percent of england's population fall into this category, nhs data from 2015 show they accounted for a significant proportion, 16% of all a&e visits and well over a quarter of all ambulance journeys, and well over a quarter of all ambulancejourneys, as and well over a quarter of all ambulance journeys, as well as to 26% of all emergency fiddles in england. but specialist teams in a&es can help to reduce visits by offering individual support to people who feel hospital is their only option. the people who feel hospital is their only option-— people who feel hospital is their only option. the this book but in a&e are quite — only option. the this book but in a&e are quite complex - only option. the this book but in a&e are quite complex because | only option. the this book but in - a&e are quite complex because they often don't have anywhere else to go and they have followed between the gaps between other services and teams previously. it is interesting,
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there are the 29 with health problems and other issues, and those over 70 who have complex issues, including chronic loneliness. it is important to work with people to understand them as individuals so we can get them the support they need hopefully before they get to a&e. specialist help can cut repeat visits by more than 80%, potentially saving the nhs millions of pounds and reducing the pressure on an already stretched service. dominic hughes, bbc news. dominic hughes, bbc news. two mothers who died of herpes after giving birth could have been infected by the surgeon who carried out caesareans on the women. the families were told there was no connection between the deaths, which were six weeks apart. they're calling for inquests into the deaths to be opened. the east kent hospitals trust says it could not identify the source of the infection, and the surgeon had no history of the virus. 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan is with me. what's the background to this case?
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this put the death of two women, kim samson, and samantha mackay, if two different hospitals run by the same nhs trust. however both developed complications that doctors could not diagnose and unfortunately both died a few days after giving birth. tests later revealed both had died of herpes. it is extremely rare to die of this indeed, but despite the rarity of the death of the two families were told there was no link between the cases.— between the cases. what have you discovered? _ between the cases. what have you discovered? working _ between the cases. what have you discovered? working with - between the cases. what have you discovered? working with the - discovered? working with the families we _ discovered? working with the families we were _ discovered? working with the families we were able - discovered? working with the families we were able to - discovered? working with the i families we were able to reveal discovered? working with the . families we were able to reveal a previously undisclosed investigation that revealed the same surgeon had operated on the two women and a lab had written to the trust after the second death to say explicitly it doesn't look like surgical contamination. we passed all the documentation to an expert on herpes
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and he said the most biologically plausible explanation is the surgeon had unwittingly infected the women. there is no suggestion whatsoever that the surgeon had any idea that he may have been infectious. in a statement the east kent hospitals trust, which ran the hospital, told us they passed their sympathies on two families, but the investigation led by the trust and the health care safety investigation branch took advice from a number of experts and concluded it was not possible to identify the source of either infection. both families, as you said, are now hoping there will be an inquest into the deaths. police in kenya are investigating the death of a british woman who worked for the bbc�*s international charity media action. the body of kate mitchell was found at a hotel in the capital, nairobi. it is not believed her death was connected to her work with the bbc and police say they are treating the case as a murder. a memorial service hasjust begun
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for the conservative mp sir david amess, who was killed last month. speakers at the service, in his southend constituency, will include political colleagues and friends. danjohnson is in southend. this is a very sad, but a really significant day for so many people here in southend, paying their respects to an mp who had given his service to this community over so many decades. this is a private memorial service with readings, hymns and prayers from the friends, the family and the closest colleagues of sir david amess. the focus today is not on the brutal way in which the mp lost his life, but on the positive, generous, kind and committed spirit in which he lived his life. sir david amess was an mp for nearly a0 years. first famously in basildon, winning the seats for the conservatives
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in the close election of 1992, before going on to represent southend. last month, he was stabbed to death whilst holding a constituency surgery, where mps meet the people they represent. today, localfriends, family and colleagues are coming together to remember him. literally working with him on the streets, knocking on the doors, going to see people and he ran them, you had to be fit to keep up with him, because he ran the streets. the prime minister said his thoughts are with sir david amess's family today and he recounted how he got the news. i then got called out and got given the news, i had to go back into the tell cabinet colleagues, many of whom had known david for decades, and i'm afraid several colleagues broke down in tears, because it wasjust an appalling piece of news. i think he inspired real feelings of... ..affection and love, admiration for the causes
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he espoused and i think we were all very shaken by the implication of what had happened, the fact that his life had been tragically ended in the way it was. today's memorial service will be followed by a horse—drawn procession which will take sir david's coffin through southend, where members of public are likely to line the streets to pay their respects. you really do get a sense here of what a towering figure sir david amess was in this constituency, how much good he did for local community groups and for many, many people here. that is why there are hundreds in the church today and many hundreds more are expected to line the streets. his coffin is being carried by firefighters from essex fire and rescue and it will be escorted through the streets later today by officers from essex police.
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this really is a county that is showing its best in respect for one of the longest surfing mps. and tomorrow at westminster cathedral there will be a full funeral service for sir david who was a committed catholic. there is expected to be a message read there from the pope. this is a huge public figure who had an impact on so many people, which we should perhaps reflect also on. and sir david's family are having a statement read which says, as a family we are still trying to understand why this awful thing occurred. we are absolutely broken but we will survive and carry on for the sake of a wonderful and inspiring man. danjohnson, inspiring man. dan johnson, thank inspiring man. danjohnson, thank you very much. rugby league legend kevin sinfield has set off to run 101 miles in 2a hours. he's trying to raise money for the motor neurone disease assocation and for his friend and former teammate rob burrow, who has the illness. graham satchell has been watching. three, two, one, go. kevin sinfield, setting off on an epic challenge.
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he's running 2a hours straight from leicester to leeds. it is 101 miles with no sleep. i want it to be horrible, raining and sleeting and windy. i want everything to get thrown at us that can be. there's people out there doing it really tough with mnd and people connected with mnd who are fighting a really tough fight at the minute, and we're just showing them that we care. this is a sensational try. there aren't many in super league that could do that. kev is running for his former team—mate and friend rugby league legend rob burrow. rob was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 2019. his family can't quite believe what kev is about to do. 100 miles in one day without no sleep? you are crazy! you know we think you are amazing. thank you for doing everything you have done for my dad and people with mnd.
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good luck on your next challenge. today's run will be a physical and mental test like no other. running through the night, sleep deprived, glycogen depleted, fatigued, he motivates us to do things that we don't think we can do and he does that by leading by example and doing things that nobody should be able to do. kev will be raising money for people with motor neurone disease like ian, who was diagnosed in 2019. mnd is a cruel disease, a degenerative brain disorder. there is no effective treatment, no cure. but in the mnd community, kev has become a hero. the money raised today will help build new, much—needed treatment centres. a place that has some dignity, has some joy and has some hope would provide so much hope for people when they enter it, that they know the research is going on, they know the technology is there. i suppose you have your good days, your bad days, but, yeah...

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