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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 22, 2021 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. at least five people are killed, and a0 injured after a car drives at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin. today our community faced horror and tragedy in what should have been a community celebration. i am deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went to a parade, but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. there's further unrest over covid restrictions in europe. police clash with protestors in brussels — while austria returns to full lockdown. some conservative mps urge the government to rethink changes to funding social care in england — saying poorer people will be disproportionately affected. a memorial service is to be held
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laterfor the murdered mp sir david amess. and less than 1% of the population in england account for more than 16% of visits to accident and emergency departments — according to a new study. good morning and welcome to bbc news. there have been distressing scenes as five people have been killed — and dozens injured — after a car drove at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin. more than 20 people — half of them children — were taken to hospital following the incident. it's understood police are not treating the incident as terrorism — and believe the suspect may have been fleeing another crime scene. a "person of interest" is in police custody.
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our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. this was the scene seconds before the holiday parade in waukesha descended into chaos and mayhem. all of a sudden, a red sports utility vehicle ploughed at high speed into a school marching band that was entertaining the crowd. the sequence of events was captured on video by the city's livestream of the parade and on the mobile phones of people there in person. much of it quickly shared in social media. horrified and screaming, the onlookers, families with children, fled for their lives as the suv sped off. the vehicle struck more than 20 individuals. some of the individuals were children and there were some fatalities as a result of this incident. we will not be releasing information on fatalities at this time while we are working on notifying the family members of the deceased. police say an officer fired his gun
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at the vehicle to try to stop it. officials say no bystanders were injured as a result. the car has since been recovered and one person is in custody. today, our community faced horror and tragedy in what should have been a community celebration. i'm deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went to a parade but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. the white house says it's monitoring the situation and the fbi is helping the local authorities with their investigation. reports suggest the suspect was fleeing another scene, possibly a knife fight, when he ran into people at the parade. this was the town's first holiday parade after months of restrictions because of covid. but it ended in tragedy. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. reverend david simmons from st matthias episcopal church in waukesha was part of the parade and witnessed the incident.
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my church is right at the beginning of the parade route. there are stages and it starts off. at that point, a red car came in from the right. we found out later it had basically gone through police barriers further down main street, came into main street. as it passed the church at high speed, the driver was honking the horn, making a bunch of noise and swelling to the right to actually try to avoid people. many of us assumed he was somebody like a local resident who was really upset that a parade was going on and was trying to get round it. somebody who had blundered into the parade route. when he passed us, he started to accelerate and moved into the main part of where the casualties actually occurred. at that point, i never heard
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gunshots, but at one point one of our policemen took three shots to try to stop the vehicle. and then police on our end of the street basically told us we needed to vacate the street. we always have our church open during this parade for rest rooms, for warmth, stuff like that. we started to pull people into the church, including a dance team. what ended up is we had a dance team, basically of young girls and women and most of their parents were down at the other end of the parade route, waiting for them finish. it ended up they were told to shelter and other buildings. luckily with cell phones but most kids could get hold of their parents and let them know they were safe at the other end of the zone. it took about two and a half hours to resolve that part of the story. wisconsin's state representative — sara rodriguez — was also at the parade and told us
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what she saw. i was in the parade, i was a little bit earlier in the parade, and we had just finished. i was walking with waukesha county democrats, when there were people running and yelling and telling everybody to get off the street because a car had come through that main area of the parade and hit multiple people. and so, what we are hearing today officially is that they have around 23 people who have been injured and taken to the hospital and that includes multiple children. and so they do have somebody of interest today. they have lifted the lockdown for downtown waukesha but they are still investigating. there's a lot that we need to be able to learn from this and we don't have all the answers right now. i'm in a state of shock. these are the kids that my kids go to school with. these are the parents that i know when we go to the schools. i have been on the phone all evening
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with different parents that i know, checking in on people to see if there 0k, getting updates from kids and other people's parents who may have been affected. this was just a tragedy and we're going to learn more about why it happened. tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets of brussels to protest against anti—covid measures. fireworks were thrown at police who responded with tear gas and water cannons. it follows similar protests across parts of europe as leaders try to battle a fresh wave of the virus. austria, which has one of the highest infection rates on the continent, has introduced a nationwide lockdown from today and is set to make vaccinations mandatory for everyone. anna holligan has more. another day of unrest, unsettling another european capital. this is brussels. what began as an organised,
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peaceful march quickly turned nasty. some protesters threw fireworks at police. others targeted their vehicles. officers intervened with tear gas and water cannon. belgium hasjust brought in new rules in response to a sharp rise in infections. demonstrators are mainly angry about the use of covid passes, which stops the unvaccinated from entering venues, such as restaurants or bars. some object to plans to make vaccinations mandatory for health workers. translation: we know that the virus is there, l but we leave it to people to decide whether or not to be vaccinated. translation: i came to give my i opinion about freedom of expression and individual choice and really to be able to respect everyone's choices. the netherlands witnessed the most extreme violence this weekend. rotterdam was rocked by rioters. police opened fire, shooting
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at the crowd with live rounds in response to what they described as a life—threatening situation. vandals torched bicycles in the hague. these startling demos happening, too, in austria, croatia and denmark reflect rumbling frustrations about the evolving covid restrictions, considered essential to bring down record high infection rates. and there's more trouble here in the netherlands. small groups of people destroying things in the northern city of groningen and reports of unrest elsewhere too. it's mostly peaceful now but the catalyst for this still exists, and many countries are watching and wondering whether this latest disturbing symptom may be coming their way. with varying vaccine rates, getting the shots in is seen as critical, but they won't cure the distrust or divisions seeping through some european societies.
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anna holligan, bbc news in the hague. a full national coronavirus lockdown has come into force in austria. it's the first country in europe to announce such a step, as covid cases surge. the austrian government says it will also make covid vaccinations mandatory from february as bethany bell reports. the lockdown will last forjust under three weeks. it comes after record numbers of new covid infections in recent days. last week austria introduced a lockdown for the unvaccinated, but cases continue to soar on the government decided to impose even tougher measures. the chancellor said covid vaccinations will become mandatory as of february. the move is controversial. thousands of people took to the street this weekend in protest at the plans
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for compulsoryjabs. around two—thirds of austrians are fully vaccinated, one of the lowest rates in western europe. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna. the government's being urged by senior conservatives to rethink the latest changes to its social care overhaul in england over concerns poorer people will be disproportionately affected. ministers insist the plans — which will be voted on in parliament today — will protect everyone from what they describe as the "catastrophic costs" of care. labour's shadow health secretary, jonathan ashworth, said that people would be "paying more in tax for a system that benefits people with wealthier assets in the south" and that this was "manifestly unfair". it's actually a care con because if you need social care and you're fortunate enough to own a £1 million house, for example in the home counties, then 90% of your assets
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will be protected. but if you're unfortunate enough to need social care and you live in an £80,000 terrace house in barrow or hartlepool or mansfield, you'll lose nearly everything. that is manifestly unfair. it's not levelling up, it's frankly daylight robbery. let's talk to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. what difficulties is the government facing from its own backbenchers? there is an important caveat about the cap is being delivered through an amendment to a piece of legislation going through parliament at the moment which will itself amend the original legislation that put the social care cap in place a few years ago but it was never activated. this legislation has still got a few more parliamentary stages to go through, not least to the house of lords. i think tonight's vote rather than some kind of make or break moment is more going to be an opportunity to take
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the temperature in the commons, particularly on the tory backbenchers around this issue and will be an opportunity to see that the temperature is rising on this, which could presage some more difficulties for the government further on in the legislative process. so, iwouldn�*t further on in the legislative process. so, i wouldn't describe it as a showdown yet but definitely a bit of a tremor on the tory backbenchers about this. if the temperature — backbenchers about this. if the temperature shows _ backbenchers about this. if the temperature shows it - backbenchers about this. if the temperature shows it is - backbenchers about this. if the temperature shows it is fairly l backbenchers about this. if the temperature shows it is fairly high, might the government change strategy? might the government change strate: ? ~ ., , ., , strategy? apologies for mixing my metahors strategy? apologies for mixing my metaphors there. _ strategy? apologies for mixing my metaphors there. throw _ strategy? apologies for mixing my metaphors there. throw the - strategy? apologies for mixing my. metaphors there. throw the kitchen sink at it, especially when it's quite a difficult issue to explain. was quite interesting is the government has been explaining to the other parties and its own backbenchers some of the numbers behind this. there was an analysis published by the department of health friday which showed that the amount saved by not coming for the full ideal version of the cap and going for this tweaked version means the government will be spending £900
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million a year less by the end of this decade. in other words, they're suggesting that a u—turn or going back to the ideal version of the plans would cost quite a lot of money. so, appealing to tory backbenchers' sense of fiscal probity. also the government pointing out that people who are less well off will still be helped in quite a big way by changes to the means test. they are changing the levels at which you get state support for social care so that more people overall will be helped and the government reinforcing this idea, ortrying the government reinforcing this idea, or trying very hard to say that this tweaked version of the cap is still significantly better for everyone than the existing system for social care. they're just trying to fight against this idealised version of the system that could be in place. another interesting bit of politics here which is about what yardstick do you use to measure whether something is a good reform. the prime minister said, our social
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care plans will mean no one has to sell their homes. another version of thatis, sell their homes. another version of that is, ok, what percentage of people's assets are left when they reach the end of their lives and care costs are ta ken into reach the end of their lives and care costs are taken into account? that is what the government's opponents arejudging that is what the government's opponents are judging these reforms on, so maybe the government shouldn't be too surprised that that's the yardstick people are using. that's the yardstick people are usina. ., ~ that's the yardstick people are usina. . ~' ,, i'm joined now by caroline abrahams, charity director at age uk. thank you forjoining us. what yardstick do you measure these reforms on?— yardstick do you measure these reforms on? ~ , �* , reforms on? the prime minister's romise. reforms on? the prime minister's promise- he _ reforms on? the prime minister's promise. he promised _ reforms on? the prime minister's promise. he promised to - reforms on? the prime minister's promise. he promised to fix - reforms on? the prime minister's| promise. he promised to fix social care very soon after he became prime minister in that big speech outside downing street and that's the yardstick we are holding him too. unfortunately, the changes that the government wants to make to this bill means that what we're going to end up with falls way short of any kind of solution to the social care problems we face.—
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kind of solution to the social care problems we face. what do you want to see happen? _ problems we face. what do you want to see happen? we _ problems we face. what do you want to see happen? we would _ problems we face. what do you want to see happen? we would like - problems we face. what do you want to see happen? we would like the i to see happen? we would like the government _ to see happen? we would like the government to — to see happen? we would like the government to decide _ to see happen? we would like the government to decide not - to see happen? we would like the government to decide not to - to see happen? we would like the government to decide not to take | government to decide not to take £900 million out of this scheme. that would be a really big help. it wasn't the greatest game in the first place. it's not idealised as a double suggesting, it was kind of half decent and if you take £900 million out of it it's not even half decent and that's the problem. that's not all social care needs. we need more money into the main system so people can get decent care. all this argument is about at the moment is about how much financial protection people get if they need care for a long time. it does nothing to improve the quality of care or make it more consistent or bring more workers into the workforce, which is the really big problem at the moment. in workforce, which is the really big problem at the moment. in terms of how the government _ problem at the moment. in terms of how the government is _ problem at the moment. in terms of how the government is measuring i how the government is measuring whether these are good reforms, they say that it does protect everybody from catastrophic costs. so, everybody is going to be better off compared with the current system.
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well, it doesn't stop light i know you want the full version but is not a fair point? not really. no. it doesn't protect everybody. you'd have to be in a care home for three years to get the protection of the cap and very few people are, because it set so high at 86,000 for the overall cost you would have to pay. that's not the only problem, of course. the change the government has made means that people will reach the cap more slowly. so if you haven't got many assets to protect in the first place, you're likely to use them all by the time you reach the cap. the government have had to acknowledge that, it's what their own analysis shows, that if you're not so well off, if you have less than £186,000 in assets, this cap doesn't help you. that's the problem. the government said it would protect everyone and we think they should do that and that means turning the scheme back to what it was originally intended to be when
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they announced it, and not taking all that money out of it. 50. they announced it, and not taking all that money out of it.— all that money out of it. so, if that extra _ all that money out of it. so, if that extra £900 _ all that money out of it. so, if that extra £900 million - all that money out of it. so, if that extra £900 million per i all that money out of it. so, if. that extra £900 million per year cost was put into the mix to do that, would you be happy with that scheme? i’d that, would you be happy with that scheme? �* , ., , , that, would you be happy with that scheme?�* , . ,, ,, ., scheme? i'd be happier because that would mean — scheme? i'd be happier because that would mean that _ scheme? i'd be happier because that would mean that people _ scheme? i'd be happier because that would mean that people who - scheme? i'd be happier because that would mean that people who aren't i would mean that people who aren't fantastically well off, people with modest amounts of housing assets, people living in the north and the midlands, living in poorer areas, they will get something out of it as well. the problem at the moment is that it's only really going to benefit people who own an expensive house, probably in the south for the home counties and thatjust doesn't seem fair to ask. home counties and that 'ust doesn't seem fair to askh seem fair to ask. thank you. let me know what — seem fair to ask. thank you. let me know what you _ seem fair to ask. thank you. let me know what you think _ seem fair to ask. thank you. let me know what you think about - seem fair to ask. thank you. let me know what you think about this. - seem fair to ask. thank you. let mej know what you think about this. you can get in touch with me on twitter. a memorial service for conservative mp sir david amess, who was killed last month, will take place this afternoon in his southend constituency. members of the public are expected to line the streets
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to pay their respects as simon dedman reports. sir david amess had been an mp for nearly a0 years, first famously in basildon, winning the seat for the conservatives in the close �*92 election before going on to represent southend. last month, he was stabbed to death whilst holding a constituency surgery — where mps meet people they represent. today, localfriends, family and colleagues will come together to remember him. we've had some great times together and, literally, working with him on the streets, knocking on doors, going to see people. and he ran them. you had to be fit to keep up with him because he ran the streets. a memorial service will be held this afternoon at st mary's parish church in southend. neighbouring mp mark francois will deliver the eulogy and ann widdecombe will read a statement on behalf of the amess family. afterwards, a horse—drawn procession
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will take sir david's casket through southend, where members of the public are likely to line the streets to pay their respects. tomorrow, a funeral service takes place at westminster cathedral presided over by the leader of the catholic church in england and wales, cardinal vincent nichols. mps and members of the house of lords will attend, where a message from the pope will be read. simon dedman, bbc news. our correspondent danjohnson is in southend and joins me now. good morning. good morning. this is the church where _ good morning. good morning. this is the church where that _ good morning. good morning. this is the church where that memorial- the church where that memorial service will be held this lunchtime. it's a sad day for people in southend, an important day, a chance to reflect on the life and work of their mp. the things he put his energy and effort into during his work here over so many years. his strong commitment to this constituency and the community, the
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groups and organisations, charities that he supported and the things that he supported and the things that he supported and the things that he achieved. the memorial service is for his family, his friends and his closest colleagues. but then there will be that procession through the streets of southend for his constituents, for the people he represented, to come and pay their tribute for their former mp. tomorrow will see that big a funeral service at westminster. let me introduce you to ian gilbert, the council leader for southend borough council. good morning. it's a sad day and an important day. what is going to be the most significant part of today for you? i the most significant part of today for ou? ., , . for you? i think the service will cive for you? i think the service will give people — for you? i think the service will give people a _ for you? i think the service will give people a chance _ for you? i think the service will give people a chance to - for you? i think the service will give people a chance to come i give people a chance to come togather— give people a chance to come together and to remember sir david, together and to remember sir david, to celebrate what he was able to do. and i_ to celebrate what he was able to do. and i think_ to celebrate what he was able to do. and i think one of the striking thinge— and i think one of the striking things through all this is everybody you things through all this is everybody
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vou meet_ things through all this is everybody you meet has a memory of meeting sir david _ you meet has a memory of meeting sir david or— you meet has a memory of meeting sir david or have _ you meet has a memory of meeting sir david or have had dealings with him. there's_ david or have had dealings with him. there's been a lot of very heart—warming stories we've heard over the _ heart—warming stories we've heard over the past few weeks. heart-warming stories we've heard over the past few weeks.— heart-warming stories we've heard over the past few weeks. could you share some — over the past few weeks. could you share some of _ over the past few weeks. could you share some of those _ over the past few weeks. could you share some of those stories? - over the past few weeks. could you | share some of those stories? you're a political opponent in some ways but you work closely together. yes. but you work closely together. yes, and one thing _ but you work closely together. yes, and one thing that _ but you work closely together. yes, and one thing that sir _ but you work closely together. yes, and one thing that sir david was very good — and one thing that sir david was very good at was working across divides — very good at was working across divides. even if he disagreed with sir david, — divides. even if he disagreed with sir david, as i did on many things, that didn't — sir david, as i did on many things, that didn't stop him from working with you — that didn't stop him from working with you and treating you with courtesy— with you and treating you with courtesy and respect. the main thing that i've _ courtesy and respect. the main thing that i've had — courtesy and respect. the main thing that i've had dealings with sir david — that i've had dealings with sir david was on southend's city status bid and _ david was on southend's city status bid and the — david was on southend's city status bid and the last time i saw sir david — bid and the last time i saw sir david in — bid and the last time i saw sir david in fact was when we were together— david in fact was when we were together launching that bid. something he was deeply committed to and something which will now happen. absolutely and it's a great legacy for sir— absolutely and it's a great legacy for sir david and something that the town can _ for sir david and something that the town can be proud of. something
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which _ town can be proud of. something which will— town can be proud of. something which will allow us to continue to recognise — which will allow us to continue to recognise the contribution he made. you may— recognise the contribution he made. you may even have to change the name of the council. you may even have to change the name of the council-— of the council. indeed and it is a treat of the council. indeed and it is a great honour. — of the council. indeed and it is a great honour, just _ of the council. indeed and it is a great honour, just a _ of the council. indeed and it is a great honour, just a shame - of the council. indeed and it is a great honour, just a shame that| of the council. indeed and it is a i great honour, just a shame that it had to— great honour, just a shame that it had to come about in this way. it�*s had to come about in this way. it's been more — had to come about in this way. it�*s been more than a month since his death, today isn't about the way he lost his life but the way he lived it, the contribution he made, but how have people in the town coped in that time? ~ , how have people in the town coped in that time? ~ .., , ., , that time? well, the community has been very strong _ that time? well, the community has been very strong and _ that time? well, the community has been very strong and i _ that time? well, the community has been very strong and i think - that time? well, the community has been very strong and i think faith - been very strong and i think faith groups. — been very strong and i think faith groups, community groups have quite spontaneously organised events and commemorations which will allow people _ commemorations which will allow people to — commemorations which will allow people to share memories of sir david _ people to share memories of sir david and — people to share memories of sir david and what he stood for. i'm really _ david and what he stood for. i'm really proud of the way people have reacted _ really proud of the way people have reacted to _ really proud of the way people have reacted to this tragedy.— reacted to this tragedy. thank you. we appreciate _ reacted to this tragedy. thank you. we appreciate your _ reacted to this tragedy. thank you. we appreciate your time _ reacted to this tragedy. thank you. we appreciate your time and - reacted to this tragedy. thank you. we appreciate your time and your. we appreciate your time and your thoughts. there will be hundreds of
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people here at the church this lunchtime, although it is a private memorial service it will be broadcast via bbc essex so you can listen to that through bbc sounds from 1pm. less than i% of the population in england, account for more than i6% of all visits to accident and emergency departments. a study by the british red cross shows some of the people in this group — known as high intensity users — visit emergency departments more than 300 times a year. dominic hughes has this report. accident and emergency departments across the uk are busier than ever, with some patients facing long waits for treatment. now, a study of six years of nhs data reveals how a small number of people, known as high—intensity users, are returning to a&es time and time again. high—intensity use of an a&e department is defined as more than five visits in a year. while less than 0.7% of england's population fall into this category, nhs data from 2015 showed they accounted for a significant proportion — i6% of all a&e visits,
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and well over a quarter of all ambulance journeys, as well as 26% of all emergency hospital admissions in england. but specialist teams based in a&es across england can help to reduce frequent visits by offering individual support to people who feel hospital is their only option. the reasons for people attending a&e are quite complex, but it's often because they don't feel they've got anywhere else to go and they have fallen through the gaps between other services and teams previously. and we found that really interesting. there's a couple of cohorts, which are particular frequent attenders at a&e. there's younger people from the age of 22 to 29, who might have particular mental health problems as well as other issues. and those over 70, who have other complex issues, including chronic loneliness. so it's really important to work with people, to understand them as individuals, so we can get them the support that they need, hopefully before they even get to a&e. specialist help can cut repeat visits by more than 80%,
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potentially saving the nhs millions of pounds, and reducing the pressure on an already—stretched service. dominic hughes, bbc news. joining me now is naomi phillips, head of policy and advocacy at the british red cross. thank you forjoining us. the point you are making their is how important it is to understand the people that fall into this group of less than i% as individuals. can you tell us a bit more about the individuals within that group? absolutely. thank you for having me this morning. what our research at the british red cross shows is it's about deprivation can be a really big driverfor about deprivation can be a really big driver for high—intensity use of a&e. if you look at maps of areas of high deprivation and those of high—intensity use of a&e, they really have a strong overlap. we know that deprivation can be a driver for this and know that people
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who frequently attend a&e of all ages will also have other things going on. they are likely to have physical health issues that need addressing, these people have high admissions to hospitals than other groups. there will be other things going on in their lives. why do health inequalities, for example, loneliness and isolation, financial problems, a bereavement or sudden life changes that can be impacting them so by the time they go to a&e they have hit crisis point. our research also shows two particular grapes which attend a&e frequently. —— two particular groups. younger people aged 22 to 29 and older people aged 22 to 29 and older people over 70. those groups will have particular needs. it might be more focused on the mental health needs as well as physical health conditions or socialisation and loneliness. what is key across all groups is by the time people have reached a&e, they often feel unheard, not listen to, it can be
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deeply frustrating for them. the hard—working nhs teams who are really trying to help them but may not be best placed to meet all of their wider social needs.- not be best placed to meet all of their wider social needs. what's the answer? from _ their wider social needs. what's the answer? from what _ their wider social needs. what's the answer? from what you're - their wider social needs. what's the i answer? from what you're describing, these are people who really need support but a&e isn't necessarily the place but it's where they're landing up. how to make sure they get the right support.— get the right support. that's right. we know it's _ get the right support. that's right. we know it's really _ get the right support. that's right. we know it's really bad _ get the right support. that's right. we know it's really bad for - get the right support. that's right. | we know it's really bad for people, it's also really bad for the system. our research estimates this can cost the nhs as much as 2.5 billion per yearin the nhs as much as 2.5 billion per year in ambulance journeys, admissions and attendance. it's really important to find solutions. what we also know from senses the red cross provides in partnership with the nhs across all seven regions of england is that a person centred approach, a specialist high—intensity service has a huge return on investment as well. we know from the specialist services which take a personalised approach, we work with individuals, we start
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with what's right with them not what's wrong with them and we give them a clean sheet so we can really talk to them and understand what's going on in their lives and hopefully connect them to services in the community that are going to help them and also provide really practical support. help them and also provide really practicalsupport. one help them and also provide really practical support. one gentleman we supported had attended a&e over 300 times. by the time we spoke to him, we found out he'd been having real problems with his benefits, didn't have any heating or food in the fridge and he lacked social connections. we help sort out his benefits, got that heating back on, he had enough to eat and connected him to his local church and local community. he now has that wider support he needs as well as adjusting his physical problems and his a&e attendance now is hardly at all. the simple things can help but it needs a targeted approach. thank ou.
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we have showers across the east coast, they could be wintry, will tend to fade and we've got some showers coming in across east anglia and the south—east as well as the channel islands. at the other end of the country we've got a lot of cloud across scotland and patchy rain. the southern scotland, some sunshine, much of england and wales and eastern northern ireland also seeing some sunshine. temperatures between seven and ii. some sunshine. temperatures between seven and 11. through this evening and overnight, the cloud moves further south. some drizzle and patchy light rain and showers continue across the far south—east. cold enough under clear skies in the south for a touch of frost and also some patchy mist and fog. we will see some sunshine. still some patchy light rain or drizzle.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: at least five people are killed and a0 injured after a car drives at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin. today our community faced horror and tragedy in what should have been a community celebration. i am deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went to a parade, but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. there's further unrest over covid restrictions in europe. police clash with protestors in brussels — while austria returns to full lockdown. some conservative mps urge the government to rethink changes to funding social care in england — saying poorer people will be disproportionately affected. a memorial service and procession are to be held later in southend — to remember the murdered mp sir david amess. and less than i% of the population in england account
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for more than i6% of visits to accident and emergency departments — according to a new study. sport and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good morning. there were tears from ole gunnar solskjaer yesterday after his painful exit from manchester united, their fourth managerial sacking since sir alex ferguson left the club. heavy defeats to liverpool and rivals manchester city left him under pressure — this weekend's 4—1 defeat to watford the final straw. michael carrick will be in temporary charge as united seek an interim manager, before a permanent appointment at the end of the season. speaking to the club's in—house tv channel, solskjaer gave an emotional exit interview yesterday. i've given everything for this club. the club means everything to me. and together we're a good match, but unfortunately i couldn't get
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the results that we needed and it's time for me to step aside. michael is going to be in charge. michael, i have got the utmost respect. i love michael to bits. becoming emotional now because he's top. they will be fine. i will watch them and support them. the mood around manchester not helped as rivals city beat everton. raheem sterling and bernardo silva scored either side of this sensational effort from rodri to win 3—0 as the blue half of manchester climb to second, three points behind chelsea. tottenham manager antonio conte banned ketchup to get his players fit. sergio reguillon the fastest to respond — getting the winner against leeds. 2—i it finished. conte with his first win since taking over — which he enjoyed. rangers started life without steven gerrard with a league cup semifinal defeat to hibernian. martin boyle
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scored a hat—trick for hibs as they won 3—1 and they'll now play celtic in next month's final. meanwhile, rangers new boss giovanni van bronckhorst is expected to take charge of training today. women's super league leaders arsenal's sensational start to the season continued as they beat manchester united 2—0. vivianne miedema amongst the goals — she's already got 13 this season. lewis hamilton isn't going down without a fight in this season's formula i championship. a few weeks ago he was 19 points behind max verstappen at the top of the standings but, after back to back wins, the gap between them is just eight points. david beckham in attendance there in qatar to watch the first fi race in the country. he saw hamilton lead from start to finish, with verstappen finishing second. there are two more races to come, in saudi arabia and abu dhabi. if hamilton wins again in the next one, it sets up a winner—takes—all final race of the season.
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it was pretty straightforward. it was pretty lonely at the front. of course, i enjoy those races where you are battling through, but we needed those points today, so i think a real solid job from the team. after a brilliant win over new zealand, ireland completed a clean sweep of autumn test victories, with a 53—7 win over argentina. they ran in seven tries — this one from dan sheehan — against an ill—disciplined argentina side which reduced to m men in the second half. that's eight wins in a row for ireland. england's women head coach simon middleton said they'd shown what's possible when you're given the resources, after they took their winning run to 18 matches. they ran in 15 tries in an 89—nil thrashing of the usa. since giving full—time contracts to a group of players two years ago, england have dominated the game and are world number ones — their focus now is on trying to win a third women's six nations title in a row in april.
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meanwhile, wales women lost to a resurgent canada who came from 7—0 down to win 21t—7. and look who's back. it's tiger woods, who's shared this clip on social media hitting balls with the caption "making progress". the first time we've seen him doing this since his car crash back in february. and that is only going to heighten talk the 45—year—old could be preparing to make a comeback. that one shot has got golf fans the world over are very excited. watching it over and over! good to see him back- _ let's get more now on the memorial service that is going to be held for the conservative mp sir david amess, who was killed last month. the prime minister has been paying tribute to sir david — and spoke to our correspondent simon
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dedman about when the pair first met. i met imet him i met him years and years ago when i was first trying to become an mp and he was a very wise and encouraging and friendly guy and he was on my wavelength on a number of issues. he was a great believer in the independence of the uk and all that sort of stuff, a firm eurosceptic as people were then categorised, but also a staunch believer in opportunity for everybody. i think the moment he first came to national attention, long before i met him in person, i saw him on the night of that election in 1992 when his being
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lit up light when he was returned to victory, much to everybody�*s surprise. it victory, much to everybody's surrise. , victory, much to everybody's surprise-— victory, much to everybody's surrise. , ., ., ., , . surprise. it is now a month since he was killed in — surprise. it is now a month since he was killed in his _ surprise. it is now a month since he was killed in his constituency. - surprise. it is now a month since he| was killed in his constituency. when you think back to that friday, how do you feel about it?— you think back to that friday, how do you feel about it? everybody is absolutely devastated. _ do you feel about it? everybody is absolutely devastated. we - do you feel about it? everybody is absolutely devastated. we were l do you feel about it? everybody is| absolutely devastated. we were in bristol actually doing a high—technology awayday looking at some incredible things happening and we were sitting round and i got called out and got given the news. i had to go back on to tell cabinet colleagues, many of whom had known david for decades, and i am afraid several colleagues broke down in tears because he was just —— several colleagues broke down in tears because he wasjust —— it several colleagues broke down in tears because he was just —— it was just an appalling piece of news. i think he inspired realfeelings of affection, love, admiration for the
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causes that he exposed and i think they were very shaken by the implications of what had happened, the fact that his life had been tragically ended and the way that it was. , ., tragically ended and the way that it was. r ., , ~ tragically ended and the way that it was. y., , ~ ., ,., ,, was. everyone is thinking about sir david amess" _ was. everyone is thinking about sir david amess' family. _ was. everyone is thinking about sir david amess' family. have - was. everyone is thinking about sir david amess' family. have you - was. everyone is thinking about sir- david amess' family. have you spoken to them? how are they coping? i haste to them? how are they coping? i have soken to to them? how are they coping? i have spoken to members _ to them? how are they coping? i have spoken to members of _ to them? how are they coping? i have spoken to members of his _ to them? how are they coping? i have spoken to members of his family - to them? how are they coping? i isa: spoken to members of his family and they have had a very tough time as you can only imagine, how heart—rending it has been for them, and i think our thoughts are with his wife and his children and all those who knew and loved him. ianthem those who knew and loved him. when ou think those who knew and loved him. when you think about _ those who knew and loved him. when you think about him _ those who knew and loved him. when you think about him as _ those who knew and loved him. when you think about him as an _ those who knew and loved him. when you think about him as an mp, what do you think his legacy is going to be? i do you think his legacy is going to be? ., do you think his legacy is going to be? ~ �* , do you think his legacy is going to be? ~ �*, do you think his legacy is going to be? ~', �*, , be? i think david's legacy is multifarious. _ be? i think david's legacy is multifarious. he _ be? i think david's legacy is multifarious. he did - be? i think david's legacy is multifarious. he did all - be? i think david's legacy is | multifarious. he did all sorts be? i think david's legacy is . multifarious. he did all sorts of things. he campaigned on endometriosis, fuel poverty, the registration of driving instructors,
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all sorts of things, on children with learning disabilities. he had a tremendous natural sympathy for people who needed help and so he showed what a backbencher can do. he has a big legacy of things he actually achieved as a backbencher. he was a valiant campaigner for a long time for leaving the european union. i suppose he was ultimately successful in that. he has the permanent memorial of having transformed southend into a city, her majesty the queen posthumously sadly approved city status for southend. his legacy really is that he will be a kind of exemplar of what a constituency mp candour. d0 what a constituency mp candour. do ou what a constituency mp candour. do you think more mps should emulate
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his character, the fact he was so focused on his constituency? yes. his character, the fact he was so focused on his constituency? yes, i do, and i focused on his constituency? yes, i do. and i think— focused on his constituency? yes, i do, and i think that _ focused on his constituency? yes, i do, and i think that all _ focused on his constituency? yes, i do, and i think that all our - do, and i think that all our strength and our enjoyment of the job ultimately derives from that interaction with their constituents, our ability to pick up what is really happening and to try to help, and i think the last thing that david would want no would be for that vital free exchange between mps and constituents to be interrupted or closed down, and i think what he would want is for us to be able to continue to interact with their constituents in the normal way. we've got to make sure mps take proper precautions. the police are renewing their advice to mps about how to do it or make sure that the security services do everything they can to pick up possible threats and
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we try to anticipate problems wherever we can, but in the end i think david would agree we have got to be able to meet her constituents and to help them. you to be able to meet her constituents and to help them.— and to help them. you mention southend- _ and to help them. you mention southend. he _ and to help them. you mention southend. he mentioned - and to help them. you mention southend. he mentioned it- and to help them. you mention - southend. he mentioned it countless times in parliament. when is southend going to get that letter from the queen it is officially a city? from the queen it is officially a ci ? ~., . , from the queen it is officially a ci ? , , ., , from the queen it is officially a ci ? _ from the queen it is officially a ci? ,, m city? her ma'esty has agreed it. as the sa city? her ma'esty has agreed it. as they say on — city? her majesty has agreed it. as they say on the _ city? her majesty has agreed it. as they say on the bills, _ city? her majesty has agreed it. as they say on the bills, the _ city? her majesty has agreed it. as they say on the bills, the acts - city? her majesty has agreed it. as they say on the bills, the acts of i they say on the bills, the acts of parliament, it is in the process, i cannot tell you officially when it is going to be done, i think the males grind slowly on this kind of stuff but it will happen. the prime minister remembering _ stuff but it will happen. the prime minister remembering sir- stuff but it will happen. the prime minister remembering sir david i minister remembering sir david amess. the number of children in care in england could climb from 80,000 to reach almost 100,000 by 2025, according to new analysis commissioned
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by county councils and shared with the bbc. of those in care, around 12,000 are in children's homes, and that number is rising. local authorities say this is due to a shortage of foster carers and cuts to family support. the government says it's providing "new grant funding" to help maintain children's social care. our political correspondent chris mason has this report. i realised when i left my mum how little support i have compared to other kids. i was just a bit scared. olivia is 2a and lives in oxford. she was 16 when her life changed in a way she'll never forget. this emergency happened and i had to go into emergency foster care. it was so terrifying for me, i remember at that time. i didn't know where i'll end up. and it was terrifying. and there's a shortage of foster carers. it means the demand for and cost
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of places in children's homes is rocketing. from oxfordshire to cheshire, local authorities across england are confronted by this. here in warrington, a new children's home opened in april. this home is part of a trial scheme. the aim is simple. minimise how long children are in the home and put money and effort into stopping them ending up here in the first place. this is a lighthouse. the reason why it's called the lighthouse is that it's a beacon of light for the young people going through theirjourney. right. let's have a look. what we have here? so this is our chillout area. it's yes to beanbags and to mobile phones in here. there are six bedrooms, two reserved for emergency last—minute admissions. this is an insight for most of us into something that is out of sight, unseen, unheard of, perhaps little thought about. and yet it is about some of society's most vulnerable.
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yes, how to help them, but also to minimise the problems that will follow — a failure to get it right now. the blunt truth is a quarter of the adult prison population in england used to be in care. so meet the policeman based here, who doesn't look like one. imagine if i was coming into work in a full uniform. the young people, firstly, it just wouldn't sit right. you know, me not wearing a uniform, it breaks down those barriers away. policing cannot fix everything on their own. so we do a lot ofjoined—up work with obviously with social care, with parents, with carers, with education, with health. and we're realising one of those other terminologies, you can't arrest your way out of this. there's got to be another approach. and that's where i absolutely 100% believe in the system. the children living here are at school right now. at the end of the corridor, the office, the front line in helping children at a desperate time. a place in a children's home is the last resort
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and hugely expensive. on average in england, more than £4,000 a week. and sometimes with private providers a lot more. we were recently quoted, you know, £22,000 a week for a child to be placed in a children's home. £22,000 a week! yeah. and when, you know, you're faced with the prospect at five o'clock in the evening, where you can't find a home for a child who needs to come into our car, unfortunately, you are between a rock and a hard place. joe and joanne in eastbourne have been foster carers for nine years. when the children come to us and they look so down, they look like they're carrying so much baggage. and then after a few weeks, sometimes you just see their face start to light up. i mean, the fact of the matter is there's more children who need our help than there is carers who can help. yeah, but i also think people have got a misconception about fostering. ithink, you know, it's...
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am i qualified enough to be a foster carer? and it's, at the end of the day, it's about your personality, it's about your character, it's about your heart. foster carers, children's homes, local authorities, the police. society wrestling with helping the next generation's most in need take their first steps. chris mason, bbc news. joining me now is anna bacchoo, the director of practice at what works for children's social care — an organisation which aims to improve the lives of children and families through research. into what is best for children's social care. what do you think the answer is?— answer is? there isn't one single answer is? there isn't one single answer to _ answer is? there isn't one single answer to how — answer is? there isn't one single answer to how we _ answer is? there isn't one single answer to how we can _ answer is? there isn't one single answer to how we can safely - answer is? there isn't one single i answer to how we can safely reduce the number of children entering care. what is crucial as we improve the amount of research evidence available but will help us understand how to improve the lives of children and families. in
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medicine and psychology research and trials are used as standard and we would like to see the pic on the case in children's social care so we can have a much stronger sense of how we can improve children's lives. what are the missing pieces that need to be understood in terms of research? . need to be understood in terms of research? , ., ., research? there is not one single clear reason _ research? there is not one single clear reason why _ research? there is not one single clear reason why the _ research? there is not one single clear reason why the numbers - research? there is not one single clear reason why the numbers of| clear reason why the numbers of children entering care continues to rise. it is likely to be down to a range of complicated factors so we worked closely with local authorities and social workers tell us that the families they are working with are facing increasingly complex difficulties and that those difficulties well have been exacerbated by the covid—19 pandemic on issues such as unemployment, poverty and mental health issues. social workers also tell us that young people are experiencing increasing risks from outside of their family increasing risks from outside of theirfamily home increasing risks from outside of their family home through criminal and sexual exploitation and that fits with adolescence being the biggest group of children coming
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into care. we need a much better understanding of what works to support children and young people facing these types of challenges. that is completely understandable, of course, to really be able to work out what the factors are in order to fix the system, but what about the immediacy of the problems? we were hearing in a report that in one situation a quote from a private providerfor a place in a care home for a child was £22,000 a week. and the person receiving that quote knows very well that they have a child that needs a bid that night. absolutely. there is lots of concerning local authorities and across the sector about the cost, quality and availability of care for children and that is something the independent review of children's social care has asked the competition and markets authority to look at specifically and we await the outcome of their report next year. in the meantime in terms of
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what we can be doing now we are working with local authorities across the country to trial ways of working that have shown some evidence of promise like the intervention you just so in a previous piece and so we are using those methods to try and understand what will make a difference for children and young people, but it will not happen overnight, it will take time for us to build that robust evidence base.- take time for us to build that robust evidence base. thank you for “oininu us. charging points for electric vehicles will have to be installed at new homes — as well as new offices and supermarkets in england, from next year, under new legislation being outlined by borisjohnson in the next hour. the prime minister will tell business leaders that another 145,000 charging points will be installed annually but labour says the announcement doesn't address what it called the "appalling" geographical divide in available ev points. workshops to help men understand sexual harassment and abuse against women have started in nottingham. they're thought to be the first courses of their kind in the country
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to help men challenge or intervene when they see women being targeted. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports. each training session but unlike when you have experienced before. latte when you have experienced before. - need guys like you who are wanting to make a difference.— need guys like you who are wanting to make a difference. these men have come to learn — to make a difference. these men have come to learn about _ to make a difference. these men have come to learn about how— to make a difference. these men have come to learn about how to _ to make a difference. these men have come to learn about how to be - to make a difference. these men have come to learn about how to be a - to make a difference. these men have come to learn about how to be a good | come to learn about how to be a good ally for women. ii come to learn about how to be a good ally for women-— ally for women. if people get away with stuff at _ ally for women. if people get away with stuff at a _ ally for women. if people get away with stuff at a lower _ ally for women. if people get away with stuff at a lower level... - ally for women. if people get away with stuff at a lower level... stand| with stuff at a lower level... stand b her with stuff at a lower level... stand by her programme _ with stuff at a lower level... stand by her programme is _ with stuff at a lower level... stand by her programme is a _ with stuff at a lower level... stand by her programme is a man's - with stuff at a lower level... stand by her programme is a man's only| by her programme is a man's only workshop about sexual harassment and abuse faced by women, created by a community group and the charity women's eight. this community group and the charity women's eight.— community group and the charity women's eight. community group and the charity women's eiaht. , , ., ., , ., women's eight. this programme is for men that want — women's eight. this programme is for men that want to _ women's eight. this programme is for men that want to be _ women's eight. this programme is for men that want to be allies _ women's eight. this programme is for men that want to be allies in - men that want to be allies in making a difference in relation to women safety. it is not a programme for perpetrators, so this programme will help to give them the skills, knowledge and confidence to be more effective than intervening when they say women getting unwanted attention
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but also raise their confidence and talking to other men in their networks and also other young boys in their network as well. i ieeii in their network as well. i feel threatened, _ in their network as well. i feel threatened, laughed - in their network as well. i feel threatened, laughed at. - in their network as well. i feel| threatened, laughed at. seven in their network as well. i feel - threatened, laughed at. seven out of ten women have _ threatened, laughed at. seven out of ten women have experienced - threatened, laughed at. seven out of ten women have experienced some i threatened, laughed at. seven out of. ten women have experienced some form of sexual harassment in public according to a recent poll. i of sexual harassment in public according to a recent poll. i love a aood according to a recent poll. i love a good laugh _ according to a recent poll. i love a good laugh with — according to a recent poll. i love a good laugh with my _ according to a recent poll. i love a good laugh with my colleagues . good laugh with my colleagues and things. sometimes the line is crossed and it is the word banter that almost makes it acceptable. compliment. i am that almost makes it acceptable. compliment. iam not that almost makes it acceptable. compliment. i am not sure when to complement. compliment. i am not sure when to complement-— complement. these sessions are desi . ned complement. these sessions are designed for _ complement. these sessions are designed for men _ complement. these sessions are designed for men to _ complement. these sessions are designed for men to reflect - complement. these sessions are designed for men to reflect on i complement. these sessions are i designed for men to reflect on their own personal experiences with advice on how to intervene effectively when help is needed. on how to intervene effectively when help is needed-— help is needed. somebody was unchin: help is needed. somebody was punching this _ help is needed. somebody was punching this women - help is needed. somebody was punching this women on i help is needed. somebody was punching this women on the i help is needed. somebody was i punching this women on the floor under a street light and he said, she's my girlfriend and she said it's all right, it stopped the violence, but it's hard to intervene
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sometimes because you do not know the dynamics. sometimes because you do not know the dynamics-— the dynamics. what we wanted to do is be dynamic _ the dynamics. what we wanted to do is be dynamic and _ the dynamics. what we wanted to do is be dynamic and look _ the dynamics. what we wanted to do is be dynamic and look at _ is be dynamic and look at masculinity notjust as is be dynamic and look at masculinity not just as toxic masculinity not just as toxic masculinity which we see the response _ masculinity which we see the response of and the effects of, we wanted _ response of and the effects of, we wanted to — response of and the effects of, we wanted to see and support men to use healthy— wanted to see and support men to use healthy masculinity to supporters. we are _ healthy masculinity to supporters. we are not— healthy masculinity to supporters. we are not asking to be rescued by men. _ we are not asking to be rescued by men. we _ we are not asking to be rescued by men. we are — we are not asking to be rescued by men, we are asking to be supported by men _ men, we are asking to be supported b men. ~., men, we are asking to be supported b men. ., by men. more workshops are running in greater manchester _ by men. more workshops are running in greater manchester and _ by men. more workshops are running in greater manchester and london i by men. more workshops are running in greater manchester and london in | in greater manchester and london in the next few weeks. it is hoped through doing these courses men will put into practice what they have learned and go on to educate other men and boys in their communities. i'm nowjoined by scott willis — who is a therapist and deputy services coordinator at yellow door — a therapy centre in southampton. thank you forjoining us. what we were hearing there from those attending that workshop was the
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possible unintended offence being caused by saying the wrong thing and also the fear of saying or doing the wrong thing. how much of an issue do you see those things as being? i think they can be problematic when you are trying to intervene in situations that as alluded to in the report. it is really important that we continue to have this conversation. it cannot be something we can be frightened by. i was talking to my little boy this morning and it hit home about if i am feeling nervous about this, women going about in their day—to—day lives, frightened, that is not acceptable. lives, frightened, that is not acceptable-— lives, frightened, that is not accetable. . , , acceptable. healthy masculinity was raised in a report. _ acceptable. healthy masculinity was raised in a report. how—
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acceptable. healthy masculinity was raised in a report. how much - acceptable. healthy masculinity was | raised in a report. how much healthy masculinity is the versus toxic masculinity? there has been so much of a focus on toxic masculinity. these are labels but in terms of practical application what does it mean? . , , practical application what does it mean? . , i, practical application what does it mean? . , , ., mean? healthy masculinity is around. s-ueakin as mean? healthy masculinity is around. speaking as a — mean? healthy masculinity is around. speaking as a man — mean? healthy masculinity is around. speaking as a man myself _ mean? healthy masculinity is around. speaking as a man myself it _ mean? healthy masculinity is around. speaking as a man myself it is - mean? healthy masculinity is around. speaking as a man myself it is about. speaking as a man myself it is about vulnerability and accepting our vulnerability and accepting our vulnerability but also not ensuring we are ok with saying all men are bad because society is not saying all men are bad. a lot of men will say i don't do that that it is normal. when we talk about healthy masculinity i think we have to think what it means to be vulnerable in situations. . .. what it means to be vulnerable in situations. ., ,, , ., what it means to be vulnerable in situations-— situations. thank you very much for talkin: to situations. thank you very much for talking to us- _ borisjohnson hasjust boris johnson has just started addressing the cpi conference. latte addressing the cpi conference. we have
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addressing the cpi conference. - have gone from being able to supply 1% of our national leads to 80% and thank you to british industry, enterprise, commerce, third producing not one but perhaps half a dozen vaccines because without showbiz be simply would not be heard, northe showbiz be simply would not be heard, nor the tens of thousands of people in the country around the world who all their lives to your resourcefulness and inventiveness. can i ask who has had their booster? has everyone had their booster? you all the young, far too young perhaps do need a booster but get your booster as soon as you can. by vaccinating our country we have been able to get your staff back to their place of work, to open our theatres and restaurants and get back far longer now than any comparator country to something like normal life, even if we are still bumping elbows and wearing masks. i am not
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going to pretend that everything is going to pretend that everything is going to pretend that everything is going to be plain sailing and we can see the state of the pandemic abroad, the supply chain issues that we are facing, the pressure on energy prices that we are facing and the skill shortages, but do not forget, my friends, but only last year we would they were saying we would have an unemployment crisis on the scale not seen since the 80s or 90s and forecasting 12% unemployment and thanks to you and the resilience of british business we have the number of people back in work at pre—pandemic levels. it was only last year we experienced the biggest fall in output in a century as we were forced to lock the economy. now, thanks to go, thanks to british business bounce back ability, we are forecast to have the fastest economic growth in the g7. i was there in the 90s and in the 80s and in the 70s, come to that. anyone
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remember the 70s? i remember mass unemployment. in the nursery and the drain of the human spirit. i would rather have the problem is which are fundamentally caused by a return on global conference and a surge in demand because now we have a massive opportunity to fix these supply—side problems to transform all sectors of our economy and to tackle the chronic problems underlying the uk economy, the woeful imbalance in productivity across the country, but also the imbalance between british business, between the go getting world beaters represented by so many people in this room and those whose potential is yet to be realised. but don't have the skills. particularly it skills, as the chancellor is so often points out. i don't have the banks behind them. and that is the
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mission of this government, to unite and develop across the whole country. it is a moral mission and as you get older you get more idealistic and less cynical. it is a moral thing but also an economic imperative. because if this country could achieve the same kind of geographical balance and dispersion of growth and wealth that you find in most of our most successful economic comparators and if all our businesses could reach more balance in their levels of productivity then there would be absolutely no stopping us and we would achieve what i believe we can and become the biggest and most successful economy in europe. today fate has handed us an opportunity to do that. when the first industrial revolution began 250 years ago it was british industry that had first mover
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advantage. for hundreds of years we maintain that pace up until the beginning of the 20th century. we were producing more coal, is nothing more i learn, building more ships... asjohnson is addressing the cbi conference. as johnson is addressing the cbi conference-— as johnson is addressing the cbi conference. . ., , ._ , conference. there are many ways in which we have _ conference. there are many ways in which we have first _ conference. there are many ways in which we have first mover— conference. there are many ways in | which we have first mover advantage and today i want to tell you and the cbi how britain is going to wind in the new green industrial revolution, provided we act and act now. —— britain is going to win. i've had some wonderfuljobs in my life but among the most purely head on a stick i would rank motoring correspondent of gq. i drove ferraris, maseratis, you name it, i drove it and i learnt to admire the
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incredible diversity of the

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