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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 21, 2021 9:30am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. the headlines. the women's tennis association says footage of missing player pung shuai at a tennis tournament, released by chinese media, doesn't prove she's genuinely free. fires and fighting on the streets of the hague — lockdown protesters clash with dutch police in a second night of violence. in the uk, an investigation is being launched into whether there is racial bias in the design of some medical devices used by the national health service. in sport, speculation that ole gunnar solskjaer is set to leave manchester united after senior figures at the club met last night.
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and barcelona's bid to get rid of the wild boars besieging the city and stealing people's sandwiches. now the sport with sarah mulkerrins, let's start with the news a manchester united are set to get rid of ole gunnar solskjaer. there has been no official confirmation but we understand that the club's senior figures, including owners the glazers, have discussed solksjaer�*s future and decided the watford loss would be his last game in charge. everyone was waiting to see if there would be a reaction for manchester united after the international break.
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not the one they would have wanted — they conceded four goals at waford — and captain harry maguire was sent off. it's been a terrible run of results, united have won just four of their last 13 games. looked like a wave goodbye afterwards. strong comments from players saying it was a nightmare. technical director darren fletcher is set to take over as there's a big week ahead — with a champions league trip to villarreal. at the top of the premier league table, chelsea are looking very comfortable — they beat leicester 3—0. and just behind them in second, are liverpool after they beat arsenal 4—0 at anfield. sadio mane opened the scoring the first half. then goals from diogojota, mohammed salah and this finish from takumi minamino in the second half sealed the win. it was also a good day for the league's newest managers.
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dean smith watched on as norwich beat southampton. newcastle picked up a point against brentford — but new boss eddie howe was isolating from home with covid, while steven gerrard was in the dugout at villa park for the first time and saw his side score two late goals to beat brighton 2—0, ollie watkins and tyrone mings sealing the win. stjohnstone�*s reign as scottish league cup holders is over — they were beaten 1—0 by celtic in the semifinals of the competition. substitute james forrest came off the bench to score the only goal of the game midway through the second half — so celtic are through to the final next month where they could lift the trophy for a 20th time.
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now, what a day of rugby union matches we had yesterday as the autumn internationals draw to a close. england got a last—minute win over south africa to avenge their 2019 world cup final defeat. wales won by a single point against australia and scotland beat japan. patrick gearey was watching. on another continent on the other side of a pandemic, england and south africa met in the world cup final. south africa won, england failed to score a try. so what a start they got from manu tuilagi afterjust six minutes. against the springboks, you hope your points outnumber your bruises. it's a test of strength. freddie steward muscled england 11 points clear, but you're never safe from handre pollard's boot. he helped make up the distance — kick for kick, south africa crept back. they were just ahead when england saw an escape route. joe marchant to 20—year—old raffi quirke to score his first international try. commentator: the moment of his life! he'll never forget that, but south africa soon did. with english ranks elsewhere, makazole mapimpi had the space he needed. not long later, south africa led, but only by two points. an advantage vulnerable to an english surge,
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an english penalty — there it was. less than a minute left and marcus smith, england's great hope, had england's big kick. england finished 2021 by beating the world number one. when wales scored their first try of the match against australia through ryan elias, it seemed they were on course for a fairly comfortable victory. the wallabies had already lost a man to a red card at that point but were determined to make it interesting. not long after felipo daugunu's try, they actually went ahead. but as in london, so in cardiff. this time rhys priestland's penalty would be the final action of wales�* year. they finish on a high. scotland's performance in beating japan was a little patchy, but to hog the limelight, that took stuart hogg clear as his nation's top try scorer — a record that will surely only be extended. patrick geary, bbc news. and an amazing game in paris last
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night where france beat new zealand for the first time in 12 years later today ireland take on argentina — and for the women, england face usa, while wales host canada. formula i now, as lewis hamilton will be hoping to close the iii—point gap to championship leader max verstappen at this afternoon's qatar grand prix. he was almost half a second quicker than his rival as he claimed pole for the first race to be held in qatar. his mercedes team mate valtteri bottas will start from third. hamilton's performance all the more impressive given he'd felt unwell on friday. i struggled yesterday in my own feeling and my own driving but also in the setup. the work i did last night, just studied hard and it paid dividends today so great to wake up feeling better this morning but also to be able to deliver on track. fallon sherrock�*s run in the grand slam of darts is over. she was beaten 16—13 last
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night by world number two peter wright in wolverhampton. sherrock was attempting to become the first woman to reach the semifinals. she'd already become the first female to reach a major darts quarterfinal. wright will take on michael smith in the semis, after he beat michael van gerwen. joe salisbury has become the first british man to reach the doubles final at the season—ending atp tour finals. salisbury and his american partner rajeev ram needed a deciding tie—break to beat the world number—one pair of nikola mektic and mate pavic in turin — they'll play the french pair of nicolas mahut and pierre—hugues herbert in the final. the final round of the season—ending event on the european tour is under way in dubai. rory mcilroy teed off on 14 under par, with a one shot lead on england's sam horsfield. he's parred the first. he did have a birdie and then
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dropped a shot so he is back on 14 under. matthew fitzpatrick was one of the early starters and is going well — he shares the lead with mcilroy that's all the sport for now. hello and welcome to our look at the papers. with me are the business journalistjohn crowley, and laura hughes, political and diplomatic correspondent at the financial times. the observer leads with social care — and says that the prime minister is facing calls from senior conservatives to ditch plans for care charges or face a tory rebellion. another conservative warning makes
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the front of the telegraph. it says senior figures have told borisjohnson that the migrant crisis is putting tories in peril. further calls for the pm to resolve the migrant crisi' — alongside support from red—wall tory mps — is the lead for the express. the times leads with news that the health secretary has ordered a review into whether medical devices have driven higher fatality rates among ethnic minority patients. "bare faced again" is the mirror's headline — which focuses on the prime minister being reportedly �*maskless�* on a crowded train. the people has the story of william verden — a schoolboy with a rare kidney disease. and a royal feud with the bbc. the mail reports that the queen has united with prince charles and prince william in a threat to boycott the bbc over a documentary. so let's begin. let's start with sunday times and the story about the review into the medical devices, particularly one that started to be used in the early
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19805 that started to be used in the early 1980s and from the late 1980s there were issues if it was actually effective for people from ethnic minorities. sajid javid, taking this very seriously. laura, what is your take on this?— take on this? this is all come to liuht take on this? this is all come to light because — take on this? this is all come to light because of _ take on this? this is all come to light because of the _ take on this? this is all come to light because of the pandemic. take on this? this is all come to | light because of the pandemic in take on this? this is all come to - light because of the pandemic in the number of people who died and i think the biggest alarm bell ringing from reading the story is that because of failures to really look into this equipment over the years and years, people have more died than should have died and this is prompted the health secretary clearly to look into this and it is also interesting he is working with his american counterpart to try to come up with some sort of international standard to make sure all equipment is tested and all different types of people. i was pretty shocked to learn this morning a lot of this equipment is developed in the western world and therefore the kind of archetypal patient who trials it is a white westerner and
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obviously we are living in a very multicultural world now and that could be potentially fatal for millions of people. so it does sound as though this has been a problem that has been in the offing for a long time and clearly it is coronavirus where we saw the statistics come out that prompted sajid javid to take this really seriously. he sajid javid to take this really seriously-— sajid javid to take this really seriousl . , . ~ .. ., seriously. he is taking action with this review _ seriously. he is taking action with this review due _ seriously. he is taking action with this review due to _ seriously. he is taking action with this review due to report - seriously. he is taking action with this review due to report at - seriously. he is taking action with this review due to report at the i seriously. he is taking action with i this review due to report at the end of january. this review due to report at the end of janua . , ., , this review due to report at the end ofjanua . , .,, ., ~ this review due to report at the end ofjanua . , ., ., ~ ., ofjanuary. yes. it has taken a pandemic— ofjanuary. yes. it has taken a pandemic for— ofjanuary. yes. it has taken a pandemic for something - ofjanuary. yes. it has taken a pandemic for something to . ofjanuary. yes. it has taken a i pandemic for something to come ofjanuary. yes. it has taken a - pandemic for something to come out that doctors have known about for the last _ that doctors have known about for the last 30 — that doctors have known about for the last 30 years. any of us who have _ the last 30 years. any of us who have gone — the last 30 years. any of us who have gone into hospital to have an operation — have gone into hospital to have an operation will have had an oxometer placed _ operation will have had an oxometer placed on_ operation will have had an oxometer placed on the hand to monitor blood levels _ placed on the hand to monitor blood levels and _ placed on the hand to monitor blood levels and darker skin absorbs the li-ht levels and darker skin absorbs the tight more — levels and darker skin absorbs the light more and 12% of black patients a ticket _ light more and 12% of black patients a ticket had skewed readings —— that
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had taken _ a ticket had skewed readings —— that had taken it — a ticket had skewed readings —— that had taken it. i think this is welcome _ had taken it. i think this is welcome action from sajid javid and a piece _ welcome action from sajid javid and a piece from the science editor talks— a piece from the science editor talks about an intentional racial division — talks about an intentional racial division or— talks about an intentional racial division or structural racism within the nhs _ division or structural racism within the nhs looking at things like sickle — the nhs looking at things like sickle cell disease which predominantly affects people from a caribbean_ predominantly affects people from a caribbean background. lets predominantly affects people from a caribbean background.— predominantly affects people from a caribbean background. lets move on to the observer. _ caribbean background. lets move on to the observer. the _ caribbean background. lets move on to the observer. the prime - caribbean background. lets move on to the observer. the prime minister| to the observer. the prime minister told to dump plans for care charges orface told to dump plans for care charges or face conservative rebellion. told to dump plans for care charges orface conservative rebellion. the observer has learned several northern tory mps took part in a call set up by the care minister on friday afternoon when she was said to be monitored by backbenchers seeing the plans were unfair and had
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not been thought through. it sounds like the government is missing another rebellion, potentially another rebellion, potentially another u—turn. tell us more about what the paper is saying. another u-turn. tell us more about what the paper is saying.— what the paper is saying. another headache for _ what the paper is saying. another headache for the _ what the paper is saying. another headache for the prime _ what the paper is saying. another headache for the prime minister. | what the paper is saying. another i headache for the prime minister. we have had so much drama in the house of commons over the last few weeks and there is a lot of tory anger and details have emerged last week that the government has set out how it social care policy will work and this looking at the social care cap on how that will really work in practice on the bottom line as it does not protect people with assets less than £100,000 and people will still be asked to contribute up to £86,000. there are a lot of red wall conservative mps know the impact that will have some of their poorer pensioners in their constituencies and that is why they are so furious
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potentially telling the government whips they might abstain or vote against it. social care is honestly hugely controversial in terms of who will pay for it in the prime minister came up with an announcement this year and has claimed he sold it but the details were not set out another so lowly —— and now the sony have been and it looks like ministers set out these plans during the whole debate on sleaze. i think this story in particular will really worry number ten. , ., . ., , . ., ten. john, the cumulative effect of the -a ten. john, the cumulative effect of the party being — ten. john, the cumulative effect of the party being divided _ ten. john, the cumulative effect of the party being divided and - ten. john, the cumulative effect of the party being divided and the - the party being divided and the u—turns keeping coming is not comfortable, to say the least for number ten. comfortable, to say the least for numberten. it comfortable, to say the least for number ten-— comfortable, to say the least for numberten. ., , ., , ., , number ten. if any one story could sum u- number ten. if any one story could sum up the _ number ten. if any one story could sum up the administration - number ten. if any one story could sum up the administration of -
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number ten. if any one story could j sum up the administration of boris johnson _ sum up the administration of boris johnson in — sum up the administration of boris johnson in a — sum up the administration of boris johnson in a nutshell it is probably theirs _ johnson in a nutshell it is probably theirs he — johnson in a nutshell it is probably theirs. he has tried to grasp the nettle _ theirs. he has tried to grasp the nettle around social care funding when _ nettle around social care funding when successive government administrations have failed to do so and he _ administrations have failed to do so and he made this big announcement but then— and he made this big announcement but then there is no detail and that is kind _ but then there is no detail and that is kind of— but then there is no detail and that is kind of getting into the weeds about— is kind of getting into the weeds about what this means and the thing that upset— about what this means and the thing that upset the so—called red wall conservative mps and working—class constituencies is that means tested benefits, _ constituencies is that means tested benefits, it was announced last week they wont— benefits, it was announced last week they won't count towards the £86,000 fi-ure they won't count towards the £86,000 figure which will impact them more and particularly around housing so if you _ and particularly around housing so if you live — and particularly around housing so if you live in a house in the south of england. — if you live in a house in the south of england, middle—class, it may be worth— of england, middle—class, it may be worth £1_ of england, middle—class, it may be worth £1 million but the figure will not make — worth £1 million but the figure will not make as much of a dent into setting _ not make as much of a dent into selling your house as if it was
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worth— selling your house as if it was worth thousand £20 and damian green has said _ worth thousand £20 and damian green has said this _ worth thousand £20 and damian green has said this is unfair because it should — has said this is unfair because it should apply across the uk the percentage of your home and boris johnson _ percentage of your home and boris johnson promised she would not have to sell— johnson promised she would not have to sell your— johnson promised she would not have to sell your home as a result of this poiicv _ to sell your home as a result of this policy-— to sell your home as a result of this oli . �* ,,, ., this policy. and let spring into the mix the sunday — this policy. and let spring into the mix the sunday telegraph - this policy. and let spring into the mix the sunday telegraph front i this policy. and let spring into the - mix the sunday telegraph front page, migrant crisis put stories in peril. —— the conservatives. it says boris johnson has been told it could destroy the conservative party and a poll showing the government approach to channel crossing is too soft according to conservative supporters. and it should do more to tackle the problem and it will destroy the party that will be a new party in the style of nigel farage. a few things swirling around and they are obviously all key conservative issues.-
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they are obviously all key conservative issues. , , ., ., conservative issues. this is another rum - of conservative issues. this is another rump of the — conservative issues. this is another rump of the conservative _ rump of the conservative parliamentary party and sounds to me like complaints from the tory shires. — like complaints from the tory shires, from the right of the party. nobody— shires, from the right of the party. nobody is — shires, from the right of the party. nobody is actually quoted and they caught— nobody is actually quoted and they caught this prominent treasurer who says the _ caught this prominent treasurer who says the 187—year—old conservative party— says the 187—year—old conservative party risks — says the 187—year—old conservative party risks being destroyed by not dealing _ party risks being destroyed by not dealing with this crisis. and then there _ dealing with this crisis. and then there are — dealing with this crisis. and then there are a — dealing with this crisis. and then there are a few other hackles from a few other— there are a few other hackles from a few other cabinet ministers off the record _ few other cabinet ministers off the record it — few other cabinet ministers off the record. it says that borisjohnson is moving — record. it says that borisjohnson is moving the party like david cameron— is moving the party like david cameron to the centre too much and opening _ cameron to the centre too much and opening it _ cameron to the centre too much and opening it up to attacks from the right— opening it up to attacks from the right as — opening it up to attacks from the right as a — opening it up to attacks from the right as a result.— opening it up to attacks from the right as a result. let's bring in as art of right as a result. let's bring in as part of this _ right as a result. let's bring in as part of this particular _ right as a result. let's bring in as part of this particular discussion | part of this particular discussion at the front of the sunday express which says boris is still a winner. he has been told he has to solve the migrant crisis the paper says loyal red wall tory mps are still backing when borisjohnson to lead them into
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the next election. what is your take on where he currently stands within the party as these issues bite? that's a fairly typical sunday express front page and i would expect them always to take a positive spin on the prime minister. i think the truth is that they actually have a point. when you speak to tory mps, they are incredibly unhappy at the litany of errors made over the last few weeks, the sleaze scandal, social care are now the migrant crisis which is worrying a lot of conservatives as the telegraph reflects even though they don't necessarily name any major party figures there. the major feeling and the thing that keeps saving boris johnson feeling and the thing that keeps saving borisjohnson even although people are really losing their patience with him is they know he is thought when —— he is a vote winner and when selections —— he wins
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elections. it is worth sticking with him because she will get your seat. but i think there is a generational divide in the conservative party emerging and the older ministers are still incredibly loyal to him but i think there are younger mps who represent seats that have not always been conservative and they are worried their voters might look at what life has become under a conservative government and might decide it is not better at all and decide it is not better at all and decide to go back to labour. it is those tory mps i think you will see making the biggest noises in parliament, the ones prepared to stand up to the government over issues like social care because the need to show that in such an there fighting for them and are always thinking on a sort of smaller level. overall i think borisjohnson can get away with a lot more than most
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conservative prime ministers and leaders because he does poll well with a lot of the public, even when he seems to keep messing things up. the front of the sunday mirror says barefaced cheek of boris, mask list days after hospital apology. he was told last week to put a mask and three times during a visit to hexham general hospital in northumberland and he apologised but now they say he is on the train without a mask and people surrounding the prime minister were noticeably not wearing a mask unlike the rest of the passengers. what do you make of this one, john? he passengers. what do you make of this one, john? ., , passengers. what do you make of this one, john? .,, ., ., ., , one, john? he was on a train between manchester — one, john? he was on a train between manchester and _ one, john? he was on a train between manchester and warrington. - one, john? he was on a train between manchester and warrington. this - one, john? he was on a train between manchester and warrington. this is i manchester and warrington. this is one of— manchester and warrington. this is one of the — manchester and warrington. this is one of the high—speed rail line switch — one of the high—speed rail line switch are _ one of the high—speed rail line switch are being affected, the announcement was made last week the extension— announcement was made last week the extension would be happening to leeds _ extension would be happening to leeds it — extension would be happening to leeds. it strikes me as unfeeling or uncaring _ leeds. it strikes me as unfeeling or uncaring or— leeds. it strikes me as unfeeling or uncaring or a — leeds. it strikes me as unfeeling or uncaring or a bit of both.—
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uncaring or a bit of both. laura, in terms of whether _ uncaring or a bit of both. laura, in terms of whether that _ uncaring or a bit of both. laura, in terms of whether that cuts - uncaring or a bit of both. laura, in | terms of whether that cuts through because it's a very mixed picture in this country in terms of masks. we don't officially have to wear them, we do in public transport. i'm not sure what the rulers on that particular line but on the underground you have to still wear them. some people still are choosing and some people have to end up slie some choose not to. i and some people have to end up slie some choose not to.— some choose not to. i think that is the point- — some choose not to. i think that is the point. there _ some choose not to. i think that is the point. there are _ some choose not to. i think that is the point. there are a _ some choose not to. i think that is the point. there are a lot - some choose not to. i think that is the point. there are a lot of - some choose not to. i think that is| the point. there are a lot of people choosing not to who would look at borisjohnson think i completely sympathise with that position. i have had enough of wearing them. he was honestly talking to someone and i think it will annoy a lot of people but i still think, as you say, and this is often the case with borisjohnson, he actually sometimes does tap into the public mood can reflect opinions that are not particularly savoury that he knows actually want costing too much
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damage the long term. it's pretty careless, though, given he has been repeatedly called agerness by the labour party in particular yet he seems to continue to not always stick to the rules. and honestly it is different for him because he is such a public figure and some would argue should be setting example. john, take it through the mail on sunday front page, royal is at war with bbc over tittle tattle documentary.— with bbc over tittle tattle documenta . , , ., ., documentary. this is a programme cominu on documentary. this is a programme coming on tomorrow _ documentary. this is a programme coming on tomorrow in _ documentary. this is a programme coming on tomorrow in which - documentary. this is a programme coming on tomorrow in which the l coming on tomorrow in which the senior— coming on tomorrow in which the senior royals, the queen and the prince _ senior royals, the queen and the prince of— senior royals, the queen and the prince of wales and prince william, the paper— prince of wales and prince william, the paper reports are furious because _ the paper reports are furious because they haven't seen an advance copy of— because they haven't seen an advance copy of this _ because they haven't seen an advance copy of this. obviously it will be pretty— copy of this. obviously it will be pretty uncomfortable to them and never _ pretty uncomfortable to them and never the — pretty uncomfortable to them and never the twain shall meet in the meantime — never the twain shall meet in the meantime-—
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never the twain shall meet in the meantime. �* . . , , meantime. and laura, the paper says it is i think unprecedented _ meantime. and laura, the paper says it is i think unprecedented for - meantime. and laura, the paper says it is i think unprecedented for the - it is i think unprecedented for the royals to come together in this way and make their feeling so clear and something like this. i and make their feeling so clear and something like this.— something like this. i didn't know this. something like this. i didn't know this- there _ something like this. i didn't know this. there were _ something like this. i didn't know this. there were some _ something like this. i didn't know this. there were some little - something like this. i didn't know this. there were some little and. this. there were some little and there are apparently there was another documentary aired earlier this year on itv where there was a particular revelation that was removed at the last minute again referring to the briefing was that were going on between prince harry and prince william. it is unusual for all three senior royals to club together and this account and i think maybe it reflects sort of growing willingness within the so—called firm to really stand up against the media. that does seem to be a real feeling that i'm not sure how well that would necessarily go down with the public who are paying for the very existence of the royal family and i think a lot of people want to know all the sort of details and gossip surrounding them and it
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will be interesting to see if the bbc stands firm continues to refuse to show any royal aides the documentary before it goes out. there are some really interesting piece on the sunday times about the ex—wife ofjeff bezos giving away her money says she is giving it a way that the value of her stock keeps rising. they say she has given away over a year over $8 billion, $8.6 billion in the 12 months to june and they make the point she is doing it quite differently from other people. sometimes when these last nations are giving to charities, they see mostly when that happens there is a very specific detail attached to the donation in terms of how it should be used but she just seems to be going down the route of wanting to give it away quickly and spreading it quite wide. there is support from her saying
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that she wants to, it was money that basically was got through a system that she wants to see change. john, pick up with your thoughts on this please. we pick up with your thoughts on this lease. ~ ., ., ., ., ., please. we would all love to have that problem. _ please. we would all love to have that problem, wouldn't _ please. we would all love to have that problem, wouldn't we? - please. we would all love to have | that problem, wouldn't we? giving away— that problem, wouldn't we? giving away our— that problem, wouldn't we? giving away our money are not being able to do it fast— away our money are not being able to do it fast enough. $8.6 billion, her foundation _ do it fast enough. $8.6 billion, her foundation has handed out in the last 12 _ foundation has handed out in the last 12 months which i was trying to find out, _ last 12 months which i was trying to find out, it— last 12 months which i was trying to find out, it must be the biggest giveaway— find out, it must be the biggest giveaway ever buyer philanthropist in historv — giveaway ever buyer philanthropist in history. the hackles of the people — in history. the hackles of the people who scrutinise the charity sector— people who scrutinise the charity sector sav— people who scrutinise the charity sector say is there has been no transparency about it. you can't apply— transparency about it. you can't apply for— transparency about it. you can't apply for this funding and you sort of get _ apply for this funding and you sort of get anointed. they find you and there _ of get anointed. they find you and there are — of get anointed. they find you and there are hundreds of what they describe — there are hundreds of what they describe as progressive charities which _ describe as progressive charities which benefit from her largesse and can receive — which benefit from her largesse and can receive it. they say this is
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lovely— can receive it. they say this is lovely and _ can receive it. they say this is lovely and wonderful. philanthropic gesture _ lovely and wonderful. philanthropic gesture to do but we need more scrutiny— gesture to do but we need more scrutiny into what you're getting from _ scrutiny into what you're getting from them as a result. 3�*86 from them as a result. 786 organisations _ from them as a result. 786 organisations are - from them as a result. 35 organisations are benefiting from them as a result. t3? organisations are benefiting from this massive giveaway, laura. i think the issue is if you don't specify exact how you want the money used there could be room for it to be misused and that is a problem and a criticism levied at charities all the time but the argument she has made is actually how could she possibly know where that money is best spent? it is better to give it to the experts actually on the ground and i think that reflects her change in lifestyle completely after being married to the richest man in the entire world for 25 years, she recently married a teacher and is clearly trying to deliver a more normal humble life that is hard with
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this 4% stake in amazon is value keeps rising and rising. this is a first world problem, i think we can conclude. not a problem many of us would complain about having. thank ou ve would complain about having. thank you very much- _
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hello. it is a weekend of two halves, weather—wise. yesterday, many of us were still in the mild air, we had temperatures up at 1a degrees, but today it is a colder, fresher—feeling day. this was the picture a bit earlier on as the sun rose above eastbourne. now, through the course of today we are expecting a chillier feel wherever you are. sunnier skies in general but also some showers in the forecast and the bulk of the showers today are going to be towards the east. and that's because higher pressure is sitting out to the west. here you can see the winds are rotating around that area of high pressure, so coming in from a northerly direction, bringing us that cold air mass and that wind—chill you will notice out there particularly close to those east coasts. so the northerly breeze driving some showers in across eastern scotland, wintry over the higher ground. rain showers, perhaps some hail mixed in down across the east coast of england in particular, for the likes of yorkshire and northumberland as well right down towards kent and east sussex. but for the west most places are looking largely dry for much of the day. you will notice out there particularly close to those east coasts. so the northerly breeze driving some showers in across eastern scotland, wintry over the higher ground. rain showers, perhaps some hail mixed in down across the east coast of england in particular,
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for the likes of yorkshire and northumberland as well right down towards kent and east sussex. but for the west most places are looking largely dry for much of the day. you will notice the wind gusts could be as high as 30 mph a0 mph close to that east coast. so temperatures between 7 degrees to 11 degrees but feeling a bit cooler than that where you do notice that wind—chill around. into this evening and overnight, most of the showers will ease away. we will continue to see some filtering through the english channel here, affecting the likes of kent and east sussex. and a little bit more cloud for the north of scotland but in between these two areas, a cold night with temperatures a few degrees either side of freezing, a touch of frost certainly first thing monday. a mostly dry settled sort of day on monday. we have got more cloud and patchy rain for northern scotland and a few showers in the far south—east as well. most places avoiding the showers with temperatures between 7 and 10. we do it all again on tuesday. another dry, settled sort of day with sunshine for most areas. cloudier in the far north—west. the chance of a few passing showers in the far south—east as well. most places avoiding the showers were temperatures between 7 to 10 degrees. we do it all again on tuesday. spot the difference. a dry and settled sort of day
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with sunshine for most areas. cloudier in the far north—west and the chance of passing showers in the far south—east. highs on tuesday between about 8 to 11 degrees for most of us. feeling cooler when exposed to the north—easterly breeze typically east anglia and the south—east. as we head to the middle of the week you will notice things turn colder once again because a second cold front this is bbc world news. our top stories... the women's tennis association says videos released by chinese media showing missing player pung shuai, including one at a tennis tournament, don't prove she's genuinely free. fires and fighting on the streets of the hague — lockdown protesters clash with dutch police in a second night of violence. in the uk, an investigation is being launched into whether there is racial bias in the design of some medical devices used by the national health service. the health secretary said people may have died as a result of the issue. i think possibly, yes, yes. ithink possibly, yes, yes. i i think possibly, yes, yes. i don't have the full facts. these oximeters are being used in every country and they have the same problem.
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in sport, speculation that ole gunnar solskjaer

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