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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 21, 2021 6:00am-9:00am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and sima kotecha. our headlines today: a second night of rioting in the netherlands over covid restrictions, as rising case numbers mean tougher controls in mainland europe. new videos emerge of chinese tennis star peng shuai, following concern in the international community that the player had gone missing. an investigation is launched into whether there is racial bias in the design of some medical devices used by the nhs. in the sport, manchester united have lost again. so is this a wave goodbye, as speculation mounts that ole gunnar solksjaer is on the verge of being sacked after a dismal defeat to watford?
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we meet the 6—year—old golfer who only took up the sport a year ago, and has already qualified forjunior world championships in america. a colder date and we had yesterday but more sunshine around. a few showers, especially towards the east. i will bring you all the details throughout this morning's programme. it's sunday, november 21st. our main story: there's been another night of rioting in the netherlands against new lockdown rules amid rising covid—19 cases in parts of europe. protests have also ta ken place in austria, croatia and italy after some governments moved to bring in new restrictions. the world health organization said it was "very worried" about rising coronavirus cases on the continent. our europe correspondent anna holligan reports. explosion.
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another dutch city rocked by discontent. in the hague, protesters burned bicycles and pelted police with stones and fireworks. officers used horses, dogs, but on bikes to chase them away. earlier, anti—vaxxer demonstrators brought their beads to the southern city of brader. while most dutch people accept the need for tighter rules, the distrust is spreading. we have to live with _ the distrust is spreading. we have to live with corona _ the distrust is spreading. we have to live with corona because - the distrust is spreading. we have to live with corona because it - the distrust is spreading. we have to live with corona because it is i to live with corona because it is not... people want to live, right? that is why we're with all the people. that is why we're with all the eo - le. , ., people. the night before, there were ram ”aes people. the night before, there were rampages in — people. the night before, there were rampages in rotterdam. _ people. the night before, there were rampages in rotterdam. riot - people. the night before, there were rampages in rotterdam. riot police i rampages in rotterdam. riot police fired live rounds. three demonstrators were hit and taken to hospital. it is still unclear of their injuries were caused by police gunfire. restrictions in the netherlands began last saturday and will remain until at least the start of december. the
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will remain until at least the start of december-— will remain until at least the start of december. the streets here are eaceful of december. the streets here are peaceful right _ of december. the streets here are peaceful right now, _ of december. the streets here are peaceful right now, but _ of december. the streets here are peaceful right now, but pockets i of december. the streets here are peaceful right now, but pockets of| peaceful right now, but pockets of discontent exist across the country, and the atmosphere remains volatile. the netherlands is among several european countries battling record infection rates, and many governments are considering or implementing tougher measures targeting the unvaccinated. in blustery, supporters of the far right freedom party marched against mandatory coronavirus vaccinations. a 20 day lockdown will begin next week. denmark's capital, copenhagen, witnessed a discord, too. germany is a national healthcare emergency. numerals are expected for those who haven't had theirjabs. the world health organization has again sounded the alarm, calling for anti— coronavirus measures to be stepped up coronavirus measures to be stepped up as a matter of urgency. implementing the basic measures like
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masks, average 48% of the european population is wearing a mask indoors. any percentage above that will have an immediate effect, much more attention to be paid to ventilation, and finally, two new treatment protocols which have to be standardised. figs treatment protocols which have to be standardised-— standardised. as the fourth wave crushes across _ standardised. as the fourth wave crushes across the _ standardised. as the fourth wave crushes across the continent, - crushes across the continent, countries are struggling to ease pressure on the health services and the streets. anna hoggan, bbc news, in the hague. the foreign office hasjoined international calls for china to prove that the tennis player peng shuai is safe and well. chinese state media has posted more footage claiming to show the star living freely, but the videos have not been verified. she's been missing since claiming in early november that she was sexually exploited by a former high ranking government official. james reynolds reports.
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this unverified video was posted by the editor of a state—run newspaper. the footage appears to show feng shui in the one—stop having dinner last night at a beijing restaurant with her coach and friends. —— peng shuai. the tennis player restraint listening, but not speaking. the video raises many questions. the cli starts video raises many questions. the clip starts with _ video raises many questions. tue: clip starts with someone video raises many questions. tte: clip starts with someone off video raises many questions. tt2 clip starts with someone off screen saying now is the perfect time. ok, now is perfect. then there is a two second pause, and then the coach goes into this remark in which he hammers home that it is november 21. so it seems incredibly scripted, and even they didn't cut out the director's you at the beginning of the video. the whole thing is incredibly bizarre but creepy and sinister. ,., ., incredibly bizarre but creepy and sinister. ., ,.,, sinister. the same edited and posted to this video — sinister. the same edited and posted to this video purporting _ sinister. the same edited and posted to this video purporting to _ sinister. the same edited and posted to this video purporting to show- to this video purporting to show peng shuai, second on the left, being introduced this morning at a youth tennis tournament in china's capital. the state media also
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released these unverified and undated stills on friday, but this rapid accumulation of state provided material does not convince the increasing numbers who are calling for independent proof. in a statement released last night, the foreign office said: peng shuai, a winner of two grand slam doubles tournaments, including wimbledon, is well—known on the tennis circuit. the winds tennis association has threatened to cancel its many events in china unless it can assure itself of her well—being. james reynolds, seniors. let's get more on this from our china correspondentjohn sudworth.
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he's in taiwan. john, the chinese authorities appear keen to release videos of peng, but not facilitate direct contact. will the growing international pressure prompt them to change tactics? well, i think what is interesting with this latest video is that unlike the other bits of material, as we had injames' report, where there were serious doubts about the authenticity, i think it is likely this one is genuine. not only because it is a video of an event that took place in beijing this morning but because the event organisers of that tournament have also posted those photos showing peng shuai there, being introduced to the audience. even having said that i do not think the questions will go away. it isn't really proof of whereabouts, proof of life, that the international tennis authorities and fellow tennis stars and governments have been demanding. it is proof of peng shuai's freedom, that showers not under duress,
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showers able to go and say what she wants, when you consider that they can be few things as politically sensitive in china is accusing a former vice premier of sexual assault, then you have to conclude that the real bind for china here is that the real bind for china here is that the real bind for china here is that the more it tries to show that everything is normal, the more questions are raised. and the winds tennis association has already said in response to this appearance at this tournament that its concerns have not yet been answered. t this tournament that its concerns have not yet been answered. i mean, there is so much _ have not yet been answered. i mean, there is so much international - there is so much international attention of the story. how sure can we be that showers actually missing, and potentially in trouble? figs we be that showers actually missing, and potentially in trouble?— and potentially in trouble? as with many things _ and potentially in trouble? as with many things in _ and potentially in trouble? as with many things in china, _ and potentially in trouble? as with many things in china, we - and potentially in trouble? as with many things in china, we cannot . and potentially in trouble? as with | many things in china, we cannot be sure of very much at all. we know the allegations she made and we know that she has not been seen in public since, except these bits of material put out of state media. this isn't that unusual. higher profile figures gone missing in china fairly frequently. it also, state media
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often, as a result of pressure from the international community, collaborates enforced confessions or releasing proof of life videos. i think the danger for china is just a few weeks ahead of an olympics, this risks exposing the gulf between an event that is supposed to be all about openness and friendship and a political system that is only about control. . ~ political system that is only about control. ., ~ , ., ., ., , g ., control. thank you, that was john sudworth with _ control. thank you, that was john sudworth with the _ control. thank you, that was john sudworth with the latest - control. thank you, that was john sudworth with the latest from - sudworth with the latest from taiwan. some professional tennis players in the papers today calling out questions, asking whether this causes a lot of concern. the health secretary sajid javid says it's "unacceptable" that some medical devices used by the nhs may be less effective on black and minority ethnic patients. he's commissioned a review into racial bias in equipment including oximeters, which measure oxygen in the blood, but tend to give inaccurate readings for people with darker skin. the review will also address the issue of certain procedures, like mri scans, being unavailable to pregnant and breast—feeding women.
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from tomorrow, people aged over a0 will be able to book their covid boosterjab. 16— and i7—year—olds will also be invited to sign up for a second jab. it's hoped increased uptake will offer greater protection to individuals and shield the nhs from extra pressure from coronavirus admissions. well, the booster is really important in giving extra protection over and beyond the two doses that people have already had. and of course it is very effective at boosting that long—term protection against severe disease from covid. so if you are invited in to get the booster it is really important that you get it as soon as possible. police in lancashire have arrested a man on suspicion of murder after two people were found dead at a house near preston. officers discovered the bodies of a man and a woman at a property in the village of higher walton yesterday afternoon. a 35—year—old man from the local
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area was detained last night. a rescue operation is taking place in southern india where flash floods triggered by heavy monsoon rains have killed at least 30 people. in one incident, three buses were washed away. analysts say unpredictable and extreme weather across south asia is driven by climate change and made worse by human activity such as deforestation and over—development. two people have been arrested for stealing money that flew out of an armoured truck on the highway in california. bags of cash escaped from an armoured vehicle on its way to san diego yesterday morning. the incident sparked a free—for—all in which people were grabbing handfuls of bills and posting videos on social media. probably not the smartest thing to do if you want to pick the cash up limited and advertise the fact you picked it up, but anyway.
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good morning. dojoin us, if you're not watching properly, do! because we have what's coming up in the show. let's take a look at today's front pages. "migrant crisis puts tories in peril" is the headline on the front page of the sunday telegraph. the paper is reporting that the prime minister has been warned by members of his own party that english channel crossings by migrants in small boats could "destroy" the conservatives. the sunday times reports that health secretary sajid javid has ordered a review into racial bias in medical devices over fears that thousands of ethnic minority patients died of covid when they should have survived. oximeters, which monitor blood oxygen levels, are less accurate on people with dark skin, the paper says research has shown. according to the observer, borisjohnson has been urged by his own mps to scrap plans which would see some of england's poorest pensioners paying more for social care. the main image dominating the front page is of protesters in vienna, who are opposed to the austrian government's lockdown measures. anti—lockdown riots are making
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headlines across europe. das telegraaf, the biggest paper in the netherlands, is reporting that three people in rotterdam are in hospital with gunshot wounds after a another "restless" night in the country. let's ta ke let's take a look inside. i've got to stories that caught my eye this morning. this one, hospitals hope robots will help doctors save mature babies the story is that hundreds of premature babies could be saved by using new technology. trial during a pandemic, it will allow doctors to
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treat them remotely. we have seen that picture on the telly, i'm sure many of us have, or those tubes connected to the child. this many of us have, or those tubes connected to the child.— connected to the child. this is inside the _ connected to the child. this is inside the sunday _ connected to the child. this is inside the sunday mirror - connected to the child. this is l inside the sunday mirror today, talking about seaweed farming. it is a good story but also a good excuse for a few puns that had minor writers. seaweed farming "kelps" the planet. and never mind aquaculture, this is "algae" culture. seaweed, it has environment or benefits in terms of carbon capture and everything else, but it is very quick growing, a superfood, they are basically saying there is a big upsurge in the amount of seaweed that has been consumed. aha, amount of seaweed that has been consumed. �* ., amount of seaweed that has been consumed-— amount of seaweed that has been consumed. �* ., .. , , ., consumed. a dog caught my eye, dog lover, consumed. a dog caught my eye, dog lover. sorry. — consumed. a dog caught my eye, dog lover. sorry. peeple _ consumed. a dog caught my eye, dog lover, sorry, people at _ consumed. a dog caught my eye, dog lover, sorry, people at home. - consumed. a dog caught my eye, dog lover, sorry, people at home. do - consumed. a dog caught my eye, dog lover, sorry, people at home. do you | lover, sorry, people at home. do you like button burke? t lover, sorry, people at home. do you like button burke?— lover, sorry, people at home. do you like button burke? t do. i love like button burke? i do. i love marzipan- _ like button burke? i do. i love marzipan. apparently - like button burke? i do. i love marzipan. apparently it - like button burke? i do. i love marzipan. apparently it is - like button burke? t if i love marzipan. apparently it is making a comeback. it was created for a royal wedding about a century and a half ago, but as i said, it is about to make a resurgence. that is because queen elizabeth's 70 years on the
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throne will be hit next year. so if you are a fan, good news for you. mi; you are a fan, good news for you. my mom you are a fan, good news for you. tjt mom used to you are a fan, good news for you. m: mom used to tell you are a fan, good news for you. m mom used to tell me you are a fan, good news for you. m1: mom used to tell me she had a you are a fan, good news for you. m1 mom used to tell me she had a job when she was younger working and the battenberg factory, packing the cakes, and she could never eat them, but she used to bring them home for us when we were kids.— us when we were kids. talking about the new forest _ us when we were kids. talking about the new forest now, _ us when we were kids. talking about the new forest now, a _ us when we were kids. talking about the new forest now, a cyclist - us when we were kids. talking about the new forest now, a cyclist riding l the new forest now, a cyclist riding roughshod as ponies suffer, the time of year is when they round up all of the ponies in the new forest and they are free to roam as you probably know, free to roam across the forest, but they round them up and give them health checks. but they are suggesting some cyclist are not sticking to the rules as requested and it is hampering their effort to check on the ponies which are important for the forest�*s sustainability. t are important for the forest's sustainability.— are important for the forest's sustainability. i love the ponies. an a , sustainability. i love the ponies. anyway. it _ sustainability. i love the ponies. anyway. it is — sustainability. i love the ponies. anyway, it is quarter— sustainability. i love the ponies. anyway, it is quarter past - sustainability. i love the ponies. anyway, it is quarter past six. . having a heart attack
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and a couple of falls hasn't a stopped a 92—year—old water aerobics instructor going back to herjob. iam quite i am quite impressed with this! margaret takes two classes a week at renfrew baths, but had to stop during the pandemic. aileen clarke went to meet her. in 2019, we popped along to the victory bath in renfrew to meet margaret, still coaching the over 50s class as she turned 90. t margaret, still coaching the over 50s class as she turned 90. i would sa about 50s class as she turned 90. i would say about 80- _ 50s class as she turned 90. i would say about 80- i— 50s class as she turned 90. i would say about 80. i don't _ 50s class as she turned 90. i would say about 80. i don't feel— 50s class as she turned 90. i would say about 80. i don't feel 90, - 50s class as she turned 90. i would say about 80. i don't feel 90, no. | say about 80. i don't feel 90, no. after break of more than 18 months due to the covid lockdowns and restrictions, margaret is back doing what she loves best.— what she loves best. absolutely ma . ic. what she loves best. absolutely magic pure _ what she loves best. absolutely magic. pure magic. _ what she loves best. absolutely magic. pure magic. she - what she loves best. absolutely magic. pure magic. she has- what she loves best. absolutely l magic. pure magic. she has been advised to _ magic. pure magic. she has been advised to pull— magic. pure magic. she has been advised to pull up _ magic. pure magic. she has been advised to pull up a _ magic. pure magic. she has been advised to pull up a seat - magic. pure magic. she has been advised to pull up a seat at - magic. pure magic. she has been advised to pull up a seat at the i advised to pull up a seat at the poolside now after a heart attack, broken hip and another for which broken hip and another for which broke her arm, all earlier this year. broke her arm, all earlier this ear. ., . , broke her arm, all earlier this ear. ., ., , ., year. you have been through the wars.
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year. you have been through the wars- kind _ year. you have been through the wars. kind of, _ year. you have been through the wars. kind of, yes. _ year. you have been through the wars. kind of, yes. i— year. you have been through the wars. kind of, yes. i would - year. you have been through the wars. kind of, yes. i would not l year. you have been through the. wars. kind of, yes. i would not let wars. kind of, yes. iwould not let it get me down. i mean, yeah, but happened. you get it into your head you have to get on your feet and do what you can. you have to get on your feet and do what you can-— you have to get on your feet and do what you can. margaret might have to sit down now — what you can. margaret might have to sit down now while _ what you can. margaret might have to sit down now while she _ what you can. margaret might have to sit down now while she is _ what you can. margaret might have to sit down now while she is taking - sit down now while she is taking this class but she is still managing to give these ladies a right good workout. but even her amazing resilience was tested by lockdown. terrible, really terrible. i mean, i've got five great granddaughters and i could not get to see them. the situation familiar to many here, all very pleased to be back again for friendship and fitness.— very pleased to be back again for friendship and fitness. great to be back, we missed _ friendship and fitness. great to be back, we missed it _ friendship and fitness. great to be back, we missed it so _ friendship and fitness. great to be back, we missed it so much, - friendship and fitness. great to be back, we missed it so much, we i friendship and fitness. great to be i back, we missed it so much, we did. the level of my fitness definitely fell the level of my fitness definitely felt a _ the level of my fitness definitely felt a lot — the level of my fitness definitely fell a lot during the lockdown. i was supposed to be shielding for the first three _ was supposed to be shielding for the first three months and i found it very— first three months and i found it very isolating. do first three months and i found it very isolating-— first three months and i found it very isolating. do you think your fitness is coming _ very isolating. do you think your fitness is coming back? -
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very isolating. do you think your. fitness is coming back? definitely, thank ou fitness is coming back? definitely, thank you to _ fitness is coming back? definitely, thank you to margaret, _ fitness is coming back? definitely, | thank you to margaret, absolutely. she keeps— thank you to margaret, absolutely. she keeps us— thank you to margaret, absolutely. she keeps us going. _ thank you to margaret, absolutely. she keeps us going. she _ thank you to margaret, absolutely. she keeps us going.— she keeps us going. she is an inspiration. — she keeps us going. she is an inspiration, she _ she keeps us going. she is an inspiration, she is _ she keeps us going. she is an inspiration, she is amazing. i she keeps us going. she is an i inspiration, she is amazing. and marc aret inspiration, she is amazing. and margaret is _ inspiration, she is amazing. and margaret is very _ inspiration, she is amazing. margaret is very keen we all inspiration, she is amazing- margaret is very keen we all think about our fitness.— about our fitness. don't sit on the couch too long. _ about our fitness. don't sit on the couch too long. and _ about our fitness. don't sit on the couch too long. and don't - about our fitness. don't sit on the couch too long. and don't what i couch too long. and don't what you're telling all the time. move about. —— don't watch your telly. margaret, if you can do it after a broken hip, broken arm and heart attack, you can do it.— attack, you can do it. och, aye. think clearly— attack, you can do it. och, aye. think clearly about _ attack, you can do it. och, aye. think clearly about what - attack, you can do it. och, aye. think clearly about what you i attack, you can do it. och, aye. | think clearly about what you are doing and take your time. she is hoinu to doing and take your time. she is hoping to be _ doing and take your time. she is hoping to be back _ doing and take your time. she is hoping to be back dancing - doing and take your time. she is| hoping to be back dancing before doing and take your time. she is hoping to be back dancing before too long. aileen clarke, bbc news. broken hip, broken arm, a half step and it's fantastic. so broken hip, broken arm, a half step and it's fantastic.— and it's fantastic. so inspiring, indeed. let's _ and it's fantastic. so inspiring, indeed. let's check— and it's fantastic. so inspiring, indeed. let's check the - and it's fantastic. so inspiring, l indeed. let's check the weather. sarah. indeed. let's check the weather. sarah- good _ indeed. let's check the weather. sarah. good morning, _ indeed. let's check the weather. sarah. good morning, a - indeed. let's check the weather. sarah. good morning, a colder. indeed. let's check the weather. i sarah. good morning, a colder one out there certainly _ sarah. good morning, a colder one out there certainly if _ sarah. good morning, a colder one out there certainly if you _ sarah. good morning, a colder one out there certainly if you are - out there certainly if you are getting up and about and you will probably notice that, a real chill in the air outside because we have
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changed their masses so it is colder today but it does mean there will be more sunshine around. the chance for a showerfor some of more sunshine around. the chance for a shower for some of us, most will be towards the north and the east. this is the cold front that came south across the uk overnight. higher pressure is building in from the atlantic which will tend to squeeze away a lot of the showers through the course of the day that these winds from a northerly direction bring us the blue colours, the cold air, but also showers. plenty through central and eastern scotland, some wintry over the higher ground and one or two showers around the irish sea coast, they should tend to fade away, but eastern england will keep the rain showers for longest. anywhere from east yorkshire right down towards east yorkshire right down towards east anglia and kent. the winds will be quite strong and fresh, gusting to 30 miles an hour or so, especially down the east coast. temperatures 7— nine in the east, feeling colder with the breeze. while the further west and you
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should see a bit of sunshine through the day. this evening and tonight many places will see the show easing away. we will continue to see one or two rattling through the channel towards the channel islands. overnight temperatures, quite cold, colder than last night, generally one degree also either side of freezing for many. frost to start monday. a warm front will move in from the north which will introduce slightly less cold air to scotland, northern ireland and clouding over here. most places looking bright and sunny in england and wales through the day. top terms similar to today, still the chance of showers and south—east as they will be for tuesday and down towards the channel islands. dry weather with high pressure across the uk by this stage, bringing more cloud to parts of scotland and northern ireland. many still seeing the temperatures struggling to get up into double figures on tuesday. as we have through into the middle part of the week, another bite of colder air because this cold front will work
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its way south slowly through wednesday and into thursday, a fairly weak front which will not bring too much on the way of rainfall but it will open the doors again for more of a northerly flow of air to come in. some of us will see temperatures in double figures over the next few days but let's take a look at the second half of the week. from wednesday, it will be pretty chilly for the time of year so temperatures stuck in single figures. it looks like it then turns more unsettled once again towards the end of this week that you can see the showers coming into the of aberdeen, aberystwyth for instance. remaining dryer, i think, aberdeen, aberystwyth for instance. remaining dryer, ithink, in aberdeen, aberystwyth for instance. remaining dryer, i think, in the south—east for a time. a little bit up south—east for a time. a little bit up and down this week but what you certainly will notice is it won't be as warm as it has over really the rest of november. it has been mild so far but colder weather is on the cards out there. you so far but colder weather is on the cards out there.— cards out there. you called it spot on yesterday. _ cards out there. you called it spot on yesterday. you _ cards out there. you called it spot on yesterday, you said _ cards out there. you called it spot on yesterday, you said it - cards out there. you called it spot on yesterday, you said it would i cards out there. you called it spot j on yesterday, you said it would be colder this morning, and it was when i walked out of the house. well done. thank you!
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as we've been hearing this morning, there's been a number of protests across parts of europe as several countries impose tighter restrictions to tackle a rise in covid cases. from tomorrow, austria will go into a full national lockdown and mandatory vaccination will be introduced from february. we can speak now to journalist, damita pressl. shejoins us from she joins us from vienna. thank you for talking to us, damita. how are people in austria feeling? i know there have been some problems in vienna. how are they feeling about the restrictions and the prospect of having to get vaccinated? regarding the restrictions, _ having to get vaccinated? regarding the restrictions, i— having to get vaccinated? regarding the restrictions, i think— having to get vaccinated? regarding the restrictions, i think you - having to get vaccinated? regarding the restrictions, i think you have - the restrictions, i think you have to remember the people who marched yesterday, they are a minority but a sizeable one but the minority and the majority of people regarding this lockdown understand why it is necessary but they are angry at the political feeling that it is
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necessary because this was avoidable, had measures been taken sooner and had our politicians been very busy with themselves and fighting between themselves, this lockdown could have been avoided. so people understand at this point that the icu are overflowing and doctors and nurses are urging stricter measures so they are angry that it became this way and regarding the protest yesterday, i think we had 40,000 people from all over the country come together and march which is a lot. but i think the most dangerous part about that is really, you were seeing right wing groups and the freedom party, far right party here in austria, co—opt the protests and sort of use them for their own agenda which i think is their own agenda which i think is the most worrying part about the whole thing. bhd the most worrying part about the whole thing-— the most worrying part about the whole thin. . ., .. ., ., ., , whole thing. and vaccination rates in the country _ whole thing. and vaccination rates in the country are _ whole thing. and vaccination rates in the country are very _ whole thing. and vaccination rates in the country are very low - whole thing. and vaccination rates i in the country are very low compared to other parts of europe. so a lot of vaccine hesitancy there, is that because of the influence of the far
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right on general day—to—day austrian politics? t right on general day-to-day austrian olitics? .. . right on general day-to-day austrian olitics? ~ , , ., politics? i think it is several thins. politics? i think it is several things- one _ politics? i think it is several things. one is _ politics? i think it is several things. one is that - politics? i think it is several things. one is that we - politics? i think it is several things. one is that we have | politics? i think it is several. things. one is that we have a traditionally quite science sceptical society, traditionally quite science scepticalsociety, i traditionally quite science sceptical society, i would say. compared to other countries in western europe. compared to western europe and our vaccination rates are low, compared to eastern europe a clear we are higher but it is that scepticism of medicine and science in general. it's also there was a lack of a real vaccination campaign. people were encouraged to get their vaccine up until aboutjune and reached those people who are going to get it anyway and by the time that we had enough vaccine to vaccinate everyone, by the time that those people who wanted it anyway had gotten it, there was no more information, there was not really a co—ordinated campaign from the government to convince those people who are actually hesitant. i hosted yesterday and information, so we
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talk to some doctors from the medical university of vienna, they talk to people one on one in person and we noted then that there are still so many questions and so much fake information out there and so many people who don't understand and don't know how the vaccine works, whether they should get it, so in part that also was a failure to communicate.— part that also was a failure to communicate. ., ~ , ., communicate. damita, austria will become the _ communicate. damita, austria will become the first _ communicate. damita, austria will become the first country _ communicate. damita, austria will become the first country in - communicate. damita, austria will become the first country in europe j become the first country in europe to make it mandatory, compulsory, for people to have vaccinations from february. what will happen, what will be the sanction if people do not choose to go along with that and have the vaccination?— have the vaccination? yeah, so of course, have the vaccination? yeah, so of course. this _ have the vaccination? yeah, so of course, this is just _ have the vaccination? yeah, so of course, this isjust a _ have the vaccination? yeah, so of course, this isjust a suggestion i course, this isjust a suggestion that has come up in the past few days. we do not have it drafted or anything. but for those people who refused to get the first or second shot, there would be a fine of 3600 euros, which is about twice the average salary here. and for the
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booster shot, for those people who refuse to get that, it would be 1400 euros fine. so we're talking about financial penalties. fight! euros fine. so we're talking about financial penalties.— financial penalties. and when you sa twice financial penalties. and when you say twice the _ financial penalties. and when you say twice the average, _ financial penalties. and when you say twice the average, are - financial penalties. and when you say twice the average, are you i say twice the average, are you talking monthly salary? yes, yes. it is a lot of money, isn't it. it's interesting that people are so against vaccinations in austria. is that, as you said, just because they are science sceptics in your country?— are science sceptics in your count? , �*, ., , country? yes, it's not 'ust the covid vaccine, fl country? yes, it's not 'ust the covid vaccine, it's _ country? yes, it's notjust the covid vaccine, it's specifically | covid vaccine, it's specifically covid vaccine, it's specifically covid because it is new, right? people are extra sceptical because of that but even the influenza vaccine or other vaccines, i think we have 10% of people vaccinated against influenza each year which is quite low so there is a general scepticism there. i think what i thought of when this made headlines internationally was we are not the first country to implement a vaccine
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mandate, we are the first for the magazine —— covid vaccine but france, hungary has mandate for a bunch of vaccines from diphtheria to polio so this is not a new concept and so i understand it is an infringement upon a personal liberty but at the same time, if people had just gotten vaccinated, voluntarily, we would not be in this situation, so i see why this is becoming necessary. damita, thank you indeed for speaking to us. we are very grateful to you. damita pressl. welcome to breakfast if you are just joining us. six—year—old fraizer harris only took up golf around a year ago as a way of helping with his cystic fibrosis but now, he's already better than most grown—ups. he's so good he's qualified for thejunior world championships in america next year. let's see him in action.
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lovely. speed through. lovely. oh, baby! yes! fantastic! oh, yes! what a shot! he looks the real deal, doesn't he?
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seriously impressive. looking forward to speaking to him and his dad just after half past eight. that's it for now. stay with us. it is 28 minutes past six. good morning if you have joined is 28 minutes past six. good morning if you havejoined us. we'll give you a summary of the main stories in just a moment. stay with us, wherever you are.
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hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and sima kotecha. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. sarah mulkerrins is here with all the sports news. good morning. iam good morning. i am good today, i am not sure those manchester united players will be feeling good this morning. players will be feeling good this morninu. ~ . . players will be feeling good this morninu. ., , players will be feeling good this mornin_ ., , ., players will be feeling good this morninu. ., , ., ., morning. what a shocker, but a great win for watford. _ morning. what a shocker, but a great win for watford. absolutely. - morning. what a shocker, but a great win for watford. absolutely. a - morning. what a shocker, but a great win for watford. absolutely. a great. win for watford. absolutely. a great win for watford. absolutely. a great win for watford. absolutely. a great win forthem- _ win for watford. absolutely. a great win for them. no _ win for watford. absolutely. a great win for them. no doubt _ win for watford. absolutely. a great win for them. no doubt that - win for watford. absolutely. a great win for them. no doubt that but - win for them. no doubt that but for—1 defeat the manchester united has caused all sorts of conversations today. huge speculation but there was an
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emergency board meeting last night, that although solas covered awesome is on the verge of being sacked from manchester united. —— ole gunnar solskjaer. tlat manchester united. -- ole gunnar solsk'aer. ., ., manchester united. -- ole gunnar soiskjaer-— noti manchester united. -- ole gunnar| solskjaer._ not a solskjaer. not a good return. not a aood solskjaer. not a good return. not a good return- _ "embarrasing," "a nightmare," "not good enough." all used to describe manchester united's display yesterday in their 4—1 loss to watford. ole gunnar solskjaer�*s side have now lost four of their last five premier league games. watford were leading 2—0 at the break, thanks to goals from joshua king, and then this one from ismaila sarr. united pulled one back through donny van de beek but then things took a turn for the worse when harry maguire was sent off for a second yellow, and watford went on to add two more goals in injury time throuthoao pedro and then emmanuel dennis. ole gunnar solskjaer looked dejected after the game as question marks remain over his future at the club.
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iam i am never going to say that i feel safe. i work for the club, with the club, as hard as i can, with a great star. the players are doing as well as they can. any conversation between me and the club, of course, thatis between me and the club, of course, that is not for you and me, but that is for us. while things at manchester united are very rocky, for leaders chelsea, things are looking very comfortable. thomas tuchel�*s side beat leicester city 3—0 with this ngolo kante strike coming in between goals from antonio rudiger and christian pulisic. chelsea are now four points clear at the top of the premier league table. and just behind chelsea in second are liverpool, after they beat arsenal 4—0 at anfield. sadio mane opened the scoring for liverpool, heading beyond aaron ramsdale in the first half. then goals from diogojota, mohammed salah and this finish from takumi minamino in the second half sealed the win.
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and it was also a good day for the premier league's new managers. aston villa beat brighton 2—0 to give steven gerrard a first win in his first game as their manager. ollie watkins fired villa into the lead with just six minutes to go before tyrone mings added the second just minutes later. a brilliant start for dean smith as norwich boss. they came from behind to beat southampton. captain grant hanley scored a late winner in a 2—1victory. that means that norwich are off the bottom of the table for the first time this season. and the team they have overtaken is newcastle united. new boss eddie howe had to sit this one out because of covid, but he'll have been pleased to watch his side come from behind twice to draw 3—3 with brentford. a busy day in the women's super league gets underway at lunchtime when league leaders arsenal travel to manchester united. but yesterday it was the team on the other side of manchester in action with manchester city beating aston villa 5—0 to ease the pressure on boss gareth taylor.
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stjohnstone's reign as scottish league cup holders is over. they were beaten 1—0 by celtic in the semi—finals of the competition. substitute james forrest came off the bench to score the only goal of the game midway through the second half, so celtic are through to the final next month and could lift the trophy for a 20th time. in the scottish premiership, hearts remain third despite losing 2—0 to motherwell, but the main drama of the day took place between dundee united and aberdeen. have a look at this. aberdeen's funso ojo was sent off after being pushed by a dundee united supporter. ojo ended up over the advertising hoardings before being pushed by the fan. ojo then confronted the fan before being pulled away by teammates and received a second yellow for his troubles. united's ian harkes then put his side ahead with just 10 minutes to go to send then
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to fourth in the table. now, what a day of rugby union matches we had yesterday as the autumn internationals draw to a close. england got a last minute win over south africa to avenge their 2019 world cup final defeat. wales won by a single point against australia and scotland beat japan. patrick gearey was watching. on another continent on the other side of a pandemic, england and south africa met in the world cup final. south africa one, england failed to score a try. so what a start they got from me to a lonely after just six start they got from me to a lonely afterjust six minutes. against the springboks, you hope your points outnumber the bruises. it is a test of strength. freddie stewart muscled on 11 points clear, but you are never safe from andre pollard's boot. he helped make up a distance, kick for kick. south africa crept back. they were just ahead when england saw an escape route. scoring
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his first international try. he will never forget that, but south africa soon dead, with english ranked elsewhere, napa sold an debbie had the space he needed. long after, south africa lead, but only by two points. an advantage vulnerable to an english surge, neglect penalty, there it was. marco smith, england's great hope, had england's big quick. england finished 20—21 by beating the world number one. when wales scored their first try of the match group australia through ryan alliance, it seemed they were on course for a comfortable victory. the wallabies had already lost amount to a red card at that point but were determined to make it interesting. not long after flip a dog any�*s try, it actually went ahead. but as in london, so inkatha. this time reese president's penalty would be the final action of wales to bosnia. scotland's performance in
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beating japan was a bit patchy, but it took stuart hockley as his nation's top try scorer, record that surely only be extended. patrick geary bbc news. amazing game in paris last night with france beat new zealand for the first time since 2009. later today ireland take on argentina, and for the women, england face usa, while wales host canada. f1 now, as lewis hamilton will be hoping to close the 14—point gap to championship leader max verstappen at this afternoon's qatar grand prix. he was almost half a second quicker than his rival as he claimed pole for the first race to be held in qatar. his mercedes teammate valtteri bottas will start from third. hamilton's performance all the more impressive given he'd felt unwell on friday. fallon sherrock�*s run in the grand slam of darts is over. she was beaten 16—13 last night by world number two peter wright in wolverhampton. sherrock was attempting to become the first woman to reach the semi—finals.
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she'd already become the first female to reach a major darts quarter—final. wright will take on michael smith in the semis, after he beat michael van gerwen. it has been great to see the reaction this week committed the run that she has been on. she reaction this week committed the run that she has been on.— that she has been on. she keeps breakin: that she has been on. she keeps breaking down _ that she has been on. she keeps breaking down barriers, - that she has been on. she keeps breaking down barriers, doesn'tl that she has been on. she keeps - breaking down barriers, doesn't she? she does. and it is her temperament, as well. in those big moments, she has had to pull off some great comebacks this week, and she is composed. comebacks this week, and she is composed-— comebacks this week, and she is comosed. ., . , , , ,, we will be back with headlines for you at seven o'clock. now, more than four years on from the grenfell fire disaster, sarah corker has been speaking to people still living in flats wrapped in flammable cladding. who should pay to fix britain's dangerous buildings? it is fine a half years since the grunfeld tragedy, yet more than 500,000 people are still living in flats
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wrapped in flammable materials, from london to leeds, manchester to merseyside, many homes are unsafe and unsaleable. what work needs doing on the building? what needs to be replaced? tt doing on the building? what needs to be replaced?— be replaced? if you look at all the timber cladding _ be replaced? if you look at all the timber cladding that _ be replaced? if you look at all the timber cladding that you - be replaced? if you look at all the timber cladding that you see, - be replaced? if you look at all the timber cladding that you see, but| timber cladding that you see, but all has to come down.— timber cladding that you see, but all has to come down. those who can least afford — all has to come down. those who can least afford it — all has to come down. those who can least afford it are _ all has to come down. those who can least afford it are facing _ all has to come down. those who can least afford it are facing life - least afford it are facing life changing bills. t least afford it are facing life changing bills.— least afford it are facing life chanauin bills. ., ., changing bills. i am on universal credit, changing bills. i am on universal credit. every _ changing bills. i am on universal credit, every penny _ changing bills. i am on universal credit, every penny actually - changing bills. i am on universal. credit, every penny actually counts. we are still facing high, huge, out this universe type bills. there are warnings this is becoming a mental health crisis also. tt is warnings this is becoming a mental health crisis also.— health crisis also. it is the financial— health crisis also. it is the financial strain _ health crisis also. it is the financial strain that - health crisis also. it is the financial strain that has i health crisis also. it is the i financial strain that has kind health crisis also. it is the - financial strain that has kind of forced me to take medication for my mental health, just to keep afloat. safety checks have exposed the failure of building regulations over decades. we failure of building regulations over decades. ~ ., , decades. we were having meetings with government _ decades. we were having meetings with government in _ decades. we were having meetings with government in 2009, - decades. we were having meetings with government in 2009, 2010, i decades. we were having meetings i with government in 2009, 2010, with concerns about the quality issues on building sites. pressure is now mounting from the conservative backbenchers. if we don't want
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another grenfell, if we want buildings to be safe, cannot be forced to pay. buildings to be safe, cannot be forced to pay-— forced to pay. this is britain's buildin: forced to pay. this is britain's building safety _ forced to pay. this is britain's building safety crisis, - forced to pay. this is britain's building safety crisis, but - forced to pay. this is britain's building safety crisis, but it i forced to pay. this is britain's building safety crisis, but it is forced to pay. this is britain's i building safety crisis, but it is to blame? —— who is to blame? so, this is the children's bedroom. they share a room, as you can see it is quite cramped. a lot of stuff is in here. th is quite cramped. a lot of stuff is in here. ,., ., ., is quite cramped. a lot of stuff is in here. ., ., , in here. in south london, single mum emma has outgrown _ in here. in south london, single mum emma has outgrown her— in here. in south london, single mum emma has outgrown her one - in here. in south london, single mum emma has outgrown her one bed - in here. in south london, single mum emma has outgrown her one bed flat. this is the living room, and this doubles as your bedroom? yes, some in the evening it is like changing rooms. and in here is my bed. tt in the evening it is like changing rooms. and in here is my bed. it was 12 months ago _ rooms. and in here is my bed. it was 12 months ago when _ rooms. and in here is my bed. it was 12 months ago when we _ rooms. and in here is my bed. it was 12 months ago when we first - rooms. and in here is my bed. it was 12 months ago when we first met. i 12 months ago when we first met. back then, emma had just been told her block was so unsafe it needed round—the—clock fire wardens. t’m round-the-clock fire wardens. i'm an: . i round-the-clock fire wardens. i'm angry- i am _ round—the—clock fire wardens. t“n angry. i am actually furious at it. this is ruining people's lives. it is not our fault.
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this is ruining people's lives. it is not ourfault. we didn't this is ruining people's lives. it is not our fault. we didn't buy these properties thinking that there's something wrong with them. thy, there's something wrong with them. a year on, they have a fire alarm installed. but her block won't get any funding to remove the cladding orfix the otherfire any funding to remove the cladding or fix the other fire safety faults. 18 metres is the cut—off for government supports. austin apartments for short. to government supports. austin apartments for short. to know that we have got _ apartments for short. to know that we have got nothing, _ apartments for short. to know that we have got nothing, but _ apartments for short. to know that we have got nothing, but it - apartments for short. to know that we have got nothing, but it is - apartments for short. to know that we have got nothing, but it is all i we have got nothing, but it is all down to us, is devastating. because ou are down to us, is devastating. because you are four— down to us, is devastating. because you are four stories _ down to us, is devastating. because you are four stories rather _ down to us, is devastating. because you are four stories rather than - down to us, is devastating. because you are four stories rather than six . you are four stories rather than six stories? . , . 1 . you are four stories rather than six stories? , , , . , ., you are four stories rather than six stories? , , _ , ., , ., what colour was the cake? chocolate cake! very nice- _ what colour was the cake? chocolate cake! very nice. emma _ what colour was the cake? chocolate cake! very nice. emma is _ what colour was the cake? chocolate cake! very nice. emma is out - what colour was the cake? chocolate cake! very nice. emma is out of - what colour was the cake? chocolate j cake! very nice. emma is out of work and on universal _ cake! very nice. emma is out of work and on universal credit. _ cake! very nice. emma is out of work and on universal credit. she - cake! very nice. emma is out of work and on universal credit. she taught i and on universal credit. she taught using an affordable housing scheme ten years ago, yet her share of the bill to fix the building could be up to £30,000. how is the way you feel about your home change through all of this? ma;
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about your home change through all of this? ~ , ., about your home change through all of this? g ., .,, about your home change through all ofthis? g ., " of this? my mom died when i was 19. so the deposit _ of this? my mom died when i was 19. so the deposit for _ of this? my mom died when i was 19. so the deposit for my _ of this? my mom died when i was 19. so the deposit for my flight, - of this? my mom died when i was 19. so the deposit for my flight, i - so the deposit for my flight, i essentially, it was inheritance. i am only here because i've lost my mom. i've made good use of that inheritance, especially at a young age, i think everyone was quite shocked that i actually was quite sensible and thought, yes, i'm actually going to invest it and do something for my life and for my future. fast forward to this now, i feel like it has probably been the worst thing that i have ever done, is signed on the dotted line. i'm stuck with something that potentially might ruin me. tt is potentially might ruin me. it is hard to even _ potentially might ruin me. it is hard to even think _ potentially might ruin me. it is hard to even think about it all, because it is just too much, hard to even think about it all, because it isjust too much, it hard to even think about it all, because it is just too much, it is too heartbreaking. concerns over building safety were triggered by the grenfell tower fire in 2017. 72 people died. an enquiry found the type of cladding used, known as acm, was the primary cause of the fire's rapid spread. was the primary cause of the fire's rapid spread-— rapid spread. something wasn't riaht, and rapid spread. something wasn't right. and i— rapid spread. something wasn't right, and i think _ rapid spread. something wasn't right, and i think you _ rapid spread. something wasn't right, and i think you all- rapid spread. something wasn't right, and i think you all knew . rapid spread. something wasn't i right, and i think you all knew too.
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since then, the cladding crisis has only escalated. there have been a wave of demonstrations. this is a scandal that has been 30 years in the making. safety checks on other tower blocks after the grenfell tower fire found notjust problems with cladding, but many other fire safety defects to, so flammable balconies, missing fire breaks, defective installation, and the question at the heart of this issue is, who is to blame for those failures, and who should pay to fix them? flat owners have come from across the uk to protest in westminster. he has the money on your block? anyone?— westminster. he has the money on your block? anyone? nobody, nobody. i know of your block? anyone? nobody, nobody. i know of one — your block? anyone? nobody, nobody. i know of one guy. _ your block? anyone? nobody, nobody. i know of one guy, certainly, _ your block? anyone? nobody, nobody. i know of one guy, certainly, he - i know of one guy, certainly, he will be going bankrupt. i've lost £75,000 of my money, really. if we are looking at 30,000— £40,000 from remediation, that is half the value of my apartment. haifa
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remediation, that is half the value of my apartment-— of my apartment. how was it impacting — of my apartment. how was it impacting on _ of my apartment. how was it impacting on your _ of my apartment. how was it impacting on your health - of my apartment. how was it impacting on your health and of my apartment. how was it - impacting on your health and your well—being at how you feel every day? well-being at how you feel every da ? ~ .,, ., , , well-being at how you feel every da ? ., , , ., well-being at how you feel every da? ., , ., day? most mornings i get up and i am sick. i day? most mornings i get up and i am sick- i don't— day? most mornings i get up and i am sick. i don't eat, _ day? most mornings i get up and i am sick. i don't eat, i— day? most mornings i get up and i am sick. i don't eat, i don't _ day? most mornings i get up and i am sick. i don't eat, i don't sleep. - sick. i don't eat, i don't sleep. i have _ sick. i don't eat, i don't sleep. i have advised my son not to buy. he was saving — have advised my son not to buy. he was saving up to get a mortgage and i was saving up to get a mortgage and i told _ was saving up to get a mortgage and i told him. _ was saving up to get a mortgage and itold him, don't was saving up to get a mortgage and i told him, don't bother. was saving up to get a mortgage and itold him, don't bother. it was saving up to get a mortgage and i told him, don't bother. it is not worth— i told him, don't bother. it is not worth it — i told him, don't bother. it is not worth it. a, i told him, don't bother. it is not worth it. , . itold him, don't bother. it is not worth it. , ., ~ , i told him, don't bother. it is not worth it. , ., ~ ,., worth it. more conservative mps are 0 enl worth it. more conservative mps are openly criticising — worth it. more conservative mps are openly criticising their _ worth it. more conservative mps are openly criticising their own - openly criticising their own government. we openly criticising their own government.— openly criticising their own government. openly criticising their own covernment. ~ ., ., ., ., government. we are going to get a resolution to — government. we are going to get a resolution to this _ government. we are going to get a resolution to this one _ government. we are going to get a resolution to this one way - government. we are going to get a resolution to this one way or- government. we are going to get a resolution to this one way or the i resolution to this one way or the other, thank you. tt is resolution to this one way or the other, thank you. it is important, lease, other, thank you. it is important, please. come _ other, thank you. it is important, please, come on _ other, thank you. it is important, please, come on stage _ other, thank you. it is important, please, come on stage and - other, thank you. it is important, please, come on stage and join i other, thank you. it is important, i please, come on stage and join us. the mp_ please, come on stage and join us. the mp for— please, come on stage and join us. the mp for stevenage has been a thorn in the side of his own party. if we don't want another grenfell, if we want buildings to be safe, leaseholders cannot be forced to pat’- leaseholders cannot be forced to pay. i am standing up not only for the leaseholders in my constituency but leaseholders up and down the country. the millions of people who are trapped. and i don't want to live in a society where we write off millions of people. the government
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has announced _ millions of people. the government has announced a _ millions of people. the government has announced a £5 _ millions of people. the government has announced a £5 million - millions of people. the government has announced a £5 million fund - millions of people. the government has announced a £5 million fund to| has announced a £5 million fund to remove cladding on the most high—risk blocks, as above 50 metres. the buildings under 18 metres, plans for a loan scheme have been paused. so currently there is no financial help for those living in smaller blocks. and the housing select committee estimates this is at least a £15 billion problem — that is just to remove cladding. you want to go again? living with all of this has _ you want to go again? living with all of this has been _ you want to go again? living with all of this has been described - you want to go again? living with all of this has been described as . you want to go again? living with i all of this has been described as an ongoing trauma. i work so hard constantly, working to provide proof for my child, working to provide a roof for my child that the thought that that could just go in an instant because i'd already seen people become bankrupt because of the situation. sophie bought this two—bed flat in chelmsford just weeks before her son reuben was born but their world came crashing down. which part of the
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building is a problem? behind you, you can see the acm panels. so this stuff here? that's the same type of cladding as grenfell. sophie is left to find out how much it may cost to remove and that's taking a toll on her mental health. crippling depression where you cannot get up. just couldn't see the point in anything. i had a really bleak outlook on life. i've been able to pick myself up from the worst of it but since then, i've had such bad issues with anxiety. some days, ifeel like i can't leave the house and i have physical problems leaving the house because i feel so sick. sophie is not alone in her struggles. i've come to sheffield to find out more about how housing and health are interlinked. new research carried out by academics here and shared exclusively with the bbc found that the building safety
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crisis is having a severe impact on the mental health of some leaseholders. it was a kind of really catastrophic experience for some people. and that's not something that exist today but kind of goes on in the future as well. and in the worst case scenarios? several people talked about points of crisis through building safety problems. this is as a result of them needing to get immediate help from a gp. things like feeling that they could go on, they were trapped and they couldn't see a way out of this crisis was leading to feelings of suicide and self—harm. if we don't see a change in policy, some action actually, where is this going to end? psychiatrists have issued those concerns. professor cooper echoes those concerns. concerns. professor cooper echoes those concerns-— concerns. professor cooper echoes those concerns. uncertainty and lack of control other _ those concerns. uncertainty and lack of control other two _ those concerns. uncertainty and lack of control other two leading - those concerns. uncertainty and lack of control other two leading causes . of control other two leading causes of control other two leading causes of stress and these people have it
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in tons. . ., ., , of stress and these people have it in tons. _, ., , ,, in tons. living in conditions like that for long — in tons. living in conditions like that for long periods _ in tons. living in conditions like that for long periods of - in tons. living in conditions like that for long periods of time, i in tons. living in conditions like i that for long periods of time, what impact does it have a mental health? number one, you know you're going to have to cough up some and number two, you don't know how much, and it could be quite substantial, so there are worries about but on top of all of the other worries, and i think that will be quite a significant issue. these people really do need support. they probably will need counselling support. 50 support. they probably will need counselling support.— support. they probably will need counselling support. so your whole life is on hold _ counselling support. so your whole life is on hold until— counselling support. so your whole life is on hold until this _ counselling support. so your whole life is on hold until this can - counselling support. so your whole life is on hold until this can be - life is on hold until this can be sorted out? how long do you think this could be until you can move on from this property? t this could be untilyou can move on from this property?— from this property? i think i am bein: from this property? i think i am being optimistic— from this property? i think i am being optimistic by _ from this property? i think i am being optimistic by thinking - from this property? i think i am being optimistic by thinking i i from this property? i think i am. being optimistic by thinking i will being optimistic by thinking i will be able to move in ten years. back in chelmsford, _ be able to move in ten years. back in chelmsford, sophie _ be able to move in ten years. back in chelmsford, sophie went to her gp for help and has been prescribed antianxiety medication. the doctor was so shocked by her situation, he wrote to her local mp, asking her to raise the issues in parliament.
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sophie's focus is now on her son, who has recently diagnosed diagnosed with autism. the family is desperate to move somewhere bigger that meets his needs. i'm the very tip of the iceberg in the sense that i'm one of the lucky ones that have support around me. my love for my son has enabled me to drag myself up from the depths of despair, to go reach out to get help, to keep myself in check. it is still unknown how many buildings there are with fire safety faults but figures obtained by the bbc reveal almost 1600 blocks are so unsafe fire services changed their evacuation policies or round—the—clock fibre trials have been put in place. 1531 of these buildings are in england, concentrated in london, manchester and merseyside. 56 are in wales. no blocks in northern ireland have these measures in place. figures for
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scotland were not available. this ongoing crisis is now starting to paralyse entire sections of the property market. i'm on my way to hampshire, to meet one woman who believes her block did not meet regulations at the time it was built. ~ ., ., ,., , regulations at the time it was built. ~ ., ., , , ., , built. we moved in about seven years auo. for built. we moved in about seven years ago- foryour— built. we moved in about seven years ago. for your retirement? _ built. we moved in about seven years ago. for your retirement? that's - ago. for your retirement? that's riuht. ago. for your retirement? that's right- and _ ago. for your retirement? that's right- and has— ago. for your retirement? that's right. and has not _ ago. for your retirement? that's right. and has not been - ago. for your retirement? that's right. and has not been plain - right. and has not been plain sailinu. right. and has not been plain sailing. what _ right. and has not been plain sailing. what is _ right. and has not been plain sailing. what is the - right. and has not been plain | sailing. what is the problem? right. and has not been plain - sailing. what is the problem? the roblem sailing. what is the problem? the problem is — sailing. what is the problem? the problem is all _ sailing. what is the problem? the problem is all of _ sailing. what is the problem? the problem is all of the _ sailing. what is the problem? the problem is all of the cladding - sailing. what is the problem? the. problem is all of the cladding here, the grey cladding. this problem is all of the cladding here, the grey cladding-— the grey cladding. this is crown hei . hts the grey cladding. this is crown heights in _ the grey cladding. this is crown heights in basingstoke. - the grey cladding. this is crown heights in basingstoke. built. the grey cladding. this is crown heights in basingstoke. built in 2003, marketed as modern city living outside of the capital. jean planned a happy retirement here. so this move was to make your life easier as you got older? what is the reality been? ., ., , ., . ., , you got older? what is the reality been? ., ., , ., been? unfortunately, financially and mentall , been? unfortunately, financially and mentally. it — been? unfortunately, financially and mentally. it is _ been? unfortunately, financially and mentally, it is ruining _ been? unfortunately, financially and mentally, it is ruining us. _
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been? unfortunately, financially and mentally, it is ruining us. the - mentally, it is ruining us. the claddin: mentally, it is ruining us. the cladding inspection last year revealed safety failures within the walls of this 14 story block, including combustible material and missing fire barriers. jean and her husband terry are living with the consequences of those issues. service charges and insurance costs are soaring. t service charges and insurance costs are soaring-— are soaring. i spend my life 'ogging alon: are soaring. i spend my life 'ogging along behind — are soaring. i spend my life 'ogging along behind you, i are soaring. i spend my life 'ogging along behind you, don't _ are soaring. i spend my life 'ogging along behind you, don't i, h are soaring. i spend my life jogging along behind you, don't i, my- along behind you, don't i, my darling? i had to leave myjob to care for my husband and therefore, we are surviving on benefits. we are flat broke. you know, we cannot afford this. and therefore, the final years of his life are lived on benefits, surviving rather than being able to live as we would have hoped. being able to live as we would have ho ed. ~ . ., _ , being able to live as we would have hoed. . .. hoped. when the cladding system was installed here, _ hoped. when the cladding system was installed here, it— hoped. when the cladding system was installed here, it should _ hoped. when the cladding system was installed here, it should have - installed here, it should have included fire barriers in the walls on every floor above two stories. tests by surveyors set at least
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three locations found none. typically, flats should have barriers inside the spaces between cladding and the outside walls and between each floor, as well as fire stops in the internal walls. these protections help to reduce the spread of smoke and flames in the event of a fire. developers usually argue their builders were compliant at the time and they should not have to pay for work done because rules have been tightened since grenfell. but the bbc has seen a report by surveyors which concluded that some elements of construction did not appear to have complied with building regulations at the time. how did you feel when you first read that report? t how did you feel when you first read that report?— that report? i was 'ust so shocked. i definitely feel — that report? i wasjust so shocked. i definitely feel let _ that report? i wasjust so shocked. i definitely feel let down _ that report? i wasjust so shocked. i definitely feel let down by - that report? i wasjust so shocked. i definitely feel let down by a - i definitely feel let down by a whole raft of professionals. we rely on them and i'm not an expert on building, that's why we have a building, that's why we have a building control inspector. the
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developer— building control inspector. the developer told us that crown heights was signed off by an approved inspector is meeting the requirements of building regulations at the time of construction, contractors involved that the development was built in line with regulations and the national housebuilding council in charge of building control at crown heights told us : graham watts has worked in the construction sector for four decades. he says building regulations are shrunk from 300 pages to 24 pages over the years and can be ambiguous. i think anybody living in a building in which there is not enough restriction for fire spread is living in a building that does not comply with building regulations, and in my view there is no way that the leaseholders all the residents should be responsible for paying for that remediation.
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to what extent has this crisis been 20 to 30 years in the making? i think it goes back to the '70s and '80s, actually, in terms of the old deregulation bandwagon. we were having meetings with governments in 2009—2010 with our concerns about the quality issues sites, so it's been there for a very long time. rewind to 1984. tower blocks are being completely recovered or reclad and new materials. this is a bbc documentary called the great british housing disaster. structural engineers warned of the possible fire risks from cladding even back then. i think it's absolutely essential that anything that has been placed on or around an existing block should be considered very carefully in relation to a serious fire. do you think there are now systems which _ do you think there are now systems which are _ do you think there are now systems which are being used which represent a fire risk? _ which are being used which represent a fire risk? . .. , which are being used which represent a fire risk? ., ,, , , , which are being used which represent a fire risk?_ would - which are being used which represent a fire risk?_ would you i a fire risk? frankly, yes. would you be prepared — a fire risk? frankly, yes. would you be prepared to _ a fire risk? frankly, yes. would you be prepared to name _ a fire risk? frankly, yes. would you be prepared to name them? -
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a fire risk? frankly, yes. would you be prepared to name them? no! i a fire risk? frankly, yes. would you . be prepared to name them? no! and warnin: be prepared to name them? no! and warning from — be prepared to name them? no! and warning from housing _ be prepared to name them? no! and warning from housing managers - be prepared to name them? no! and | warning from housing managers about poor standards and who should fix the fault echoes from today's crisis. those experts built these buildings i have now been shown to be 33 million works of repairs, that's £33 million worth of professional mistakes and the cost of that has to be met because the builder went bankrupt and the professional�*s responsible cannot be nailed for red, and the cost of that has to be found by ratepayers and ratepayers. has to be found by ratepayers and ratepayers-— ratepayers. industry experts have warned that _ ratepayers. industry experts have warned that the _ ratepayers. industry experts have warned that the construction - warned that the construction workforce has become used to marking its own homework.— its own homework. we've lost the independent _ its own homework. we've lost the independent quality _ its own homework. we've lost the independent quality checks - its own homework. we've lost the independent quality checks on - independent quality checks on construction sites that were always part and parcel of the process. so for example architects and engineers who used to go on site regularly to supervise the work, they really go on site now. do supervise the work, they really go on site now-— supervise the work, they really go on site now. ,, _ , on site now. do you think the system is broken? i — on site now. do you think the system is broken? ithink— on site now. do you think the system is broken? i think the _ on site now. do you think the system is broken? i think the system - on site now. do you think the system is broken? i think the system was i is broken? i think the system was broken in 2017. _ is broken? i think the system was broken in 2017. i—
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is broken? i think the system was broken in 2017. i think _ is broken? i think the system was broken in 2017. i think we - is broken? i think the system was broken in 2017. i think we are - broken in 2017. i think we are gradually fixing it up now. it's a massive job. gradually fixing it up now. it's a massivejob. but gradually fixing it up now. it's a massive job. but what i gradually fixing it up now. it's a massivejob. but what i do gradually fixing it up now. it's a massive job. but what i do feel is that we've gone overboard and some buildings are being claimed to be unsafe where actually, the risk is very, very low and it's an acceptable level of risk. with the new housing _ acceptable level of risk. with the new housing secretary _ acceptable level of risk. with the new housing secretary recently i new housing secretary recently imposed, there has been a change of tone from the government. in his first appearance before the housing committee, michael gove questioned why leaseholders should have to pay at all. itote why leaseholders should have to pay at all. ~ ., ., ., at all. we also have a responsibility - at all. we also have a responsibility to - at all. we also have a i responsibility to relieve at all. we also have a - responsibility to relieve some at all. we also have a _ responsibility to relieve some of the obligations that have been faced by leaseholders at the moment who are innocent parties in this and who are innocent parties in this and who are being, in many circumstances, asked to pay disproportionate sons. and when asked who was responsible for the problems in the first place, esther gove said while local and central government had a role, he also hit out at development. the sheriff or also hit out at development. tt2 sheriff or sheriffs might not have been on the ball but the cowboys
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were behaving like cowboys in an unregulated way. back were behaving like cowboys in an unregulated way.— were behaving like cowboys in an unregulated way. back in london, work was supposed _ unregulated way. back in london, work was supposed to _ unregulated way. back in london, work was supposed to start - unregulated way. back in london, work was supposed to start on i unregulated way. back in london, - work was supposed to start on emma's block in october but it has been delayed. she bothers flow through a government affordable housing scheme so she only 50% of it. but terms of the lease means she is liable for 100% of the costs. what is the reality of shared ownership been for you? t reality of shared ownership been for ou? ., �* ~' reality of shared ownership been for ou? ., �* .. , ., reality of shared ownership been for ou? ., ., , , you? i don't think shared ownership is fit for purpose. _ you? i don't think shared ownership is fit for purpose. it _ you? i don't think shared ownership is fit for purpose. it is _ you? i don't think shared ownership is fit for purpose. it is to _ you? i don't think shared ownership is fit for purpose. it is to help - is fit for purpose. it is to help people like me who couldn't afford to get a full mortgage. on a property. i was able to own half of it and pay rent the other. it's really done me a disservice. i would not recommend anybody to go in a shared ownership.— not recommend anybody to go in a shared ownership. housing experts sa the shared ownership. housing experts say the cladding — shared ownership. housing experts say the cladding crisis _ shared ownership. housing experts say the cladding crisis has - shared ownership. housing experts say the cladding crisis has exposed| say the cladding crisis has exposed flaws in shared ownership model and wants it reformed. t
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flaws in shared ownership model and wants it reformed.— wants it reformed. i think the scheme does _ wants it reformed. i think the scheme does have _ wants it reformed. i think the scheme does have a - wants it reformed. i think the scheme does have a sort - wants it reformed. i think the scheme does have a sort of. scheme does have a sort of fundamental unfairness. there are potential liabilities which are so great that people are potentially going to go bankrupt and lose their homes. any scheme which purports to be an affordable housing and which can leave people in that situation is not doing itsjob.— can leave people in that situation is not doing its job. is not doing its 'ob. emma's housing association is not doing its job. emma's housing association told _ is not doing its job. emma's housing association told us _ is not doing its job. emma's housing association told us : _ are we going to walk down here? in essex, better news. the development of sophie's block has agreed to cover the cost of removing and replacing the dangerous cladding — a huge relief for those living here. in hampshire, jean says they have been told crown heights is eligible for government funding to pay for the work needed but there has been some delays in the money being released and they do not know if it will cover everything. tt’s released and they do not know if it will cover everything.— will cover everything. it's on my mind a lot- _
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will cover everything. it's on my mind a lot- i— will cover everything. it's on my mind a lot. i find _ will cover everything. it's on my mind a lot. i find it _ will cover everything. it's on my mind a lot. i find it difficult - will cover everything. it's on my mind a lot. i find it difficult to i mind a lot. ifind it difficult to sleep, i'm taking medication for stress. it is fairly difficult. but at the end of the day, money... money is not the same as life. i'm much more worried about this fire safety that i am about the worry —— money. tb. safety that i am about the worry -- mone . . ., ., ., ., ., , money. a generation of homeowners face financial — money. a generation of homeowners face financial ruin _ money. a generation of homeowners face financial ruin through _ money. a generation of homeowners face financial ruin through no - money. a generation of homeowners face financial ruin through no fault i face financial ruin through no fault of their own. ordinary people have been forced to become protesters, determined to ramp up the pressure on government developments and building owners to take greater responsibility for their part in this crisis. sarah corker, bbc news.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and sima kotecha. our headlines today: a second night of rioting in the netherlands over covid restrictions, as rising case numbers mean tougher controls in mainland europe. new videos emerge of chinese tennis star peng shuai, following concern over her safety after she accused a senior politician of sexual assault. an investigation is launched into whether there is racial bias in the design of some medical devices used by the nhs. good morning. in the design of some medical devices used by the nhs. good morning. a in the design of some medical devices used by the nhs. good morning. a colder in the design of some medical devices used by the nhs. good morning. a colderfeeling in the design of some medical devices used by the nhs. good morning. a colderfeeling day in the design of some medical devices used by the nhs. good morning. a colderfeeling day then in the design of some medical devices used by the nhs. good morning. a colderfeeling day then we in the design of some medical devices used by the nhs. good morning. a colderfeeling day then we had in the design of some medical devices used by the nhs. good morning. a colderfeeling day then we had yesterday in the design of some medical devices used by the nhs. good morning. a colderfeeling day then we had yesterday but in the design of some medical devices used by the nhs. good morning. a colderfeeling day then we had yesterday but there in the design of some medical devices used by the nhs. good morning. a colderfeeling day then we had yesterday but there is more sunshine around. also a few showers, particularly towards the east today. i will bring you all the details throughout this morning's programme. it's sunday november 21st. our main story. there's been another night of rioting in the netherlands against new lockdown rules amid rising covid—19 cases in parts of europe.
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protests have also ta ken place in austria, croatia and italy after some governments moved to bring in new restrictions. the world health organization said it was "very worried" about rising coronavirus cases on the continent. our europe correspondent anna holligan reports. explosion. another dutch city rocked by discontent. in the hague, protesters burned bicycles and pelted police with stones and fireworks. officers used horses, dogs, batons and bikes to chase them away. earlier, anti—vaxxer demonstrators brought their beats to the southern city of breda. while most dutch people accept the need for tighter rules, the distrust is spreading. we have to live with corona, because it's not — people want to live, right? that's my opinion and that's why we're here with all the people.
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the night before, there were rampages in rotterdam. riot police fired live rounds. three demonstrators were hit and taken to hospital. it's still unclear if their injuries were caused by police gunfire. restrictions in the netherlands began last saturday and will remain until at least the start of december. the streets here are peaceful right now, but pockets of discontent exist across the country, and the atmosphere remains volatile. the netherlands is among several european countries battling record infection rates, and many governments are considering or implementing tougher measures targeting the unvaccinated. in austria, supporters of the far right freedom party marched against mandatory coronavirus vaccinations. a 20—day lockdown will begin next week. denmark's capital copenhagen
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witnessed discord, too. germany fears a national healthcare emergency. new rules are expected for those who haven't had theirjabs. the world health organization has again sounded the alarm, calling for anti—coronavirus measures to be stepped up as a matter of urgency. implementing the basic measures like masks — average 48% of the european population is wearing a mask indoors. any percentage above that will have an immediate effect, much more attention to be paid to ventilation, and finally, to new treatment protocols which have to be standardised. as the fourth wave crushes across the continent, countries are struggling to ease pressure on the health services and the streets. anna holligan, bbc news, in the hague. we can speak now to shona murray, a journalist at euro news in brussels. shona, how willing will
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the public be to accept these new lockdown measures? the picture there is really worrying, isn't it? how worried you think governments are that this could really escalate as we get into even colder months ahead? traiett. could really escalate as we get into even colder months ahead?- even colder months ahead? well, i think certainly _ even colder months ahead? well, i think certainly the _ even colder months ahead? well, i think certainly the unrest _ even colder months ahead? well, i think certainly the unrest is - even colder months ahead? well, i think certainly the unrest is a - think certainly the unrest is a concern. we saw protests in blustery yesterday about the mandatory vaccine mandate that their government is introducing there for next year. but is a concern. but from a health perspective, obviously thatis from a health perspective, obviously that is the priority. one thing that has been pointed out by many ministers and governments is that this is cold a pandemic of the unvaccinated because of the disproportionate number of people in icus unvaccinated. we had from the coronavirus commissioner here in brussels this week, who said that if you are aged between 16—84 and you are unvaccinated you are more than 16 times likely to end up in the icu
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because of the potency of the delta variant. the problem is that in countries like austria where you have only 65% of people vaccinated, you end up with huge pressure on hospital system, even though the netherlands has a high vaccination rate, you still have a potent delta variant. that is similar when it comes to ireland as well, 90% of people unvaccinated there but there is huge pressure on the icus. so now you are seeing governments essentially have restrictions on people who are not vaccinated or who are considering mandatory vaccination like we saw in austria, and as we are seeing in germany and also in belgium, mandatory vaccinations of healthcare workers, but could evolve into something more than that as well. you but could evolve into something more than that as well.— than that as well. you mention some ofthe than that as well. you mention some of the restrictions _ than that as well. you mention some of the restrictions there, _ than that as well. you mention some of the restrictions there, but - than that as well. you mention some of the restrictions there, but can - of the restrictions there, but can you elaborate on what other restrictions have been in force? and obviously the reaction to those restrictions, as we saw in that film there, that peace, lots of protests, lots of anger from people, annoyed about being told what to do? there
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is unrest about, _ about being told what to do? there is unrest about, people _ about being told what to do? there is unrest about, people being - about being told what to do? tt22 is unrest about, people being told they have to get vaccinated. but you also see the colossal impact on people's lives, from people suffering covid, the deaths of mothers and fathers and children, of parents, the impact of healthcare workers, you also see similar concerns around people who have been vaccinated and say, why do we have to suffer restrictions when people can't be bothered to get themselves vaccinated, and are therefore allowing the further spread of this disease? so there is also a flipside of people told that they are annoyed, they should be told that they should take a vaccine. that is one part. the other parties, yes, we have seen the start of restrictions, we were talking about restrictions today, in two or three days, things will probably have escalated. here in belgium, where they are really hesitant about going backwards, for example, people having to work from home for four days a week. nightclubs and someone will stay open until six o'clock or seven o'clock in the morning but you have to wear a mask on the dance floor.
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so there are other restrictions across europe, like in belgium and italy, where there will be a much more stringent use of covid passes to prove that you have been vaccinated, or that you have recovered from covid. fewer people who haven't been vaccinated, they won't get access to certain things. in germany for example you cannot use public transport soon unless you have been vaccinated or can prove you do not have coded, which means you do not have coded, which means you will have to take a test before you will have to take a test before you get on some public transport. so we are seeing these restrictions apply mainly to vaccinated people that unvaccinated people to encourage people to get vaccinated, and if that doesn't work i think we'll see a more widespread use of compulsory vaccination, regardless of the impact that has on society, i think the greater good, from a position of governments, is that people get vaccinated to stop the spread of the disease.— people get vaccinated to stop the spread of the disease. shona, thank ou so spread of the disease. shona, thank you so much — spread of the disease. shona, thank you so much for— spread of the disease. shona, thank you so much for that _ spread of the disease. shona, thank you so much for that update, - spread of the disease. shona, thank you so much for that update, really| you so much for that update, really appreciate it this morning. the foreign office hasjoined international calls for china
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to prove that the tennis player, peng shuai, is safe and well. chinese state media has posted more footage claiming to show the star living freely, but the videos have not been verified. she's been missing since claiming in early november that she was sexually exploited by a former high ranking government official. james reynolds reports. this unverified video was posted by the editor of a state—run newspaper. the footage claims to show peng shuai, in the white top, having dinner last night at a beijing restaurant with her coach and friends. the tennis player is shown listening, but not speaking. the video raises many questions. the clip starts with someone off screen saying "now is the perfect time, ok, now is perfect." then there's a two—second pause, and then the coach goes into this remark in which he hammers home that it is november 21st. so it seems incredibly scripted, and even — they didn't cut out the director's cue at the very beginning of the video.
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so the whole thing is incredibly bizarre, but creepy and sinister. the same editor then posted to this video purporting to show peng shuai, who's second on the left, being introduced this morning at a youth tennis tournament in china's capital. the state media also released these unverified and undated stills on friday, but this rapid accumulation of state—provided material does not convince the increasing numbers who are calling for independent proof. in a statement released last night, the foreign office said: . peng shuai, a winner of two grand slam doubles tournaments, including wimbledon,
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is well—known on the tennis circuit. the women's tennis association has threatened to cancel its many events in china unless it can assure itself of her well—being. james reynolds, bbc news. the health secretary sajid javid says it's "unacceptable" that some medical devices used by the nhs may be less effective on black and minority ethnic patients. he's commissioned a review into both racial and sexual bias in certain pieces of equipment. our political correspondent nick eardley can tell us more. nick, what prompted sajid javid to launch this review? good morning to you. in part, it is because of the pandemic, actually. some of the realisation that people who are not white were getting less favourable outcomes when it came to treatment, and in particular, these
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devices called oxy metres, which you put on the end of your finger, and they are designed to figure out how much oxygen is in your blood. —— oximeters. they have been quite important in a pandemic in some settings. the argument we are hearing from the department for health and social care is that actually, these devices don't work as well, they are not as accurate, if you are not white. so sajid javid, the health secretary, is going to launch this review, which is designed to come up with some findings by the end of january to look at whether there needs to be some changes to the equipment used, whether there are better ways the nhs can approach this sort of thing. we do not have a chairman or anything for that report yet, but as i said, the idea is that it comes up with some findings by the end of january. with some findings by the end of janua . . .. with some findings by the end of janua . . ~' ,, with some findings by the end of janua . ., ,, i. a a from tomorrow, people aged over 40 will be able to book their covid boosterjab.
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16— and 17—year—olds will also be invited to sign up for a second jab. it's hoped increased uptake will offer greater protection to individuals and shield the nhs from extra pressure from coronavirus admissions. well, the booster is really important in giving extra protection over and beyond the two doses that people have already had. and of course it is very effective at boosting that long—term protection against severe disease from covid. so if you are invited into get the booster, it is really important you make an appointment to get it as soon as possible. let's get a first look at the weather forecast mo salah. good morning, sarah, how is it looking? a weekend of two halves, really. yesterday many of us held onto that fairly mild hour, there was a fair bit of dry weather around as well. today things are much colder. a fresh air masses with us. sunnier, though, quite a bit of sunshine
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around. the chance of a shallow, especially if you are cross parts of eastern england and eastern scotland, where the bulk of the showers will be today. high pressure working on from the west return to drive things out as we move through today. what we all notice is that the winds will be coming in from a different direction, from the north, importing a cold air mass, the blue colours on the map showing that fresher feeling. colours on the map showing that fresherfeeling. a colours on the map showing that fresher feeling. a chilly the day, temperatures below zero in some spots. plenty of showers for eastern scotland and eastern england. entry of the high ground of scotland this morning. but will continue to the afternoon, mainly rain, perhaps the odd hail show in the east. attending drierfurther odd hail show in the east. attending drier further west, odd hail show in the east. attending drierfurtherwest, but odd hail show in the east. attending drier further west, but he will notice the breeze coming in from the north. we could see gusts of 30—40 miles an hour close to the east coast. temperature wise, many of us in single figures. around 7—9, coast. temperature wise, many of us in single figures. around 7—9 , a bit milder, ten or 11 in the far south—west of england and wales. through this evening and overnight, the bulk of the showers should tend to fade away, we will continue to see if you filtering in through the
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english channel, affecting the likes of kent and east sussex. clear skies for many, so it is going to be a cold night with those temperatures generally a few degrees on either side of a freezing first thing tomorrow. quite a widespread frost around. a bit more cloud working on phenomenon scotland and northern ireland later in the day. a warm front moving on, so something a bit less cold, patchy outbreaks of rain here. for much of the uk, a chilly and sunny day ahead. these showers filtering into account and east sussex, down towards the channel isles as well. a similar day on tuesday. cloudier in the far west of the uk, not quite as cold here, elsewhere we have larger dry and sunny conditions, light winds for most, a bit breezy to the english channel with one or showers around. 7-11 channel with one or showers around. 7—11 on tuesday, contrast that the 17 celsius we had on friday, things a bit cooler now. they turned a bit cooler still as we head through the middle of the week because the next cold front or work its way south through wednesday, and into
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thursday, another bite of cold northerly air coming in through wednesday and into thursday as well. so for the next couple of days, some of us are going to see those temperatures just about creeping into double figures, but look at wednesday, thursday and friday, we are all in those single figure temperatures, little bit down on where we should be, only by one degree for this time of year, but certainly feeling colder compared to the past few weeks that been very mild. quite a lot of dry weather on the cards as well. a chance as we head towards the end of this week, you can see a few showers on the outlook charts. things could turn more unsettled later on. today, i think the message is, it is cold but sunny. there are quite a few showers around. bring an umbrella in the east, but drier towards the west. you're watching bbc breakfast. it is bright and early at quarter past seven on a sunday morning. we're very glad you've woken up and tuned in this morning. but there's one person who we really
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hope is still sound asleep right the rugby legend kevin sinfield. for a very good reason! that's because today is kevin's final day of rest before he takes on the seriously tough challenge of running 101 miles in 24 hours. he'll set off from his current club, leicester tigers, at 8:30am tomorrow morning — we'll be covering it live on breakfast, of course. he'll then make his way north, past nottingham, mansfield, rotherham and wakefield, before finishing at the club where he spent his entire rugby league career, leeds rhinos. that's also where kevin met his great friend rob burrow, who has motor neurone disease, and he'll be raising money for both mnd research and the treatment of people living with the disease. cath muir was diagnosed with mnd in 2014. shejoins us now, along with her husband ian.
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thank you both for coming on this early on a sunday morning. we really appreciate it. cath, starting off with you, talk us through when you found out, how you responded to being diagnosed with mnd? thmd found out, how you responded to being diagnosed with mnd? and cath's voice control takes _ being diagnosed with mnd? and cath's voice control takes a _ being diagnosed with mnd? and cath's voice control takes a moment. - being diagnosed with mnd? and cath's voice control takes a moment. we - being diagnosed with mnd? and cath's voice control takes a moment. we had| voice control takes a moment. we had already spent — voice control takes a moment. we had already spent some _ voice control takes a moment. we had already spent some time _ voice control takes a moment. we had already spent some time to _ voice control takes a moment. we had already spent some time to worrying i already spent some time to worrying about— already spent some time to worrying about symptoms and podiatrist and doctors _ about symptoms and podiatrist and doctors and eventually i was sent for the _ doctors and eventually i was sent for the tests which determined it was mnd. halfway through this year, we got _ was mnd. halfway through this year, we got symptoms which was twitching which came up with the same mnd. once it _ which came up with the same mnd. once it was — which came up with the same mnd. once it was confirmed we visited close _ once it was confirmed we visited close family, are best friends and employees and told them i had decided — employees and told them i had decided to get back on with my life. well, _ decided to get back on with my life. well, cath. — decided to get back on with my life. well, cath, you are so positive. it's inspiring to hear you say that.
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what has it been like for you, ian, because you are her full—time carer and obviously it has had an impact on you as well. tt and obviously it has had an impact on you as well-— on you as well. it completely chan . ed on you as well. it completely changed my _ on you as well. it completely changed my life _ on you as well. it completely changed my life as _ on you as well. it completely changed my life as well. - on you as well. it completely changed my life as well. i i on you as well. it completely l changed my life as well. i sort on you as well. it completely - changed my life as well. i sort of transition — changed my life as well. i sort of transition from _ changed my life as well. i sort of transition from a _ changed my life as well. i sort of transition from a full—time - changed my life as well. i sort of- transition from a full—time employee to a full-time — transition from a full—time employee to a full—time carer— transition from a full—time employee to a full—time carer and _ transition from a full—time employee to a full—time carer and it _ transition from a full—time employee to a full—time carer and it was - transition from a full—time employee to a full—time carer and it was very. to a full—time carer and it was very steep _ to a full—time carer and it was very steep learning _ to a full—time carer and it was very steep learning curve. _ to a full—time carer and it was very steep learning curve. i— to a full—time carer and it was very steep learning curve. i think- to a full—time carer and it was very steep learning curve. i think the i steep learning curve. i think the hardest — steep learning curve. i think the hardest thing _ steep learning curve. i think the hardest thing was _ steep learning curve. i think the hardest thing was probably- steep learning curve. i think the hardest thing was probably not. hardest thing was probably not knowing — hardest thing was probably not knowing what _ hardest thing was probably not knowing what it _ hardest thing was probably not knowing what it was _ hardest thing was probably not knowing what it was pre— - hardest thing was probably not - knowing what it was pre— diagnosis. once _ knowing what it was pre— diagnosis. once we _ knowing what it was pre— diagnosis. once we have — knowing what it was pre— diagnosis. once we have had _ knowing what it was pre— diagnosis. once we have had the _ knowing what it was pre— diagnosis. once we have had the diagnosis - knowing what it was pre— diagnosis. once we have had the diagnosis we| once we have had the diagnosis we kind of— once we have had the diagnosis we kind of knew— once we have had the diagnosis we kind of knew what _ once we have had the diagnosis we kind of knew what we _ once we have had the diagnosis we kind of knew what we were - once we have had the diagnosis we kind of knew what we were battlingj kind of knew what we were battling against _ kind of knew what we were battling against and — kind of knew what we were battling against and set _ kind of knew what we were battling against and set out _ kind of knew what we were battling against and set out plans _ kind of knew what we were battling against and set out plans from - against and set out plans from there — against and set out plans from there. ., , , .,, ., there. horrible disease, though, isn't it? cath, — there. horrible disease, though, isn't it? cath, it— there. horrible disease, though, isn't it? cath, it is _ there. horrible disease, though, isn't it? cath, it is eight - there. horrible disease, though, isn't it? cath, it is eight years i isn't it? cath, it is eight years since your first diagnosis so as you have gone a long and once you would knowing what you help —— were dealing with, you had had to prepare for different stages, things like banking as you had done. how important wasn't being able to plot your way through?— your way through? because it has progressed _ your way through? because it has progressed relatively _ your way through? because it has progressed relatively slowly, - your way through? because it has progressed relatively slowly, we . progressed relatively slowly, we have _ progressed relatively slowly, we have been able to adapt to each
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change — have been able to adapt to each change. things like the wheelchair and my— change. things like the wheelchair and my ventilator, we have been able to organise _ and my ventilator, we have been able to organise them with anticipation. this was— to organise them with anticipation. this was particularly important when banking _ this was particularly important when banking my voice to ensure my ideas is literally— banking my voice to ensure my ideas is literally through my voice. it is literally through my voice. [t must is literally through my voice. must be is literally through my voice. tt must be wonderful for you, ian, to must be wonderfulfor you, ian, to still be able to... tt must be wonderful for you, ian, to still be able to. . ._ still be able to... it is the same voice, still be able to... it is the same voice. the _ still be able to... it is the same voice, the same _ still be able to... it is the same voice, the same cath. - still be able to... it is the same i voice, the same cath. occasionally the pronunciation— voice, the same cath. occasionally the pronunciation is— voice, the same cath. occasionally the pronunciation is not— voice, the same cath. occasionally the pronunciation is not quite - voice, the same cath. occasionally the pronunciation is not quite whatj the pronunciation is not quite what you would — the pronunciation is not quite what you would like. _ the pronunciation is not quite what you would like, but _ the pronunciation is not quite what you would like, but yes. _ the pronunciation is not quite what you would like, but yes. and - the pronunciation is not quite what you would like, but yes. and i- you would like, but yes. and i certainly— you would like, but yes. and i certainly know _ you would like, but yes. and i certainly know when - you would like, but yes. and i certainly know when i- you would like, but yes. and i certainly know when i have i you would like, but yes. and i. certainly know when i have done something — certainly know when i have done something wrong. _ certainly know when i have done something wrong. (an _ certainly know when i have done something wrong.— certainly know when i have done something wrong. certainly know when i have done somethin: wron.. ., . ., something wrong. can you change the tone? can you — something wrong. can you change the tone? can you give — something wrong. can you change the tone? can you give us— something wrong. can you change the tone? can you give us a _ something wrong. can you change the tone? can you give us a quick - tone? can you give us a quick explainer_ tone? can you give us a quick explainer on _ tone? can you give us a quick explainer on how _ tone? can you give us a quick explainer on how it _ tone? can you give us a quick explainer on how it works? i tone? can you give us a quick. explainer on how it works? it's fascinating. explainer on how it works? it's fascinating-— explainer on how it works? it's fascinatint. ., ., , , fascinating. kath recorded a series of hrases fascinating. kath recorded a series of phrases which _ fascinating. kath recorded a series of phrases which is _ fascinating. kath recorded a series of phrases which is converted - of phrases which is converted through— of phrases which is converted through software _ of phrases which is converted through software and - of phrases which is converted through software and if - of phrases which is converted through software and if you i of phrases which is converted - through software and if you imagine texting _ through software and if you imagine texting on _ through software and if you imagine texting on your— through software and if you imagine texting on your phone _ through software and if you imagine texting on your phone when - through software and if you imagine texting on your phone when you - through software and if you imagine i texting on your phone when you would use your— texting on your phone when you would use your finger. — texting on your phone when you would use your finger, strikes— texting on your phone when you would use your finger, strikes the _ use your finger, strikes the movement— use your finger, strikes the movement of— use your finger, strikes the movement of your- use your finger, strikes the movement of your eye - use your finger, strikes the. movement of your eye when use your finger, strikes the - movement of your eye when you use your finger, strikes the _ movement of your eye when you look at each _ movement of your eye when you look at each individual— movement of your eye when you look at each individual letter _ movement of your eye when you look at each individual letter and - movement of your eye when you look at each individual letter and it- at each individual letter and it creates — at each individual letter and it creates the _ at each individual letter and it creates the words _ at each individual letter and it creates the words and - at each individual letter and it creates the words and uses i at each individual letter and it. creates the words and uses your voice _ creates the words and uses your voice and — creates the words and uses your voice and builds— creates the words and uses your voice and builds the _ creates the words and uses your voice and builds the phrases. iti creates the words and uses your. voice and builds the phrases. it is an amazing —
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voice and builds the phrases. it is an amazing piece _ voice and builds the phrases. it is an amazing piece of _ voice and builds the phrases. it is an amazing piece of technology. . voice and builds the phrases. it is| an amazing piece of technology. it an amazing piece of technology. it has an amazing piece of technology. has revolutionised the way that people... has revolutionised the way that eo - le. .. ~ . has revolutionised the way that --eole... ~ ., has revolutionised the way that n-eole...~ ., ., people... when cath was diagnosed, eo - le people... when cath was diagnosed, people were — people... when cath was diagnosed, people were still _ people... when cath was diagnosed, people were still writing _ people... when cath was diagnosed, people were still writing on - people were still writing on whiteboards _ people were still writing on whiteboards it— people were still writing on whiteboards it has- people were still writing on whiteboards it has moved i people were still writing on. whiteboards it has moved on tremendously. _ whiteboards it has moved on tremendously. tris— whiteboards it has moved on tremendously.— whiteboards it has moved on tremendousl . �* . . tremendously. as we heard, kevin sinfield is doing _ tremendously. as we heard, kevin sinfield is doing his _ tremendously. as we heard, kevin sinfield is doing his challenge - sinfield is doing his challenge tomorrow and likely said, we will put it live on breakfast morning, but the money he is hoping to raise from this, how important will it be for mnd? tt’s from this, how important will it be for mnd? v . . from this, how important will it be for mnd? �*, ., ., ., for mnd? it's amazing what kevin sinfield is doing _ for mnd? it's amazing what kevin sinfield is doing tomorrow. - for mnd? it's amazing what kevin sinfield is doing tomorrow. the i sinfield is doing tomorrow. the money— sinfield is doing tomorrow. the money will go towards supporting the wider mnd community and also towards a new mnd ward at the hospital. it is not _ a new mnd ward at the hospital. it is notjust— a new mnd ward at the hospital. it is notjust money, it is inspiration given— is notjust money, it is inspiration given to _ is notjust money, it is inspiration given to other people and the awareness it has raised. i'm sure these _ awareness it has raised. i'm sure these efforts must of help because neither— these efforts must of help because neither government to provide more funding _ neither government to provide more funding for— neither government to provide more funding for research.— funding for research. that's an interesting _ funding for research. that's an interesting point, _ funding for research. that's an interesting point, ian, - funding for research. that's an | interesting point, ian, because kevin raised nearly £3 million i
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think with his seven marathons in seven days and will raise more money hopefully in the day ahead. 24 hours ahead. but the government pledging £50 million over the next five years, well, they are hoping that it will maybe — maybe— hopefully, fingers crossed, change everything for people in the future. t fingers crossed, change everything for people in the future.— for people in the future. i think, as we have _ for people in the future. i think, as we have seen, _ for people in the future. i think, as we have seen, it _ for people in the future. i think, as we have seen, it is _ for people in the future. i think, as we have seen, it is a - for people in the future. i think, as we have seen, it is a very, i for people in the future. i think, i as we have seen, it is a very, very difficult _ as we have seen, it is a very, very difficult time _ as we have seen, it is a very, very difficult time for— as we have seen, it is a very, very difficult time for it _ as we have seen, it is a very, very difficult time for it to _ as we have seen, it is a very, very difficult time for it to hit, - as we have seen, it is a very, very difficult time for it to hit, mnd- as we have seen, it is a very, very difficult time for it to hit, mnd is. difficult time for it to hit, mnd is an immensely— difficult time for it to hit, mnd is an immensely complex - difficult time for it to hit, mnd is an immensely complex disease i difficult time for it to hit, mnd is. an immensely complex disease but difficult time for it to hit, mnd is- an immensely complex disease but i think over— an immensely complex disease but i think over the — an immensely complex disease but i think over the period _ an immensely complex disease but i think over the period of— an immensely complex disease but i think over the period of eight - an immensely complex disease but i think over the period of eight years. think over the period of eight years we have _ think over the period of eight years we have gone — think over the period of eight years we have gone from _ think over the period of eight years we have gone from really— think over the period of eight yearsi we have gone from really scrabbling around _ we have gone from really scrabbling around in _ we have gone from really scrabbling around in the — we have gone from really scrabbling around in the dark— we have gone from really scrabbling around in the dark when _ we have gone from really scrabbling around in the dark when cath - we have gone from really scrabbling around in the dark when cath was i around in the dark when cath was first diagnosed _ around in the dark when cath was first diagnosed and _ around in the dark when cath was first diagnosed and we _ around in the dark when cath was first diagnosed and we did - around in the dark when cath was first diagnosed and we did not. around in the dark when cath was i first diagnosed and we did not know where _ first diagnosed and we did not know where we _ first diagnosed and we did not know where we were _ first diagnosed and we did not know where we were going _ first diagnosed and we did not know where we were going to— first diagnosed and we did not know where we were going to feel- first diagnosed and we did not know where we were going to feel there i first diagnosed and we did not knowl where we were going to feel there is a bit of— where we were going to feel there is a bit of light— where we were going to feel there is a bit of light at— where we were going to feel there is a bit of light at the _ where we were going to feel there is a bit of light at the end _ where we were going to feel there is a bit of light at the end of— where we were going to feel there is a bit of light at the end of the - a bit of light at the end of the tunnet — a bit of light at the end of the tunnet we _ a bit of light at the end of the tunnel. we have _ a bit of light at the end of the tunnel. we have not - a bit of light at the end of the tunnel. we have not got - a bit of light at the end of the tunnel. we have not got the i tunnel. we have not got the solutions— tunnel. we have not got the solutions but _ tunnel. we have not got the solutions but i— tunnel. we have not got the solutions but i think- tunnel. we have not got the solutions but i think the - tunnel. we have not got the - solutions but i think the scientist have _ solutions but i think the scientist have an — solutions but i think the scientist have an idea _ solutions but i think the scientist have an idea where _ solutions but i think the scientist have an idea where they - solutions but i think the scientist have an idea where they need i solutions but i think the scientist have an idea where they need to| solutions but i think the scientist i have an idea where they need to be working _ have an idea where they need to be working and — have an idea where they need to be working and i— have an idea where they need to be working and i think— have an idea where they need to be working and i think that _ have an idea where they need to be working and i think that is- have an idea where they need to be working and i think that is as - working and i think that is as important _ working and i think that is as important as— working and i think that is as important as anything - working and i think that is as important as anything and i working and i think that is as i important as anything and this working and i think that is as - important as anything and this money is obviously. — important as anything and this money is obviously, again, _ important as anything and this money is obviously, again, it _ important as anything and this money is obviously, again, it is _ important as anything and this money is obviously, again, it is long—term i is obviously, again, it is long—term fundingt _ is obviously, again, it is long—term fundingt over— is obviously, again, it is long—term funding, over five _ is obviously, again, it is long—term funding, over five years, _ is obviously, again, it is long—term funding, over five years, which- is obviously, again, it is long—term funding, over five years, which is. funding, over five years, which is what _ funding, over five years, which is what you — funding, over five years, which is what you need _
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funding, over five years, which is what you need to _ funding, over five years, which is what you need to do, _ funding, over five years, which is what you need to do, a _ funding, over five years, which is. what you need to do, a commitment funding, over five years, which is- what you need to do, a commitment to do it _ what you need to do, a commitment to do it so _ what you need to do, a commitment to do it so i _ what you need to do, a commitment to do it so i think— what you need to do, a commitment to do it. so t think it _ what you need to do, a commitment to do it. so t think it is — what you need to do, a commitment to do it. so i think it is amazing. - do it. so i think it is amazing. cath. — do it. so i think it is amazing. cath. if— do it. so i think it is amazing. cath, if anyone _ do it. so i think it is amazing. cath, if anyone has _ do it. so i think it is amazing. cath, if anyone has been - do it. so i think it is amazing. - cath, if anyone has been diagnosed with mnd today, what would your advice before them? you are so positive yourself but surely, that can be very difficult. tr? positive yourself but surely, that can be very difficult.— can be very difficult. try to keep as positive _ can be very difficult. try to keep as positive as — can be very difficult. try to keep as positive as you _ can be very difficult. try to keep as positive as you can. - can be very difficult. try to keep as positive as you can. i - can be very difficult. try to keep as positive as you can. i know. can be very difficult. try to keep i as positive as you can. i know this is not _ as positive as you can. i know this is not easy — as positive as you can. i know this is not easy. talk to other people going _ is not easy. talk to other people going through the same thing. there is lots _ going through the same thing. there is lots of— going through the same thing. there is lots of support both locally and nationally— is lots of support both locally and nationally from the mnd and online groups _ nationally from the mnd and online groups. try to bank your voice as soon _ groups. try to bank your voice as soon as— groups. try to bank your voice as soon as you _ groups. try to bank your voice as soon as you can, and hopefully you do not _ soon as you can, and hopefully you do not need — soon as you can, and hopefully you do not need it for a long time. losing — do not need it for a long time. losing my— do not need it for a long time. losing my voice was one of the hardest — losing my voice was one of the hardest things to deal with but being — hardest things to deal with but being able to use it with a device like this— being able to use it with a device like this is— being able to use it with a device like this is great. you being able to use it with a device like this is great.— being able to use it with a device like this is great. you have used it so eloquently. _ like this is great. you have used it so eloquently, cath. _ like this is great. you have used it so eloquently, cath. you - like this is great. you have used it so eloquently, cath. you really i so eloquently, cath. you really have. so eloquently, cath. you really have- thank — so eloquently, cath. you really have. thank you _ so eloquently, cath. you really have. thank you so _ so eloquently, cath. you really have. thank you so much. - so eloquently, cath. you really have. thank you so much. we | have. thank you so much. we appreciate you coming on. thshd have. thank you so much. we appreciate you coming on. and you will be following _ appreciate you coming on. and you will be following kevin _ appreciate you coming on. and you will be following kevin with - appreciate you coming on. and you will be following kevin with great i will be following kevin with great interest tomorrow, especially being interest tomorrow, especially being in yorkshire. thank you so much for
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coming in. in yorkshire. thank you so much for comint in. .. .. in yorkshire. thank you so much for comint in. . ,, ,., in yorkshire. thank you so much for comint in. .. ~' ,. ., in yorkshire. thank you so much for coming in-_ coming in. thank you for having us. you are very _ coming in. thank you for having us. you are very welcome. _ coming in. thank you for having us. you are very welcome. 22 _ coming in. thank you for having us. you are very welcome. 22 minutes l you are very welcome. 22 minutes past seven, a bit of a change now. panto season is upon us and, as ever, audiences can expect songs, laughs and family fun. but the producers of one show claim to have something a bit different. cinder�*aliyah is billed as a muslim pantomime. shabnam mahmood has more sings. it is that kind of the year again, rehearsals for christmas pantomimes have begun. the great muslim panto is not much different to your average production but this one has been made with muslims in mind. for one has been made with muslims in mind. ., . �* . one has been made with muslims in mind. ., , ~, ., . mind. for a british muslim audience there is nothing _ mind. for a british muslim audience there is nothing like _ mind. for a british muslim audience there is nothing like this _ mind. for a british muslim audience there is nothing like this out - mind. for a british muslim audience there is nothing like this out there i there is nothing like this out there and it makes the very relaxed outing with the family, knowing they can
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trust me, first of all, and make sure it is clear that everything will be on the halal side and there will be on the halal side and there will be on the halal side and there will be nothing inappropriate and they can bring kids of any ages to have a laugh, i have written it for the kids but also the parents enjoy. one follows the traditional story of a young girl mistreated by her evil stepmum and sisters. you a young girl mistreated by her evil stepmum and sisters.— a young girl mistreated by her evil stepmum and sisters. you are facing the mom stepmum and sisters. you are facing the wrong way! _ stepmum and sisters. you are facing the wrong way! am _ stepmum and sisters. you are facing the wrong way! am i? _ stepmum and sisters. you are facing the wrong way! am i? local - stepmum and sisters. you are facing the wrong way! am i? local panto i the wrong way! am i? local panto that has plenty — the wrong way! am i? local panto that has plenty of— the wrong way! am i? local panto that has plenty of songs, - the wrong way! am i? local pantoj that has plenty of songs, costume changes in comedy. t that has plenty of songs, costume changes in comedy.— changes in comedy. i think people are eater changes in comedy. i think people are eager to _ changes in comedy. i think people are eager to see _ changes in comedy. i think people are eager to see representation i changes in comedy. i think people i are eager to see representation and diversity on the screen and the theatre and this is exactly what we are doing and it is what penny and peel are doing and yeah, we'rejust trying to make it very inclusive. what? look. it's a spot! the performance _ what? look. it's a spot! the performance is _ what? look. it's a spot! the performance is not - what? look. it's a spot! tt2 performance is not restricted to a muslim audience. organisers are hoping panto can transcend religious boundaries. t hoping panto can transcend religious boundaries. .. . . hoping panto can transcend religious boundaries. ~ , . ., boundaries. i think it is nice to see other _ boundaries. i think it is nice to see other cultures, _ boundaries. i think it is nice to see other cultures, other - boundaries. i think it is nice to - see other cultures, other religions and see that they are just like everyone else. it is fun and you can
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resonate with them as well. you have a s-ot resonate with them as well. you have a spot too! — resonate with them as well. you have a spot too! we're _ resonate with them as well. you have a spot too! we're not _ resonate with them as well. you have a spot too! we're not cramming - a spot too! we're not cramming relition a spot too! we're not cramming religion down — a spot too! we're not cramming religion down people's - a spot too! we're not cramming religion down people's throat, i a spot too! we're not cramming i religion down people's throat, this is a classic— religion down people's throat, this is a classic tale _ religion down people's throat, this is a classic tale and _ religion down people's throat, this is a classic tale and you _ religion down people's throat, this is a classic tale and you all- religion down people's throat, this is a classic tale and you all know i is a classic tale and you all know it and _ is a classic tale and you all know it and this — is a classic tale and you all know it and this is _ is a classic tale and you all know it and this is asian _ is a classic tale and you all know it and this is asian style, - is a classic tale and you all know it and this is asian style, have i it and this is asian style, have fun. _ it and this is asian style, have fun. enjoy— it and this is asian style, have fun. enjoy it. _ it and this is asian style, have fun, enjoy it, join— it and this is asian style, have fun, enjoy it, join us- it and this is asian style, have fun, enjoy it, join us with - it and this is asian style, have fun, enjoy it, join us with this| it and this is asian style, have - fun, enjoy it, join us with this and see we _ fun, enjoy it, join us with this and see we are — fun, enjoy it, join us with this and see we are fun— fun, enjoy it, join us with this and see we are fun and _ fun, enjoy it, join us with this and see we are fun and a _ fun, enjoy it, join us with this and see we are fun and a click- fun, enjoy it, join us with this and see we are fun and a click as- fun, enjoy it, join us with this and see we are fun and a click as the. see we are fun and a click as the western— see we are fun and a click as the western communities. - see we are fun and a click as the western communities. —— - see we are fun and a click as the i western communities. —— eclectic. billed _ western communities. —— eclectic. billed as— western communities. —— eclectic. billed as the — western communities. —— eclectic. billed as the first—ever _ western communities. —— eclectic. billed as the first—ever muslim - billed as the first—ever muslim panto, the show has proved to be a surprising hit since coming to the stage four years ago. and tickets for this year's to have already almost sold out.— for this year's to have already almost sold out. ~ , almost sold out. where did the smoke come from? — almost sold out. where did the smoke come from? i — almost sold out. where did the smoke come from? i have _ almost sold out. where did the smoke come from? i have wind! _ almost sold out. where did the smoke come from? i have wind! the - almost sold out. where did the smoke come from? i have wind! the show i almost sold out. where did the smoke come from? i have wind! the show is| come from? i have wind! the show is also hoping — come from? i have wind! the show is also hoping to _ come from? i have wind! the show is also hoping to raise _ come from? i have wind! the show is also hoping to raise thousands - come from? i have wind! the show is also hoping to raise thousands of- also hoping to raise thousands of pounds for charity. shabnam mahmood, bbc news. that looks good! i love a good -anto! the andrew marr show, will be on bbc one at 9am. no it is not! i fell right into that. no it is not! i fell right into that- oh — no it is not! i fell right into that. oh yes _ no it is not! i fell right into that. oh yes it _ no it is not! i fell right into
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that. oh yes it is! - andrew, who's on the programme this morning? well, a very, very interesting tactic. — well, a very, very interesting tactic. i— well, a very, very interesting tactic, i will be conversing with people — tactic, i will be conversing with people who know what they are talking — people who know what they are talking about. lots and lots of storage. — talking about. lots and lots of storage, the migrant crisis going on, storage, the migrant crisis going on. care — storage, the migrant crisis going on, care and who will pay for it, dil on, care and who will pay for it, dig stories _ on, care and who will pay for it, dig stories in the nhs. i'm joined by sajid _ dig stories in the nhs. i'm joined by sajid javid, former home secretary and now the health secretary, by nick thomas—symonds who is— secretary, by nick thomas—symonds who is the _ secretary, by nick thomas—symonds who is the shadow home secretary, by maros— who is the shadow home secretary, by maros sefcovic who is the eu commissioner in charge of post—brexit relations, by doctor andrea — post—brexit relations, by doctor andrea almond who is charge of the european _ andrea almond who is charge of the european center for disease control and you _ european center for disease control and you would have seen all of those riots and _ and you would have seen all of those riots and protests in central and eastern — riots and protests in central and eastern europe, and by doctor andrew pollard _ eastern europe, and by doctor andrew pollard was _ eastern europe, and by doctor andrew pollard was director of the oxford vaccine _ pollard was director of the oxford vaccine group who produced the astrazeneca vaccine, so a really, really _ astrazeneca vaccine, so a really, really busy — astrazeneca vaccine, so a really, really busy morning.— astrazeneca vaccine, so a really, really busy morning. andrew, thank ou, look really busy morning. andrew, thank you, look forward _ really busy morning. andrew, thank you, look forward to _ really busy morning. andrew, thank you, look forward to seeing - really busy morning. andrew, thank you, look forward to seeing the - you, look forward to seeing the programme at nine o'clock. you will be reading the news for andrew. lots of people reacting incidentally to the interview we did with kath and
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ian, obviously kevin sinfield sets off on his run tomorrow, starting from the leicester tigers's ground and he will run up to headingley, to his old ground it leeds rhinos, 101 miles in 24 hours. t his old ground it leeds rhinos, 101 miles in 24 hours.— miles in 24 hours. i am glad it is him! it miles in 24 hours. i am glad it is him! it is — miles in 24 hours. i am glad it is him! it is incredible, _ miles in 24 hours. i am glad it is him! it is incredible, not- miles in 24 hours. i am glad it is i him! it is incredible, not sleeping, wow. yes. .. . him! it is incredible, not sleeping, wow- yes-— him! it is incredible, not sleeping, wow. yes. raising money for mnd which is just _ wow. yes. raising money for mnd which is just absolutely _ wow. yes. raising money for mnd which is just absolutely a - which is just absolutely a superhuman effort. th which isjust absolutely a superhuman effort. which isjust absolutely a su-erhuman effort. , , ., ,, ., superhuman effort. in speaking to ian and cath... _ superhuman effort. in speaking to ian and cath... lots _ superhuman effort. in speaking to ian and cath. .. lots of _ superhuman effort. in speaking to ian and cath. .. lots of people - ian and cath. .. lots of people tointint ian and cath. .. lots of people pointing out _ ian and cath. .. lots of people pointing out that _ ian and cath. .. lots of people pointing out that body - ian and cath. .. lots of people pointing out that body we - ian and cath. .. lots of people pointing out that body we are| ian and cath. .. lots of people - pointing out that body we are who did amazing job raising money as well for mnd and starting the whole thing off really critical. yes. thing off really critical. yes, well, it thing off really critical. yes, well. it is — thing off really critical. yes, well, it is the _ thing off really critical. yes, well, it is the 20 _ thing off really critical. yes, well, it is the 20 at --27 - thing off really critical. yes, well, it is the 20 at --27 is | thing off really critical. yes, i well, it is the 20 at --27 is par well, it is the 20 at ——27 is par seven and we are here on the news channel until 9am. still to come in the next hour... two midwives speak to us about why they are taking part in protest this weekend the what has
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been called a maternity care crisis. all of that coming up and andrew marr on bbc one, on here, rather, bbc one nine o'clock. we are on the bbc one nine o'clock. we are on the bbc news channel but this is where we say goodbye to you if you are watching on bbc one, have a lovely day and thank you for watching. hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and sima kotecha.
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good morning. from tomorrow in england, people aged 40—49 will be able to book their covid boosters and 16— and 17—year—olds can have their second jabs. as europe battles a new wave of covid, the health secretary said the booster would help keep another surge at bay. gp dr sarahjarvisjoins us now. good morning, sarah, thank you very much indeed for talking to us this morning. very grateful to you. talk a bit about europe, except concerning for the medical profession, seeing that spike in europe in cases, or as we were saying of the programme yesterday, are they actually just following what we perhaps have already been through? t what we perhaps have already been throuth? .. . what we perhaps have already been throuth? ~' , ., through? i think there is an element of both. through? i think there is an element of both- ibut — through? i think there is an element of both. but if _ through? i think there is an element of both. but if we _ through? i think there is an element of both. but if we look _ through? i think there is an element of both. but if we look particularly i of both. but if we look particularly at countries like austria, they have
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very low levels of vaccination. they have traditionally had quite an alternative view of medicine. they have also got really quite a worrying neo—nazi far right movement which has very much pushed the anti—vaxxer, anti—lockdown, anti— mask, antiestablishment message. so there has been a lot of backlash and a lot of resistance there. what we are seeing is that their icus are completely overflowing. now, put their levels of infection into comparison with ours, our top day was about 45,000 people diagnosed in a single day. if you look here in the uk, in austria, rather, they have got levels of almost twice that number by comparison to the population. far more worrying, they have got lots more people who are vaccinated, so not only are they more likely to get infected they are more likely to get infected they are more likely to be hospitalised, and thatis more likely to be hospitalised, and that is the real concern.— that is the real concern. closer to home, that is the real concern. closer to
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home. starting — that is the real concern. closer to home, starting from _ that is the real concern. closer to home, starting from tomorrow, i that is the real concern. closer to i home, starting from tomorrow, the national booking service will open for people aged over 42 brocade booster, and for young people, 16— 17 —year—olds, who have had 1 shot, many of them, already, to get their 2nd shot. so things are expanding, aren't they?— aren't they? things are very much expanding- _ aren't they? things are very much expanding- i— aren't they? things are very much expanding. i think— aren't they? things are very much expanding. i think this _ aren't they? things are very much expanding. i think this is - aren't they? things are very much expanding. i think this is really i expanding. i think this is really good news. i don't think there is any question that while we don't have the highest level of vaccinations in europe, we have among the highest, but not the highest, what we do have is1 among the highest, but not the highest, what we do have is 1 of the highest, what we do have is 1 of the highest levels of boosters, in fact, the highest level, i believe. so we have a huge number of people, 15,000,000 people who have had their booster vaccines already, and i am quite sure that has translated into those covid figures. we have not got rising rates, they are very stable at about a thousand admissions in about a thousand people dying per week, so we really are encouraging those half million people, almost, who are in their 405, who are
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currently eligible for the booster, to get online for tomorrow and start booking. to get online for tomorrow and start bookint. , .. .. to get online for tomorrow and start bookint. , ., ,, ., booking. every time we talk about vaccinations _ booking. every time we talk about vaccinations on _ booking. every time we talk about vaccinations on this _ booking. every time we talk about vaccinations on this programme, i vaccinations on this programme, there always some people, mainly on social media, who say that not everybody wants a vaccine and you shouldn't be forcing people to have a vaccine that we be promoting it. what do you say to people who come into your surgery who are reticent and reluctant to have a vaccine, and can you always talk them around, or do you find that sometimes they are not willing a5 do you find that sometimes they are not willing as they don't want to because they are firmly set in their view? ' . because they are firmly set in their view? ' , ., , ., ,~' view? the 1st thing i do is ask them wh , and view? the 1st thing i do is ask them why. and it — view? the 1st thing i do is ask them why. and it is _ view? the 1st thing i do is ask them why, and it is often _ view? the 1st thing i do is ask them why, and it is often because - view? the 1st thing i do is ask them why, and it is often because they i why, and it is often because they have seen misinformation on social media. think about misinformation on social i5 media. think about misinformation on social is that it can be carried compelling because it is difficult to disprove something that doesn't exist, if you like, so for instance with young people it is often about, will it affect my fertility? and i explained where the myths arose from and why there is no sense in them. the next thing i look at... and why there is no sense in them. the next thing i look at. . ._
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the next thing i look at... sorry, i apologise — the next thing i look at... sorry, i apologise for— the next thing i look at... sorry, i apologise for interrupting, - the next thing i look at... sorry, i apologise for interrupting, the - apologise for interrupting, the point that people make in relation to that is, well, it is too early to know, and it will take time. so, go on, i was about. t know, and it will take time. so, go on, i was about.— on, iwas about. i mean, this is1 ofthe on, iwas about. i mean, this is1 of the most _ on, iwas about. i mean, this is1 of the most extensively - on, iwas about. i mean, this is1. of the most extensively researched vaccines in the history of the world, ever. when we do studies on vaccines, every year we produce a slightly different version of the flu vaccine to keep up with what the strains were last year. we have had million5, hundreds, probably billions, certainly hundreds of millions of people vaccinated, and we have never had a vaccine which has been as well researched a5 we have never had a vaccine which has been as well researched as this. it has gone through all the trials and all the initial promise has now been borne out, even better than we had anticipated. it offers greater levels of protection, and importantly it offers levels of protection against variants likely delta variant that we were really it wouldn't. so actually, from my perspective, it has wouldn't. so actually, from my perspective, it ha5ju5t wouldn't. so actually, from my perspective, it has just got more and more reassuring. the
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counterargument - and more reassuring. the counterargument people always make to that is, when you say it has been the best researched, et cetera, it was done in a rush, because it was only a year ago we started putting it into people's arms. back to you. the recent studies usually take a long time is because it takes a long time to recruit people. it takes a long time for people to get the infection, so it takes a long time for the studies to happen. it takes a long time to go through the process is looking at the paperwork, not for any other reason, all that has been done, and all that has become so much easier because they were so many people getting infected, so it took no time at all to work out the differential —— difference between the groups who have been vaccinated and the groups who had not. all the regulatory authorities have been working day and night and looking at the data as it came through, rather than waiting until it had all been done before they did their research, and all the regulatory approvals for doing the trials were there in advance, as was the money, which often also delays things. so those were the only
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things. so those were the only things that cause delays to other vaccine trials. it is not concerned longer—term side—effects, because we have never seen problems in the longer term with any vaccine that we were not aware of once we had got the number of people researched that we have with covid. lets the number of people researched that we have with covid.— we have with covid. lets turn away from vaccines _ we have with covid. lets turn away from vaccines for _ we have with covid. lets turn away from vaccines for the _ we have with covid. lets turn away from vaccines for the final - from vaccines for the final question, if that is all right. the story that has emerged today about oximeters, which you will be very familiar with 3 professional work, being less accurate for people with darker skin. this comes in a study from the university of michigan. the health secretary says he will look into this, he says the issue of bias with medical devices has been docked for far too long. with medical devices has been docked forfar too long. —— ducked. there is something in this, by the sounds of it. t is something in this, by the sounds of it. ., ~' ., is something in this, by the sounds of it. ., ,, ._ , of it. i do think there may well be something _ of it. i do think there may well be something in _ of it. i do think there may well be something in this _ of it. i do think there may well be something in this and _ of it. i do think there may well be something in this and i _ of it. i do think there may well be something in this and i do - of it. i do think there may well be something in this and i do think. something in this and i do think that we have seen, going back to vaccines, but there has been much greater hesitancy, for instance, among people of ethnic minorities, and i think that is because they have a very genuine point, for far
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too long, research has tended to look at more people of caucasian background, forfar look at more people of caucasian background, for far too long, look at more people of caucasian background, forfar too long, the care that they have received has been, and we have seen this, from the house of commons report which has confirmed that ethnic minorities, along with women, have had wor5e experiences of healthcare. so i am delighted to see this coming up, i am delighted to see that we are now finally, a5 a nation, starting to say, this is not good enough. starting to say, this is not good enouth. . starting to say, this is not good enouth. ., ., , ., ., enough. sarah, really graterlto ou this enough. sarah, really graterlto you this morning _ enough. sarah, really graterlto you this morning and _ enough. sarah, really graterlto you this morning and i _ enough. sarah, really graterlto you this morning and i hope - enough. sarah, really graterlto i you this morning and i hope people you this morning and i hope people at home found it helpful. doctor sarah jarvis. very at home found it helpful. doctor sarahjarvi5. very useful. now it's time for the travel show with carmen roberts. this week on the travel show: celebrating the world's most famous big wheel. this is brilliant. this is my london. a slice of britain on a remote japanese island. i hope i'm doing this right. you've gotta be fast! and racing to the finishing line in our icy siberian challenge.
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hello and welcome to the travel show, with me, carmen roberts, coming to you this week from japan's semi—tropical yaeyama i5lands. later on, i'll be serving up one of these islands mo5t 5urpri5ing culinary specialities — a big battered british fish favourite, fish and chips. but first. .. the world's tallest observation wheel is now up and running, and where else, but dubai.
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it's known as the 'dubai eye'. it's 250 metres tall and has 48 pods, which means it can carry more than 1,700 people in one revolution. shortly after the millennium, the world's most famous big wheel was opened. and just as a pandemic hit, the london eye was busy celebrating its 20th birthday. so we went along to meet some of the people who made it happen. the romans established london nearly 2,000 years ago. since then, the historic capital has developed an iconic skyline. for generations of us, it's always been dominated by two or three instantly recognisable hi5toric buildings. when i was a kid, you could pick out st paul's cathedral, tower bridge and the palace of westminster as three silhouettes, which made the skyline look great. and that was the case
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for more than 100 years, and you kind of knew where you were. and then exactly 20 years ago, that was all thrown up in the air because that arrived. located on the banks of the river thames, the london eye offers a panoramic 360—degree view over the capital. standing at 135 metres tall, it's still the largest observation wheel in europe, and the most popular, with more than 76 million visitors in the last two decades. it was opened back in the heady days of the year 2000, part of the celebrations that ushered in the new millennium. originally, it was only supposed to be a temporary structure with a lifespan of just five years. it's really exciting.
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it has been a while since i was first on it, and it's still hugely popular. ok, here we go! the big step. it's actually going at less than one kilometre an hour, but nonetheless, you've got to get on in time. here we are, 135 metres high, right at the top. and this is brilliant. here we are, 135 metres high, right at the top. and this is brilliant. this is my london. i know this place really well. i was born just over there, i live just over there, and every iconic building you want to see is here —
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buckingham palace, the millennium bridge, st paul's over there, the river thames. it's fantastic. this is london's equivalent of the eiffel tower and the empire state building. this is the view that everybody wants to get. automatic voice: stand clear of the opening doors. i think we're about to get off. our time is done. 30 minutes and it's all over. the architects were david marks and julia barfield, a renowned husband—and—wife team. julia, just take me to the beginning of this whole project. how did it all start? well, it started with a competition in 1993, and what the competition called for was a landmark to celebrate the millennium.
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the competition was abandoned, but david and julia decided to plough on regardless. david, sadly, died in 2017, butjulia still has great memories of that time. now, i think this is the prototype, if you like. we looked at so many different designs for the actual structure. you know, its huge, but we wanted it to be light in feeling. so we looked at very many different engineering solutions for that with different geometries, and then this seemed to be the optimal geometry in the end to make it very light. it was disappointing that the judges didn't think any of the ideas were good enough, but, you know, we thought it was a good idea, so we started a company, which was called the millennium wheel company, and we put in a planning application. we gradually got more and more exposure to the project, and we did a deal with british airways and we put a lot of our own money in, but we mortgaged the house and whatever, but then they gave us some serious money
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in order to be able to properly pay engineers. and so it kind of had a snowball effect, really, and because it was at that extraordinary time of the millennium, you know, ifeel that, you know, something extraordinary could happen. but it wasn't all plain sailing. there were still some people who were unconvinced. did anybody say, "listen, look at it, it's a horrible eyesore, it looks...it�*s ruining the skyline"? yes! no, they did, absolutely. so when we were doing the consultations, we went to the royal fine art commission, and the chairman of the royal fine art commission did not like it at all. he was apoplectically against it. so there were people who were against it of course. and even now... even now... ..some people say... well, yes, i mean, i'm sure there are some people who don't like it, but, you know, that's... you know, you can't have everything! there were 32 capsules in all,
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representing the 32 london boroughs. each of them had to be floated down the thames and installed one by one. it's one thing to actually design a structure on a piece of paper or in a computer programme, but to actually then build it on site is a completely different set of challenges. they built the london eye kind of flat on the river, so it was much easier to attach all the different parts of it, and then once it was nearly finished, they craned it up into its final position, so some really, really clever construction and engineering went behind this structure. in the last 20 years, the london eye's become something of a minnow — it's been overtaken by big observation wheels in las vegas, singapore and dubai. but for ex—london mayor ken livingstone, it isn'tjust
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about the wheel. people come from all over the world to be here and all over the rest of britain. we've got more restaurants than paris or new york, we've got more bars, we've got more museums, more cinemas. this is an amazing city to live in. there's so much you can do. you fought for it to survive. would you fight for it to survive for the foreseeable future? it could be here in 100 years' time. i mean, they'vejust got to keep packing it up, repairing it when things go wrong. people are always going to want to come and take their kids on this, and have that amazing view across the whole stretch of london. the skyline is changing all the time with dozens more skyscrapers in development, each one causing its own controversies. but now, you hardly hear anything about this iconic structure being an eyesore. not bad for something that was supposed to be torn
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down 15 years ago. well, stay with us. we've got lots of great stuff coming up after the break. we'll be seeing how good old british fish and chips go down on a tropical japanese island. really good. i think it's the actual best fish and chips i've ever tasted. and we'll be catching up with our three hardy lithuanian adventurers as their mission to cross the frozen lake baikal in russia draws to a close. i have another idea. so don't go away. the humble fish and chips is a staple of the great british diet — one that i've been missing since moving from the uk 10 years ago. but i'm in luck. i've been told this traditional takeaway has finally arrived onjapanese shores in the unlikeliest of places.
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i've travelled to a small island south of okinawa to try it out. so we're making our way across ishigaki island. it was a 3—hour plane journey from tokyo and we're actually around 400km from the okinawa main island itself. we're actually closer to taiwan than we are to japan. so i've been to ishigaki a few times. it's an easy island getaway from tokyo. and while i've had a lot of good seafood here, i've never actually had british fish and chips. you must be sam. hi! hello! nice to meet you. so tell me about bonnie blue and your business here, sam. we're trying to do kind of uk—style fish and chips
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with beer batter, but we use okinawan beer and we use local fish and nori seaweed on the chips as well. and what do the locals think of this fish and chips with the beer batter? in ishigaki, people love fish and they love deep—fried food as well, so i think it fits in nicely with the kind of food that people like, but it's also something new for everyone to try. but there was no time for yapping. i needed to learn how to make this british classic before the lunchtime rush arrived. so, sam, what's your secret? well, i won't tell you my secrets but you can give mea hand. 0k. here's some gloves. thank you. this fish is local okinawan fish, it's hiromachi, so it's a cold—water white—fleshed fish... great. ..and it's delicious. before every single order, we get fresh beer... whoa! ..it�*s bubbly. so, why do you use fresh beer? we want the bubbles to make it nice and fresh so that when the batter goes into the oil, it's going
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to bubble up and be really nice and crispy. so the consistency is very important — it has to be just right, so... like this? yeah, i think that's perfect. we're going to cover the fish in the batter and then, as you drop it in the oil, you want to kind of brush it... 0h! ..a little bit, like that, ok? and then i'm just going to drop these chips in as well, and then if you could do the other two fish. how's my brushing technique? for the first time, it's ok. i've never done this before! wow! if we have a lot of orders on, you're going to have to... right. ..get them in there. gotta pick up the pace! yeah, come on. it's my first ever fish and chips. just when i thought it was my time for a break, i had to get to grips with another of their delicacies — a deep—fried snickers bar. yes, you heard right — a deep—fried chocolate bar. sam's wife kumi was on hand to show me how this famous scottish dish was made.
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can you smell it? mmm, yeah, i can smell the chocolate. it's really bubbling! all right, a small bite, here we go. mmm. this side was a bit more gooey. that's peanuts. mmm. not sure i want to get in my bikini after this. but there was no time for a quick dip or sunbathe, anyway. so we've got a bit of a lunchtime rush, and i'm finding it a bit stressful. fish and chips, please. since the pandemic, lots of british expats have struggled to leave japan, and so it's of no surprise that a taste of home is just what the brits are after. we've got a lot of orders up here, maybe about five or six fish and chips to do. seven! eight! eight orders on. eight orders! argh! do you get stressed, sam, with this big lunch—hour rush?
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no. in ishigaki, everything is island time. island time! yeah. we have the beach and everyone's happy to wait a little bit, so... it's got to lookjust right. yes, please. presentation is everything. this is my reputation on the line. chuckles. i'm feeling the pressure! there's hungry hordes out the front of the van! i hope i'm doing this right! you've got to be fast! oh, it's too much! i can't remember the chip placement. sam, you work fast. this is good. you've done this before. once or twice! here's your fish and chips. oh, thank you very much. there you go. please don't drop it. here you go! after all that hard graft, what did the customers think? i really like the chips 'cause they've got a nice texture to them. it'sjust beautiful, really, really nice. and the fish isjust
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crunchy enough. i so far, so good, but now for the real test — the deep—fried snickers bar. you're not getting it. did you expect it to be so good? no, ididn't. what, deep—fried snickers? eugh! it's gorgeous! but not everyone is convinced. it's terrible! laughter. it's really, really bad! oh, well, everyone loved the main course, at least, and i've certainly enjoyed my time making these exotic takes on british classics. it's really good! who would've thought a chippy van would've made it here, to an island over 6,000 miles away from the uk. and people say british food doesn't travel well! well, think again! well, next up, we're headed to russia where,
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for the past two weeks, we've joined an intrepid trio of adventurers as they make their way across the frozen surface of lake baikal — the world's largest freshwater lake. last week, we left karolis, jurgis and max braving minus 30—degree temperatures as they tried navigating an ice crack that stretched on for kilometres. and they're doing it all in an open—topped car dating back to the soviet era. we rejoin them on the final leg of theirjourney in much more comfortable circumstances — warming up at one of the hot springs dotted around the lake. it's only 40km to our destination, and max says we shouldn't celebrate yet, even though it's maybe just some hours of drive. we never know for sure, what's — right, max? babushka is not the most reliable car, you know that. she is reliable, but tired. and ourselves, we are not in the best condition
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anyway now, so... max, can you sing something? sings quietly. volume up, volume up! # no woman no cry... actually, he is sleeping. chuckles. completely sleeping. i have even painted... laughter.
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woo! laughter. good! laughter. are you ready? are you happy? i'm satisfied! max, i need to swim. i'm postponing this for, like, what, already two days or something like this. uh-huh. please use your tools. the ice is about one metre deep. so i'll make a small mine. korobeiniki by nikolay nekrasov plays. so fresh!
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i have another idea. ok, we have some technical issues here. one of the tubes is broken and our cooling liquid is gone. so, basically, our engine is boiling right now.
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i cannot recognise the distance any more. i don't know if the camera can see the lights on the shore, but how far away it is, i don't understand. i think it's around 20, 40 kilometres. ok, so we needjust water now, right? water is coming. freezing. we did it! how many days it was — eight? seven. 980km. yes, potentially, we think. we think. yep, but we did it. yes! laughter.
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i love you guys! i had a brilliant trip here on ishigaki but now, it's time for me to return to the mainland. we'll be serving up another brilliant show for you next week, though, when in our dubai special, lucy will be at the delayed expo 2020, where 192 countries have come to present their own unique visions of the future. plus, she'll be visiting a truly spectacular tropical biodome and trying an inflatable assault course with a difference. ok, so that is a lot
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harder than it looks! sojoin us for that, if you can. and don't forget, we're online at bbc travel and you can catch up on any programmes you might have missed over on the bbc iplayer. but until next time, from all of us here in japan, it's goodbye.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and sima kotecha. our headlines today...
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a second night of rioting in the netherlands over covid restrictions — as rising case numbers mean tougher controls in mainland europe. new videos emerge of chinese tennis star peng shuai, following concern over her safety after she accused a senior politician of sexual assault. an investigation is launched into whether there is racial bias in the design of some medical devices used by the nhs. in the sport, ole gunnar solskjaer is set to leave manchester united. senior figures at the club met last night following the dismal defeat to watford and decided time was up for their norweigan manager. we meet the six—year—old golfer, who only took up the sport a year ago, and has already qualified forjunior world championships in america. it's sunday, november the 21st. our main story. there's been another night of rioting in the netherlands against new lockdown rules amid rising covid—19 cases in parts of europe. protests have also ta ken place in austria, croatia and italy after some governments moved to bring in new restrictions. the world health organization said it was "very worried" about rising coronavirus cases on the continent. our europe correspondent, anna holligan reports. explosion. another dutch city rocked by discontent. in the hague, protesters burned bicycles and pelted police with stones and fireworks.
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officers used horses, dogs, batons and bikes to chase them away. earlier, anti—vaxxer demonstrators brought their beats to the southern city of breda. while most dutch people accept the need for tighter rules, the distrust is spreading. we have to live with corona, because it's not — people want to live, right? that's my opinion and that's why we're here with all the people. the night before, there were rampages in rotterdam. riot police fired live rounds. three demonstrators were hit and taken to hospital. it's still unclear if their injuries were caused by police gunfire. restrictions in the netherlands began last saturday and will remain until at least the start of december. the streets here are peaceful right now, but pockets of discontent exist across the country, and the atmosphere remains volatile.
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the netherlands is among several european countries battling record infection rates, and many governments are considering or implementing tougher measures targeting the unvaccinated. in austria, supporters of the far right freedom party marched against mandatory coronavirus vaccinations. a 20—day lockdown will begin next week. denmark's capital copenhagen witnessed discord, too. germany fears a national healthcare emergency. new rules are expected for those who haven't had theirjabs. the world health organization has again sounded the alarm, calling for anti—coronavirus measures to be stepped up as a matter of urgency. implementing the basic measures like masks — average 48% of the european population is wearing a mask indoors. any percentage above that will have an immediate effect,
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much more attention to be paid to ventilation, and finally, to new treatment protocols which have to be standardised. as the fourth wave crushes across the continent, countries are struggling to ease pressure on the health services and the streets. anna holligan, bbc news, in the hague. the foreign office hasjoined international calls for china to prove that the tennis player, peng shuai is safe and well. chinese state media has posted more footage claiming to show the star living freely — but the videos have not been verified. she's been missing since claiming in early november that she was sexually exploited by a former high ranking government official. james reynolds reports. this unverified video was posted by the editor of a state—run newspaper. the footage claims to show peng shuai, in the white top, having dinner last night at a beijing restaurant with her coach and friends.
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the tennis player is shown listening, but not speaking. the video raises many questions. the clip starts with someone off screen saying "now is the perfect time, ok, now is perfect." then there's a two—second pause, and then the coach goes into this remark in which he hammers home that it is november 21st. so it seems incredibly scripted, and even — they didn't cut out the director's cue at the very beginning of the video. so the whole thing is incredibly bizarre, but creepy and sinister. the same editor then posted to this video purporting to show peng shuai, who's second on the left, being introduced this morning at a youth tennis tournament in china's capital. the state media also released these unverified and undated stills on friday, but this rapid accumulation of state—provided material does not convince the increasing numbers who are calling for
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independent proof. in a statement released last night, the foreign office said: peng shuai, a winner of two grand slam doubles tournaments, including wimbledon, is well—known on the tennis circuit. the women's tennis association has threatened to cancel its many events in china unless it can assure itself of her well—being. james reynolds, bbc news. earlier, our china correspondent john sudworth said the timing of this issue — with beijing due to host the winter olympics in february — will be a worry for the chinese authorities. this isn't that unusual. higher profile figures go missing in china fairly frequently. and also, state media often,
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as a result of pressure from the international community, collaborates in forced confessions or releasing proof of life videos. i think the danger for china is just a few weeks ahead of an olympics, this risks exposing the gulf between an event that is supposed to be all about openness and friendship and a political system that is only about control. the health secretary sajid javid says it's "unacceptable" that some medical devices used by the nhs may be less effective on black and minority ethnic patients. he's commissioned a review into both racial and sexual bias in certain pieces of equipment. our political correspondent nick eardley can tell us more. nick, what prompted sajid javid to launch this review? can you tell us more about it? can you tell us more about it? this is in tart can you tell us more about it? this is in part a — can you tell us more about it? this is in part a response _ can you tell us more about it? t't 3 is in part a response to the pandemic in the way that people from ethnic minorities were overrepresented in the number of people who needed critical care in
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hospital after contracting coronavirus. sajid javid, the health secretary, talks about oximeters in particular. they are the devices, you put them on your finger and they measure how much oxygen is in your blood. they were really important during the pandemic. some research has indicated people with darker skin, they don't work as well. what the health secretary wants to do was look at where the technology that is being developed and used at the moment is in any way having a negative impact, whether there is some sort of systematic bias in the nhs towards people with white skin and whether more research is needed into how to combat that. this review is being launched, it is designed to come up with some findings early in the new year by the end of january. thank you for that. i have 1 of those machines at home, 1 of those
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devices are now i am thinking, does it work properly? from tomorrow, people aged over 40 will be able to book their covid boosterjab. 16 and 17—year—olds will also be invited to sign up for a second jab. it's hoped increased uptake will offer greater protection to individuals and shield the nhs from extra pressure from coronavirus admissions. well, the booster is really important in giving extra protection over and beyond the two doses that people have already had. and of course it is very effective at boosting that long—term protection against severe disease from covid. so if you are invited in to get the booster, it's really important you make an appointment to get it as soon as possible. police in lancashire have arrested a man on suspicion of murder after two people were found dead at a house near preston. officers discovered the bodies of a man and a woman at a property in the village of higher walton yesterday afternoon. a 35—year—old man from the local area was detained last night. a major rescue operation has been taking place in southern india
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where flash floods triggered by heavy monsoon rains have killed at least 30 people. in one incident, three buses were washed away. analysts say unpredictable and extreme weather across south asia is driven by climate change and made worse by human activity such as deforestation and over—development. if you're planning to walk the dog this morning — perhaps take a few pictures along the way — here's some inspiration for you. iam not i am not very good at taking pictures. the winners of the "dog photography awards" have just been announced. these are from the "action" category — with the winners coming from germany, the usa and canada. other categories include "studio" and "landscape". that's more like my dog, sitting,
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watching. just sitting, watching the world go by. buying a seagull i'm wondering if he can chase it. if you are going to do a dog walk let's see what the weather is looking like. not too bad. the dogs are not fussy. they will go for a walk rain or shine. cold underfoot for the dogs at the moment. it is a colder, fresher feeling day very mild for much of november so far. a change of feeling the weather. this is the picture from torquay. through the day we had northerly winds which will drive in showers across parts of northern and eastern scotland, when tryi over the high ground. rain showers with hail in the east of england. a few showers further west. they will fade away during the afternoon. these are the average wind are set to see but there will
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be stronger gusts. temperatures will be stronger gusts. temperatures will be up at roundabout 79 degrees, ten or 11 in the far south—west of england and wales as well. this evening and overnight, the showers for most places tender is away. becoming largely dry with lighter wins for many of us. the other rain showers coming in. temperatures overnight generally athe degrees either side are freezing. certainly expecting a frost first thing morning. slightly less cold. a better patchy rain in northern ireland. dry for most away from the far south east. it will not feel particularly warm despite the sunshine. top temperatures around seven to 10 degrees. thank you. speak to you later. "giving birth in the uk is becoming critically unsafe" according to midwifery staff working in the nhs. a recent survey by the royal
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college of midwives found almost 60% of staff are thinking of leaving due to severe understaffing and pressures on their mental health. let's speak to midwives amyjohnson and sundas khalid. thank you both very much indeed for coming to talk to us. we are very grateful to you. amy festival, in your experience, tell us how pressurised things are.- your experience, tell us how pressurised things are. prior to covid, pressurised things are. prior to covid. the _ pressurised things are. prior to covid, the pressures _ pressurised things are. prior to covid, the pressures have - pressurised things are. prior to i covid, the pressures have always been there. when the pandemic hit, a big majority of staff had to self isolate and our numbers were reduced. some of those staff have come back and others have not. working throughout the pandemic, it became the norm for us to miss breaks on 13 hour shifts. not being able to go to the toilet sometimes if you are one—to—one with someone in labour. we will always prioritise care over documentation. and the knee, it came to the end of
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september and ijust knee, it came to the end of september and i just couldn't knee, it came to the end of september and ijust couldn't do it anymore. ifelt like i was failing with many of my children and families. i had to take some time. hopefully returning soon. that is something you don't want to do yourself. that adds to the shortage of people. yourself. that adds to the shortage of eole. �* , ., yourself. that adds to the shortage of eole. ~ , ., ., , of people. absolutely. you are very conscientious _ of people. absolutely. you are very conscientious of _ of people. absolutely. you are very conscientious of that _ of people. absolutely. you are very conscientious of that as _ of people. absolutely. you are very conscientious of that as a _ of people. absolutely. you are very conscientious of that as a midwife i conscientious of that as a midwife is that there are messages on whatsapp and facebook asking for midwives. nel is accepted. you can work for two hours because we need another body in the building. you another body in the building. you had another body in the building. you had considered leaving, it has got so bad. what has it been like for you? t so bad. what has it been like for ou? .. so bad. what has it been like for ou? ., ,.,,.,,y so bad. what has it been like for ou? ., , ., so bad. what has it been like for ou? ., . . , you? i am probably not the only midwife who — you? i am probably not the only midwife who has _ you? i am probably not the only midwife who has considered - you? i am probably not the only - midwife who has considered leaving. when you came into... when i came into midwifery i knew there were staff shortages. it is away something we had known. with covid,
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the pandemic has increased staff shortages. the pressures on midwives, we are not able to keep our midwives will retain them. we are told we had more midwives coming in. if you cannot keep the ones we had, how can you possibly say that one's who are coming into midwifery will receive training to then stay in midwifery?— will receive training to then stay in midwife ? , , ., ., , in midwifery? their sense of anxiety and trepidation _ in midwifery? their sense of anxiety and trepidation you _ in midwifery? their sense of anxiety and trepidation you can _ in midwifery? their sense of anxiety and trepidation you can experience, | and trepidation you can experience, does that impact on your actualjob? yes. i have had ships where it has been dramatic and i have not been able to process what happened in the shift tell a couple of days later. itjust hits you that all of this has happened. that essentially is failing us midwives, when we are failing. we are failing their families we are caring for. mental health and well-being _ families we are caring for. mental health and well-being of- families we are caring for. mental health and well-being of staff - families we are caring for. mental health and well-being of staff is i families we are caring for. mentalj health and well-being of staff is a health and well—being of staff is a key priority. there are more midwives working in the nhs than
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ever before. they will retire another 1200 in another recruitment drive. you have confidence maybe this is going to be addressed and once these people can be hired but once these people can be hired but once they can get in post, things might get a bit easier? the most recent survey — might get a bit easier? the most recent survey said _ might get a bit easier? the most recent survey said for— might get a bit easier? the most recent survey said for every - might get a bit easier? the most recent survey said for every 30 i recent survey said for every 30 midwives we have coming into the nhs, 29 may. {lttc we also have the nhs, 29 may. ok. we also have the fact we have known this for 20 years. fact we have known this for 20 ears. . ~ fact we have known this for 20 ears. ., ~ ., , ., years. you knew that before the pandemic. _ years. you knew that before the pandemic, that _ years. you knew that before the pandemic, that information. - pandemic, that information. apologies. pandemic, that information. apologies-— pandemic, that information. apologies. pandemic, that information. atoloties. ,., ,~. ., ., ,, apologies. the point you are making is ou hire apologies. the point you are making is you hire 30 _ apologies. the point you are making is you hire 30 and _ apologies. the point you are making is you hire 30 and there _ apologies. the point you are making is you hire 30 and there are - apologies. the point you are making is you hire 30 and there are such - apologies. the point you are making is you hire 30 and there are such a i is you hire 30 and there are such a number of people still living you are not getting 30 new people. yes. is this are not getting 30 new people. yes. is this about — are not getting 30 new people. yes. is this about the _ are not getting 30 new people. t2; is this about the money? is it about being paid more because perhaps that will make you feel more appreciated
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or is this about the simple fact you are saying they were not enough people to do the job?— are saying they were not enough people to do the job? people to do the 'ob? firstly it is about the fact, _ people to do the job? firstly it is about the fact, we _ people to do the job? firstly it is about the fact, we may - people to do the job? firstly it is about the fact, we may have - people to do the job? firstly it is i about the fact, we may have these midwives _ about the fact, we may have these midwives on the register but they may not— midwives on the register but they may not be working clinically on the shop floor~ — may not be working clinically on the shop floor. we need to take that into account. the ones we have on the shop _ into account. the ones we have on the shop floor are traumatised. we have seen— the shop floor are traumatised. we have seen the statistics. this is essentially about patient safety and improvement, maintaining satisfaction in keeping staff in the workforce. we have not been able to do that— workforce. we have not been able to do that and _ workforce. we have not been able to do that and need to look at how we can do— do that and need to look at how we can do that — do that and need to look at how we can do that. one thing is listening to our— can do that. one thing is listening to our staff, their workforce when the midwives, how can we keep you in the midwives, how can we keep you in the workforce, how can we make this better— the workforce, how can we make this better for— the workforce, how can we make this better for you so we can continue to provide _ better for you so we can continue to provide the — better for you so we can continue to provide the care bs midwife set out to care? _ provide the care bs midwife set out to care? . ., . provide the care bs midwife set out to care? ., .y , ., to care? today there will be a series of— to care? today there will be a series of vigils _ to care? today there will be a series of vigils taking - to care? today there will be a series of vigils taking place i to care? today there will be a i series of vigils taking place with midwives and families. tbthd series of vigils taking place with midwives and families. and doctors, and maternity _
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midwives and families. and doctors, and maternity support _ midwives and families. and doctors, and maternity support workers. - midwives and families. and doctors, and maternity support workers. tell| and maternity support workers. tell us and maternity support workers. us roughly and maternity support workers. ’t2tt. us roughly where they are and what you are hoping to achieve. th you are hoping to achieve. in manchester, there is one in saint peter's _ manchester, there is one in saint peter's square and one in burnley as well you _ peter's square and one in burnley as well you have organised. all peter's square and one in burnley as well you have organised.— well you have organised. all round the country. _ well you have organised. all round the country. it _ well you have organised. all round the country, it is _ well you have organised. all round the country, it is nationwide. - well you have organised. all round the country, it is nationwide. this| the country, it is nationwide. this crisis is not an isolated event. ttat crisis is not an isolated event. not 'ust one crisis is not an isolated event. not just one hospital or trust. midwives all over— just one hospital or trust. midwives all over the — just one hospital or trust. midwives all over the uk just one hospital or trust. midwives all overthe uk are just one hospital or trust. midwives all over the uk are feeling like this _ all over the uk are feeling like this the — all over the uk are feeling like this. the system is failing us and failing _ this. the system is failing us and failing women. just this. the system is failing us and failing women.— failing women. just lastly, there mitht be failing women. just lastly, there might be some _ failing women. just lastly, there might be some people - failing women. just lastly, there might be some people watching | failing women. just lastly, there i might be some people watching it failing women. just lastly, there - might be some people watching it who want to be a midwife. how would you persuade them to go into that field after what you have said? tt is after what you have said? it is extremely _ after what you have said? it is extremely difficult. _ after what you have said? tt 3 extremely difficult. when you start off as a student midwife it is quite hard to get a place on a university course. they can with such enthusiasm and passion. it is absolutely amazing to see. we try to protect that, encourage it and nurture it. if it is something you want to do, it is very different
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from nursing in that you are looking up from nursing in that you are looking up to people but you are nurturing them. things can go wrong but it is a physiological event and it should be the happiest event for a woman and the partner's lives. tt is be the happiest event for a woman and the partner's lives.— and the partner's lives. it is a treat and the partner's lives. it is a great responsibility, - and the partner's lives. it is a great responsibility, isn't - and the partner's lives. it is a great responsibility, isn't it? | great responsibility, isn't it? bringing a life into the world. giving somebody the happiest news they have ever received, they have a healthy child, that must be a lot of satisfaction for you. tt healthy child, that must be a lot of satisfaction for you.— satisfaction for you. it is. from the very first — satisfaction for you. it is. from the very first day _ satisfaction for you. it is. from the very first day i _ satisfaction for you. it is. from the very first day i was - satisfaction for you. it is. from the very first day i was at - satisfaction for you. it is. from the very first day i was at a - satisfaction for you. it is. from i the very first day i was at a birth, to now. _ the very first day i was at a birth, to now. it— the very first day i was at a birth, to now. it is— the very first day i was at a birth, to now. it is a _ the very first day i was at a birth, to now, it is a euphoric feeling. for those — to now, it is a euphoric feeling. for those wanting to come to the profession, there are individuals who are — profession, there are individuals who are pushing and fighting for this change. people believe this change — this change. people believe this change can happen because i don't want _ change can happen because i don't want an— change can happen because i don't want an assistant, i do not want an assistant— want an assistant, i do not want an assistant who is failing midwives and families. it is that
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determination that it will change and it— determination that it will change and it will— determination that it will change and it will happen and we'll be able to create _ and it will happen and we'll be able to create a — and it will happen and we'll be able to create a workforce and create a maternity — to create a workforce and create a maternity set is that is able to provide — maternity set is that is able to provide careful families. thank you both for coming _ provide careful families. thank you both for coming in. _ provide careful families. thank you both for coming in. thank - provide careful families. thank you both for coming in. thank you - provide careful families. thank you | both for coming in. thank you both. we will be back shortly. after ros atkins on russia. many people watching eastern europe at the moment are asking one question — is russia going to invade ukraine? the answer is, i don't know. i think we have to be on our guard and i think we have to make sure that deterrence prevails. the uk's most senior military officer doesn't know. putin has the west guessing. but what everyone knows is that tension is rising. the eu and russia have been blaming each other for the migrant crisis on the belarus— poland border. there's also been a major build—up of russian troops near the border with ukraine. and america is watching.
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we do continue to see unusual military activity and concentration of forces in russia but near ukrainian borders. and that remains concerning to us. we've also heard one ukrainian minister warning of... vladimir putin calls these fears alarmist. though russia did invade georgia in 2008 and we know more broadly, putin doesn't want to test the west. to understand how and why he's doing that well, ukraine is a place to start. it was once part of the soviet union and even after independence in 1991 remained in ally of russians. but the relationship frayed and 2014 russia annexed crimea orfrom the ukraine and made a military incursion into the east of ukraine to support separatists. for that russia was booted out of the g—8 group of rich countries and faced economic sanctions too. but it didn't back down. and now this year,
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this is been happening. first in the spring of thousands of russian troops were sent towards the border with ukraine. now in november another build—up is happening. and ukrainian officials estimate that 114,000 troops had been deployed. and vladimir putin will be well aware that the us continues to watch. we've seen in the past russia mask forces on ukraine's borders, claim some kind of provocation by ukraine. —— mass forces. and then invade and basically following through on something they were planning all along. that's what they did in 2014. if that's the us, ukraine too says it's learned lessons. he did the same seven years ago in crimea.
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they recognise that actually this peninsularfrom us. vladimir putin knew his actions would bring sanctions and condemnations but he had his reasons for the it is he one of them in this article injuly. president putin wrote... and certainly one of his motivations is a desire to maintain the alliances, influences and cultural connections that are rooted in russia's history. but for all that this is also about security. have a look at this map from the website of the defence alliance nato. there is russia in the east and the light blue coloured countries are all nato members. ukraine, well, it's not a nato member but it gets major military support from the us and others. and all of this is too close for comfort for putin. in his eyes it requires a response. keep that in mind as we consider how the us is now connecting the current rushing troop build—up in another escalating situation.
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here is a recent tweet from the secretary of state. he describes a hybrid campaign on the poland— belarus border which seeks to so... and to understand why the americans are making that connection we need to look at belarus. the story is a very human drama but the backdrop, that's geopolitics. that's the bbc�*s steve rosenberg in belarus this week. this country was also once part of the soviet union but unlike ukraine, belarus remains an ally of russia. presidents lukashenko and putin know each other well. that's relevant as we look at the crisis on the border between poland and belarus. poland is in the european union and the eu accuses lukashenko of encouraging migrants to use belarus as a route into the eu. lukashenko denies that but thousands have come in and in desperate conditions have tried to get into poland. other eu countries are affected too. lithuania and latvia have also seen a rise in
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illegal crossings from belarus. and for the polish prime minister this is not only about belarus and the eu, it's about russia. translation: this attack which lukashenko has conducted - has its mastermind in moscow. the mastermind is president putin. others disagree with that saying this is simply lukashenko taking revenge for eu sanctions on belarus. and whether russia is or isn't the mastermind, it's certainly involved in this crisis. vladimir putin's spoken to angela merkel on the phone twice perhaps mischievously he's offering to mediate. this analyst argues this is exactly what putin wants to be. he wants to be seen as a power broker in europe. he already had two goals from angela merkel. that is what he wants. he wants to boost up
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his in europe. this is one possible explanation for britain's approach was a little when he is president goes further. translation: it is totally clear what the lukashenko regime and allies are seeking. to test the unity of the west. not that russia is having that — one official dismissed the west thinking as keep calm and blame russia. but russia does have a track record of testing the west. it did so in crimea, it did so in georgia, it even did so in space this week by destroying a satellite and a missile task much to nato's irritation. here in the uk, the conservative mp tobias ellwood sees another test coming. it is going to be a moment where we defend ukraine's sovereignty or are we going to allow russia to march in once again? it is notjust russia that will be looking to see how the west, how the united states, the eu
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reacts, but also china as well. everyone is watching. and this isn'tjust about military might because to understand putin's plans we also need to think about energy too. this is the gas pipeline. it runs from russia all the way to western europe. but it's not switched on yet, in fact germany has just delayed giving it the ok. but here it is stretching under the baltic sea. and when it's on it will increase europe's reliance on russian gas. for borisjohnson, that is a problem. a choice is shortly coming between mainlining ever—more russian hydrocarbons in giant new pipelines or sticking up for ukraine and championing the cause of peace and stability. reliance on russian gas is one security concern. but there's another, the stream will
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reduce the volume of gas it's delivered by ukraine. and ukraine believes that's dangerous. ukraine may become more vulnerable in terms of its security and more vulnerable to potential russian aggressive actions. as we are hearing most issues in this part of europe have a security dimension. and if nato is unimpressed with russia's actions, the feeling is mutual. translation: we need to consider that western partners worsen the situation. they deliver modern, lethal weapons to kyiv and have provocative exercises in the black sea and other regions close to our borders. putin sees a serious challenge in the west's military proximity. at that helps us understand what is doing so does this from april. translation: i hope no—one will cross russia's red line.
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but in each case we are the ones who will decide where the redline is. organisers of any part of our security will regret it like they have not regretted anything for a long time. here we see the aggressive dimension to putin's approach. he says that russia will set the rules and enforce them. and this all connects to the broader goal of putin's leadership, to establish russia as a global force. to do that putin wants to test the limits of western power. what we don't know is what he wants to happen next.
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hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and sima kotecha. six—year—old fraizer harris only took up golf around a year ago as a way of helping with his cystic fibrosis but now he's already better than most grown—ups. he's so good he's qualified for thejunior world championships before we speak to fraizer and his dad, let's see him in action. lovely. speed through.
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lovely. oh, baby! yes! fantastic! oh, yes! what a shot! and frazier and his dad jermainejoin us now. thank you so much for coming on this morning and waking up for the surly. that film that shows how brilliant you are, frazier, a doll. what got
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you are, frazier, a doll. what got you into? t you are, frazier, a doll. what got ou into? . . you are, frazier, a doll. what got ou into? , . ., . you into? i started watching the short game _ you into? i started watching the short game and _ you into? i started watching the short game and i _ you into? i started watching the short game and i said _ you into? i started watching the short game and i said to - you into? i started watching the short game and i said to my - you into? i started watching the | short game and i said to my dad you into? i started watching the i short game and i said to my dad i wanted _ short game and i said to my dad i wanted to— short game and i said to my dad i wanted to qualify for the world championship and it got me some classic— championship and it got me some classic clubs. in championship and it got me some classic clubs.— classic clubs. in that hit it off literally- _ classic clubs. in that hit it off literally. you _ classic clubs. in that hit it off literally. you must _ classic clubs. in that hit it off literally. you must be - classic clubs. in that hit it off literally. you must be so - classic clubs. in that hit it off. literally. you must be so proud. classic clubs. in that hit it off- literally. you must be so proud. i literally. you must be so proud. i am proud of him, regardless. literally. you must be so proud. t am proud of him, regardless. and everything it does it work so hard facing so many challenges. for golf is the icing on the cake beyond his wildest dreams.— is the icing on the cake beyond his wildest dreams. what you like about otlf? i like wildest dreams. what you like about golf? i like hitting _ wildest dreams. what you like about golf? i like hitting good _ wildest dreams. what you like about golf? i like hitting good shots. - wildest dreams. what you like about golf? i like hitting good shots. do i golf? i like hitting good shots. do ou ever golf? i like hitting good shots. do you ever hit _ golf? i like hitting good shots. do you ever hit a _ golf? i like hitting good shots. do you ever hit a bad _ golf? i like hitting good shots. do you ever hit a bad shot, _ golf? i like hitting good shots. do you ever hit a bad shot, frazier? l you ever hit a bad shot, frazier? sometimes stop everyone hits some bad shots. _
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jermaine, i know you are involved in golf but he only got really involved during lockdown. there was a medical reason, explain about the cystic fibrosis and how it helps. back when he was three — fibrosis and how it helps. back when he was three weeks _ fibrosis and how it helps. back when he was three weeks old _ fibrosis and how it helps. back when he was three weeks old he - fibrosis and how it helps. back when he was three weeks old he was - he was three weeks old he was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis and we always knew that would be challenges in physical activity would be of great benefit helping as long stay clear and him stay well. the opportunity arose when he was the lockdown —— keeping his lungs clear. we were in the garden because we weren't going anywhere and getting out there and walking the fairways and nine holes is still two and a half miles for the little boy, it is really helping benefit him. you mentioned the fresh air. how do you think they golf helps the cystic
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fibrosis, frazier? t you think they golf helps the cystic fibrosis, frazier?— fibrosis, frazier? i don't really know. jermaine? _ fibrosis, frazier? i don't really know. jermaine? the - fibrosis, frazier? i don't really know. jermaine? the amazingj fibrosis, frazier? i don't really- know. jermaine? the amazing cystic fibrosis team _ know. jermaine? the amazing cystic fibrosis team at _ know. jermaine? the amazing cystic fibrosis team at university _ know. jermaine? the amazing cystic fibrosis team at university hospital. fibrosis team at university hospital wales have always championed physical activity and the physical hibernation the maximum vibration of the walking and breathing like mucus and the rest of us helps clear and at out. . . and the rest of us helps clear and at out. ~ . . and the rest of us helps clear and at out. . ., ., i. and the rest of us helps clear and at out. t ., ., i. ., ., . at out. who are your favourite golf tla ers? at out. who are your favourite golf players? tiger— at out. who are your favourite golf players? tiger woods. _ we have a very special message for you from professional golfer, tommy fleetwood. hey, frazier, how you doing, just want to send a quick message. we've been keeping track of your progress, been watching how you're doing, you're doing absolutely amazing.
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you're inspiring us all, you're winning so much i wish i could win that much and we know you're going to the world championships as well, so just want to wish you the best of luck in that, we'll be keeping track of how you're getting on. keep smiling, keep enjoying the game, keep working hard and i'm pretty sure we'll end up seeing you out on tour soon, i hope you get a game with you, ok? good luck. sending you all the best. bye, mate. how good is that? i imagine in ten years or so you might be beating tommy fleetwood. is that what you want to do, frazier? do you want to grow up and be our professional golfer? grow up and be our professional otlfer? ., , t grow up and be our professional golfer?— tell i grow up and be our professional| golfer?_ tell us golfer? yeah, very much. tell us about the — golfer? yeah, very much. tell us about the world _ golfer? yeah, very much. tell us about the world championships. about the world championships frazier is going to, five and up. tt frazier is going to, five and up. tt all started with a documentary called the short game where they
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follow us kids qualifiers around the world and the get—together at a golf course in north carolina. frazier got to the south wales arm of the tour late and had to win the final five and luckily he did so. frazier, we wish you _ five and luckily he did so. frazier, we wish you all— five and luckily he did so. frazier, we wish you all the _ five and luckily he did so. frazier, we wish you all the very - five and luckily he did so. frazier, we wish you all the very best - five and luckily he did so. frazier, we wish you all the very best in i we wish you all the very best in getting to america. . jermaine, thank you for talking to us, best wishes to you both. it isa it is a big pathway in golf. i will be sitting there with pipe and slippers watching it. a little bit less lovely for ole gunnar solksjaer, a tough day at the office
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yesterday for him and we understand he is set to leave manchester united as manager. i was really tricky afternoon for him and everyone was speculating over it and it was probably only a matter of time. there has been no official confirmation but we understand that the club's senior figures, including owners the glazers, have discussed solksjaer�*s future and decided the watford loss would be his last game in charge. everyone was waiting to see if there would be a reaction for manchester united after the international break. not the one they would have wanted — they conceeded four goals at waford — and captain harry maguire was sent off. it's been a terrible run of results,
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united have won just four of their last 13 games. looked like a wave goodbye afterwards. strong comments from players saying it was a nightmare. technical director darren fletcher is set to take over as there's a big week ahead — with a champions league trip to villarreal. keep updated on the bbc sport website and that developing news today. at the top of the premier league table, chelsea are looking very comfortable — they beat leicester 3—0. arsenal 4—0 at anfield. sadio mane opened the scoring the first half. then goals from diogojota, mohammed salah and this finish from takumi minamino in the second half sealed that win. it was also a good day for the league's newest managers. dean smith watched on as
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norwich beat southampton. newcastle picked up a point against brentford — but new boss eddie howe was isolating from home with covid. while steven gerrard was in the dugout at villa park for the first time and saw his side score two late goals to beat brighton 2—0. ollie watkins and tyrone mings sealing the win. stjohnstone's reign as scottish league cup holders is over — they were beaten 1—0 by celtic in the semi—finals of the competition. substitute james forrest came off the bench to score the only goal of the game by celtic in the semi—finals of the competition. substitute james forrest came off the bench to score the only goal of the game midway through the second half — so celtic are through to the final next month where they could lift the trophy for a 20th time. now, what a day of rugby union matches we had yesterday as the autumn internationals draw to a close. england got a last minute win over south africa to avenge their 2019
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world cup final defeat. wales won by a single point against australia and scotland beat japan. on another continent on the other side of a pandemic, england and south africa met in the world cup final. south africa won, england failed to score a try. so what a start they got from manu tuilagi afterjust six minutes. against the springboks, you hope your points outnumber your bruises. it's a test of strength. freddie steward muscled england 11 points clear, but you're never safe from handre pollard's boot. he helped make up the distance — kick for kick, south africa crept back. they were just ahead when england saw an escape route. joe marchant to 20—year—old raffi quirke to score his first international try. commentator: the moment of his life! he'll never forget that, but south africa soon did. with english ranks elsewhere, makazole mapimpi had the space he needed. not long later, south africa led, but only by two points. an advantage vulnerable to an english surge, an english penalty — there it was. less than a minute left and marcus smith, england's big and marcus smith, england's great hope, had england's big kick.
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england finished 2021 by beating the world number one. when wales scored their first try of the match against australia through ryan elias, it seemed they were on course for a fairly comfortable victory. the wallabies had already lost a man to a red card at that point but were determined to make it interesting. not long after felipo daugunu's try, they actually went ahead. but as in london, so in cardiff. this time rhys priestland's penalty would be the final action of wales' year. they finish on a high. scotland's performance in beating japan was a little patchy, but to hog the limelight, that took stuart hogg clear as his nation's top try scorer — a record that will surely only be extended. patrick geary, bbc news. there was an amazing game in paris last night where france beat new zealand for the first time in 12 years later today ireland take on argentina — and for the women, england face usa, while wales host canada.
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formula 1 now, as lewis hamilton will be hoping to close the 14 point gap to championship leader max verstappen at this afternoon's qatar grand prix. he was almost half a second quicker than his rival as he claimed pole for the first race to be held in qatar. his mercedes team mate valtteri bottas will start from third. hamilton's performance all the more impressive given he'd felt unwell on friday. fallon sherrock�*s run in the grand slam of darts is over. she was beaten 16—13 last night by world number two peter wright in wolverhampton. sherrock was attempting to become the first woman to reach the semifinals. she'd already become the first female to reach a major darts quarter—final. wright will take on michael smith in the semis, after he beat michael van gerwen. the final round of the season—ending event on the european tour has just got under way in dubai. rory mcilroy teed off on 14 under par, with a one shot lead on england's sam horsfield. he's parred the first. scotland's robert mcintyre and ireland's shane lowry are in the chasing pack.
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joe salisbury has become the first british man to reach the doubles final at the season—ending atp tour finals salisbury and his american partner rajeev ram needed a deciding tie—break to beat the world number1 pair of nikola mektic and mate pavic in turin — they'll play the french pair of nicolas mahut and pierre—hugues herbert in the final this afternoon. this is where we say goodbye to sima who's going tojoin the andrew marr show. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. a lovely morning out there if you like sunshine but cold weather
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because we are all in a fresher air mass today so different feeling day compared to yesterday and much of november which has been really mild. many of us waking up to some sunshine around, a bit of blue sky but also the course of the day plenty of showers around particularly across parts of eastern england where we will see the bulk of the shallowest of the course of the day. higher pressure building on from the west wall squeeze away the showers from many western parts and with the high pressure and winds rotating coming from a northerly direction across all of the uk. we are all in the blue colours in the colder air mass and a bit of frost around this morning. the colder weather will drive showers across central and eastern scotland and across the east coast of england we will see plenty of showers through the day. further west light showers this morning for ireland in pembrokeshire and kampl should ease later. winds will be strong for the north and east and gas could reach
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30 mph or 40 north and east and gas could reach 30 mph or40 mph north and east and gas could reach 30 mph or 40 mph here and top temperatures this afternoon between about six degrees to 11 degrees but filling, particularly in the east where you are exposed to that brisk breeze and showers continuing. overnight tonight most of the showers ease away so largely clear and a cold night ahead. a few showers in the far south—east and the north of scotland. not quite as cold with cloud moving on here but temperatures a few degrees either side of freezing even in towns and cities and colder in the countryside. a cold and frosty start to monday morning. cloud will come across the north of scotland bringing less cold conditions but most of us will be in single figures reaching 10 degrees or 11 degrees in the far south but may be some showers in the far south—east and channel islands. that continues into tuesday. the breeze coming through the dover straits to the channel islands and some rain across the north—west of scotland. for most
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places another dry day with temperatures perhaps seven degrees to 10 degrees. then it turns a little colder through the middle of the week. wednesday into thursday, this next cold front works south across the uk so another bite of cold northerly winds in store for thursday in particular. i think over the next couple of days some of us will just about reach the next couple of days some of us willjust about reach double figures, 10 degrees or 11 degrees but from wednesday onwards, you can see we are all stuck in low single figures so it will feel significantly colder. we will see a return to overnight frost and mist and fog patches lingering into the mornings. that's the picture over the next few days. towards the end of the week a few showers creeping into the forecast so something a bit more unsettled by friday. plenty of dry weather around today but if you're a eastern england and eastern scotland you might want to bring your umbrella with you.
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the nightmare of a pet going missing is something owners hope they ll never have to go through, but for an increasing number, it's become a reality. now, one woman is going pet detective with the help of a heat—detecting drone to help reunite dogs and their owners. jacob tomlinson has the story. sit. meet chester. he is now safely back home with his own but a few months ago he went missing for three nights. went for a walk up to a local beauty spot. chester was running about. out of nowhere, to lectures appeared and attacked him. he got scared, ran off in an unfamiliar direction. i can only speak for myself. it's like losing a family member, i would say. my daughter, she didn't sleep for three days. she just bought her pet was gone. the family had almost lost hope until erica decided to offer
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her services. she uses a drone worth almost £7,000 to help find lost dogs by using thermal imaging technology. the drone is equipped with a high—tech thermal imaging camera which can detect heat signatures from up to 250 feet in the air. therefore, when erica is asked to help out in the search for a simply turns up to the dog's last known location, set up the drone and up it goes. having found more than 160 dogs it's proved pretty successful. and it's easy to see why. can you spot chester running round these woods? to the naked eye or even a normal drone, it's virtually impossible but, pop thermal image up and hejumps out, allowing his owner to bring him safely back home. when i first found that first dog and seen his expression on his face because it had been missing nearly four days, it was just like i can do something and make myself useful and be a part of the community and help unite loved
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ones with their dogs. and how many dogs do reckon you found in six years? easy 200, easy. i've done seven this week. having said hundreds of dogs, the methodists seriously —— the method is clearly working. erica doesn't charge for her services and instead does it for the pleasure of seeing owners were united. these are the videos taken during a search for pickle after he'd been missing for more than nine hours until eventually being brought back to his owner. in this video you can see flo the pug, who had been missing for almost three days until she was found cowering behind a small building in someone's back garden. once again, erica's help managed to reunite flo with her loving owners. i've never lost a dog myself but i've seen
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first—hand what it does to people when they lose dogs. i know how much it must hurt to losing that loved one. it's like winning the lottery, it is absolutely priceless. if it weren't for people, the community, wider community trying to help us, erica especially, there was a happy ending, there was a happy ending to the story and we didn't realise we would find him. erica's has helped create countless happy endings and are sure to make many more in the future. jacob tomlinson, bbc news. it was all about musicals last night on strictly as the pairs waltzed and charlstoned their way into week nine. and it was all change at the judges table as craig revel horwood was replaced by star of stage and screen cynthia erivo, a temporary measure whilst he recovers from covid. here are some of the highlights. i think you are joyful, beautiful.
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#a # a sweep is as lucky as lucky can be. # for me that is your best dance so far. . . be. # for me that is your best dance so far. ., ., i. be. # for me that is your best dance so far. ., - i. ,. be. # for me that is your best dance so far. ., ., ,~. ,., ., be. # for me that is your best dance sofar. ., ., ., , so far. how do you solve a problem like maria? — so far. how do you solve a problem like maria? you _ so far. how do you solve a problem like maria? you cast _ so far. how do you solve a problem like maria? you cast aj, _ so far. how do you solve a problem like maria? you cast aj, that's - so far. how do you solve a problem| like maria? you cast aj, that's how. anton du bec. anton du bec. ten stop. we're joined now by former strictly professional dancer flavia cacace—mistry.
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titty tilly was on the dance off and let's talk about her performance. t tilly was on the dance off and let's talk about her performance. i have alwa s talk about her performance. i have always been _ talk about her performance. i have always been a _ talk about her performance. i have always been a huge _ talk about her performance. i have always been a huge fan _ talk about her performance. i have always been a huge fan of- talk about her performance. i have always been a huge fan of her- talk about her performance. i have always been a huge fan of her and| always been a huge fan of her and she can _ always been a huge fan of her and she can do — always been a huge fan of her and she can do the latin ille well and she can do the latin ille well and she comes — she can do the latin ille well and she comes back with a really classy boring _ she comes back with a really classy boring numberand then she comes back with a really classy boring number and then come back with couples choice and she is a wonderful— with couples choice and she is a wonderful energy and is perfect for the show— wonderful energy and is perfect for the show and is young and has enthusiasm and it's really very good and you _ enthusiasm and it's really very good and you can — enthusiasm and it's really very good and you can tell she is never danced before _ and you can tell she is never danced before but— and you can tell she is never danced before but her improvement on her technique _ before but her improvement on her technique isjust so obvious before but her improvement on her technique is just so obvious and evident — technique is just so obvious and evident and her performance are great _ evident and her performance are great for— evident and her performance are great for somebody who has no acting background so i am a big fan. was it shirley who — background so i am a big fan. was it shirley who said _ background so i am a big fan. was it shirley who said you _ background so i am a big fan. was it shirley who said you couldn't - background so i am a big fan. was it shirley who said you couldn't tell i shirley who said you couldn't tell who the professional was out of the two of them? that's some compliment. it is. it is difficult with the couples— it is. it is difficult with the couples choice. i don't know much couples choice. idon't know much about— couples choice. i don't know much about his — couples choice. i don't know much about his background and he is probably— about his background and he is probably more of a latin and i've never— probably more of a latin and i've never done — probably more of a latin and i've never done hip—hop street so i would be learning _ never done hip—hop street so i would be learning as well. i would give it
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a good _ be learning as well. i would give it a good goal but you don't know really _ a good goal but you don't know really what the background of everyone is but she is great and energetic— everyone is but she is great and energetic and shooting she does she toes energetic and shooting she does she goes for— energetic and shooting she does she goes for it— energetic and shooting she does she goes for it and she is fed to tell which _ goes for it and she is fed to tell which i — goes for it and she is fed to tell which i really like. will goes for it and she is fed to tell which i really like.— which i really like. will scotch arrive last _ which i really like. will scotch arrive last night? _ which i really like. will scotch arrive last night? i _ which i really like. will scotch arrive last night? i thought i which i really like. will scotch arrive last night? i thought a] i arrive last night? i thought aj could have been top of the leaderboard. who else caught your eye last night? sign that you could tell she had worked on all the footwork and it was really effortless. t footwork and it was really effortless.— footwork and it was really effortless. , ,, effortless. i was really impressed with dan. effortless. i was really impressed with dan- i _ effortless. i was really impressed with dan. i was _ effortless. i was really impressed with dan. i was a _ effortless. i was really impressed with dan. i was a little _ effortless. i was really impressed with dan. i was a little concerned i with dan. i was a little concerned when _ with dan. i was a little concerned when i _ with dan. i was a little concerned when i heard it was at charleston because — when i heard it was at charleston because you have that swivelling action _ because you have that swivelling action and itjust because you have that swivelling action and it just wasn't sure if he was going — action and it just wasn't sure if he was going to be able to get that swivelling action with the feet you really _ swivelling action with the feet you really need to get in the charleston. i thought if he doesn't charleston. ! thought if he doesn't master— charleston. i thought if he doesn't master that he will get penalised a lot but— master that he will get penalised a lot but he — master that he will get penalised a lot but he did. and the thing with dan is _ lot but he did. and the thing with dan is he — lot but he did. and the thing with dan is he is — lot but he did. and the thing with dan is he is very good it's all the work— dan is he is very good it's all the work so — dan is he is very good it's all the work so i — dan is he is very good it's all the work so i hadn't really thought
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there — work so i hadn't really thought there could be a lot of solo work in there could be a lot of solo work in the charleston so it works in his favourt — the charleston so it works in his favour. �* . . ~ favour. and he is six feet 56 feet six, he favour. and he is six feet 56 feet six. he is — favour. and he is six feet 56 feet six. he is a _ favour. and he is six feet 56 feet six. he is a very _ favour. and he is six feet 56 feet six, he is a very tall— favour. and he is six feet 56 feet six, he is a very tall man. - favour. and he is six feet 56 feet six, he is a very tall man. he - favour. and he is six feet 56 feet six, he is a very tall man. he is i six, he is a very tall man. he is but he is _ six, he is a very tall man. he is but he is musical, _ six, he is a very tall man. he is but he is musical, he _ six, he is a very tall man. he is but he is musical, he has - six, he is a very tall man. he is but he is musical, he has got i six, he is a very tall man. he is - but he is musical, he has got rhythm and he _ but he is musical, he has got rhythm and he knows he is maybe not the best answer but he looks like he is having _ best answer but he looks like he is having a _ best answer but he looks like he is having a great time and he comes across— having a great time and he comes across like — having a great time and he comes across like he doesn't really care, he is _ across like he doesn't really care, he isjust— across like he doesn't really care, he isjust performing and sometimes when _ he isjust performing and sometimes when you're — he isjust performing and sometimes when you're trying hard it doesn't work— when you're trying hard it doesn't work in _ when you're trying hard it doesn't work in your— when you're trying hard it doesn't work in your favour but he isjust enjoying — work in your favour but he isjust enjoying the whole experience and it comes— enjoying the whole experience and it comes over— enjoying the whole experience and it comes over and his performances so i was very— comes over and his performances so i was very impressed with them. tom didn't have such _ was very impressed with them. tom didn't have such a _ was very impressed with them. ’trrr’n didn't have such a good week this week. t didn't have such a good week this week. .. �* . ' t week. i think it's difficult with tom. week. i think it's difficult with tom- some — week. i think it's difficult with tom. some dance _ week. i think it's difficult with tom. some dance halls - week. i think it's difficult with tom. some dance halls really week. i think it's difficult with - tom. some dance halls really suit tom. some dance halls really suit himt _ tom. some dance halls really suit him the — tom. some dance halls really suit him. the pasta dough blade, randomly, he did an old—style one a few weeks— randomly, he did an old—style one a few weeks ago and it was wonderful and i few weeks ago and it was wonderful and i think— few weeks ago and it was wonderful and i think look like he enjoyed
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doing _ and i think look like he enjoyed doing it — and i think look like he enjoyed doing it that's where think when you are doing _ doing it that's where think when you are doing something so expressive you need _ are doing something so expressive you need to be a bit more out there and look— you need to be a bit more out there and look up — you need to be a bit more out there and look up and stretch a bit more. ithink— and look up and stretch a bit more. i think one — and look up and stretch a bit more. i think one of— and look up and stretch a bit more. i think one of the judges said that, it was— i think one of the judges said that, it was to _ i think one of the judges said that, it was to do — i think one of the judges said that, it was to do with his chest and head position _ it was to do with his chest and head position. there wasn't enough out there _ position. there wasn't enough out there towards the audience, he was a little bit _ there towards the audience, he was a little bit in _ there towards the audience, he was a little bit in words so i am a bit worried — little bit in words so i am a bit worried about him. is little bit in words so i am a bit worried about him.— little bit in words so i am a bit worried about him. is that we have the different _ worried about him. is that we have the different types _ worried about him. is that we have the different types of _ worried about him. is that we have the different types of dance, - worried about him. is that we have the different types of dance, if - the different types of dance, if you're not a professional, the whole point as you learn them, but some of them you will get better than others? sign that absolutely. some dances suit different body types and we all have different body types and different length arms and legs. i am good at dad dancing. t different length arms and legs. i am good at dad dancing.— good at dad dancing. i always think the 'ive if good at dad dancing. i always think the jive if you're — good at dad dancing. i always think the jive if you're small _ good at dad dancing. i always think the jive if you're small and - good at dad dancing. i always think| the jive if you're small and compact is easiert _ the jive if you're small and compact is easiert i— the jive if you're small and compact is easier. i was a bit worried about rhys _ is easier. i was a bit worried about rhys but _ is easier. i was a bit worried about rhys but i — is easier. i was a bit worried about rhys but i thought he did a great 'ob
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rhys but i thought he did a great job as _ rhys but i thought he did a great job as well but if he does something like a _ job as well but if he does something like a warts — job as well but if he does something like a warts and a foxtrot you are taller— like a warts and a foxtrot you are taller and — like a warts and a foxtrot you are taller and you are more elegant. so if he could — taller and you are more elegant. so if he could have pointed to stores it would _ if he could have pointed to stores it would have been the cherry on the cake _ it would have been the cherry on the cake the _ it would have been the cherry on the cake. the thing with rhys as it is almost _ cake. the thing with rhys as it is almost like — cake. the thing with rhys as it is almost like he is trying too hard on the saturday night and you can see how much— the saturday night and you can see how much work you put into it at rehearsals — how much work you put into it at rehearsals but at the performance really _ rehearsals but at the performance really has — rehearsals but at the performance really has to let go and perform it and i_ really has to let go and perform it and i think— really has to let go and perform it and i think he is trying too hard, he wanted — and i think he is trying too hard, he wanted to be perfect and it is never— he wanted to be perfect and it is never ever— he wanted to be perfect and it is never ever going to be perfect. sol 'ust never ever going to be perfect. sol just want— never ever going to be perfect. sol just want him to let go a little bit. just want him to let go a little bit i— just want him to let go a little bit. .. �* ., ., ., , bit. i can't imagine how hard it is if ou're bit. i can't imagine how hard it is if you're not— bit. i can't imagine how hard it is if you're not a — bit. i can't imagine how hard it is if you're not a dancer _ bit. i can't imagine how hard it is if you're not a dancer to - bit. i can't imagine how hard it is i if you're not a dancer to remember all those things and join them up and forget about everything else. you always have to forget about thinking — you always have to forget about thinking and just dance it in the music— thinking and just dance it in the music will— thinking and just dance it in the music willjust take over as you go with the _ music willjust take over as you go with the flow but that is easier said than— with the flow but that is easier said than done. having said that, at this point— said than done. having said that, at this point there will be doing a lot of hours _ this point there will be doing a lot of hours a — this point there will be doing a lot of hours a day. this point there will be doing a lot of hours a day-— this point there will be doing a lot ofhoursada. ., .y ., , ., of hours a day. how many hours would the do? of hours a day. how many hours would
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they do? they — of hours a day. how many hours would they do? they could _ of hours a day. how many hours would they do? they could do _ of hours a day. how many hours would they do? they could do up _ of hours a day. how many hours would they do? they could do up to - of hours a day. how many hours would they do? they could do up to eight - they do? they could do up to eight hours. six they do? they could do up to eight hours- six or _ they do? they could do up to eight hours. six or eight _ they do? they could do up to eight hours. six or eight or— they do? they could do up to eight hours. six or eight or ten, - they do? they could do up to eight hours. six or eight or ten, who - hours. six or eight or ten, who knows? — hours. six or eight or ten, who knows? the _ hours. six or eight or ten, who knows? the further you go the more you want— knows? the further you go the more you want to — knows? the further you go the more you want to get into it because your technique _ you want to get into it because your technique is— you want to get into it because your technique is getting stronger and your understanding of the different styles _ your understanding of the different styles becoming a bit more evident so you _ styles becoming a bit more evident so you have a want that grows and you get _ so you have a want that grows and you get a — so you have a want that grows and you get a buzz from it. | so you have a want that grows and you get a buzz from it.— so you have a want that grows and you get a buzz from it. i must admit last week when _ you get a buzz from it. i must admit last week when the _ you get a buzz from it. i must admit last week when the music _ you get a buzz from it. i must admit last week when the music died - you get a buzz from it. i must admit last week when the music died it. you get a buzz from it. i must admit. last week when the music died it was such a poignant moment and rose has been so good, so consistent. did she dipped a bit last night? t been so good, so consistent. did she dipped a bit last night?— dipped a bit last night? i don't think so at _ dipped a bit last night? i don't think so at all. _ dipped a bit last night? i don't think so at all. i _ dipped a bit last night? i don't think so at all. ithink- dipped a bit last night? i don't think so at all. i think her- think so at all. i think her technique was great. when you look at rose _ technique was great. when you look at rose she — technique was great. when you look at rose she looks effortless, her shoulders — at rose she looks effortless, her shoulders are not going up. to keep a nice _ shoulders are not going up. to keep a nice neckline and keep your shoulders— a nice neckline and keep your shoulders down during a quickstep for your— shoulders down during a quickstep for your hopping up and down a lot is very— for your hopping up and down a lot is very difficult and if you look at her posture it is very still and she is very— her posture it is very still and she is very connected with giovanni and i is very connected with giovanni and i really— is very connected with giovanni and i really loved it. it is impossible
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to come — i really loved it. it is impossible to come back after last week's performance with anything better and that so _ performance with anything better and that so it _ performance with anything better and that so it would be unfair to expect that so it would be unfair to expect that from _ that so it would be unfair to expect that from her. she that so it would be unfair to expect that from her.— that so it would be unfair to expect that from her. she got 37 last time. i think it that from her. she got 37 last time. i think it was _ that from her. she got 37 last time. i think it was a _ that from her. she got 37 last time. i think it was a really _ that from her. she got 37 last time. i think it was a really cute _ that from her. she got 37 last time. i think it was a really cute routine i i think it was a really cute routine and it— i think it was a really cute routine and it was— i think it was a really cute routine and it was lovely and well executed and it was lovely and well executed and her— and it was lovely and well executed and her technique is really good. it and her technique is really good. [t must and her technique is really good. must be, to and her technique is really good. tt must be, to see those tens, it must be great. tt must be, to see those tens, it must be treat. . . t must be, to see those tens, it must be treat. , , . ., ., be great. it is such a great ending to a really — be great. it is such a great ending to a really tough _ be great. it is such a great ending to a really tough week. _ be great. it is such a great ending to a really tough week. when - be great. it is such a great ending i to a really tough week. when you're working _ to a really tough week. when you're working six— to a really tough week. when you're working six are eight or ten hours a week— working six are eight or ten hours a week it's _ working six are eight or ten hours a week it's hard so to have that the end of— week it's hard so to have that the end of at— week it's hard so to have that the end of at it — week it's hard so to have that the end of at it is our big failing. and then— end of at it is our big failing. and then you — end of at it is our big failing. and then you start again, put that to one side — then you start again, put that to one side. . . then you start again, put that to one side. ., ., ., , , , one side. you have always been very tood at one side. you have always been very good at identifying _ one side. you have always been very good at identifying who _ one side. you have always been very good at identifying who might - one side. you have always been very good at identifying who might be - one side. you have always been very good at identifying who might be in. good at identifying who might be in jeopardy, who do we think might be in trouble this week? t am jeopardy, who do we think might be in trouble this week?— in trouble this week? i am a bit concerned _ in trouble this week? i am a bit concerned about _ in trouble this week? i am a bit concerned about people - in trouble this week? i am a bit concerned about people in - in trouble this week? i am a bit concerned about people in the. in trouble this week? i am a bit - concerned about people in the middle of the _ concerned about people in the middle of the leaderboard. it depends who the public— of the leaderboard. it depends who the public save from the bottom of the public save from the bottom of the leaderboard at the moment but i
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thinkjon_ the leaderboard at the moment but i thinkjon could get messed because he has _ thinkjon could get messed because he has that experience and is very good _ he has that experience and is very good technically but he could get messed — good technically but he could get messed this week and maybe rhys. and if tom _ messed this week and maybe rhys. and if tom is— messed this week and maybe rhys. and if tom is on— messed this week and maybe rhys. and if tom is on the bottom two i think he is _ if tom is on the bottom two i think he is a _ if tom is on the bottom two i think he is a little — if tom is on the bottom two i think he is a little bit of danger.- he is a little bit of danger. lovely to see you _ he is a little bit of danger. lovely to see you as _ he is a little bit of danger. lovely to see you as always. _ he is a little bit of danger. lovely to see you as always. strictly - he is a little bit of danger. lovely to see you as always. strictly is i he is a little bit of danger. lovely. to see you as always. strictly is on to see you as always. strictly is on the television tonight on bbc one. dan is off to training after tomorrow morning.
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this is bbc news. our top stories... the women's tennis association says footage of missing player peng shuai at a tennis tournament, released by chinese media, doesn't prove she's genuinely free. fires and fighting on the streets of the hague — lockdown protesters clash with dutch police in a second night of violence. in the uk, an investigation is being launched into whether there is racial bias in the design of some medical devices used by the national health service. in sport, speculation that ole gunnar solskjaer is set to leave manchester united after senior figures at the club met last night. and barcelona's bid to get rid of the wild boars besieging the city.

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