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tv   Click  BBC News  November 21, 2021 4:30am-5:00am GMT

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rioting has broken out for a second night in the netherlands over new coronavirus lockdown restrictions. hundreds of people have lit fires and pelted the police with rocks and fireworks in the hague. the protests mirror friday night's violence in rotterdam. the world health organisation says it's very worried about the rise in covid—19 cases in europe. it's warned without serious action there could be a further half—a—million covid—related deaths on the continent by march, estimating one person is dying from the virus there every 15 minutes. the women's tennis association says new videos, allegedly showing missing tennis player peng shuai this weekend, are not enough to guarantee she is safe. her whereabouts have been uncertain since she accused a high ranking chinese official of sexual harassment. the wta says it's prepared to cancel tournaments in china.
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the number of people who died in england while detained under the mental health act rose during the coronavirus pandemic, according to early figures from the watchdog, the care quality commission. it comes amid concerns that staffing shortages are compromising patient safety. one of those who took his own life after being sectioned was teenager charlie millers, who died at the end of last year. patrick baker spoke to his mother — and a warning — his report contains flashing images. after struggling with his mental health throughout most of his teenage years, 17—year—old charlie millers became increasingly unwell during the second half of 2020. he went downhill in thejuly time. he was then sectioned. charlie spent the next few months in and out of the mental health unit at prestwich hospital in manchester. in early december last year, he returned to the ward following a night at home. i dropped him off at
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quarter to eight at night. he was in really good spirits and then i got a phone call at quarter to 11 to say that they were doing cpr on him. during the course of that evening, charlie had made four attempts on his life, the last of which proved fatal. a confidential nhs report into charlie's death said that due to sickness absence being reported that day, there was no qualified nurse rostered on duty for the night shift. the nurse in charge agreed to cover the shift. she had worked from 9am to 4pm and returned at 7pm. in a statement the nhs trust that runs prestwich hospital expressed its deepest sympathies but said it would be inappropriate to comment further until the coroner's inquest has concluded. between 2012 and 2019, an average 273 people died each year while detained in hospital or being supervised in the community under the mental health act in england. but early estimates for the first year of the pandemic suggest a record high,
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with 490 people dying between march 2020 and march 2021. i think staff shortages are compromising patient safety in every part of the nhs at the moment. we have a workforce crisis and it's time we completely overhauled the way we decide how many doctors and nurses we are going to train for the future. the department of health and social care said there are now record numbers of doctors and nurses working in the nhs. they said they are investing £2.3 billion a year by 2023—24 to transform mental health care and will bring forward plans to reform the mental health act. charlie's mum, samantha, says she is still waiting for a clear explanation about how her son could have lost his life in the very place that was meant to keep him safe. a full inquest into charlie's death starts next year. now on bbc news,
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it's time for click. this week, how to rebuild the past, piece by piece by piece. on this programme, we see a lot of really useful technology, but some things are just solutions looking for problems. the first obvious place for vr was gaming, but once
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we have lost count of the virtual reality experiences we have had over the years, some feeling more useful than others. the first obvious place for vr was gaming, but once the technology had proved that it was properly immersive, we started to see signs that it really could take us to real places. it could put us in all sorts of situations, including education and even medicine. and sometimes, technology turns out to be most useful where you least expect it. i've seen vr used to help people overcome phobias. you've seen it used to teach students how to do surgery. but this has to be the most powerful use of vr i have ever seen. six—month—old archie was born with sagittal synostosis. you are a happy boy, aren't you? a condition where a baby's growth lines in the skull fuse too early. this means as the brain grows, the skull can't grow sideways
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to accommodate it, so it expands front and back, distorting the head shape. oh, that was nice! while it is not life—threatening, it leaves parents like amanda and judd faced with a difficult decision as to whether they opt for the risks of surgery or let nature take its course, with the physical and psychological impacts that follow. it's been quite overwhelming, hasn't it? like, there's been a lot of appointments and a lot of time away. so, when offered the chance to be the first to use a groundbreaking new ai platform that predicts the outcome of the operation in virtual reality, theyjumped at the chance. you are able to see your own child's condition or your own child's heart or head projected into this virtual environment, with a full feeling of what will happen
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in terms of the treatment to your own child. i've come here to great 0rmond street hospital tojoin the family for their consultation where, for the first time, they're going to get to see the virtual reality. you're about to see now what will hopefully be the final result. how are you feeling? excited. and obviously, there is always that worry about what he is going to have done. archie babbles. and that's what he thinks of it! you will be placed in - an immersive world and you're going to be able to| interact with things using the controllers. so here is archie's skull as it stands now that we have done the reconstruction using the ct scan. and as you can see, this is the side view. we've got the forehead here, the back of the head here, and these lines are the sutures — the ones that are working still, the growth lines.
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so the way we do the surgery is we make a small window in the bone, here. the algorithms needed to create these images have been made possible by the harnessing of data from 60 operations over the course of the last seven years. so here, the grey is the head shape as it's now, the green is the predicted head shape, so the first change that you can see is that the back of his head which, at the moment is sloping down, is pushed up a little and there's a more regular curvature to it. this immersive experience allows the parents to see from all angles a truly personalised picture of exactly how archie's head can be reshaped with surgery. would you like us to suggest anything about the head shape that you would like to see done differently? no, i think it's the back of the head that we are noticing the most. indeed, and that you should see
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within a week or two of surgery... wow, 0k. ..you can see the back going in. it isa it is a lot to think about. it is but we will not be wondering what is happening. haw is but we will not be wondering what is happening.— is but we will not be wondering what is happening. how much of a difference _ what is happening. how much of a difference was _ what is happening. how much of a difference was that _ what is happening. how much of a difference was that to - what is happening. how much of a difference was that to be - a difference was that to be able to see this in vr? fix, a difference was that to be able to see this in vr? a big difference — able to see this in vr? a big difference because - able to see this in vr? a big difference because to - able to see this in vr? a big difference because to be - difference because to be honest, looking at him, i did not realise the size of the forehead and things like that that would make a difference. so to be able to see the whole
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head at different angles, it was quite nice to see, wasn't it? , , ., , was quite nice to see, wasn't it? , , a, , was quite nice to see, wasn't it? ,, o, it? this is a big day for amanda _ it? this is a big day for amanda and _ it? this is a big day for amanda and john - it? this is a big day for amanda and john and l it? this is a big day for. amanda and john and for it? this is a big day for- amanda and john and for you, this is the first time you have shown your technology in action and how are you feeling about it? ,, , a, , , , it? slightly apprehensive because we _ it? slightly apprehensive because we are - it? slightly apprehensive because we are giving i it? slightly apprehensive i because we are giving them it? slightly apprehensive - because we are giving them a lot of information on the question was well that, will it be beneficial but will it be too much for them? i was delighted to see how they took to it and it was their first experience with br and they seem to enjoy the experience and gained a lot from it so delighted. it and gained a lot from it so delighted-— and gained a lot from it so deliahted. , ., ,., .,, delighted. it seemed to boost their confidence _ delighted. it seemed to boost their confidence popular - their confidence popular indeed, indeed, which is what we wanted to achieve. now they have signed the consent form, it is naturally informed consent when they sign the consent when they sign the consent form. and, having confirmed their decision to go ahead, within a few weeks, the big day arrived. the theatre is just being prepared as, in a few minutes, archie is coming into his
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surgery where a spring like this is going to be inserted into his skull through a small cut. it will immediately expand and start to change the shape of his head, and then continue to do so over the next four weeks. at that point, it can be removed. invented by doctorjeelani 13 years ago, this technique has reduced operation time from three hours to a0 minutes, cut blood transfusions by 90% and provides more predictable outcomes. 0k, spring engaged. and it's that predictability that's made the data usable for visualisations with 90% accuracy. so we have been able to capture the surface of the head of the baby— the surface of the head of the baby before enough of the procedure, we will upload the
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images — procedure, we will upload the images and compare the shape difference. and we will use some — difference. and we will use some modelling to try and understand what happens over time — so we have just finished. the surgery�*s gone really well. the springs are in, we've seen an expansion on the table and we should meet our predictions over the next few weeks. what we've seen here is being created for one particular condition, but it could be applied to many different types of surgery in the future. what we have shown here is essentially proof of principle — that if you take a condition, an art form, make it granular enough that you can study it and put it on engineering and ai platforms, then you can actually predict the future with a reasonable degree of accuracy. what i would like to see as a surgeon in ten, perhaps 20 years' time, is that most surgeries — most surgical practice is done this way, where the control and the power is very much given to the parents and the patients. two weeks on from surgery and we visited archie and his family. we're quite relieved that we
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are over the other side now. archie's doing really well. so we've been told that obviously now he's had it done, there shouldn't be any concerns with development and things, so we're really with how it went. but having the opportunity of doing the vr really, really sort of reassured us that we were doing the right thing. i know that was something that did cross our mind at first, but being able to actually see the before and after was quite a relief of that pressure, wasn't it? it lifted that weight off our shoulders so, yeah, we're happy. wow! that seems so incredibly hard for everyone involved. the family was _ hard for everyone involved. the family was so — hard for everyone involved. tue: family was so amazing hard for everyone involved. tte: family was so amazing and hard for everyone involved. tt2 family was so amazing and was so keen to raise awareness on the condition they were quite happy for us to follow the journey, despite it being quite intimate. ~ , journey, despite it being quite intimate. , , journey, despite it being quite intimate. ~ , , intimate. absolutely. did you aet intimate. absolutely. did you net the intimate. absolutely. did you get the sense _ intimate. absolutely. did you get the sense that _ intimate. absolutely. did you get the sense that seeing - intimate. absolutely. did you i get the sense that seeing those images in vr help the family make the decision?-
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images in vr help the family make the decision? yes, i think there were _ make the decision? yes, i think there were already _ make the decision? yes, i think there were already pretty - there were already pretty confident they would go ahead with the operation but you could tell it provided them with that extra bit of reassurance that they felt they were making the right decision and they knew what to expect from the surgery and in the weeks that followed. that really did give them a little bit more confidence along the way. bit more confidence along the wa . ., ., , , ., , bit more confidence along the wa. ., , ., ~ way. yeah, absolutely. thank ou for way. yeah, absolutely. thank you for telling _ way. yeah, absolutely. thank you for telling a _ way. yeah, absolutely. thank you for telling a story - way. yeah, absolutely. thank you for telling a story and - way. yeah, absolutely. thank you for telling a story and to l you for telling a story and to the family, lots of love and best wishes from us. welcome to the weekend tech. the fbi are investigating thousands of fake e—mails sent from thousands of servers. star trek fans will only discover season four if they live in canada or us after netflix loses streaming to paramedic dhows before release. a new tube announced making private numbers private. apple will let users repair their own phones, sending the tools and parts available for the common
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fixes. those of us with the inclination, time and knowledge can purchase the manual and parts to fix the battery replacements in the iphone 12 and 13 and plans to offer the service next year before a global rollout and let me tell you from experience, it is not for the fainthearted! berlin robots with soft inside are now a possibility thanks to making soft actuators, and scientists at princeton university used bubble casting to use soft robots such as this star shaped one that can perform delicate tasks like picking up a blueberry! and here is dog phone, the toy pets can use to call owners. to help with separation anxiety, the internal on these toy allows a dog companion to move the ball to start the calling and even answer incoming calls to move the ball again to receive. it has obviously been thought up in the lab! i think it is fair
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to say that facebook has had a hard few weeks, down to frances haugen for leaking internal documents. james clayton has been wondering whether her testimony along with a new californian law may inspire others to come forward too. people like frances haugen are a rare thing and silicon valley. the decision she made to take on facebook wasn't taken lightly.— taken lightly. the company intentionally _ taken lightly. the company intentionally hides - taken lightly. the company intentionally hides vital - intentionally hides vital information from the public, the us government and governments around the world. silicon valley is notoriously secretive and notoriously litigious place when it comes to employees who want to put their head above the parapet to raise concerns.— raise concerns. how did big tech get — raise concerns. how did big tech get so _ raise concerns. how did big tech get so big? _ raise concerns. how did big tech get so big? and - raise concerns. how did big tech get so big? and one . raise concerns. how did big| tech get so big? and one of raise concerns. how did big - tech get so big? and one of the reasons it got so big to be honest is by exploiting
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thousands of people who work there in the way that they have managed to keep that exploitation going is by silencing people who work there, including through incredibly wide and broad nondisclosure agreements. i've honestly almost never seen anything like it. i'm a human rights lawyer who used to bring things against the cia and the culture of secrecy and fair at big tech is basically as bad as they used to see in the cia. tt they used to see in the cia. it means whistleblowers who want to come forward like frances haugen need to be extremely brave and have extremely deep pockets. nondisclosure and non—disparagement agreements have often been used here in silicon valley to try and silence employees. take them notorious case of theranos. paint me are what used to be theranos' very plush and expensive offices. the company claimed it could diagnose hundreds of diseases with just a few drops of blood. the
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problem was that idea was a fantasy, it didn't work. every erson fantasy, it didn't work. every person should _ fantasy, it didn't work. every person should have - fantasy, it didn't work. every person should have the - fantasy, it didn't work. everyl person should have the ability to get that type of test. elizabeth holmes, its founder, raised hundreds of millions of dollars from investors. and four years, dollars from investors. and fouryears, no—one dollars from investors. and four years, no—one knew that the technology didn't work. even major investors were in the dark. it took whistleblowers to come forward to expose the truth here, but they were met with a huge amount of legal pressure. now, amount of legal pressure. now, a new law in california aims to re—tip the balance away from companies using nda's to silence employees. the silence no more act was passed into californian law last month and it essentially dilutes the power of nda's. workers will have more protection to bring up have more protection to bring up things like harassment and discrimination. it is a huge win for whistleblowers. cher
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scarlett used to work at apple, she filed complaints about equal pay and then add some of her grievances publicly.- her grievances publicly. when we work at — her grievances publicly. when we work at these _ her grievances publicly. when we work at these huge - her grievances publicly. when - we work at these huge companies that have, you know, not only big huge external law firms but they also have lawyers in house, that is very intimidating, you know. i go and seek a lawyer and i'm looking up and it's like $500 an hour. you know? that is five times what i make. there is no way what they can afford it and i certainly don't understand all this legaljargon, so most people just give all this legaljargon, so most peoplejust give up. all this legaljargon, so most people just give up. it is very intimidating and scary. she believes the _ intimidating and scary. she believes the new _ intimidating and scary. she believes the new law - intimidating and scary. she believes the new law is a game changer. t believes the new law is a game chan . er. ~ believes the new law is a game chanaer. ~ ., ., changer. i think that more --eole changer. i think that more peeple will _ changer. i think that more people will start _ changer. i think that more people will start speaking | changer. i think that more . people will start speaking out because of this because there will be that plain language there that says you are allowed to talk about these things and they won't be so worried that a lawyer can come after them and take everything from them or that they won't be able to work again, you know, because they
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breached some agreement in their contract. they are going to see that they are allowed to talk about that and they are going to. talk about that and they are auoin to. . talk about that and they are aoian to. ., talk about that and they are aoain to. ., ., ., ., going to. the law in california comes into — going to. the law in california comes into force _ going to. the law in california comes into force in _ going to. the law in california comes into force in january i going to. the law in california i comes into force in january and scarlett is lobbying to replicate it in her home state of washington. things are changing in america's tech sector. farfrom frances haugen being an outlier, she may well have inspired others to do the same. big tech has many problems and the best disinfectant, as they say, is light. welcome to 0lympia in greece, as you have never seen it before stopping unless you are 2000 years old. the greek government has done a deal with microsoft to recreate the amphitheatres in augmented reality so visitors can feel
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what the area was like. experts and archaeologists use cameras and archaeologists use cameras and drones to scan the entire site in 3d, capturing as much detail as possible in both the buildings and the artefact, and visitors can enjoy the results in ar on their phones. among the 27 monuments that they can see are the original 0lympic stadium, the temples of zeus and error and the workshop of phidias, all of which have weathered thousands of years of war, erosion and earthquakes, and which now have been digitally refurbished. the technology _ digitally refurbished. the technology is _ digitally refurbished. tt2 technology is definitely changing the way visitors explore historical and ecological sites. it presents a different way of experiencing our cultural heritage, actually besides the 3d, the digital representation of the monument,
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it has the potential to demonstrate, to showcase aspects of life in ancient societies.— aspects of life in ancient societies. a ., societies. as part of the same projects. _ societies. as part of the same projects, visitors _ societies. as part of the same projects, visitors to _ societies. as part of the same projects, visitors to the - projects, visitors to the olympic museum can use a 0lympic museum can use a headset to see a miniature version of the site, and it is hoped that this form of digital archiving will continue to offer a portal to another error, to help us feel part of history, to understand what humanity has achieved in the past and possibly showing us what we are still capable of today. speaking of which, let's hop now greece to italy, to another ancient treasure. the lost city of pompeii was destroyed by an eruption of mount vesuvius in the first century. while a lot of the site was remarkably preserved, many details of life here were lost, including some of the colourful frescoes of the buildings. above the main site
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is the cacina rustica, a storage place for thousands of fragments of two frescoes destroyed in the initial eruption and damaged further by bombing in world war ii. how many pieces do you think are here? i think here we get 10,000 pieces of fragments at the moment. this is only a little part because in other storerooms we have more and more in a box that never studied before. the fragments come in all sorts of sizes, from tiny bits of rubble to big pieces. so no—one knows exactly how these frescoes look like. there are lots of missing pieces. it's not like an ordinary puzzle. there will be a lot of holes in this fresco. these are three—dimensional pieces which are flat on one side. 0n the flat side, there is usually some decoration, some colour, and there is a kind of a three—dimensional structure, and these pieces do not match exactly, so it's a very difficult and challenging problem.
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the puzzle has remained unsolved for decades, and now, a team led by the ca' foscari university of venice, will create a robotic system to analyse and eventually piece together the frescoes. called repair, or reconstructing the past: artificial intelligence and robotics meet cultural heritage, it's the first time machine learning and artificial intelligence techniques will be used to take on a project of this scale. the robot is scanning a piece of fresco using polarised lenses and so, at the end of the process, the piece will be scanned in 3d. with the same infrastructure and the same type of technology, we can also scan the same piece using hyperspectral sensors that are able to collect information that the human eyes cannot see. this information includes the residual colours of pigments used by the romans which cannot be seen
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with the naked eye. what we can see here is basically, the light coming from our object at different wavelengths. we can select the wavelength that we want to look at, and this amount gave us initial information of our material of our sample. different points on the objects can be selected to examine closely, with information given about similarities and differences between pixels in the image. once all of the information is collected, an algorithm will suggest how it thinks the pieces fit together and what's missing, and run it past a human expert. if this works, i think it will have a huge potential in future projects, both in pompeii and elsewhere, for not only wall paintings but also pottery fragments, which is the majority of finds
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during most excavations. and there is a huge potential in reconstructing and, yeah, analysing these finds. the final piece of the puzzle is a robot that will be built to be able to handle and reconstruct the frescoes using soft hands. the robot will pick up with its hands all the fragments, grasping every single pieces, and i think this kind of robotic colleague is like — maybe internet before 19 years. yes! now it's new and i hope it will be very usual and common for us in the future
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to have this kind of help. how interesting was that? absolutely. that wasjen in pompeii. that is it for the shortcut of click. as ever, you can keep up with the team on social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook, and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks for watching. we'll see you soon. bye— bye. hello. certainly a colder feel to the weather on sunday but also a sunnier look to things and for many will be a dry and largely day. exceptions, showers in the north of scotland, more spread down the east of england. the old shower in the west, northern ireland and wales
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will get the lion's share of the sunshine. adding a chill the proceedings are making these temperatures feel a bit lower will be a brisk northerly breeze, strongest around the coast of northern scotland, gusts up to 40 mph and still windy overnight into monday with a few showers. cloud increasing in the north of scotland, patchy rain here, temperatures holding up and on the north sea coast on the breeze and elsewhere under clear skies, a more widespread frost into monday. lighter winds on monday, sunny spells for england and wales, cloudy skies in scotland and northern ireland, patchy rain in the north of scotland and temperatures rallying again by a couple of degrees.
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this is bbc world news: i'm ben boulos. our top stories: a second night of violence in the netherlands as new coronavirus restrictions draw protesters onto the streets in the hague. the world health organization says it is very worried about the number of cases in europe, as the virus once again becomes the continent's biggest killer. success today does not mean success tomorrow because no country is an island. the missing tennis player peng shuai — new videos chinese media says were filmed this weekend fail to allay the fears of the international community. bad news for hong kong's wild boars — attacks on the public prompt authorities to launch a cull of the creatures
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