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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 20, 2021 10:30pm-11:01pm GMT

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hello. this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment. first the headlines. the world health organisation says it is very worried about the rise in covid—19 cases in europe — saying the disease is once again the continent's biggest killer and warns the uk against complacency. success today does not mean success tomorrow, because no country is an island. in the netherlands, more than 50
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people have been arrested, after protests over new covid restrictions in rotterdam erupted into rioting last night. record numbers of migrants crossing the channel prompts a government review. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are benjamin butterworth, late editor and senior reporterfor the i and former pensions minister, conservative peer, baroness roz altmann. good evening to both of you. first a reminder of some of those from pages. the observer leads with
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social care plans as it reports the prime minister is facing calls from senior conservatives to dump plan for care charges orface tory rebellion. another conservative warning takes the front of the telegraph, it writes that senior figures warn borisjohnson ' migrant crisis puts tories in peril�* and quoting that 77 percent of party s voters call approach too soft. meanwhile the times leads with the news that the health secretary has ordered a review into into racial bias in medical equipment, it writes that teh review is due to fears that thousands of ethnic minority patients who died of covid should have survived. �*bare faced again�* — the mirror focuses on the prime minister being reportedly �*maskless�* on a crowded train. fears that terrorists
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are slipping through the net, the independent�*s front page focuses on the impact the pandemic has has on referrals. �*i don't want to die�* — a schoolboy�*s plea schoolboy s plea to court as doctors look to end �*vital treatment�* so let�*s begin... that was a flavour of the front pages, benjamin and roars, very good evening. roars, you will kick us off, front page of the observer and the prime minister has been told, apparently, he needs to dump the plan for care charges other could be trouble the party. i plan for care charges other could be trouble the party-— trouble the party. i actually completely _ trouble the party. i actually completely agree. - trouble the party. i actually completely agree. i- trouble the party. i actually completely agree. i think i trouble the party. i actually i completely agree. i think that trouble the party. i actually - completely agree. i think that the plans for social care which were watered down this way, all of a sudden, without warning, and are supposed to pass through parliament this coming week are in deep trouble
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and need, in my view as well, to be rethought. what these plans will do is protect the wealthiest people, the people with the biggest and most expensive houses in particular or large amounts of assets, but the average middle—class voter in the north, say, or in areas of the country where house prices are not at the kind of levels that they reach in other places like the southeast, will still lose all their life savings, potentially, if they are unlucky enough to need care and it has not ended in any way the problem is that we face in social care. what we are seeing at the moment is a tory party which is deeply dissatisfied with many of the policies that are being decided and
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so far, except for the owen paterson case, the prime minister has been able to push things through the commons with his huge majority, but i think a lot of the backbench mps, since that experience of being humiliated when they voted with the three line whip against their own betterjudgment, are now saying, we are not going to do that again, and certainly the new redwall tories are saying this social care plan was already difficult, but what you have done is made it impossible for us to really try on sale on the doorstep. benjamin, when you look at their front page, it says that northern mps in particular or in a rage. yeah, i think borisjohnson needs to yeah, i think borisjohnson needs to tread _ yeah, i think borisjohnson needs to tread incredibly yeah, i think borisjohnson needs to tread incredibly carefully, because memories— tread incredibly carefully, because memories and politics might be short but a couple of years ago to raise a very clearly — but a couple of years ago to raise a very clearly lost the general election_ very clearly lost the general election against an opponent in
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jeremy— election against an opponent in jeremy corbyn who was thought to be a weak— jeremy corbyn who was thought to be a weak labour leader over this issue of who— a weak labour leader over this issue of who pays — a weak labour leader over this issue of who pays for care homes. what happens _ of who pays for care homes. what happens here as you're meant to get up happens here as you're meant to get up to— happens here as you're meant to get up to £86,000 before you have to sell anything and the idea was that so people — sell anything and the idea was that so people do not have to sell their homes _ so people do not have to sell their homes to— so people do not have to sell their homes to pay for social care needs, but of— homes to pay for social care needs, but of course — homes to pay for social care needs, but of course as baroness altman points _ but of course as baroness altman points out, — but of course as baroness altman points out, there is such a disparity_ points out, there is such a disparity in house prices which for the vast _ disparity in house prices which for the vast majority of people is now their_ the vast majority of people is now their one — the vast majority of people is now their one and only serious asset. in london. _ their one and only serious asset. in london, £86,000 is about 16.9% of the average person's personal wealth but in _ the average person's personal wealth but in the _ the average person's personal wealth but in the north—east were many of these _ but in the north—east were many of these seate— but in the north—east were many of these seats were picked up by boris johnson, _ these seats were picked up by boris johnson, it— these seats were picked up by boris johnson, it is more than 57% of the average _ johnson, it is more than 57% of the average personal wealth and there is an enormous disparity and what you can see _ an enormous disparity and what you can see here — an enormous disparity and what you can see here is that these supposedly redwall seats, the former labour _ supposedly redwall seats, the former labour seats that created boris johnsoh's — labour seats that created boris johnson's majority, they will be worst— johnson's majority, they will be worst affected by this and if you look at — worst affected by this and if you look at the questions about high
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rail in_ look at the questions about high rail in the — look at the questions about high rail in the past few days where the leeds_ rail in the past few days where the leeds and — rail in the past few days where the leeds and bradford park will not be extended _ leeds and bradford park will not be extended which has annoyed some new tory voters. _ extended which has annoyed some new tory voters, you can see why a lot of backbenchers are angry, but also a former— of backbenchers are angry, but also a former cabinet minister, damian green, _ a former cabinet minister, damian green, suggested it should be about a percentage of your personal wealth and not _ a percentage of your personal wealth and not a _ a percentage of your personal wealth and not a flat rate because that would _ and not a flat rate because that would mean you would not get the disparity— would mean you would not get the disparity between a middle—class person— disparity between a middle—class person in— disparity between a middle—class person in london at a middle—class in gateshead. we person in london at a middle-class in gateshead.— in gateshead. we will stay with the front -a . e in gateshead. we will stay with the front page of _ in gateshead. we will stay with the front page of the _ in gateshead. we will stay with the front page of the observer, roz, i in gateshead. we will stay with the i front page of the observer, roz, and go to the picture story there and it is labelled the red mist, this comes from austria and vienna.— is labelled the red mist, this comes from austria and vienna. vienna and in fact from austria and vienna. vienna and infect much — from austria and vienna. vienna and in fact much of— from austria and vienna. vienna and in fact much of continental— from austria and vienna. vienna and in fact much of continental europe i in fact much of continental europe at the moment is going through a huge surge in covid cases and what austria has done is impose new lockdowns and that has angered a lot of people and what you are seeing
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here is a really quite frightening march against lockdowns, they were letting off flares, there is real angen letting off flares, there is real anger, because i think most people might believe that lockdowns have helped a little bit, but some people think they have not really done much good and they do a lot of harm and they are now rebelling against this concept. i think a lot of us expected people to have rebelled at the earlier stages, but now that there is a vaccination and there are better treatments, there is a vaccination and there are bettertreatments, i there is a vaccination and there are better treatments, i think what a lot of people are increasingly saying is, if you want to isolate, fine, but if you are locking down the whole population, especially with younger people, who really want to go out and are used to going out, then many of them will start increasingly to protest and that is what you are seeing here. there are not any easy answers for the government, this is a tricky
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decision. government, this is a tricky decision-— government, this is a tricky decision. ., ., ., ., ., decision. we are going to go to the front -a~e decision. we are going to go to the front page of _ decision. we are going to go to the front page of the _ decision. we are going to go to the front page of the sunday _ decision. we are going to go to the front page of the sunday times, i decision. we are going to go to the front page of the sunday times, a l front page of the sunday times, a story that came out a number of months ago and this is the equipment thatis months ago and this is the equipment that is used to measure oxygen and it looks as though things are moving on this. i it looks as though things are moving on this. , _, ,, , on this. i must confess, it is the first time _ on this. i must confess, it is the first time i _ on this. i must confess, it is the first time i have _ on this. i must confess, it is the first time i have noticed - on this. i must confess, it is the first time i have noticed this. i on this. i must confess, it is the | first time i have noticed this. the health _ first time i have noticed this. the health secretary sajid javid is opening an enquiry into whether medicai— opening an enquiry into whether medical equipment has racial bias. so ethnic— medical equipment has racial bias. so ethnic minorities, non—white people — so ethnic minorities, non—white people are _ so ethnic minorities, non—white people are worse affected by the equipment they are using and the example — equipment they are using and the example that you give about oximeters, this machine that pins to your finger— oximeters, this machine that pins to your finger and shines a light through— your finger and shines a light through the tissue and itjudges your oxygen levels by how much light shines _ your oxygen levels by how much light shines through tissue. research from the us— shines through tissue. research from the us and _ shines through tissue. research from the us and investigations in this country— the us and investigations in this country say that people with darker skin can _ country say that people with darker skin can get misleading and it is far less —
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skin can get misleading and it is far less accurate for a black person than for— far less accurate for a black person than for me — far less accurate for a black person than for me as a white person and the reason — than for me as a white person and the reason that is so important after— the reason that is so important after the — the reason that is so important after the pandemic is because this was determining whether people went on potentially life—saving oxygen machines — on potentially life—saving oxygen machines which were so common for people _ machines which were so common for people who — machines which were so common for people who got seriously ill with covid-19 — people who got seriously ill with covid—19 and they are opening this and back— covid—19 and they are opening this and back -- — covid—19 and they are opening this and back —— investigation and in the us they— and back —— investigation and in the us they found that black people were three times more likely to have got an inaccurate result from these oximeter— an inaccurate result from these oximeter machines compared to a white _ oximeter machines compared to a white person. this is quite a serious _ white person. this is quite a serious mistake that might be made. from _ serious mistake that might be made. from page _ serious mistake that might be made. from page of the mirror, baroness, it is the prime minister, part of a trip that took place on thursday, travelling to manchester and he has been caught out without a mask again. been caught out without a mask aaain. ., been caught out without a mask aaain. . �* , ., been caught out without a mask aaain. . �*, ., . ., , again. yeah. there's not much doubt about this- — again. yeah. there's not much doubt about this- he _ again. yeah. there's not much doubt about this. he pictured, _ again. yeah. there's not much doubt about this. he pictured, on _ again. yeah. there's not much doubt about this. he pictured, on a - again. yeah. there's not much doubt about this. he pictured, on a train, l about this. he pictured, on a train, about this. he pictured, on a train, a reasonably crowded train, facing someone who is wearing a mask,
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completely without a mask. it is not mandatory by law now to wear a mask on the train, but on the tube you are expected to wear a mask, on other trains, apparently you can choose whether or not to do so. of course, if you expect others to look after the rest of the population then you are at least recommending or asking people to wear masks, it once again looks as if there is one rule for one group and one rule for everyone else. i do not think, in this instance that that criticism would be fair, but it is not a good look and it would have been sensible, i think for the prime minister when he is on this kind of public transport, on public view, perhaps to have chosen to wear a mask in this instance, but you know, it makes a good picture and a good story, i am it makes a good picture and a good story, iam not
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it makes a good picture and a good story, i am not sure that this is a major incident, if you are going to ask me. it major incident, if you are going to ask me. , ., ., , major incident, if you are going to ask me. , ., ., ., ask me. it is more a case of mixed messages — ask me. it is more a case of mixed messages because _ ask me. it is more a case of mixed messages because a _ ask me. it is more a case of mixed messages because a couple - ask me. it is more a case of mixed messages because a couple of- ask me. it is more a case of mixed i messages because a couple of weeks ago he was talking about mask wearing as being a common—sense thing when he listed what we should be doing. we are going to turn to the front page of the telegraph and what is happening in the tory party? there is more peril perhaps, this time with migrants.— there is more peril perhaps, this time with migrants. there is always eril in the time with migrants. there is always peril in the tory _ time with migrants. there is always peril in the tory party, _ time with migrants. there is always peril in the tory party, it _ time with migrants. there is always peril in the tory party, it is - time with migrants. there is always peril in the tory party, it is the - peril in the tory party, it is the permanent— peril in the tory party, it is the permanent story, but in this case it is about— permanent story, but in this case it is about the — permanent story, but in this case it is about the number of refugees, the number— is about the number of refugees, the number of— is about the number of refugees, the number of people coming across the engiish _ number of people coming across the english channel and there is really concerning saying that we have seen last year— concerning saying that we have seen last year and particularly in the last year and particularly in the last months, apparently the number of people _ last months, apparently the number of people coming through the channel is three _ of people coming through the channel is three times what it was last year already— is three times what it was last year already and — is three times what it was last year already and this is causing disquiet among _ already and this is causing disquiet among some tories, and one donor is quoted _ among some tories, and one donor is quoted in— among some tories, and one donor is quoted in the — among some tories, and one donor is quoted in the sunday telegraph as saying _ quoted in the sunday telegraph as saying this is a serious problem and what it— saying this is a serious problem and what it will— saying this is a serious problem and what it will mean is that it will
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open — what it will mean is that it will open up — what it will mean is that it will open up the space for an nigel farage — open up the space for an nigel farage style party to sweep up voters _ farage style party to sweep up voters who are so concerned about protecting — voters who are so concerned about protecting our borders. i think it puts— protecting our borders. i think it puts the — protecting our borders. i think it puts the prime minister in a difficult _ puts the prime minister in a difficult position, because we know from past — difficult position, because we know from past elections that protecting the borders was a key reason that a lot of— the borders was a key reason that a lot of people voted to leave the eu, it was _ lot of people voted to leave the eu, it was clearly a topic. if you look at the _ it was clearly a topic. if you look at the polling, it has fallen down, environmental issues are far higher and dare _ environmental issues are far higher and dare i— environmental issues are far higher and dare i be a bit cynical, but the kind of— and dare i be a bit cynical, but the kind of tories concerned about this are always — kind of tories concerned about this are always on the right of the party and they— are always on the right of the party and they are always making these arguments and i think they might be trying _ arguments and i think they might be trying to— arguments and i think they might be trying to use the current crisis which — trying to use the current crisis which is — trying to use the current crisis which is very serious to try and increase — which is very serious to try and increase leveraged against boris johnson — increase leveraged against boris johnson. one accused him of drifting into being _ johnson. one accused him of drifting into being a — johnson. one accused him of drifting into being a centre is like david cameron, — into being a centre is like david cameron, which many of us might not think of— cameron, which many of us might not think of such — cameron, which many of us might not think of such a bad thing.— think of such a bad thing. baroness, i know think of such a bad thing. baroness, i know you — think of such a bad thing. baroness, i know you would _ think of such a bad thing. baroness, i know you would have _ think of such a bad thing. baroness, i know you would have a _ think of such a bad thing. baroness, i know you would have a lot - think of such a bad thing. baroness, i know you would have a lot to - think of such a bad thing. baroness, i know you would have a lot to say l i know you would have a lot to say on this, but i wonder if we could please move, we will do this in the
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11:30pm. iwant please move, we will do this in the 11:30pm. i want to move to an international story because it has gone global and that is the whereabouts and the welfare of the chinese tennis star peng shuai. baroness, could you take is to that, front page of the independent. absolutely. chinese state television, i think, absolutely. chinese state television, ithink, released absolutely. chinese state television, i think, released a picture of peng shuai, who looks in the picture of health, smiling and seemingly relaxed, but she has not been seen in public for i think it is about two weeks now and she did criticise the chinese state and there are deep concerns. andy murray has expressed concerns about whether or not she has been in some way captured by the chinese authorities, some strange apology was released
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and people are thinking that she is being pressurised and what i think the americans are saying now is we want proper evidence that she is free, she is not being held against her will and this photograph does not really prove anything. fik. her will and this photograph does not really prove anything. ok. we have run out _ not really prove anything. ok. we have run out of— not really prove anything. ok. we have run out of time, _ not really prove anything. ok. we have run out of time, but - not really prove anything. ok. we have run out of time, butjust - not really prove anything. ok. we have run out of time, butjust to l have run out of time, butjust to remind viewers that the allegations made against a former vice premier concerned sexual assault, but we are going to have more discussions. that�*s it for the papers this hour. benjamin butterworth,and baroness roz altmann will be back at half past eleven for another look at the papers. goodbye for now. stay with us, click is up next.
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on this programme, we see a lot of really useful technology, but some things are just solutions looking for problems. the first obvious place for vr was gaming, but once the technology had proved that it was properly immersive, we started to see signs that it really could take us to real places. it could put us in all sorts of situations, including education and even medicine. and sometimes, technology turns out to be most useful where you least expect it. i�*ve seen vr used to help people overcome phobias. you�*ve seen it used to teach students how to do surgery. but this has to be the most powerful use of vr i have ever seen.
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six—month—old archie was born with sagittal synostosis. you are a happy boy, aren�*t you? a condition where a baby�*s growth lines in the skull fuse too early. this means as the brain grows, the skull can�*t grow sideways to accommodate it, so it expands front and back, distorting the head shape. oh, that was nice! while it is not life—threatening, it leaves parents like amanda and judd faced with a difficult decision as to whether they opt for the risks of surgery or let nature take its course, with the physical and psychological impacts that follow. it�*s been quite overwhelming, hasn�*t it? like, there�*s been a lot of appointments and a lot of time away. so, when offered the chance to be the first to use
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a groundbreaking new ai platform that predicts the outcome of the operation in virtual reality, theyjumped at the chance. you are able to see your own child�*s condition or your own child�*s heart or head projected into this virtual environment, with a full feeling of what will happen in terms of the treatment to your own child. i�*ve come here to great ormond street hospital tojoin the family for their consultation where, for the first time, they�*re going to get to see the virtual reality. you�*re about to see now what will hopefully be the final result. how are you feeling? excited. and obviously, there is always that worry about what he is going to have done. archie babbles. and that's what he thinks of it! you will be placed in - an immersive world and you're going to be able to| interact with things using the controllers.
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so here is archie�*s skull as it stands now that we have done the reconstruction using the ct scan. and as you can see, this is the side view. we�*ve got the forehead here, the back of the head here, and these lines are the sutures — the ones that are working still, the growth lines. so the way we do the surgery is we make a small window in the bone, here. the algorithms needed to create these images have been made possible by the harnessing of data from 60 operations over the course of the last seven years. so here, the grey is the head shape as it�*s now, the green is the predicted head shape, so the first change that you can see is that the back of his head which, at the moment is sloping down, is pushed up a little and there�*s a more regular curvature to it. this immersive experience allows the parents to see from all angles a truly
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personalised picture of exactly how archie�*s head can be reshaped with surgery. would you like us to suggest anything about the head shape that you would like to see done differently? no, i think it's the back of the head that we are noticing the most. indeed, and that you should see within a week or two of surgery... wow, ok. ..you can see the back going in. and, having confirmed their decision to go ahead, within a few weeks, the big day arrived. the theatre is just being prepared as, in a few minutes, archie is coming into his surgery where a spring like this is going to be inserted into his skull through a small cut. it will immediately expand and start to change the shape of his head, and then continue to do so over the next four weeks. at that point, it can be removed.
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invented by doctorjeelani 13 years ago, this technique has reduced operation time from three hours to a0 minutes, cut blood transfusions by 90% and provides more predictable outcomes. ok, spring engaged. and it�*s that predictability that�*s made the data usable for visualisations with 90% accuracy. so we have just finished. the surgery�*s gone really well. the springs are in, we�*ve seen an expansion on the table and we should meet our predictions over the next few weeks. what we�*ve seen here is being created for one particular condition, but it could be applied to many different types of surgery in the future. what we have shown here is essentially proof of principle — that if you take a condition, an art form, make it granular enough that you can study it and put it on engineering and ai platforms, then you can actually predict the future with a reasonable degree of accuracy.
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what i would like to see as a surgeon in ten, perhaps 20 years�* time, is that most surgeries — most surgical practice is done this way, where the control and the power is very much given to the parents and the patients. two weeks on from surgery and we visited archie and his family. we�*re quite relieved that we are over the other side now. archie�*s doing really well. so we�*ve been told that obviously now he�*s had it done, there shouldn�*t be any concerns with development and things, so we�*re really with how it went. but having the opportunity of doing the vr really, really sort of reassured us that we were doing the right thing. i know that was something that did cross our mind at first, but being able to actually see the before and after was quite a relief of that pressure, wasn�*t it? it lifted that weight off our shoulders so, yeah, we�*re happy.
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the lost city of pompeii was destroyed by an eruption of mount vesuvius in the first century. while a lot of the site was remarkably preserved, many details of life here were lost, including some of the colourful frescoes of the buildings. above the main site is the cacina rustica, a storage place for thousands of fragments of two frescoes destroyed in the initial eruption and damaged further by bombing in world war ii. how many pieces do you think are here? i think here we get 10,000 pieces of fragments at the moment. this is only a little part because in other storerooms we have more and more in a box that never studied before. the fragments come in all sorts of sizes, from tiny bits of rubble to big pieces. so no—one knows exactly how
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these frescoes look like. there are lots of missing pieces. it�*s not like an ordinary puzzle. there will be a lot of holes in this fresco. these are three—dimensional pieces which are flat on one side. on the flat side, there is usually some decoration, some colour, and there is a kind of a three—dimensional structure, and these pieces do not match exactly, so it�*s a very difficult and challenging problem. the puzzle has remained unsolved for decades, and now, a team led by the ca�* foscari university of venice, will create a robotic system to analyse and eventually piece together the frescoes. called repair, or reconstructing the past: artificial intelligence and robotics meet cultural heritage, it�*s the first time machine learning and artificial intelligence techniques will be used to take on a project of this scale. the robot is scanning a piece of fresco using polarised lenses and so, at the end
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of the process, the piece will be scanned in 3d. with the same infrastructure and the same type of technology, we can also scan the same piece using hyperspectral sensors that are able to collect information that the human eyes cannot see. this information includes the residual colours of pigments used by the romans which cannot be seen with the naked eye. what we can see here is basically, the light coming from our object at different wavelengths. we can select the wavelength that we want to look at, and this amount gave us initial information of our material of our sample. different points on the objects can be selected to examine closely, with information given about similarities and differences between pixels in the image. once all of the information
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is collected, an algorithm will suggest how it thinks the pieces fit together and what�*s missing, and run it past a human expert. if this works, i think it will have a huge potential in future projects, both in pompeii and elsewhere, for not only wall paintings but also pottery fragments, which is the majority of finds during most excavations. and there is a huge potential in reconstructing and, yeah, analysing these finds. the final piece of the puzzle is a robot that will be built to be able to handle and reconstruct the frescoes using soft hands. the robot will pick up with its hands all the fragments, grasping every single pieces, and i think this kind of robotic colleague is like — maybe internet before 19 years. yes! now it�*s new and i hope it
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will be very usual and common for us in the future to have this kind of help. how interesting was that? absolutely. that wasjen in pompeii. that is it for the shortcut of click. the full—length version is waiting for you right now on iplayer. as ever, you can keep up with the team on social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook, and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks for watching. we�*ll see you soon. bye— bye. hello. certainly a colder feel to the weather on sunday but also a sunnier look to things and for many will be
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a dry and largely day. exceptions, showers in the north of scotland, more spread down the east of england. the old shower in the west, northern ireland and wales will get the lion�*s share of the sunshine. adding a chill the proceedings are making these temperatures feel a bit lower will be a brisk northerly breeze, strongest around the coast of northern scotland, gusts up to a0 mph and still windy overnight into monday with a few showers. cloud increasing in the north of scotland, patchy rain here, temperatures holding up and on the north sea coast on the breeze and elsewhere under clear skies, a more widespread frost into monday. lighter winds on monday, sunny spells for england and wales, cloudy skies in scotland and northern ireland, patchy rain in the northern ireland, patchy rain in the north of scotland and temperatures rallying again by a couple of degrees.
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this is bbc news. i�*m lukwesa burak with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. horse a second night of violent demonstrations in the netherlands — against covid restrictions, after the city of rotterdam was rocked on friday night. as coronavirus infection rates rise across europe, tens of thousands take to the streets in austria, in protest against a new lockdown and plans for mandatory vaccines. the world health organisation says it is very worried about the rise in covid cases in europe, as the virus once again becomes the continent�*s biggest killer. success success today does not mean success tomorrow because no country is an island.
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in other news, the us secretary of state warns of "real concerns"

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