Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 20, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

6:00 pm
this is bbc news the headlines at six the world health organisation says it is very worried about the rise in covid cases in europe — and is urging countries to "drastically" increase the use of face masks and vaccinations. more than 50 people have been arrested, after protests over new covid restrictions in rotterdam erupted into rioting last night. record numbers of migrants crossing the channel prompts a government review a public consultation starts on a potential ban on single—use plastics like disposable cutlery and polystyrene boxes in england and coming up in sportsday — how the premier league's 3 new managers fared in theirfirst games.
6:01 pm
good afternoon. the world health organisation has called for an urgent tightening of measures across europe to halt spiralling transmission rates of the virus. in the netherlands — the mayor of rotterdam has condemned what he's called "an orgy of violence" after protestors took to the streets to demonstrate against coronavirus restrictions. the netherlands is one of a number of places in europe to re—impose a lockdown because of a surge in cases. from rotterdam our europe correspondent anna holligan reports. rotterdam, the netherlands second city. scarred by a night of rage. riot police came from across the country to try and quell the uprising. they fired warning shots and then live rounds. in response to scenes condemned by rotterdam's mayor
6:02 pm
as an orgy of violence. translation: on several occasions, police officers had _ to draw their weapons to defend themselves. some aimed shots were fired. at least seven were injured. restrictions in the netherlands began last saturday and will be in place for another two weeks at least. the streets are peaceful now but the atmosphere across the country remains volatile. the netherlands is battling record infection rates and the government is considering new restrictions targeting the unvaccinated. in austria today, supporters of the far right freedom party marched against mandatory coronavirus vaccines. a 20 day lockdown will start next week, working from home will be ordered and only essential shops will stay open. germany fears and national
6:03 pm
health scare emergency. new measures expected for those who haven't had theirjabs, a full lockdown is still on the cards. the uk is not yet seen such a dramatic surge in cases. the uk has not yet seen such a dramatic surge in cases. and these are some of the reasons why. many countries faced delta a bit later, so they're dealing with it now and some of them opened up later than we did~ _ and there is differences in vaccines. you have high levels and uptake in some populations in some european countries. higher roots in the uk sure that the push to encourage people to get their boosterjabs continues. the incentive for many, the avoidance of harsher rules like those enforced elsewhere. let's have a look at how the uk is performing in comparison to other european countries — as based on figures we had two days ago. this graph shows a rolling seven—day
6:04 pm
average of daily cases per million people in italy, germany, and here in the uk. but look what happens when we include the netherlands and austria. we can see can see how the numbersjump to more than double those rates for the uk and germany. we can speak now to hans kluge 7 the world health organisation s regional director for europe. thank you very much. how concerned are you by the picture that you're sitting across europe? we are you by the picture that you're sitting across europe?— sitting across europe? we are definitely worried. _ sitting across europe? we are definitely worried. of - sitting across europe? we are definitely worried. of the - sitting across europe? we are | definitely worried. of the good sitting across europe? we are - definitely worried. of the good news is, we know what to do. let's look at the positive side. portugal, spain, recently they're implementing what i call a vaccination plus spot. they are vaccinating their boosting, and also implementing the basic measures like masks, average 40% of the european population is wearing a mask indoor and evening percentage
6:05 pm
above that will have an immediate effect, much more attention will be paid to ventilation and finally, to new treatment protocols which will have to be standardised.— have to be standardised. austria wants to make _ have to be standardised. austria wants to make vaccinations - wants to make vaccinations mandatory. how wise is that we are already seeing people on the streets protesting about the new lockdown severe imposing?— severe imposing? confidence complacency _ severe imposing? confidence complacency and _ severe imposing? confidence. complacency and convenience. severe imposing? confidence - complacency and convenience. the mandatory vaccination has to be really a last resort. we have to be sure that all of the axis values are removed but i do think it is starting to have a legal and societal debate about mandatory vaccinations. but societal debate about mandatory vaccinations.— societal debate about mandatory vaccinations. ., ~ , ., vaccinations. but not likely to take lace until vaccinations. but not likely to take place until next _ vaccinations. but not likely to take place until next year, _ vaccinations. but not likely to take place until next year, the - vaccinations. but not likely to take l place until next year, the mandatory vaccinations. we've got several weeks of winter to get through. what are you hoping that you will see?
6:06 pm
how are you encouraging different countries to respond to these rising numbers of? rep countries to respond to these rising numbers of?— countries to respond to these rising numbers of? , ., ,, numbers of? rep has missed the boat unfortunately. — numbers of? rep has missed the boat unfortunately, so _ numbers of? rep has missed the boat unfortunately, so all— numbers of? rep has missed the boat unfortunately, so all the _ numbers of? rep has missed the boat unfortunately, so all the efforts - unfortunately, so all the efforts have to focus on keeping mortality down. 7200 deaths a day and ms. covid—i9 is back in the number one cause of mortality and that is why the vaccination, the booster, the masks, the clinical treatment protocols and the means for example of covid—i9 passports, it is not limiting liberty, it is collective tool to avoid more painful lockdown. we look at the experience of the united kingdom, what might other countries learn from the uk because this country did manage to get the vaccines rolled out fast and many people are having their third boosterjab._
6:07 pm
boosterjab. yes, that is the vaccination _ boosterjab. yes, that is the vaccination valid, _ boosterjab. yes, that is the vaccination valid, every - boosterjab. yes, that is the i vaccination valid, every country boosterjab. yes, that is the - vaccination valid, every country did good things in every country could have done some things better. they think the key here is that success today does not mean success tomorrow because no country is an island. so, in essence, the uk is also better off by implementing the strict public health and social measures to keep the situation as it is and to further improve.— keep the situation as it is and to further improve. would you advise the british government _ further improve. would you advise the british government to - further improve. would you advise the british government to do, - further improve. would you advise the british government to do, that it has not done in the past that should do in the future because there's been a huge amount of criticism of the number of cases that we have had in the sheer number of people who have died here. too many countries of the pandemic was over well in fact it many countries of the pandemic was over well in fact— over well in fact it was 'ust another i over well in fact it was 'ust another way i over well in fact it was 'ust another way of i over well in fact it was just another way of passing. i over well in fact it was just i another way of passing. so over well in fact it was just - another way of passing. so goes over well in fact it was just _ another way of passing. so goes back to the basics. vaccination, booster, masks, clinical protocols and of
6:08 pm
course, it has to be based on the national situation. course, it has to be based on the nationalsituation. so, course, it has to be based on the national situation. so, a continuous risk approach, but do not lift the guards too early. we should learn that. ., . ., ., , .,~ guards too early. we should learn that. ., . ., ., that. how much of a mistake was it to describe — that. how much of a mistake was it to describe measures _ that. how much of a mistake was it to describe measures as _ that. how much of a mistake was it| to describe measures as lockdowns, rather than protections? if we change the language, do you think people might be more willing to accept them?— people might be more willing to accept them? yes. i think that is important- _ accept them? yes. i think that is important- a _ accept them? yes. i think that is important. a year _ accept them? yes. i think that is important. a year ago, - accept them? yes. i think that is important. a year ago, the - accept them? yes. i think that is - important. a year ago, the lockdown was a shut down and i think it is important to remind the people of that one, the whole economy came to a standstill with disastrous impacts on mental health and increase of domestic violence, including intimate sexual violence. so, domestic violence, including intimate sexualviolence. so, in that sense, to put public health measures of covid—i9 passports, is not a lockdown, it is really to keep a safe and to have a balance between
6:09 pm
life and livelihoods. brute a safe and to have a balance between life and livelihoods.— life and livelihoods. we appreciate ou takin: life and livelihoods. we appreciate you taking the _ life and livelihoods. we appreciate you taking the time _ life and livelihoods. we appreciate you taking the time to _ life and livelihoods. we appreciate you taking the time to talk- life and livelihoods. we appreciate you taking the time to talk to - life and livelihoods. we appreciate you taking the time to talk to us. i you taking the time to talk to us. thank you. there's to be a review into how to prevent migrants crossing the english channel to the uk. it follows months of pressure on the government over record numbers of people making the journey — as our political correspondent, iain watson explained. the pressure is on. 2a,000 roughly crossing so far this year or three times the level of last year and given that level of pressure, there is some frustration from the prime minister that preps the government doesn't seem to be getting to grips with this, it's a government that pledged to take back control of the border, the labour leader was weighing in on this yesterday. there's going to be this cross departmental review what i'm told in with the premise wants to see is the same type of focused across whitehall on this issue as it is on tackling covid—i9. he has decided to nominate steve barkley, the cabinet
6:10 pm
officer is his problem solver is conducted drink from this poisoned chalice of the next week or so. until the very things is going be looking at is more data on why people are coming to the channel in, but also he is going to come up with whether any new policies are required in this area and i in terms of solid achievements and review our very many initiatives, big interventions of already been prevent people from setting sail in the first place and actually have potential to stop the crossings but we are reaching record numbers this year and that has not worked. this from policy initiatives to turn boats back towards france but these have not yet talks of potentially processing people offshore but nothing is quite happy there either. the review will be looking at successful and failed attempts to try to control this problem but fundamentally, it is a big headache
6:11 pm
for the prime minister and his increasing frustration if your is trying something new to try to get to grips with the crisis. in other news. there's growing concern over the safety of chinese tennis star, pung who made sexual assault allegations against a former chinese vice—premier, two weeks ago. photos have been posted on social media and in the last few hours 2 videos have emerged of her eating in a restaurant but there's some scepticism about their authenticity. hundreds of tesla drivers have been locked out of their vehicles following a technical problem. the company's founder elon musk has apologised after a fault with the app stopped customers connecting to their car. tesla said the problem should now be resolved. and in america, the highway was strewn with cash after an armoured vehicle had a minor accident. bags of notes fell out of an open door when the vehicle was near san diego. the authorities are appealing to those who picked up the money to hand it back.
6:12 pm
there have been calls for calm in the united states after yesterday's court verdict that cleared a teenager of murder. eighteen year old kyle rittenhouse had argued he was acting in self—defence when he shot dead two men and injured a third during unrest last year over a police shooting of a black man. the not—guilty verdict has divided the country, as our north america correspondent nomia iqbal now reports. who's streets? our streets! hundreds of people marched through new york and protest at the verdict. in the city of portland, a riot broke out after protesters smashed windows and threw rocks at police. but nothing on the scale of last year's unrest. i'm alive but what could've happened? after the verdict came out, he spoke to one of america's most conservative talk show host. tucker carlson. self—defense is not illegal. i believe they came to the correct
6:13 pm
verdict and i'm glad that everything went well and it has been a rough journey, but we've made it through it. we made it through the hard part. the case goes beyond that in this house in kenosha. for politicians, kyle rittenhouse is a brave patriot who was for republican politicians, kyle rittenhouse is a brave patriot who was defending himself that night after being chased. in many democrats are worried that by not being held accountable for killing two men and injuring the third, it sends a dangerous message. the vice president said the decision reflected poorly on the justice system. the verdict speaks for itself and as many of you know, i spend a majority of my career - working to make the criminaljustice system more equitable and clearly, there's a lot more to be done. - president biden says he understands the angry and concern by some but struck a more measured tone. i stand by what the jury has concluded, the jury system works and we have to abide by it.
6:14 pm
this case has exposed so many divisions that already exist in america about gun laws, racism and left versus right. the story of this teenager will do almost nothing to bring the sides together. the headlines on bbc news. the world health organisation says it is very worried about the rise in covid cases in europe — and is urging countries to "drastically" increase the use of face masks and vaccinations. more than 50 people have been arrested, after protests over new covid restrictions in rotterdam erupted into rioting last night. the government is launching a review into how to stop migrants crossing the english channel in small boats. ealier we heard from friends of the earth plastics campaign lead, camilla zerr — and i started by asking her how helpful is it to ban something like a plastic cup? single—use plastics such as plates and cutlery,
6:15 pm
they this product by product approach isn't enough. it's not that helpful to do just one item at the time. we really need is an overarching target to reduce all types of plastic pollution that target needs to be in love right now so these high—profile bands which are helpful, but to give the impression that the battle is being one when actually it's getting worse and they need notjust the commonly litter types of plastic, but all plastics. litter types of plastic, but all lastics. ., ~' , , litter types of plastic, but all lastics. ., ~ , , ., plastics. how likely is it that we can let plastics. how likely is it that we can get away — plastics. how likely is it that we can get away from _ can get away from plastic completely? because there are times where it is the only thing they'll actually the purpose we needed for. not all plastics should be gotten rid of. some plastics really essential for health purposes and for people with disabilities many of the reasons. so what we're saying is
6:16 pm
that we need to get rid of those unnecessary single use plastics that very easily could be replaced by a result reusable alternative or refillable alternative that is possible because there are countries where it is already the case and we know that it's the past 20 years or so that we see a search of single use plastic items and actually will be used to use were way more reusable. bottles, coffee cups, things are to be refilled, your supermarket, that is something that is absolutely possible. you supermarket, that is something that is absolutely possible.— is absolutely possible. you say it is absolutely possible. you say it is caettin is absolutely possible. you say it is getting worse. _ is absolutely possible. you say it is getting worse, but _ is absolutely possible. you say it is getting worse, but how - is absolutely possible. you say it is getting worse, but how is - is absolutely possible. you say it is getting worse, but how is the | is getting worse, but how is the pandemic to do with that because very quickly, into the lock, we're still able to go to coffee shops, we were told that we could not use or reusable cups? we had to use throwing ones.— reusable cups? we had to use throwing ones. yes. it is really hard at this — throwing ones. yes. it is really hard at this stage _ throwing ones. yes. it is really hard at this stage to _ throwing ones. yes. it is really hard at this stage to tell -
6:17 pm
throwing ones. yes. it is reallyl hard at this stage to tell exactly how much the pandemic had an effect on the increase of single use plastics and specifically, single use masks, coffee cups, etc because the general date is not out there yet. i will be can say is that is really heartbreaking to see the rs pc a showing that more and more animals are being found tangled up in single use plastic masks and beach surveys that show two thirds of beaches, while they've never been seen that before and all of this can be avoided in quite earlier under the pandemic, over hundred scientists from across the road came in to really say to the public and the governments of the world, reusable is safe to use, a to do is use some of the basic hygiene that have windows about watching these items well with soap and water once they've been used.— they've been used. what extent you auree they've been used. what extent you a . ree with they've been used. what extent you agree with friends _ they've been used. what extent you agree with friends of— they've been used. what extent you agree with friends of the _ they've been used. what extent you agree with friends of the earth - they've been used. what extent you agree with friends of the earth as l agree with friends of the earth as to what the government is doing and
6:18 pm
trying to doing this product by product banning of things. we agree that all of these products, plastic plates, need to be banned. but i would say it is too little too late and we are called for the government to set an overarching target and love right now and this can be all plastic, we cannot be set with just getting rid of the most commonly littered plastic items, that is a baseline and the rest of europe, all of those items have not really been banned this year all of those items have not really been banned this yea— of those items have not really been banned this year all those items are now no longer— banned this year all those items are now no longer on _ banned this year all those items are now no longer on sale, _ banned this year all those items are now no longer on sale, barbie - now no longer on sale, barbie waiting until april 2023, which is what the government is proposing right now, to consider banning these items? i right now, to consider banning these items? . , right now, to consider banning these items? ., , , , items? i have seen in places where there plastic _ items? i have seen in places where there plastic straws, _ items? i have seen in places where there plastic straws, they're - items? i have seen in places where there plastic straws, they're not. there plastic straws, they're not paper straws. there plastic straws, they're not paperstraws. i there plastic straws, they're not paper straws. i see where this plastic cutlery, bamboo and wouldn't cut three. still throwing it away and how much of a problem is that
6:19 pm
because it takes energy, carbon to create these things and they're still only used once. i completely auree. still only used once. i completely agree- there's — still only used once. i completely agree. there's a _ still only used once. i completely agree. there's a problem - still only used once. i completely agree. there's a problem here i still only used once. i completely l agree. there's a problem here with still only used once. i completely - agree. there's a problem here with a switch from one material plastic to another material wood or paper and friends of the earth, you shouldn't be making that switch to others use product, but we should be doing is focusing on reusable items or refill. i think we need to be building an economy that prioritises re—use refill and repair are both single use items and instead of these used once and throw away way of living. and i will not distort the problem but create a less wasteful society for the materials as well. a record number of people died while detained under the mental health act in england during the coronavirus pandemic. that's according to early estimates from the independent regulator, the care quality commission. the figures come amid concerns that staffing shortages are compromising patient safety in psychiatric wards
6:20 pm
and across the nhs. patrick baker reports — and a warning — his report contains flashing images. after struggling with his mental health throughout most of his teenage years, 17—year—old charlie millers became increasingly unwell during the second half of 2020. he went downhill in thejuly time. he was then sectioned. charlie spent the next few months in and out of the mental health unit at prestwich hospital in manchester. in early december last year, he returned to the ward following a night at home. i dropped him off at quarter to eight at night. he was in really good spirits and then i got a phone call at quarter to ii to say that they were doing cpr on him. during the course of that evening charlie had made four attempts on his life, the last of which proved fatal. a confidential nhs report into charlie's death said that due to sickness absence being reported that day there was no qualified
6:21 pm
nurse rostered on duty for the night shift. the nurse in charge agreed to cover the shift. she had worked from 9am to 4pm and returned at 7pm. in a statement the nhs trust that runs prestwich hospital expressed its deepest sympathies but said it would be inappropriate to comment further until the coroner's inquest has concluded. between 2012 and 2019 an average 273 people died each year while detained in hospital or being supervised in the community under the mental health act in england. but early estimates for the first year of the pandemic suggest a record high, with 490 people dying between march 2020 and march 2021. i think staff shortages are compromising patient safety in every part of the nhs at the moment. we have a workforce crisis and it's time we completely overhauled the way we decide how many doctors and nurses we are going to train for the future.
6:22 pm
the department of health and social care said there are now record numbers of doctors and nurses working in the nhs. they said they are investing £2.3 billion a year by 2023—24 to transform mental health care and will bring forward plans to reform the mental health act. charlie's mum samantha says she is still waiting for a clear explanation about how her son could have lost his life in the very place that was meant to keep him safe. a full inquest into charlie's death starts next year. we've been reporting on the covid situation causing concerns across europe. here in the uk we've received the official daily figures from the government — they show that a further 150 people had died within 28 days of testing positive for covid—i9 as of today, bringing the uk total to 143,866. and, as of 9am on saturday, there had been a further 40,941 lab—confirmed covid—19 cases in the uk,
6:23 pm
and we've been talking about vaccine take—up in countries such as austria. well, here in the uk now more than 25% of the population have had there booster — or third vaccine dose, according to the official data. regular trains are returning to the dartmoor line in devon — for the first time in almost 50 years. from today, great western railway services will run between okehampton and exeter. it's part of a government scheme to restore abandoned railway lines. john maguire reports. when the railway arrived in okehampton, the town through a huge street party to celebrate. that was 150 years ago. the next century saw crowds gather for other important occasions, to name trains and to send the town sun is off to war. to name trains and to send the towns sons off to war.
6:24 pm
and even the line's closure in 1972, part of the beeching cuts, was marked with some ceremony. today, the festivities continue as scheduled passenger services return, in the world for years of campaigning. back in the summer, we filmed the new tracks being laid. fantastic. this is the moment, isn't it, really, when the track gets put down, the new track and it is going to be shortly, hopefully, a trained exeter. how long have you been working on this? well, i arrived on okehampton in 1805 and ice of it well, i arrived on okehampton in 1975 and i saw it going largely derelict then and that was when i first became interested in it. the line is the very first to be open as part of the government's restoring your railway scheme but this week we have seen controversy and anger elsewhere with the scrapping of the hs2 link to leeds and the northern powerhouse line between leeds and manchester. the restoration of the dartmoor line was made easier by the fact that
6:25 pm
after closing to passenger services it continued to be used in transporting railway ballast from a nearby quarry. it also ran as a heritage railway but now it has been upgraded. it is not as easy as you think. it hasn't been in good condition- but there is a huge amount of work. we have done 11 miles of track. insulation in the past four weeks. it has actually been one - of the fastest track installations in network rail history. this is the new track construction machine, an impressive piece of kit, around a quarter a mile long. you can see what is happening is a grade on top one is back, grab the sleepers, brings it to the front of the train and then lays them in a perfectly straight line on the bed with the two tracks on top. it will run at a rate of around 400 metres per hour. and in the belly of the beast it is ryan'sjob to keep the machine, well, on track.
6:26 pm
my position is to ensure it is somewhere near and usually i am pretty good so you have to constantly monitor the height of your clamps so they don't hit your sleepers, the spacing of the veil behind you and obviously the line itself. so it is a concentration game? yeah, big time. after a week where the government has been accused of reneging on promised rail improvements in the north of england reopening this line may seem a small step but it is a giant leap for people here. the passengers who will use it in the community that will serve. john maguire, bbc news, devon. almost 40—million—pounds has been raised by the bbc children in need appeal. the show was jam packed with the usual comedy sketches and star studded performances — as our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson reports.
6:27 pm
children in need took place in the north. the city and saw folk and some familiar people were here to welcome them. as sharon kicked off the proceedings but it wasn't the most talked about music performance of the evening. that belongs to the all—star pulpit ensemble covering the starship classic. and ina and in a special news and sports episode of i can see your voice, the challenge was to work out if this was his real singing voice. turns out it wasn't. hi. east enders made
6:28 pm
coronation steve mcdonnell on the first date. by, coronation steve mcdonnell on the first date. �* .., , coronation steve mcdonnell on the first date. ~ , ., , coronation steve mcdonnell on the firstdate. ~ , ., , first date. a couple of times in? seven. first date. a couple of times in? seven- on _ first date. a couple of times in? seven. on the _ first date. a couple of times in? seven. on the life _ first date. a couple of times in? seven. on the life and - first date. a couple of times in? seven. on the life and times i first date. a couple of times in? seven. on the life and times of| first date. a couple of times in? . seven. on the life and times of her co-host, graham _ seven. on the life and times of her co-host, graham norton. _ seven. on the life and times of her co-host, graham norton. what - seven. on the life and times of her co-host, graham norton. what is l co-host, graham norton. what is graham norton's _ co-host, graham norton. what is graham norton's favourite - co-host, graham norton. what is graham norton's favourite film? | graham norton's favourite film? cling _ graham norton's favourite film? cling film — graham norton's favourite film? cling film no, _ graham norton's favourite film? cling film. no, et. _ graham norton's favourite film? cling film. no, et.— graham norton's favourite film? cling film. no, et. how much is 24 hourtrauma _ cling film. no, et. how much is 24 hour trauma thought _ cling film. no, et. how much is 24 hour trauma thought had _ cling film. no, et. how much is 24 hour trauma thought had raised. i cling film. no, et. how much is 24 hour trauma thought had raised. ? | hour trauma thought had raised. ? from contest and race. and that helped the total money raised on the night reach...
6:29 pm
an increase of 2 million from last year. you can watch the highlights of the show on bbc one, at ten to three tomorrow afternoon. now it's time for a look at the weather with phil avery. hello. we're just seeing first signs of a much advertised change in our weather fortunes where sunday produces a much cooler feeling day across all parts of the british isles. first signs of the cold air already getting up into the north of scotland but as we get on through the night and into sunday the weather fronts will allow a northerly flow to dominate right across the east. and that transition will happen for many overnight. we will keep some showers going across northern and eastern parts of the british isles. one or two drifting through the irish sea. in between with these skies clear and there isn't so much of a noticeably north wind will end up with a touch of frost. so it's a chilly, bright, really sunny start to the day provided you're not picking up on all of the showers across the eastern side of the british isles with the odd
6:30 pm
one again coming through the irish sea. in between there's a lot of sunshine but it really won't do anything for the temperatures. single figures for many, a high of ten or 11. hello this is bbc news. the headlines. the world health organisation is sounding the alarm over the rise in covid cases in europe —
6:31 pm
and is urging countries to "drastically" increase mask use and vaccination uptake.

45 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on