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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 20, 2021 5:00pm-5:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news the headlines at five the world health organisation says it is very worried about the rise in covid cases in europe — and is urging countries to "drastically" increase the use of face masks and vaccinations. more than 50 people have been arrested, after protests over new covid restrictions in rotterdam erupted into rioting last night. there have been calls for calm in the us, after a teenager who shot dead two people during racial unrest last year was cleared of murder. a public consultation starts on a potential ban on single—use plastics like disposable cutlery and polystyrene boxes in england hundreds of tesla drivers have been locked out of their vehicles, after the carmaker�*s app stopped working. coming up — travelling to russia to track down the alleged cyber—criminals living millionaire lifestyles, with little chance
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of ever being arrested. good afternoon. the mayor of the dutch city of rotterdam has condemned what he's called "an orgy of violence" after protestors took to the streets to demonstrate against coronavirus restrictions. the netherlands is one of a number of places in europe to re—impose a lockdown because of a surge in cases. the world health organisation has called for an urgent tightening of measures across europe to halt spiralling transmission rates of the virus. from rotterdam our europe correspondent anna holligan reports rotterdam, the netherlands second city. scarred by a night of rage.
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riot police came from across the country to try and quell the uprising. the fired warning shots and then live rounds. in response to scenes condemned by rotterdam's mayor as an orgy of violence. fin mayor as an orgy of violence. on several mayor as an orgy of violence. q�*i several occasions, police officers had to draw their weapons to defend themselves. some aimed shots were fired. at least seven were injured. restrictions in the netherlands began last saturday and will be another two weeks at least. the streets are peaceful now but the atmosphere across the country remains volatile. battling record infection rates and the government is considering new restrictions targeting the unvaccinated. in austria today, supporters of the far right freedom party marched against mandatory coronavirus vaccines. a 20
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day lockdown will start next week, working from home will be ordered and on the essential shops will stay open. germany fears and national health scare emergency. new measures expected for those who have had theirjab, a full lockdown is still on the cards. the uk is not yet seen such a dramatic surge in cases. and these are some of the reasons why. they face without a bit later, so they're — they face without a bit later, so they're dealing with it now and some of them _ they're dealing with it now and some of them opened up later than we did. and there _ of them opened up later than we did. and there is — of them opened up later than we did. and there is differences in vaccines _ and there is differences in vaccines. you have high levels and uptake _ vaccines. you have high levels and uptake in— vaccines. you have high levels and uptake in some populations in some european _ uptake in some populations in some european countries. high uptake in some populations in some european countries.— european countries. high in roots in the uk sure — european countries. high in roots in the uk sure that _ european countries. high in roots in the uk sure that the _ european countries. high in roots in the uk sure that the push _ european countries. high in roots in the uk sure that the push to - the uk sure that the push to encourage people to get their boosterjabs continues. the booster jabs continues. the incentive boosterjabs continues. the incentive for many, the avoidance of harsher rules like those enforced elsewhere.
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let's speak now to doctor burkhard gustorff. he works in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine at klinik 0ttakring which is a hospital in vienna. thank you very much forjoining us. how is your health service in austria coping with covid—i9 cases? good evening. we actually facing a difficult situation in vienna and also particularly the situation is stable on a level of people having covid—i9 in the hospitals and many of the intensive care units. this country is _ of the intensive care units. this country is facing _ of the intensive care units. this country is facing record infections. what is your advice. what is your advice to the public? i’m what is your advice. what is your advice to the public? i'm a doctor, of course and _ advice to the public? i'm a doctor, of course and of _ advice to the public? i'm a doctor, of course and of course, the - advice to the public? i'm a doctor, | of course and of course, the advice is to be careful and to regard all
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the measures and the most important is to go to the vaccine aid. we have a very low vaccination rate and we want it to increase to protect individuals and society. the idea vaccinations _ individuals and society. the idea vaccinations is _ individuals and society. the idea vaccinations is very _ individuals and society. the idea j vaccinations is very controversial for some people. they do not believe they should be forced to have the jab if they do not want to. what is your view of mandatory vaccinations? i can tell you what we did. we were faced with a virus and i can just tell you, in my department, all doctors without, except one vaccine aid, or people facing this disease know what vaccination helps. hora know what vaccination helps. how sensible is it _ know what vaccination helps. how sensible is it to _ know what vaccination helps. how sensible is it to find _ know what vaccination helps. how sensible is it to find people money if they refuse to take the vaccine?
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we haven't gotten to that point that you're coercing people in that way. this is a question for politicians. i'm a doctor and we discuss with regularly amongst our colleagues and friends and also the patient�*s. the major thing is everything that helps the vaccination is increasing because this is the major goal of vaccination and protection of all people. whatever helps may be good. what do you find of the most convincing arguments if you want to persuade somebody to take the vaccine? ., ., , ., , vaccine? there are many arguments. i alwa s vaccine? there are many arguments. i always talk. — vaccine? there are many arguments. i always talk. i — vaccine? there are many arguments. i always talk, i talked _ vaccine? there are many arguments. i always talk, i talked to _ vaccine? there are many arguments. i always talk, i talked to quite - vaccine? there are many arguments. i always talk, i talked to quite a - vaccine? there are many arguments. i always talk, i talked to quite a lot - always talk, i talked to quite a lot of people because i'm convinced that it is necessary to be vaccinated. i told them stories of our patients,
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and that young people are in our intensive care unit and it is worthwhile to protect from this. i tell them, i have seen and between 13 pregnant women in the intensive care unit and their babies dormant and suffering from covid—i9. and very life—threatening situations. i told them the situation, i hope will be convinced.— told them the situation, i hope will be convinced. would soon winter you exectin: ? be convinced. would soon winter you expecting? ? — be convinced. would soon winter you expecting? ? what— be convinced. would soon winter you expecting? ? what sort _ be convinced. would soon winter you expecting? ? what sort of _ be convinced. would soon winter you expecting? ? what sort of winter? i be convinced. would soon winter you | expecting? ? what sort of winter? we faced a short — expecting? ? what sort of winter? we faced a short lockdown _ expecting? ? what sort of winter? we faced a short lockdown in _ expecting? ? what sort of winter? we faced a short lockdown in austria - faced a short lockdown in austria and in vienna, i think in ten days we will have a stable situation in our hospitals and also in the intensive care units. so, we expect around christmas, which we are all working for. around christmas, which we are all working for-— working for. when you look at the
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vaccination _ working for. when you look at the vaccination uptake _ working for. when you look at the vaccination uptake in _ working for. when you look at the vaccination uptake in the - working for. when you look at the vaccination uptake in the united l vaccination uptake in the united kingdom, for example, what do you think the british government went correct and perhaps the austrian system is gone wrong? i do correct and perhaps the austrian system is gone wrong?— correct and perhaps the austrian system is gone wrong? i do not know ve well system is gone wrong? i do not know very well the — system is gone wrong? i do not know very well the uk _ system is gone wrong? i do not know very well the uk vaccination - system is gone wrong? i do not know very well the uk vaccination rates. i very well the uk vaccination rates. i only know some of this. i do not know what has been wrong or right. we saw in summary, a decline of the number of vaccinations and i think this is the major point to increase the number, the last 20% points and for this effort to be done. the number, the last 2096 points and for this effort to be done.— for this effort to be done. thank ou ve for this effort to be done. thank you very much- _ i'm joined now by keith neal — emeritus professor in the epidemiology of infectious diseases at the university of nottingham.
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good to see you. what are your thoughts when you look at the rates that we are seeing climbing and parts of europe? that that we are seeing climbing and parts of europe?— that we are seeing climbing and parts of europe? at the must be a number of — parts of europe? at the must be a number of different _ parts of europe? at the must be a number of different factors. - parts of europe? at the must be a number of different factors. i - parts of europe? at the must be a | number of different factors. i think if you go to the netherlands, they're very upset about some of the restrictions of having riots and their other countries that have similar problems. the big advantage of and the united kingdom is that we got the vaccine out of the blocks very much quicker. you've seen the vaccine is waning from our systems of monitoring things and we've now vaccinated probably nearly 13 and a half million people with the third dose. the data i have seen from israel and within the united kingdom is virtually close to 98% protection against all forms of disease. clearly, it is very successful against stopping serious disease. is against stopping serious disease. is also stopping people catching it, from what we can gather and therefore, they cannot spread it. i
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think when it comes to international comparisons, is not easy to compare other countries directly because they are doing a million tests a day. and therefore, were going to find a lot of people are positive, many of them in the school each group that barely get any serious effects. and the vaccine programme is to stop people dying in getting ill and stopping long covid—i9. when you look at the protests across europe, what do their scientist, the politicians what he think they have not done that is happened here so successfully. you mentioned in particular the booster, the third dose.~ particular the booster, the third dose. ~ . , particular the booster, the third dose. ~ ., , ., , ., dose. we have been able to deliver this for a number— dose. we have been able to deliver this for a number of— dose. we have been able to deliver this for a number of reasons. - dose. we have been able to deliver i this for a number of reasons. around the structure and the respect for the structure and the respect for the nhs. the nhs is a centralised system and we know everybody is. this can be some younger people who
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don't register the gps, they are not the ones where most at risk covid—i9, but also have access to mobile phones in the can book the vaccine online. i think other state systems, although they have a central insurance. with free essential health care, there is no registration in the same way. someone seeing you on the tv in his room to tell you. it is someone seeing you on the tv in his room to tell you.— room to tell you. it is sure colleagues _ room to tell you. it is sure colleagues in _ room to tell you. it is sure colleagues in the - room to tell you. it is sure - colleagues in the programme. they should be watching _ colleagues in the programme. they should be watching the tv than commission they? but should be watching the tv than commission they? should be watching the tv than commission the ? �* . ., , ., commission they? but politicians and scientists are — commission they? but politicians and scientists are tearing _ commission they? but politicians and scientists are tearing their _ commission they? but politicians and scientists are tearing their hair- scientists are tearing their hair out. , , ~ . scientists are tearing their hair out. , ,, ., , , out. just like we are. probably they want to interview, _ out. just like we are. probably they want to interview, don't _ out. just like we are. probably they want to interview, don't they - out. just like we are. probably they want to interview, don't they come | want to interview, don't they come up want to interview, don't they come up with a will have to wait. thank you so much. they've got tvs in the radio stations and studios stop by let's finish this. we should not be
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complacent here. there are still people in britain who didn't not want the jab come people would rather lose their jobs want the jab come people would rather lose theirjobs than have the jab. what sort of winter do you think were looking for? we are still seeing people in hospitalfrom covid—i9 and we are still seeing people tragically die from this awful virus. people tragically die from this awfulvirus. i people tragically die from this awful virus-— people tragically die from this awful virus. ~' ., , ., awful virus. i think the only way out of this _ awful virus. i think the only way out of this is _ awful virus. i think the only way out of this is vaccine, _ awful virus. i think the only way out of this is vaccine, vaccine i awful virus. i think the only way out of this is vaccine, vaccine in j out of this is vaccine, vaccine in vaccine. the more more people to get it, the better and most people particularly going after the major risk groups are the ones who are most at risk in going to end up in hospital. the austrian person who talked about the number of pregnant women seriously ill. 19 out of 20 of those on the units have not been vaccinated and the other one had only had one dose. i think the message is simple. get vaccinated.
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thank you very much for talking to us. there have been calls for calm in the united states after yesterday's court verdict that cleared a teenager of murder. eighteen year old kyle rittenhouse had argued he was acting in self—defence when he shot dead two men and injured a third during unrest last year over a police shooting of a black man. the not—guilty verdict has divided the country, as our north america correspondent nomia iqbal now reports. hundreds of people marched through new york and protest at the verdict. in the city of portland, a riot broke out after protesters smashed windows and threw rocks at police. but nothing on the scale of last year's unrest.—
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year's unrest. what could've happened — year's unrest. what could've happened was _ year's unrest. what could've happened was white - year's unrest. what could've happened was white after i year's unrest. what could'vel happened was white after the year's unrest. what could've - happened was white after the verdict came out, he spoke to one of america's most conservative talk show host. america's most conservative talk show host-— show host. tucker carlson. self-defense _ show host. tucker carlson. self-defense is _ show host. tucker carlson. self-defense is not - show host. tucker carlson. self-defense is not a i show host. tucker carlson. | self-defense is not a legal. show host. tucker carlson. i self-defense is not a legal. i self—defense is not a legal. i believe they came to the correct verdict _ believe they came to the correct verdict and i'm glad that everything went weti— verdict and i'm glad that everything went well and it has been a rough journey, — went well and it has been a rough journey, but we've made it through it. journey, but we've made it through it we _ journey, but we've made it through it we made — journey, but we've made it through it. we made it to the hard part. the case noes it. we made it to the hard part. tie: case goes beyond it. we made it to the hard part. tt;e: case goes beyond that it. we made it to the hard part. t“t9: case goes beyond that in this it. we made it to the hard part. tt9 case goes beyond that in this house in kenosha. for politicians, kyle rittenhouse is a brave patriot who was defending himself that night after being chased. in many democrats are worried that by not being held accountable for killing two men and injuring the third, it's it's a dangerous message. the vice president said the decision reflected poorly on the justice system. reflected poorly on the 'ustice s stem. : ,, ., :, system. the verdict speaks for itself and as _ system. the verdict speaks for itself and as many _ system. the verdict speaks for itself and as many of- system. the verdict speaks for itself and as many of you i system. the verdict speaks for| itself and as many of you know, spend _ itself and as many of you know, spend a — itself and as many of you know, spend a maiority_ itself and as many of you know, spend a majority of— itself and as many of you know, spend a majority of my - itself and as many of you know, spend a majority of my career l spend a majority of my career working — spend a majority of my career working to _ spend a majority of my career working to make _ spend a majority of my career working to make the - spend a majority of my career working to make the criminall spend a majority of my career -
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working to make the criminaljustice system _ working to make the criminaljustice system more — working to make the criminaljustice system more equitable _ working to make the criminaljustice system more equitable and - working to make the criminaljustice system more equitable and clearly, | system more equitable and clearly, there's— system more equitable and clearly, there's a _ system more equitable and clearly, there's a lot — system more equitable and clearly, there's a lot more _ system more equitable and clearly, there's a lot more to— system more equitable and clearly, there's a lot more to be _ system more equitable and clearly, there's a lot more to be done. i there's a lot more to be done. president _ there's a lot more to be done. president biden_ there's a lot more to be done. president biden says - there's a lot more to be done. president biden says he - there's a lot more to be done. - president biden says he understands the angry and concern by some but struck a more measured tone. i stand ijy struck a more measured tone. i stand by with what the jury has concluded, the jury system works and we have to abide by it. this case is exposed to so many divisions that already exist in america about gun laws, racism and left versus right. the story of this teenager will do almost nothing to bring the sides together. after months of pressure for the government following record numbers of people crossing the channel in small boats, ministers have launched a review. with me is our political correspondent, iain watson.— what's this going to achieve? ill should the government is actually doing something about tackling this crisis because the pressure is on 2a,000 tackling this crisis because the pressure is on 24,000 crossing so far this year _ pressure is on 24,000 crossing so far this year three _ pressure is on 24,000 crossing so far this year three times _ pressure is on 24,000 crossing so far this year three times the i
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pressure is on 24,000 crossing so far this year three times the level| far this year three times the level of last year and given that pressure, there's some frustration thatis pressure, there's some frustration that is perhaps the government is not getting to grips with this and so the government is plagued to take back control of the border, keir starmer was weighing in on this yesterday. there's a cross departmental review and there is a focus across whitehall on this issue on tackling covid—i9. and they've decided to nominate the cabinet office minister as his problem solver and is quite adept this drink from this poison chalice and the various things that will be looking at are more data on why people are coming to the channel in order to cross to the uk, but also they're going to come up with any new policies that are required in this area may think it is difficult to see in terms of solid achievements for review is very many interventions are going to be tried, the 54 million deal with france to stop people sitting sale. we are
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reaching record numbers and that has not worked. there has been policy to turn boats back in the been talking about potentially processing people offshore. again, nothing is quite happened there either. so the be looking at successful and failed attempts to try to control this problem but fundamentally, it is a big headache for the prime minister and an increasing frustration to try something new to get to grips with the crisis. the headlines on bbc news. the world health organisation says it is very worried about the rise in covid cases in europe — and is urging countries to "drastically" increase the use of face masks and vaccinations. more than 50 arrests have been made after violent clashes in the netherlands over new covid restrictions. austria has also seen demonstrations after a new lockdown was announced single—use plastic plates, cutlery and polystyrene cups
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could all be banned in england, as a consultation is launched on extending current waste measures sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's chetan. final argument to national and what a match this was. absolutely thrilling final test match. england weathering the second half in south africa pressuring scoring a tram the brick and 20—year—old just making a second appearance. pressure and scored a try on the break through their 20 year old scrum half raffi quirk — making just his second appearance and here scoring his first international try. south africa responded and were two points up when with just one minute
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on the clock marcus smith had this penalty to win it for england. he slotted that nerveless kick to ensure a 27—26 win for england, against the side who may well finish the year as the best in the world. so quite a match at twickenham earlier scotland were involved in a cracker as well. they ran out 29—10 winners againstjapan. in around ten minutes wales take on australia at the principality stadium manchester united have lost for the fourth time in five premier league games — as they were thrashed 4—1 at watford. another day to forget for 0le gunnar solskjaer — who saw harry maguire sent off. watford were 2—0 up when united pulled a goal back through donny van de beek, then maguire got a second yellow card, watford got two more goals in stoppage time. they're now 4 points clear of the relegation zone. united are seventh, 12 points off top spot. all high fives for steven gerrard though, who's made a winning start to his managerial career at aston villa, with two goals in the final six minutes giving them victory over brighton. 0llie watkins and tyrone mings with the goals. and chelsea are six points clear at the top of the table for now after winning 3—0 at leicester city in
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the lunchtime kick off — antonio rudiger headed the first before n'golo kante set off on a run against his former club — that nobody stopped — chelsea 2—0 up inside half an hour thomas tuchel�*s side made it 16 points out of a possible 18, as they wrapped up the win in the second half thanks to christian pulisic. there's a certain spirit now and a certain quality that we know better and better, where we can take risks and better, where we can take risks and where we should not take risks and how to play our game and how to find our identity and force our identity onto the pitch. also the certain freedom but the most important thing is the attitude in the teamwork. elsewhere a winning start for dean smith as norwich manager — as they came from behind to beat southampton to move off the bottom of the table.
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newcastle are in that position now after an entertaining 3 all draw with brentford in eddie howe's first match in charge, although he wasnt�* in the dugout because of covid. there was also a 3 all draw between burnely and crystal palace. west ham's four—game winning run is over after they lost 1—0 at wolves. in the scottish premiership hearts missed the chance to go second ahead of celtic — they lost 2— nil at motherwell. elsewhere dundee united beat aberdeen i—nil, while the game between st mirren and livingston was drawn i—all. celtic have just kicked off against stjohnstone in the semi final of the league cup. lewis hamilton will start tomorrow's qatar grand prix from pole. he was almost half a second quicker than the red bull of his title rival max verstappen. his mercedes team mate valtteri bottas was third. it's the 102nd pole of hamilton's career, but his first since the hungarian grand prix back in august. that's all the sport for now.
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you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc. c0. uk/sport hundreds of tesla drivers have been locked out of their vehicles following a technical problem. the company's founder elon musk has apologised after a fault with the app stopped customers connecting to their car. tesla said the problem should now be resolved. a record number of people died while detained under the mental health act in england during the coronavirus pandemic. that's according to early estimates from the independent regulator, the care quality commission. the figures come amid concerns that staffing shortages are compromising patient safety in psychiatric wards and across the nhs. patrick baker reports — and a warning — his report contains flashing images. after struggling with his mental health throughout most of his teenage years, 17—year—old charlie millers became increasingly unwell during the second half of 2020. he went downhill in thejuly time.
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he was then sectioned. charlie spent the next few months in and out of the mental health unit at prestwich hospital in manchester. in early december last year, he returned to the ward following a night at home. i dropped him off at quarter to eight at night. he was in really good spirits and then i got a phone call at quarter to ii to say that they were doing cpr on him. during the course of that evening charlie had made four attempts on his life, the last of which proved fatal. a confidential nhs report into charlie's death said that due to sickness absence being reported that day there was no qualified nurse rostered on duty for the night shift. the nurse in charge agreed to cover the shift. she had worked from 9am to 4pm and returned at 7pm. in a statement the nhs trust that runs prestwich hospital expressed its deepest sympathies but said it would be inappropriate to comment further until the coroner's
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inquest has concluded. between 2012 and 2019 an average 273 people died each year while detained in hospital or being supervised in the community under the mental health act in england. but early estimates for the first year of the pandemic suggest a record high, with 490 people dying between march 2020 and march 2021. i think staff shortages are compromising patient safety in every part of the nhs at the moment. we have a workforce crisis and it's time we completely overhauled the way we decide how many doctors and nurses we are going to train for the future. the department of health and social care said there are now record numbers of doctors and nurses working in the nhs. they said they are investing £2.3 billion a year by 2023—24 to transform mental health care and will bring forward plans to reform the mental health act. charlie's mum samantha says she is still waiting for a clear
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explanation about how her son could have lost his life in the very place that was meant to keep him safe. a full inquest into charlie's death starts next year. single—use plastics such as plates and cutlery, as well as polystyrene cups, could all be banned in england under new plans being considered by the government. it is estimated that only ten per cent of such items are recycled. according to estimates, in england alone, we get through 1—point—1 billion single—use plates every year. in addition to that, four—and—a—quarter billion single use pieces of cutlery — the vast majority of which are plastic — are also used. disposable coffee cups have been a long standing problem — the uk throws away two and half billion of those every year. rob 0psomer is from the ellen macarthur foundation, which aims to promote what it calls a 'circular�* economy. he explained how it works.
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what we mean by this is the best way to explain it is to look at how it works and we take resources out of the ground, we make products and that we throw them away. it is like a lion. and it is about taking the line and turning it into a circle by eliminating certain things and recycling and regenerating nature. to what extent do we do that now? because countries, many councils will say that they make huge efforts to try to reduce re—use and recycle. that is the slogan. to try to reduce re-use and recycle. that is the slogan.— that is the slogan. received over the ast that is the slogan. received over the past copple _ that is the slogan. received over the past couple of _ that is the slogan. received over the past couple of years, - that is the slogan. received over the past couple of years, but i that is the slogan. received over the past couple of years, but the| the past couple of years, but the momentum building around that idea of a circular economy and businesses, governments and individuals. but the key is, we need to do much more go further that is
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why the announcement, the plan of the uk government to bend more single—use plastics is so important because it is where we need to start. we need to, rather than trying to manage the pollution and waste, we need to prevent it from being there in the first place by eliminating some of those items that we really do not need to our economy. at we really do not need to our economy-— we really do not need to our econom . : :, :, ., , economy. a lot of food manufacturers would sa , economy. a lot of food manufacturers would say. to — economy. a lot of food manufacturers would say, to transport _ economy. a lot of food manufacturers would say, to transport their - economy. a lot of food manufacturers would say, to transport their goods, l would say, to transport their goods, they need a certain amount of packaging. we are not going to bed it entirely. we really, what are we going to replace it with? if it entirely. we really, what are we going to replace it with?— going to replace it with? if you look at what _ going to replace it with? if you look at what is _ going to replace it with? if you look at what is needed, i going to replace it with? if you look at what is needed, the i going to replace it with? if you i look at what is needed, the plan for the uk government is vital because that's where we need to start, we need to see what we can eliminate right now. as you say, that is not going to be possible for everything, so it is crucial that would complement that with innovation to expand what we can eliminate in one example, if you look at packaging,
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packaging to protect fruits, avoid food waste, there is a company that sprays and edible layer on top of fruit and vegetables that also extends the shelf life and avoid foods wastes but without single—use packaging and that is a new innovation that makes it possible to eliminate much more than we are currently doing. and finally, we need to make sure that we circulate whatever we do put on the economy because we will always need packaging, lots of products and it is crucial that once we put them in the economy, they are designed in a way that they can be easily recirculated and used over and over again, ratherthan recirculated and used over and over again, rather than being with her pollution. again, rather than being with her ollution. , _ ., pollution. driven by the fact that someone will _ pollution. driven by the fact that someone will be _ pollution. driven by the fact that someone will be able _ pollution. driven by the fact that someone will be able to - pollution. driven by the fact that someone will be able to make i pollution. driven by the fact that someone will be able to make a | someone will be able to make a profit out of more environmentally friendly packaging? tit profit out of more environmentally friendly packaging?— friendly packaging? in the road of business, that's _
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friendly packaging? in the road of business, that's always _ friendly packaging? in the road of business, that's always going i friendly packaging? in the road of business, that's always going to i friendly packaging? in the road of. business, that's always going to be a primary driver. we are seeing now is if we look at what is happening in the world, notjust the uk but the world, we have more than a thousand organisations, including many of the worlds largest businesses like nestl and coca—cola, with ambitious targets to reduce the packaging they use a mixture that other packaging they do use is easily reusable, recyclable or combustible. and those companies are driving an enormous search for solutions. if you're in an innovator today and have a solution that will help prevent plastic waste, that is surely going to be a buyer and that is given birth to a lot of innovators very rapidly scaling of the last couple of years and the other part of that is that obviously, business action is absolutely vital we encourage all businesses to do whatever they can.
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it is going to have to be complemented from action by the government as we have seen today or yesterday with a single use and lots of other government regulations not just the band, but lots of other stuff and it's notjust the uk, and really pushing the foundation for not just really pushing the foundation for notjust government action in the uk for a global plastics treaty that would unite all the governments of the world for ambitious regulation on plastics. hello. we're just seeing first signs of a much advertised change in our weather fortunes where sunday produces a much cooler feeling day across all parts of the british isles. first signs of the cold air already getting up into the north of scotland but as we get on through the night and into sunday the weather fronts will allow a northerly flow to dominate right across the east.
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and that transition will happen for many overnight.

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