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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 20, 2021 4:00pm-4:30pm GMT

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good afternoon. the mayor of the dutch city
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of rotterdam has condemned what he's called "an orgy of violence" after protestors took to the streets to demonstrate against coronavirus restrictions. the netherlands is one of a number of places in europe to re—impose a lockdown because of a surge in cases. the world health organization has called for an urgent tightening of measures across europe to halt spiralling transmission rates of the virus. from rotterdam, our europe correspondent anna holligan reports. rotterdam, the netherlands�* second city. scarred by a night of rage. riot police came from across the country to try to quell the uprising. they fired warning shots, then live rounds, in response to scenes condemned by rotterdam's mayor as an orgy of violence. translation: on several. occasions police officers had to draw their weapons to defend themselves. some aimed shots were fired.
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at least seven were injured. restrictions in the netherlands began last saturday and will be in place for another two weeks at least. the streets are peaceful now but the atmosphere across the country remains volatile. the netherlands is battling record infection rates and the government is considering new restrictions targeting the unvaccinated. in austria today, supporters of the far—right freedom party marched against mandatory coronavirus vaccines. a 20—day lockdown will start next week. working from home will be ordered and only essential shops will stay open. germany fears a national health care emergency. new measures are expected for those who haven't had theirjabs. a full lockdown is still on the cards. the uk isn't yet seeing such a dramatic surge in cases and these are some of the reasons why.
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many countries in europe were faced with delta a little later so they are dealing with it now and some of them opened up slightly later than we did so that is a factor. the second point is there are differences in vaccines. you have high levels of non—vaccine uptake in some populations in some european countries. high infection rates have helped to build up immunity in the uk. now the push to encourage people to get their boosterjabs continues. the incentive for many — the avoidance of harsher rules like those enforced elsewhere. anna holligan, bbc news. there have been calls for calm in the united states after yesterday's court verdict that cleared a teenager of murder. 18—year—old kyle rittenhouse had argued he was acting in self—defence when he shot dead two men and injured a third during unrest last year over a police shooting of a black man. the not—guilty verdict has divided the country, as our north america correspondent
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nomia iqbal now reports. whose streets? our streets. hundreds of --eole whose streets? our streets. hundreds of peeple marched _ whose streets? our streets. hundreds of people marched to _ whose streets? our streets. hundreds of people marched to new _ whose streets? our streets. hundreds of people marched to new york- whose streets? our streets. hundreds of people marched to new york in - of people marched to new york in protest at the verdict. in that city of portland, protesters smashed windows and threw rocks at police but nothing on the scale of last year's unrest. after the verdict came out, cal rittenhouse spoke to one of america's most conservative talk hosts. , w talk hosts. the “ury reached the correct verdict. — talk hosts. the jury reached the correct verdict. self-defence i talk hosts. the jury reached the correct verdict. self-defence is| talk hosts. the jury reached the i correct verdict. self-defence is not correct verdict. self—defence is not illegal and i believe they came to the correct verdict and i'm glad everything went well. it has been a rough journey but we made everything went well. it has been a roughjourney but we made it everything went well. it has been a rough journey but we made it through the hard part. the rough journey but we made it through the hard part-— the hard part. the case goes beyond what happened _ the hard part. the case goes beyond what happened in — the hard part. the case goes beyond what happened in this _ the hard part. the case goes beyond what happened in this courthouse i the hard part. the case goes beyond what happened in this courthouse in| what happened in this courthouse in kenosha. for most republican politicians pilot rittenhouse is a brave patriot who was defending
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himself after being tight but many democrats are worried that by not being held accountable for killing two men and injuring a third, it sends a dangerous message. the vice president said the decision reflected purely on the justice system. reflected purely on the 'ustice s stem. . ,, ., ., system. the verdict speaks for itself. i have _ system. the verdict speaks for itself. i have spent _ system. the verdict speaks for itself. i have spent a _ system. the verdict speaks for itself. i have spent a majorityl system. the verdict speaks for. itself. i have spent a majority of my career— itself. i have spent a majority of my career working to make the criminal— my career working to make the criminaljustice system more criminal justice system more equitable criminaljustice system more equitable and clearly there is more work to— equitable and clearly there is more work to d0~ — equitable and clearly there is more work to de— equitable and clearly there is more work to do-— equitable and clearly there is more work to do. , �* , ., work to do. president biden said he understood — work to do. president biden said he understood the _ work to do. president biden said he understood the anger— work to do. president biden said he understood the anger and _ work to do. president biden said he understood the anger and concern l work to do. president biden said he l understood the anger and concern by some but struck a more measured tone. i some but struck a more measured tone. , ., , some but struck a more measured tone. , . _ ., , some but struck a more measured tone. ,. _ ., , tone. i stand by what the “my has concluded. — tone. i stand by what the “my has concluded. the t tone. i stand by what the “my has concluded. the jury h tone. i stand by what the jury has concluded. the jury system - tone. i stand by what the jury has - concluded. the jury system works and we have _ concluded. the jury system works and we have to _ concluded. the jury system works and we have to abide _ concluded. the jury system works and we have to abide by— concluded. the jury system works and we have to abide by it. _ concluded. the jury system works and we have to abide by it. this— concluded. the jury system works and we have to abide by it.— we have to abide by it. this case has exposed _ we have to abide by it. this case has exposed so _ we have to abide by it. this case has exposed so many _ we have to abide by it. this case i has exposed so many divisions that already exist in america about gun laws, racism and left versus right. the story of this teenager will do almost nothing to bring those sides together. nomia iqbal, bbc news, kenosha. after months of pressure for the government following record numbers of people crossing
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the channel in small boats, ministers have launched a review. with me is our political correspondent, iain watson. what's this going to achieve? frankly the government has to be seen to be doing something. 2a,000 crossings this year, about three times the level of last year and that's embarrassing for government pledged to take back control of the border. yesterday the labour leader said the government was not delivering on its promises. the prime minister is frustrated by the crisis she wants to see the same level of grip attached across government departments to this issue as there is on tackling covid and he has that barclay as his problem solver. mr barclay will drink from this poisoned chalice over the next week and i'm told he will also look at whether other policies are required but there will be interventions, £54 million going to france to try to stop people setting
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sail, it is not clear if the review will be successful and critics say the government has to do more to tackle the underlying reasons why people wish to migrate. in other news: there's growing concern over the safety of chinese tennis star peng shuai, who made sexual assault allegations against a former chinese vice—premier two weeks ago. she has not been seen since. photos have been posted on social media under her name with the caption "happy weekend" but their authenticity has not been verified. hundreds of tesla drivers have been locked out of their vehicles following a technical problem. the company's founder elon musk has apologised after a fault with the app stopped customers connecting to their car. tesla said the problem should now be resolved. and in america, the highway was strewn with cash after an armoured vehicle had a minor accident. bags of notes fell out of an open door when the vehicle was near san diego. the authorities are appealing to those who picked up the money
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to hand it back. football, and there was a convincing win for chelsea as they took on leicester at the king power stadium. a 3—0 victory leaves chelsea tightening their grip at the top of the premier league. here's our sports correspondent patrick gearey. summer already feels distant. that hazy may day when leicester beat chelsea in the cup final was historic yet now slightly dated. two weeks later chelsea became champions of europe. maybe now they are heading towards conquering england. antonio rudiger, their number two, with their number one. soon leicester were confronting their past. this is n'golo kante, who drove them to the league title five and a half years ago. now he drove chelsea further clear. something is missing with leicester, depleted by injuries, shorn of old certainties. jamie vardy once scored those automatically. here's what it looks like when you get it right. every chelsea pass and move perfectly measured until christian pulisic
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finished things off. for some in the leicester end, time to beat the traffic. for chelsea, no need. everyone else is in the rear—view mirror. patrick gearey, bbc news. finally, a host of celebrities appeared for last night's children in need appeal. a whopping 39 million! nearly 40 million pounds was pledged — higher than last year's figure on the night. the money will go towards supporting thousands of charities and local projects around the uk. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. we're back with the late
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news at ten past ten.
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you are watching bbc news. let's return to our top story this afternoon. the world health organisation is calling for the urgent increase of anti—covid measures across europe to halt spiralling transmission rates of the virus. it fears covid—related deaths could increase by half—a—million by march. several countries have already brought in various forms of lockdown. this graph shows a rolling seven—day average of daily cases per million people in italy, germany, and here in the uk. but look what happens when we include the netherlands and austria. we can see can see how the numbersjump to more than double those rates for the uk and germany. cambridge university professor of statistics, david spiegelhalter, who is also the co—author of covid by numbers, explained why looking at covid figures across different european countries proves so useful. we have seen germany, austria, the netherlands, belgium, france and italy,
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as you show in your graphs they are at different levels but they are increasing exponentially, cases are doubling every two weeks, and that is different to what is happening in the uk at the moment. it gives us some information about what we have to be wary of. and also perhaps some of the things that have gone right for once in this country. what do you think has gone right that others could learn from? obviously the roll—out of the vaccination was very successful right from the very beginning in the uk. we have not got the highest vaccination rates in europe, but higher than many other countries. crucially it is the boosters and we have got a much higher boost rate than other countries. it is quite easy to overlook that because you might say the waning immunity and 99% protection against hospitalisation might wane to 95% or something like that, which does not sound very much. but if you flip it round and say our vulnerability has gone up from i% to 5% that shows the risk
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of hospitalisation has increased five times. the booster, which has been shown to be extraordinarily effective, if you had astrazeneca the first time round, i had pfizer, but if you had astrazeneca it is known the protection was not as good as pfizer. but if you have a pfizer booster, that mix pumps you up not only to where you were before but higher than ever. it pumps you up to have the protection as if you had just had two pfizer doses. our booster rate is higher than other countries and that is protecting us a lot at the moment. obviously you thrive on statistics, that is yourjob, your interest, but how useful would it be to better explain these numbers to the public across europe where we are seeing these protests, this rejection of policies? well, this is always a question asked, but it is more
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than a matter ofjust explaining the numbers to people. people are against vaccinations for many reasons and no matter how much you explain to them the numbers, some will not take any notice because they are idealogically opposed to them or, particularly in the east, there is a deep mistrust of government and authority. so it is difficult, but i think for people perhaps who are a little bit in the middle, wavering, cautious, to hammer home the extraordinarily power of these vaccines, particularly the boosters to prevent hospitalisations and deaths and infections is terribly important. but you cannot expect that to work on its own, it requires more than that. the world health organisation is warning that europe could see covid—related deaths rise by half a million by march. give us your thoughts on that figure and how realistic is that?
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it is not myjob to make projections like that. it all depends crucially on behaviour. in the end we know what stops this virus circulating and that is people getting vaccinated and keeping away from each other, it is as simple as that. and a lot of ventilation so we are not breathing over each other. that is what it takes, but how you get people to change their behaviour, and in our country we have had a fairly libertarian approach in the uk which has led to very high case rates, much higher than anybody else, that could have been a reasonable strategy because of the build—up of immunity in the population. but each country has to decide for itself how to get those changes of behaviour in the population. the amount to which that is done by encouragement or by laws, then that is up to every jurisdiction to choose how best they do it. but they have got to do it.
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when you have exponentially rising rates we know the consequences of that. that has to be turned around. what about the facts, the data, that you would like to be seeing now? the daily figures that we have are extremely useful. obviously the vaccination rate, all these numbers we have been talking about give quite a good picture of what is going on. it is quite interesting to know the amount of immunity in the population. in the uk we are blessed by having a survey which tests how many people have antibodies. it could be because they have had it or have had the vaccination. if you have had it, the protection is as good as a vaccine. in the uk we have got 90 something percent of the population with antibodies, either through vaccination or having had it. so that is why in spite of, that is why we are really doing fairly well at the moment,
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but we are wobbling along. single—use plastics such as plates and cutlery, as well as polystyrene cups, could all be banned in england under new plans being considered by the government. it is estimated that only ten per cent of such items are recycled. according to estimates, in england alone, we get through 1.1 billion single—use plates every year. in addition to that 4.25 billion single use pieces of cutlery — the vast majority of which are plastic — are also used. disposable coffee cups have been a long standing problem — the uk throws away two and half billion of those every year. joining me now is friends of the earth plastics campaigne lead, camilla zerr. thank you very much forjoining us. how helpful is it to ban something like a plastic cup?— like a plastic cup? hello, yes, at ffiends like a plastic cup? hello, yes, at friends of— like a plastic cup? hello, yes, at
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friends of the _ like a plastic cup? hello, yes, at friends of the earth _ like a plastic cup? hello, yes, at friends of the earth we - like a plastic cup? hello, yes, at friends of the earth we really . like a plastic cup? hello, yes, at i friends of the earth we really think this product by product approach to the plastics crisis is not enough. it is not helpful to ban just one item at a time every other year. what we really need is an overarching target to reduce all types of plastic and that target needs to be in law right now so that then these high profile bans, which are helpful, but they give the impression that the plastic pollution battle is being one, but it is getting worse. we need to look at notjust it is getting worse. we need to look at not just the it is getting worse. we need to look at notjust the most commonly littered type of plastic, but all plastics. littered type of plastic, but all lastics. ., ~' , , littered type of plastic, but all lastics. ., ~ , , ., plastics. how likely is it that we can aet plastics. how likely is it that we can get away — plastics. how likely is it that we can get away from _ plastics. how likely is it that we can get away from using - plastics. how likely is it that we can get away from using plastic| can get away from using plastic completely? there are times when it is the only thing that will surf the purpose we need it for. absolutely, not all plastic _ purpose we need it for. absolutely, not all plastic should _ purpose we need it for. absolutely, not all plastic should be _ purpose we need it for. absolutely, not all plastic should be got - purpose we need it for. absolutely, not all plastic should be got rid - not all plastic should be got rid of. some plastics are really essential for health purposes, for people with disabilities and many other reasons. what we are saying is we need to get rid of those unnecessary, single—use plastics that could very easily be replaced
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by a usable or refillable alternative. that is possible because there are countries where it is already the case and we know that it has been in the past 20 years or so that we have seen this surge of single—use plastic items when what we used to use was made to be more reasonable, reasonable coffee cups, reusable containers to refill your pastor or your eyes at the supermarket, that is something that is absolutely possible. you supermarket, that is something that is absolutely possible.— is absolutely possible. you say it is absolutely possible. you say it is caettin is absolutely possible. you say it is getting worse. _ is absolutely possible. you say it is getting worse, but _ is absolutely possible. you say it is getting worse, but to - is absolutely possible. you say it is getting worse, but to what - is absolutely possible. you say it. is getting worse, but to what extent is getting worse, but to what extent is the pandemic to do with that? very quickly into lockdown when we were still able to go to coffee shops we were told we could not use our reusable cups, we had to have the throwaway ones.— our reusable cups, we had to have the throwaway ones. yes, so actually it is really hard _ the throwaway ones. yes, so actually it is really hard at _ the throwaway ones. yes, so actually it is really hard at this _ the throwaway ones. yes, so actually it is really hard at this stage - the throwaway ones. yes, so actually it is really hard at this stage to - it is really hard at this stage to tell exactly how much the pandemic had an effect on the increase of single—use plastics and specifically things like single—use masks and
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coffee cups, because the general data is not out there yet. but what we can say is it was really heartbreaking to see statistics by the rspca and others to show more and more animals were found tangled up and more animals were found tangled up in single—use plastic masks. beach surveys showed plastic masks were on two thirds of beaches when they had never been seen there before. all this can be avoided quite early on in a pandemic. over 100 scientists from across the world came together to say to the public and the governments of the world reusable is are safe to use. all we need to do is simply use the basic hygiene that everyone knows about, washing the items well with hot, soapy water once they have been used. to soapy water once they have been used. ., . ., soapy water once they have been used. ., ., ., i. ., soapy water once they have been used. ., . ., , ., . ., used. to what extent do you agree at ffiends used. to what extent do you agree at friends of the — used. to what extent do you agree at friends of the earth _ used. to what extent do you agree at friends of the earth with _ used. to what extent do you agree at friends of the earth with what - used. to what extent do you agree at friends of the earth with what the - friends of the earth with what the government is doing and talking about the product by product banning of things? about the product by product banning of thins? ., , about the product by product banning of thins? . , ., about the product by product banning of thins? . , . ., ., of things? clearly we agree that all these products. —
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of things? clearly we agree that all these products, plastic— of things? clearly we agree that all these products, plastic cutlery, - these products, plastic cutlery, cups, plastic plates, need to be banned. but i would say it is too little, too late. we are calling for the government to set an overarching target to reduce plastic pollution in law right now and this has to be all types of plastic pollution. we cannot be satisfied with just getting rid of the most commonly littered plastic items. that is a minimum baseline. in the rest of europe all those items have already been banned as of mid—this year. all those items are no longer on sale, so why are we waiting until april 2023, which is what the government is proposing to consider banning these items? i is proposing to consider banning these items?— is proposing to consider banning these items? . , , , these items? i have seen in places where there _ these items? i have seen in places where there were _ these items? i have seen in places where there were plastic— these items? i have seen in places where there were plastic straws i where there were plastic straws there are now paper straws. where there are now paper straws. where there was plastic cutlery there is no bamboo or wooden cutlery, but we are still throwing it away. how much of a problem is that because it takes energy, carbon, to create these things and they are still only use once? i these things and they are still only
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use once? .., , , these things and they are still only use once? _, , , ., use once? i completely agree. i think there _ use once? i completely agree. i think there is _ use once? i completely agree. i think there is a _ use once? i completely agree. i think there is a problem - use once? i completely agree. i think there is a problem here i use once? i completely agree. i. think there is a problem here with use once? i completely agree. i- think there is a problem here with a switch from one material, plastic, to another material, often wood or paper. at friends of the year we will be saying we should not be making that switch to another single—use product. we should be focusing on reusable items or refill. we need to be building an economy that prioritises reuse, refill and repair above all the single—use items and above the use once and then throwaway way of living. that would not only deal with the plastic pollution problem, it would create a less wasteful society overall for other materials as well. it society overall for other materials as well. ~ , ., ,, ., as well. it felt like progress at the time bringing _ as well. it felt like progress at the time bringing in _ as well. it felt like progress at the time bringing in these - the time bringing in these disposable things. thank you very much for talking to us. tesla drivers have reported being locked out of their cars after an outage struck the car—maker's app. dozens of owners said an error message on the mobile
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app was preventing them from connecting to their vehicles. our transport correspondent caroline davies had more details. our technology is designed to try and make our lives easier and we all know the pain when it does not quite go to plan. yesterday evening, hundreds of tesla users reported they were having difficulties using the tesla app according to the tracking site down detector. the ceo of tesla, elon musk, said they were checking the system and then said the system should be back online again. he apologised and said it would not happen again. it is important to emphasise it is notjust the app, that is not the only way you can open up tesla cars, you can use a key card or a fob. however, quite an interesting point, i spoke to an academic and a tesla user, professor david bailey, and he said tesla could sometimes be a victim of its own success, that it advertises itself as a very high—tech company, it has cutting—edge technology, and that is one of the things that attracts the users to purchase a tesla car in the first place and sometimes they become used
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to relying on the technology and maybe do not leave the house with their keys as well. it is a bit like leaving your house with your phone, hoping to pay contactless for everything you want and if something goes wrong and you do not have a credit card as well, you do not have a back—up option. the key message is the technology might not always work, so make sure that you have your keys as well. caroline davies reporting. regular trains are returning to the dartmoor line in devon for the first time in almost 50 years. from today, great western railway services will run between okehampton and exeter. it's part of a government scheme to restore abandoned railway lines. john maguire reports. when the railway arrived in okehampton, the town threw a huge street party to celebrate. that was 150 years ago. the next century saw crowds gather for other important occasions — to name trains and to send
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the town's sons off to war. and even the line's closure in 1972, part of the beeching cuts, was marked with some ceremony. today, the festivities continue as scheduled — passenger services return, a reward for years of campaigning. back in the summer, we filmed the new tracks being laid. fantastic. this is the moment, isn't it, really? when the track gets put down, the new track, and it'll be shortly, hopefully, a train to exeter. just remind me, how long have you been campaigning and working on this? well, i arrived in okehampton in 1975 and i saw it going gradually derelict then, so that was when i really first became interested in it. the line is the very first to reopen as part of the government's restoring your railways scheme, but this week has seen controversy and anger elsewhere with the scrapping of the hs2 link
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to leeds and the northern powerhouse line between leeds and manchester. the restoration of the dartmoor line was made easier by the fact that after closing to passenger services it continued to be used for transporting railway ballast from a nearby quarry. it also ran as a heritage railway but now it's been upgraded. it's not as easy as you think. it hasn't been in good condition, - but there is a huge amount of work. we've done 11 miles of track - installation in the last four weeks. it's actually been one _ of the fastest track installations in network rail history. well, this is the new track construction machine. it's an impressive piece of kit, around a quarter of a mile long. you can see what's happening. the grey pod at the top runs back, grabs the sleepers, brings them to the front of the train and then lays them in a perfectly straight line on the bed with the two metal tracks on top. it will run at a rate of around 400 metres per hour.
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and in the belly of the beast it's ryan'sjob to keep the machine, well, on track. my position is to ensure that it's somewhere near, and usually i'm pretty good. so you have to constantly monitor the height of your clamps so they don't hit the sleepers, the spacing of the rail behind you, and, obviously, the line itself. so it's a concentration game? yeah, big time. after week when the government's been accused of reneging on promised rail improvements in the north of england, reopening this line may seem a small step, but it is a giant leap for people here — the passengers who will use it and the communities it will serve. john maguire, bbc news, devon. now it's time for a look at the weather with phil avery. hello.
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so far this november it's been on the mild side compared to what we might expect at this time of year but all parts of the british isles as we get on through the rest of the weekend, will see a turn to much colder weather. and the mechanism for that is the progress of these weather fronts down and across all parts of the british isles, that opens us up to a northerly wind and plenty of it as well. initially you will feel that across the north of scotland but then through the night it will propagate its way down and across particularly the eastern shores of both scotland and england, accompanied by quite a bit of shower activity. and there will be quite a widespread frost across the spine of the country to start the new day on sunday. yes, quite a bit of sunshine, away from those areas fully exposed to the northerly, where you'll see quite a bit of shower activity, especially across the north and east of the british isles with one or two running down through the irish sea coast and the thing you'll really notice, temperatures really struggling. take care, bye—bye.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines. the world health organization says it is very worried about the rise in covid cases in europe — and is urging countries to "drastically" increase the use of facemasks and vaccinations. more than 50 people have been arrested, after protests over new covid restrictions in rotterdam erupted into rioting last night. meanwhile a rally has been held in austria, ahead of a new national lockdown and plans to make coronavirus vaccinations compulsory next year. there have been calls for calm in the us, after a teenager who shot
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dead two people during racial unrest last year was cleared of murder.

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