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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 20, 2021 12:00pm-12:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. anger in the netherlands over new covid restrictions. dutch police have shot and wounded at least two people during rioting, as coronavirus infection rates rise across europe. there are further protests in austria, which will return to a full national lockdown on monday. a rally is being held in vienna, after the government announced coronavirus vaccines will be made mandatory next year. joe biden says he's angry, after a teenager who shot two people dead during racial unrest is cleared of murder. protests took place in new york following the verdict — the president says it should be respected... i stand by what the jury has concluded. the jury system works and we have to abide by it.
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the women's tennis association threatens to pull out of china, as pressure grows over missing tennis star peng shuai. a record number of people died while detained under the mental health act in england during the first year of the pandemic, according to new figures from the health watchdog. a public consultation starts on a potential ban on single—use plastics like disposable cutlery and polystyrene boxes in england and nearly £40 million has been raised for bbc children in need, with a host of stars and performers joining pudsey bear for the annual fundraiser. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world.
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the mayor of the dutch city of rotterdam has condemned what he's called "an orgy of violence" after protestors took to the streets to demonstrate against coronavirus restrictions. the netherlands is one of a number of places in europe to re—impose a lockdown because of a surge in cases. meanwhile, austria has become the first country in europe to make vaccinations compulsory, which is not supported by the world health organization. and germany has imposed new covid restrictions on the unvaccinated amid a surge in cases. this graph shows a rolling seven—day average of daily cases per million poeople in italy, germany, and the uk. but look what happens when we include the netherlands and austria. we can see can see how the numbersjump. to more than double the rate in the uk and germay. and the world health organization is warning that europe could see covid—related deaths rise by 500,000 by march unless urgent measures are taken. tim muffett reports.
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protesters in rotterdam responding to the partial lockdown imposed in the netherlands. police used water cannon and fired warning shots. at least two people were injured. restrictions here began on monday and are set to be in place for another two weeks at least. like many countries in europe, the netherlands has seen a sharp rise in covid cases. in austria, a 20—day lockdown will start this monday. people will be asked to work from home and non—essential shops will close. in february, covid vaccinations will become compulsory. what we experience in austria right now is, in my view, an unfortunate collusion of the fact
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that we have a fairly low vaccination rate in the population and that the waning of immunity an unfortunate collusion of the fact that we have a fairly low vaccination rate in the population and that the waning of immunity hits austria now, six months after we started our vaccination programme, and that is unfortunately right at the beginning of the winter season, where people are moving indoors. in germany, covid cases are also rising sharply. the government is set to introduce restrictions for unvaccinated people in areas where hospital admissions exceed a certain level. as for the prospect of a full lockdown, the german government says nothing has been ruled out. in the uk yesterday, just over a4,000 new people tested positive for coronavirus. over the week, there was a 13% increase in cases compared to the previous seven days. between the 9th and 15th of november just over 6,000 people were admitted at the moment, the uk is not witnessing the surge in cases being seen in some other countries.
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we have, i'm sure, the highest levels of overall immunity in europe — it's over 90% amongst adults and approaching that level in children as well now — so that is quite a different situation to many countries in europe, including austria and germany, who didn't have as bad first waves or second waves and didn't have their significant delta wave yet, either. with a new wave hitting hard this winter, it is clear covid—i9 will again present many challenges. infection rates will be closely monitored to see if new restrictions can keep it under control. tim muffett, bbc news. in the past few hours, the mayor of rotterdam has condemned the protest in his city here's some of what he had to say. translation: the police, public- prosecutor and local government had
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been informed about the fact that a few thousand people were due to come to make a statement about the coronavirus policy. it was agreed to give space to this demonstration even though it was not reported formally to the authorities. unfortunately, the police had to conclude quite quickly that these people had no peaceful intentions. their intention was to riot, challenge the police, destroy public property, set fire to scooters and erect barricades. this meant the police had to scale up their presence. police units from all over the country were brought in. as we speak, there are eight riot police units in rotterdam. that is about 400 officers, excluding arrest teams and officers on horseback, so that is quite a strong police presence. the police have been attacked by rioters. on several occasions, the police officers had to draw their weapons to defend themselves. some aimed shots were fired and people got hurt as a result. as far as we know, now seven people were injured.
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linda bauld is professor of public health at the university of edinburgh. we can talk to her about what is happening in europe and the decisions that are being taken around measures in response to a number of cases. welcome. thank you very much forjoining us. when you look at the vaccination rates in austria, germany and the netherlands, the rates go between 64 and 73% are fully vaccinated. it is 68% in britain. we are seeing very different pictures come about, in each country in terms of where infections are going. what's happening? i infections are going. what's happening?— infections are going. what's haueninu? ~ , happening? i think it is complicated and incredibly _ happening? i think it is complicated and incredibly challenging - happening? i think it is complicated and incredibly challenging picture . and incredibly challenging picture across europe. as you are hearing them in your report, different views on the population. i think policymakers really struggling. i think what is happening is a number of different string dominant things. the first point to make is if you look at the figures if vaccine coverage uk similar and it doesn't look like within a betis situation but it must some important
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differences. these european countries were quicker to vaccinate teenagers who make up a greater proportion of the population covered but if you look at their older age groups particularly middle age they've still got some big gaps that we have to the same extent. this same thing as they build out their campaigns in terms of second doses of the shorter gap between first and second that means if you are looking at vaccine is waning you are already seeing that in europe i think a higher level than we had in the uk and then a couple of final points, many of these countries experiencing the delta wave slightly later than those while they were moving up and then of course the weather is getting colder and so people are interacting more indoors. so it is not the same situation as the uk but we are watching, obviously, with concern. . y we are watching, obviously, with concern. . , , concern. some really interesting differentials, _ concern. some really interesting differentials, then, _ concern. some really interesting differentials, then, in _ concern. some really interesting differentials, then, in terms - concern. some really interesting differentials, then, in terms of, | concern. some really interesting l differentials, then, in terms of, as you say, the timeframe around the vaccination, where that leaves immunity now. so what can we extrapolate from that in terms of how things are likely to go forward? well, i think how things are likely to go forward? well, ithink if how things are likely to go forward? well, i think if you look at the
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exponential rise in number of these countries are experiencing, the czech republic, germany, the netherlands, even france is beginning to see big rises and once you see that going up, vaccine coverage, for example those that come forward now doesn't kick in very quickly so it is going to take time, time. ithink very quickly so it is going to take time, time. i think the hospitals are going to continue to be under real strain but the measurements governments are taking now will make a difference. i know the restrictions of unwelcome and they really need to emphasise the message around vaccination and, importantly, get those booster campaigns running at speed and i really do hope that the situation will improve. find at speed and i really do hope that the situation will improve. and what is the picture _ the situation will improve. and what is the picture with _ the situation will improve. and what is the picture with booster _ is the picture with booster campaigns in various countries? 50. campaigns in various countries? so, the have campaigns in various countries? (so, they have been campaigns in various countries? 657, they have been improved campaigns in various countries? 6513, they have been improved but campaigns in various countries? 6r3, they have been improved but it is very slow to be rolled out. many of those countries have good infrastructure to do that they started later than us. remember, the uk we have got about a quarter of people who are eligible and have already had their booster and that is a far lower proportion than many parts of europe and then, of course,
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they are still struggling particularly in eastern europe, actually. i was speaking to colleagues in romania last weekjust to get the first and second doses taken up so big, big challenges but i think progress can be made and i think the messaging around the importance of vaccination, dealing with a hesitancy in the which is rife in some countries, you know, is something we really need to tackle and scientist, of course, have a role to play in that.— role to play in that. there is currently — role to play in that. there is currently no _ role to play in that. there is currently no change - role to play in that. there is currently no change in - role to play in that. there is currently no change in the l role to play in that. there is - currently no change in the covid-19 currently no change in the covid—i9 strategy in this country. in terms of the freedoms that we haven't come obviously, we are looking at other countries in europe are of introducing other restrictions. from what you're saying, can we be fairly confident in britain that we are in a strong position as we head into the winter without needing further restrictions?— restrictions? well, i wouldn't say we're in a — restrictions? well, i wouldn't say we're in a strong _ restrictions? well, i wouldn't say we're in a strong position. - restrictions? well, i wouldn't say we're in a strong position. whatl restrictions? well, i wouldn't sayj we're in a strong position. what i would say is we have in a sort of steady state except there are warning signs in northern ireland. we have high rates of infection but they don't seem to be rising in way they don't seem to be rising in way they have in europe and the quicker we roll out our booster is the more
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time we will buy ourselves. of course, across the uk, joanna, the policies are different. wales has extended its vaccination certification scheme does this monday, actually, to cinemas and theatres so i think we can't assume that policymakers here won't take that policymakers here won't take that action that i am optimistic. the only thing i would say from a behavioural perspective is that the time is against us and you can see from the date on people's contacts that they have increased indoors. this is not a surprise, and ijust think we need to watch that and really continue to send those strong messages about protective behaviours, including wearing a face covering. behaviours, including wearing a face coverina. ., , ., ., covering. professor linda paul, thank you _ covering. professor linda paul, thank you very _ covering. professor linda paul, thank you very much. - protests against lockdowns and vaccine mandates are taking place in cities across australia. the rallies are part of a planned international day of protest at coronavirus restrictions. our correspondent phil mercer is in sydney with more on the rallies.
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well, they are going on from coast to coast in the western australian state capital of perth, in sydney, the country's bigger city, and also in brisbane, adelaide and in melbourne as well. thousands of people have gathered at these demonstrations and there are reports that there have been counter protests by people supporting australia's vaccination policies so this is clearly a very divisive issue here in australia. but if you look at the statistics, australia is approaching 85% of the eligible population fully vaccinated, so this is a country that is embracing the vaccination policies of the state and federal governments. but there is a concern among a minority of people, those people who have taken to the streets, about vaccine mandates the health workers, for aviation workers, as well as some teachers. but, safe to say, it's a very noisy
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day across many australian cities as these people come out to vent their frustrations, not only against the vaccination policies but also covid—i9 lockdowns as well. but it is worth stating that australia's state and federal governments have been insisting that the vaccinations are safe and they are a route out of lockdowns and a path towards greater freedom for millions of australians. president biden has urged americans to refrain from violence, after a teenager who shot dead two people during protests last year, was cleared by a jury of murder. kyle rittenhouse argued that he acted in self defence when he killed two men and wounded another in the city of kenosha, in wisconsin, during demonstrations for racialjustice. on friday evening, there were peaceful protests in new york city in response to the not guilty verdict. hundreds of people marched through downtown brooklyn and onto brooklyn bridge, carrying signs and chanting. many told reporters that they were disappointed but not surprised by the verdict. president biden said the verdict would leave many americans feeling angry,
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including himself, but the decision of the jury must be respected. (sot i didn't watch the trial so i can let you know... reporter: do you stand by your - past comments relating him to white supremacy? — past comments relating him to white well, look, i stand by what the jury has concluded. the jury system works and we have to abide by it. the case has exposed and deepened the political divide in the united states, as nomia iqbal reports from wisconsin. the defendant will rise to face the jury and hearken
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to its verdicts. a dangerous vigilante or someone acting in self defence? the jury find the defendant kyle rittenhouse not guilty. the 12 men and women of the jury accepted the claim he killed out of fear for his safety. somehow, some way, those 12jurors felt that he was innocent. _ clamour. woo! outside court, the political decision dominant divisions as cases caught were clear. you attack me, i have the right to defend myself. that is what kyle was on trial for and that is what has now been found acquitted for. so you're telling that if two guys come up to you and accost you, you can't defend yourself? there is no way in. a land of law where a person can shoot shoot three people, kill two. of them and be acquitted. there'sjust no way. the shooting happened against the backdrop of nationwide protests against police brutality following the murder of george floyd. in kenosha, another black man named jacob blake had been shot by police several times and in the third night of riots kyle rittenhouse entered the city. he said he came to provide security.
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in a series of confrontations, hees shot dead a man who had chased him into this car park. he then killed another man who ran after rittenhouse thinking he was an active shooter. a third man survived. police later arrested a teenager and charged him with murder. at his trial, there were tears, challenges... when he pointed the gun at someone else, that's going to make _ them feel like they're about to die, right? l that's what you wanted him to feel? no! shouting by thejudge... don't get brazen with me! and a controversial defence by a team with regards to the shooting of jacob blake. other people in this _ community have shot somebody seven times and it's.
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been found to be ok. and my client did it four times in three quarters of a second i to protect his life from mr rosenbaum. _ i am sorry, but that's what happened. - this not guilty verdict is seen as a referendum on an issue that polarises americans beyond kenosha and that is the issue this not guilty verdict is seen as a referendum on an issue that polarises americans beyond kenosha and that is the issue of gun ownership. for many conservative groups, kyle rittenhouse is now seen as a hero, but for many liberal groups he is the face of a gun culture out of control and they're worried by being cleared of the charges what it might mean now for future protests. can americans turn up with a gun but not face any consequences? nomia iqbal, bbc news, kenosha. the parents of anthony hoober, one of the people killed by kyle rittenhouse, released a statement after the verdict was announced, saying they were heartbroken. they also said, that "the verdict sends an unacceptable message that armed civilians can show up in any town, incite violence and then use the danger they've created to justify shooting people in the street." the headlines on bbc news...
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seven people have been injured — including two shot and wounded by police — during rioting over new covid restriction in the netherlands, as infection rates rise across europe. protestors gather in austria, as the government announces a new national lockdown and plans to make vaccines mandatory next year president biden says he's angry, after a teenager who shot two people dead during racial unrest is cleared of murder. protests took place in new york following the divisive verdict. concern is mounting over the safety of chinese tennis star, peng shuai, who made sexual assault allegations against a former chinese vice—premier two weeks ago. the women's tennis association says no amount of money would stop it pulling events out of china, while the united nations and the white house have joined the list of those demanding answers. tanya dendrinos reports.
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a force on court who's long done her country proud. now, there are serious concerns for her safety. it's been more than tweo weeks since peng shuai said she was forced into a sexual relationship with china's former vice premier, zhang gaoli. the former world number one doubles player made the allegations in a post on chinese social media site, weibo. the post was soon deleted from china's internet. there's been no tangible evidence of her whereabouts since. we are deeply concerned by reports that peng shuai appears to be missing after accusing a former prc senior official of a sexual assault. we join in at the calls for prc authorities to provide independent and verifiable proof of her whereabouts and that she is safe. it's the first time such a claim has been made against one of china's senior political leaders. the women's tennis association says the allegation must be respected and investigated with full transparency and without censorship. china is a lucrative market
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for the wta, but its chairman says no amount of money would stop it from pulling tour events out of the nation if it's conditions regarding peng aren't met. we cannot stand by the compromises that come from the decisions that are tied to politics, business and money, and this is one of those. and i think this is a right and wrong issue, and i feel very, very strongly about that. earlier this week, chinese state media released an e—mail attributed to the 35—year—old, but doubt has been cast over its authenticity. i'm really glad that there was a, kind of, an initiated reaction from both atp and the wta chairmans, and it's important because this is horrifying. senior international olympic committee member dick powell says the ioc could be forced to take a harder line with the upcoming winter
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olympics hosts if the situation isn't imminently resolved. it comes as the us and uk revealed they will consider a democratic boycott of the games in beijing as concern regarding human rights abuses in china increases. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. a health regulator has estimated that a record 490 people died in england while detained under the mental health act, during the first year of the pandemic. the initialfigures from the care quality commission have fuelled concerns that patient safety in psychiatric wards, and across the wider nhs, is being jeopardised by staff shortages. the department of health said record numbers of doctors and nurses were now working in the nhs. patrick baker reports.
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he was just into everything, he did it, give everything go. helped people of any kind, really outgoing. loved art. after struggling with his mental health throughout most of his teenage years, 17—year—old charlie became increasingly unwell during the second half of 2020. he went downhill in thejuly time and he was then sectioned. charlie spent the next three months in and out three months in and out of the mental health unit at prestwich hospital in manchester. in early december last year, he returned to the ward following a night at home. dropped off a quarter to eight at night, he was in really good spirits, and then i got a phone call at quarter to ii to say they were doing cpr on him. during the course of this evening, charlie had made four attempts on his life.
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attempts on his life, the last of which proved fatal. the bbc have obtained a confidential nhs report into charlie's death. it highlighted staffing issues in the night, saying... in a statement, the nhs trust that manages prestwich hospital says... i think staff shortages are compromising patient safety in every part of the nhs at the moment.
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we have analysed figures in the care quality commission which inspects the health sector. between 2012 and 2019, an average of 272 people died each year while detained in hospital or been supervising the community under the mental health act in england. but early estimates for the first year of the pandemic suggest a record high, with 490 people dying between the start of march 2020 and the start of march 2021. the former conservative health secretaryjeremy hunt told me the government needs to bring an early changes in order to save lives. government needs to bring ——in urgent changes in order to save lives. i think staff shortages are compromising patient safety in every part of the nhs at the moment. we have a workforce crisis
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and it is time we completely overhauled the way we decide how many doctors and nurses we are going to train for the future. we need an independent body that sits outside the department of health, sits outside the nhs, and says looking ahead five years, ten years, 15 years, this is the number of doctors we need. — in mental health, cancer, and every part of the nhs. charlie's mum samantha says she is still waiting for a clear explanation about how her son could have lost her life in the very place that was meant to keep him safe. a full inquest into charlie's death starts next year. patrick bacon, bbc news. in response to staff shortages, the department of health and social care has told us they are "on track to deliver 50,000 more nurses by the end of this parliament." they say there will be further investment and they will be bringing forward plans to reform the mental health act shortly "to ensure anyone in a mental health crisis is treated with dignity and respect." tesla drivers have reported being locked out of their cars after an outage struck the car—maker's app. dozens of owners said an error message on the mobile app was preventing them from connecting to their vehicles.
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it's used as a key by drivers to unlock and start their cars. tesla's chief executive, elon musk, apologised and said he would make sure the outage didn't happen again. you're watching bbc news. single use plastics such as plates and cutlery as well as polystyrene cups could all be banned in england under new plans being considered by the government. it is estimated that only 10% of such items are recycled. according to estimates, in england alone, people get through 1.1 billion single—use plates every year. in addition to that, 4.25 billion single—use pieces of cutlery — most of which are plastic — are also used. disposable coffee cups have been a long—standing issue, and the uk as a whole throws away 2.5 billion of those every year, too.
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almost £40 million has been raised by the bbc children in need appeal. you have raised, my friends, a whopping... the show was jam—packed with the usual comedy sketches and star studded performances. ed sheeran belted out his new single and there were special editions of tv programmes like the wall and the repair shop. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas hello. a real change in weather type on the way over the next 24 hours or so. mild for much of november so far, but through this weekend things turn significantly colder. particularly by the time we get to tomorrow. that is down to the fact we have this weather front slipping south, introducing the blue colours, the colder air mass and chilly northerly winds as well. for the rest of the day, a fairamount of dry and mild weather for much of england and wales, the odd spot of drizzle in the south
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and some patchy rain to northern england and north wales later on. but temperatures up to 11 or 12 celsius. scotland and northern ireland into the afternoon turning brighter with some scattered blustery showers. some heavy showers overnight for the north of scotland, snow on the highest ground. falling as snow on the highest ground. temperatures remaining above freezing in most of our towns and cities, but a touch below for some rural spots. so, a chilly start to sunday. more sunshine than we've got today, but further wintry showers going to the high ground of scotland and rain showers for the east of england. top temperatures around 7 to 11 celsius. bye— bye.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines — anger in the netherlands over new covid restrictions. dutch police have shot and wounded at least two people during rioting, as coronavirus infection rates rise across europe. there are further protests in austria, which will return to a full national lockdown on monday. a rally is being held in vienna, after the government announced coronavirus vaccines will be made
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mandatory next year. joe biden says he's angry, after a teenager who shot two people dead during racial unrest is cleared of murder. protests took place in new york following the verdict. the president says it should be respected. i stand by what the jury has concluded. the jury system works and we have to abide by it. the women's tennis association threatens to pull out of china, as pressure grows over missing tennis star peng shuai. a record number of people died while detained under the mental health act in england during the first year of the pandemic, according to new figures from the health watchdog. a public consultation starts on a potential ban on single—use plastics like disposable cutlery and polystyrene boxes in england. and nearly £40 million has been raised for bbc children in need, with a host of stars and performersjoining pudsey bear for the annual fundraiser.

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