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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 20, 2021 10:00am-10:31am GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. anger in the netherlands over new covid restrictions — dutch police have shot and wounded at least two people during rioting, as coronavirus infection rates rise across europe. translation: on several occasions, police officers had _ translation: on several occasions, police officers had to draw— their weapons to defend themselves. some aimed shots were fired and people got hurt as a result. in australia, rallies and protests against lockdowns and vaccine mandates there have taken place across the country. joe biden says he's angry after a teenager who shot two people dead during racial unrest is cleared of murder. protests took place in new york following the divisive verdict — the president says it
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should be respected. i stand by what the jury has concluded. the jury system works and we have to abide by it. the women's tennis association threatens to pull out of china, as pressure grows over missing tennis star peng shuai. a ban on single—use plastics, like disposable cutlery and polystyrene boxes, moves a step closer england with the start of a public consultation on the change. and nearly £40 million raised for bbc children in need, with a host of stars and performers including ed sheeranjoining pudsey bear for the annual fundraiser. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world.
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the mayor of the dutch city of rotterdam has condemned what he's called "an orgy of violence" after protestors took to the streets to demonstrate against coronavirus restrictions. the netherlands is one of a number of places in europe to re—impose a lockdown because of a surge in cases. meanwhile, austria has become the first country in europe to make vaccinations compulsory. and germany has imposed new covid restrictions on the unvaccinated amid a surge in cases. tim muffett reports. protesters in rotterdam responding to the partial lockdown imposed in the netherlands. police used water cannon and fired warning shots. at least two people were injured. restrictions here began on monday and are set to be in place for another two weeks at least. like many countries in europe, the netherlands has seen a sharp rise in covid cases. in austria, a 20—day lockdown will start this monday. people will be asked
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to work from home and non—essential shops will close. in february, covid vaccinations will become compulsory. what we experience in austria right now is, in my view, an unfortunate collusion of the fact that we have a fairly low vaccination rate in the population and that the waning of immunity hits austria now, six months after we started our vaccination programme, and that is unfortunately right at the beginning of the winter season, where people are moving indoors. in germany, covid cases are also rising sharply. the government is set to introduce restrictions for unvaccinated people in areas where hospital admissions exceed a certain level. as for the prospect of a full lockdown, the german government says nothing has been ruled out. in the uk yesterday, just over a4,000 new people tested positive for coronavirus.
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over the week, there was a 13% increase in cases compared to the previous seven days. between the 9th and 15th of november, just over 6000 people were admitted to hospital with covid — that's a fall of 4.5% compared to the previous seven days. at the moment, the uk is not witnessing the surge in cases being seen in some other countries. we have, i'm sure, the highest levels of overall immunity in europe — it's over 90% amongst adults and approaching that level in children as well now — so that is quite a different situation to many countries in europe, including austria and germany, who did not have as bad first waves or second waves and did not have the significant delta wave yet, either. there are renewed calls for people to get boosterjabs if they are eligible in the hope the uk can avoid the tim muffett, bbc news.
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in the past few hours, the mayor of rotterdam has condemned the protest in his city. here's some of what he had to say. translation: the police, public prosecutor and local government had been informed about the fact that a few dozen people were planning to come to make a statement against the coronavirus policy. it was agreed to give space to this demonstration, even though it was not reported formally to the authorities. unfortunately, the police had to conclude quite quickly that these people had no peaceful intentions. their intention was to riot, challenge the police, destroy public property, set fire to scooters and erect barricades. this meant the police had to scale up their presence. police units from all over the country were brought in. as we speak, there are eight riot police units in rotterdam. that is about 400 officers, excluding arrest teams
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and officers on horseback. so that is quite a strong police presence. the police have been attacked by rioters. on several occasions, police officers had to draw weapons to defend themselves. some aimed shots were fired and people got hurt as a result. as far as we know, seven people were injured. protests against lockdowns and vaccine mandates are taking place in cities across australia. the rallies are part of a planned international day of protest at coronavirus restrictions. 0ur corrspondent, phil mercer, is in sydney. what more can you tell is about the protests? what more can you tell is about the rotests? , ., what more can you tell is about the rotests? , . , ., protests? they have help in the from coast to coast — protests? they have help in the from coast to coast across _ protests? they have help in the from coast to coast across this _ protests? they have help in the from coast to coast across this vast - coast to coast across this vast island nation, from perth and at the west to hear in sydney in at the east, and also in brisbane, adelaide and melbourne. thousands of people have come out, very different
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agendas for some of these protesters, some angry at lockdown restrictions that have been a feature of australia's coronavirus strategy. 0ther feature of australia's coronavirus strategy. other people angry at vaccine mandates for certain sectors, teachers, health workers and aviation staff have been subject to mandatory vaccinations. many people with many different agendas taking to the streets. but i think it's fair to say that these are a minority of people and their views are not shared by the broader australian community. if you look at the broad vaccination rate here in australia, it is approaching 85%. all the way through authorities and in this country have been saying that the vaccinations are safe and that the vaccinations are safe and that they are the ticket to greater freedom is not only now, but in the future. ~ ., freedom is not only now, but in the future. ~ . ., , future. what reaction has there been to the australian _ future. what reaction has there been to the australian open _ future. what reaction has there been to the australian open tennis - future. what reaction has there been to the australian open tennis saying | to the australian open tennis saying only that players can take part?
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these sorts of negotiations had been going on for a long time. yet in a long time. you have to remember that the if and that starts in january long time. you have to remember that the if and that starts injanuary is held in the city of melbourne. it has been one of the world's most lockdown cities. melbourne is the victorian state capitol and victoria state officials have been very keen to state that they didn't want players coming in who were not fully vaccinated. discussions between the authorities and organisers of the event have been going on for some time. now we have organisers say that only fully vaccinated players will be able to complete. this raises an interesting issue around novak djokovic, he is the defending men's champion, he hasn't divulged his vaccination status, but if he wants to come to australia to defend his australian open title he will
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have to be double—vaccinated. lots of subplots in the australian tennis and that is due to star in a couple of months' time. president biden has urged americans to refrain from violence and destruction of property, after a teenager who shot two people dead during racialjustice protests last year was found not guilty of murder. kyle rittenhouse argued that he acted in self—defence when he killed two men and wounded another in the city of kenosha in wisconsin. on friday evening, there were peaceful protests in new york city in response to the not guilty verdict. hundreds of people marched through downtown brooklyn and onto brooklyn bridge, carrying signs and chanting. many told reporters that they were disappointed but not surprised by the verdict. president biden said the verdict would leave many americans feeling angry, including himself, but the decision of the jury must be respected. i didn't watch the trial, so... do you stand by your past comments equating him to white supremacy? well, look, istand
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by what the jury has concluded. the jury system works and we have to abide by it. the case has exposed and deepened the political divide in the united states, as nomia iqbal reports from wisconsin. the defendant will rise to face - the jury and harken to its verdicts. a dangerous vigilante, or someone acting in self—defence? after 26 hours, thejury decided kyle rittenhouse's fate. we the jury find the defendant, kyle h rittenhouse, not guilty. the 12 men and women of the jury accepted the teenager's claim that he killed out of fear for his safety. somehow, some way, those 12jurors found that he was innocent. 0utside court, the political divisions this case has caused were clear. you attack me, i have the right
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to defend myself, that's was what kyle was on trial for, that's what he was acquitted for. are you telling me that if two guys come up to you and accost you, you can't defend yourself? that's what was on trial today. there is no way in a land of law where a person can shoot three people, kill two of them, and be acquitted. there'sjust no way. the shooting happened against the backdrop of nationwide protests over racism and police brutality, following the murder of george floyd. in kenosha, another black man, named jacob blake, had been shot by police seven times and on the third night of riots, kyle rittenhouse entered the city. he said he came to provide security. in a series of confrontations, he shot dead joseph rosenbaum, who chased after him into this car park.
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he then killed another man who ran after rittenhouse, thinking he was an active shooter. a third man survived. police later arrested the teenager and charged him with murder. at his trial, there were tears, challenges... when you point the gun at someone else, that's going to make them feel like they're about to die, right? that's what you wanted him to feel. no! ..shouting by thejudge... don't get brazen with me! ..and a controversial defence by his team, in regards to the shooting of jacob blake. other people in this community have shot somebody seven times and it's been found to be ok. my client did it four times in three—quarters of the second to protect his life from mr rosenbaum. i'm sorry, but that's what happened.
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this not guilty verdict is seen as a referendum on an issue that polarises americans beyond kenosha, and that is the issue of gun ownership. for many conservative groups, kyle rittenhouse is now seen as a hero. but for many liberal groups, he is the face of a gun culture out of control and they're worried, by being cleared of the charges, what it might mean now for future protests. ted cruz, the republican senator for texas, tweeted his reaction to the verdict. he said "we're a nation governed by law, and the rittenhouse verdict reminds us we have the moral and legal right to self—defence. for months, the left unjustly tried to convict mr rittenhouse." the parents of anthony huber, one of the people killed by kyle rittenhouse, released a statement after the verdict was announced, saying they were heartbroken. they also said, that "the verdict sends an unacceptable message that armed civilians can show up in any town, incite violence and then use the danger they've created to justify shooting people
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in the street." quinn rallins is a civil rights attorney. he is counsel to anthony hoober�*s family. we are thinking about anthony's family, they are heartbroken and angry. heartbroken that they will never see that their son again, but also angry at the verdict. they didn't attend the trial, as many of you all know, because they were traumatised already by the videos of their son's murder and didn't want to see much of that, and also hurt by public comments insensitive about their son. my view is, the bottom line is there was no justice today for their son anthony or the other victims. karen and john know that anthony is the one who should be remembered as a hero. he tried to disarm rittenhouse, he tried to end the gunfire, and he tried to stop the bloodshed.
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concern is mounting over the safety of chinese tennis star pung shuai, who made sexual assault allegations against a former chinese vice—premier two weeks ago. the women's tennis association says no amount of money would stop it pulling events out of china, while the united nations and the white house have joined the list of those demanding answers. tanya dendrinos reports. a force on court who has long done her country proud. now there are serious concerns for her safety. it's been more than two weeks since peng shuai said she was forced into a sexual relationship with china's former vice—premier, zhang gaoli. the former world number one doubles player made one doubles player made the allegations in a post on chinese social media site, weibo. the post was soon deleted from china's internet. there's been no tangible evidence of her whereabouts since. we're deeply concerned by reports
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that peng shuai appears to be missing after accusing a former prc senior official of sexual assault. we join in the calls for prc authorities to provide independent and verifiable proof of her whereabouts and that she is safe. it is the first time such a claim has been made against one of china's senior political leaders. the women's tennis association says the allegation must be respected and investigated with full transparency and without censorship. china is a lucrative market for the wta, but its chairman said no amount of money would stop it pulling tour events out of the nation if its conditions regarding peng aren't met. we cannot stand by the compromises that come from the decisions that are tied to politics, business and money. this is one of those. i think this is a right and wrong issue, and ifeel very, very strongly about that. earlier this week chinese state media released an e—mail attributed to the 35—year—old. but doubt has been cast
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over its authenticity. i'm really glad that there was a kind of an initiated reaction from the atp and the wta chairmen. and it is important because this is horrifying. senior international olympic committee member dick pound says the ioc could be forced to take a harder line with the upcoming winter olympics hosts if the situation is imminently resolved. it comes as the us and uk revealed they will consider a democratic boycott of the games in beijing as concern regarding human rights abuses in china increases. the headlines on bbc news... seven people have been injured, including two shot and wounded by police, during rioting over new covid restriction in the netherlands as infection rates rise across europe. meanwhile, rallies and protests against lockdowns and vaccine mandates have taken
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place across australia. joe biden says he's angry, after a teenager who shot two people dead during racial unrest is cleared of murder. protests took place in new york following the divisive verdict. the president says it should be respected. single—use plastics such as plates and cutlery as well as polystyrene cups could all be banned in england under new plans being considered by the government. it is estimated that only 10% of such items a re currently recycled. let's take you through the scale of the problem. according to estimates, in england alone, we get through 1.1 billion single—use plates every year. in addition to that, 4.25 billion single use pieces of cutlery, the vast majority of which are plastic, are also used. disposable coffee cups have been a long—standing issue, and the uk as a whole throws away
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2.5 billion of those every year. joining me now is professor rashid gatrad 0be, who is a consultant paediatrician in walsall and also a member of the climate change committee for the royal college of paediatrician, as well as being the founder of world against single use plastics. those were the statistics for england alone. what is the picture worldwide? . , ., england alone. what is the picture worldwide? . ., , ., worldwide? once you have been on the area, 'ust a worldwide? once you have been on the area, just a minute _ worldwide? once you have been on the area, just a minute or— worldwide? once you have been on the area, just a minute or so, _ worldwide? once you have been on the area, just a minute or so, there - worldwide? once you have been on the area, just a minute or so, there are - area, just a minute or so, there are i area, just a minute or so, there are i million plastic bottles thrown away. every minute, i million plastic bottles are thrown away, as indeed are plastic bags, which are a scourge of plastic right through the oceans, which kill a lot of not only marine animals but eventually will come to haunt us as human beings. we are talking here about the
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government binding site in the single—use plastic items will stop how important is government action versus what people do themselves as they become more aware of the issues? , ., , , , , ., , issues? obviously, everything starts at home. issues? obviously, everything starts at home- once _ issues? obviously, everything starts at home. once you _ issues? obviously, everything starts at home. once you start _ issues? obviously, everything starts at home. once you start recycling i at home. once you start recycling the recyclables. ifeel at home. once you start recycling the recyclables. i feel the government should be stricter of the corpora is to make sure the accurately label what is and isn't recyclable. also for our country they should also be uniform colours of what goes into a recycling bin and what doesn't. at the moment, there is confusion. each area has got its own colours of bins. worldwide, 80% plus of countries do not actually have a ways collecting system. that is something else they would need support on. we ourselves do our bit, but i think this is a global issue, as indeed is climate
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change. global issue, as indeed is climate chance. ~ ., ., ., , change. when we look at alternatives to iastic, change. when we look at alternatives to plastic. things _ change. when we look at alternatives to plastic, things that _ change. when we look at alternatives to plastic, things that cannot - change. when we look at alternatives to plastic, things that cannot be - to plastic, things that cannot be recycled, and other materials get use for single use items. 0ther unforeseen circumstances potentially arising from that in terms of the materials used, what is it used to source those materials and any other potential impacts? it source those materials and any other potential impacts?— potential impacts? it goes back to indust , potential impacts? it goes back to industry. the _ potential impacts? it goes back to industry, the designing _ potential impacts? it goes back to industry, the designing of- potential impacts? it goes back to i industry, the designing of materials is important. 0nce designed and at the way with the least amount of plastic is used. having said that, there are some plastics, there are seven types of plastic symbols, some are easier to recycle and others are not. what we do is collect plastic thatis not. what we do is collect plastic that is more difficult to recycle, such as the one in the spectacles,
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and we do a project where other of the miss england finalist last year joined me in collecting these from various opticians and we send them across the country. so reusing plastic is also important. also, bio plastics is on an a horizon but expensive, so that will be an alternative to normal plastic we are using at the moment. the alternative to normal plastic we are using at the moment.— using at the moment. the use of throwaway _ using at the moment. the use of throwaway items _ using at the moment. the use of throwaway items is _ using at the moment. the use of throwaway items is a _ using at the moment. the use of throwaway items is a relatively i throwaway items is a relatively recent addiction. not so long ago people might have gone around carrying cutlery cups, would reuse bottles, take a bottles back to shops for being reuse. what about going back to that? that would be a huge shift. i going back to that? that would be a hue shift. ~ , huge shift. i think it is something seriously that _ huge shift. i think it is something seriously that we _ huge shift. i think it is something seriously that we will _ huge shift. i think it is something seriously that we will had - huge shift. i think it is something seriously that we will had to - huge shift. i think it is something | seriously that we will had to think of, because our planet is in trouble from various angles. years may have
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heard of the nine planetary health boundaries, and we have exceeded a few of them already. i think overall our concept should be such that we should perhaps be going back, as a medical person, going back to glass syringes. what's wrong with them? we could have those sterilised rather than using millions of plastic syringes that are thrown away. because they are contaminated with body fluids, they have two incinerated. yes, we have got to go back to glass bottles for the milk, for example. we have got to go back a little bit. what about babies nappies? might have to go back to teddy nappies. those are the things, as human beings, we have got to think of, because we are in trouble. plastic that has been produced, 50% of at present, has been in the last
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20 years. if we leave things as they are, by 2050 there will be more plastic in the oceans than there will be fish. in terms of the greenhouse gases that are produced, there will be 15% greenhouse gases released from the of plastic. plastic itself in an indirect way is hugely dangerous.— plastic itself in an indirect way is hugely dangerous. professor, thank ou so hugely dangerous. professor, thank you so much — hugely dangerous. professor, thank you so much for— hugely dangerous. professor, thank you so much forjoining _ hugely dangerous. professor, thank you so much forjoining us. - tesla drivers have reported being locked out of their cars after an outage struck the carmaker�*s app. dozens of owners said an error message on the mobile app was preventing them from connecting to their vehicles. the tesla app is used as a key by drivers to unlock and start their cars. tesla's chief executive, elon musk, apologised and said he would ensure the outage doesn't happen again. almost £40 million has been raised by the bbc children in need appeal. the show was jam—packed with the usual comedy sketches and star—studded performances, as our entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports.
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for the first time in its 41—year history, children in need took place in the north — at media city in salford. some familiar faces were on duty to welcome pudsey. # i will always love you for what it's worth...# ed sheeran kick started proceedings, but it wasn't the most talked about music performance of the evening. that belonged to the all—star puppet ensemble covering a starship classic. # and we can build this bridge together. # standing strong for ever # nothing's going to stop us now...# and in a special news and sports episode of i can see your voice, the challenge was to work out if this was mike bushell�*s real singing voice. turns out it wasn't.
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hi. eastenders' janine butcher met coronation street's steve mcdonald on first dates. you ever been married? uh, well, you could say that, yeah. a couple of times, then? seven. mastermind's clive myrie tested mel giedroyc on the life and times of her co—host, graham norton. what is graham's favourite film? clingfilm. no, et. and 0wain wyn evans found outjust how much his 24—hour drumathon had raised. an incredible 5,601,138! thank you so much. and that helped the total money raised on the night reach... a whopping 59,389,048!
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an increase of 2 million on last year. colin paterson, bbc news, salford. regular trains are returning to the dartmoor line in devon for the first time in almost 50 years. from today, great western railway services will run between 0kehampton and exeter. it's part of a government scheme to restore abandoned railway lines. john maguire reports. when the railway arrived in 0kehampton, the town threw a huge street party to celebrate. that was 150 years ago. the next century saw crowds gather for other important occasions — to name trains and to send the town's sons off to war. and even the line's closure in 1972, part of the beeching cuts, was marked with some ceremony. today, the festivities continue as scheduled
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passenger service returns — a reward for years of campaigning. back in the summer, we filmed the new tracks being laid. fantastic. this is the moment, isn't it, really, when the track gets put down, the new track, and it'll be shortly, hopefully, a train to exeter. just remind me, how long have you been campaigning and working on this? well, i arrived in 0kehampton in 1975 and i saw it going gradually derelict then, so that was when i first became interested in it. the line is the very first to reopen as part of the government's restoring your railway scheme but this week, it's seen controversy and anger elsewhere with the scrapping of the h52 link to leeds and the northern powerhouse line between leeds and manchester. the restoration of the dartmoor line was made easier by the fact that after closing to passenger services,
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it continued to be used for transporting railway ballast from a nearby quarry. it also ran as a heritage railway but now, it's been upgraded. it's not as easy as you think. it hasn't been in good condition but there is a huge amount of work. we've done kind of 11 miles of track installation in the last four weeks. it's actually been one of the fastest track installations in network rail history. well, this is the new track construction machine. it's an impressive piece of kit, about a quarter of a mile long. you can see what's happening. the grey pod at the top runs back, grabs the sleepers, brings them to the front the train and then lays them in a perfectly straight line on the bed with the two metal tracks on top. it'll run at a rate of about 400 metres per hour. and in the belly of the beast, it is ryan'sjob to keep the machine, well, on track. my position is to ensure that it's somewhere near — and usually, i'm pretty good. so you have to constantly monitor
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the height of your clamps so they don't hit the sleepers, the spacing of the rail behind you and obviously, the line itself. so it's a concentration game? yeah, big time. after a week where the government's been accused of reneging on promised rail improvements in the north of england, reopening this line may seem a small step, but it is a giant leap for people here, the passengers who will use it and the communities it will serve. john maguire, bbc news, devon. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah. we have had a very mild november so far, but things are now about the change as we head through the course of the weekend. most of us woke up to another mild and mostly dry start but we have got a weather front moving south, bringing rain at times and introducing the colder air. we have a front pushing cold air across
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scotland and northern ireland today, by tomorrow we are

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