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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 20, 2021 6:00am-10:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and mega munchetty. our headlines today: clashes in the netherlands as covid restrictions are tightened across mainland europe. and a clampdown in austria: a full lockdown from monday and compulsory vaccinations by february. we, thejury, find the defendant, kyle h rittenhouse, not guilty. cleared of murder in the us: the teenage gunman who shot dead two people during racial unrest in 2020. president biden expresses his anger but calls for calm. good morning. there's growing concern over the safety of chinese tennis star peng shuai, whom the women's tennis association
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has still not been able to contact, and now the united nations says it wants proof of the player's whereabouts. # baby, you will never be lost on me. ed sheeranjoins a host of stars and performers in this year's children in need. nearly £40 million was raised on the night. good morning. a mild start to the day today and most places should see quite a bit of dry weather but things are turning much colder through the weekend. we will see a chilly northerly wind developing tomorrow. i will have all of the details here on bbc breakfast. good morning. it's saturday the 20th of november. police in the dutch city of rotterdam have fired warning shots and used water cannon during clashes with anti—lockdown protestors. the netherlands and austria have imposed strict lockdowns following a steep rise in coronavirus infections across the continent. tim muffett has the latest.
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protesters in rotterdam responding to the partial lockdown imposed in the netherlands. police used water cannon and fired warning shots. at least two people were injured. restrictions here began on monday and are set to be in place for another two weeks at least. like many countries in europe, the netherlands has seen a sharp rise in covid cases. in austria, a 20 day lockdown will start this monday. people will be asked to work from home and non—essential shops will close. in february, covid vaccinations will become compulsory. what we experience in austria right now is, in my view, an unfortunate conclusion of the fact that we have a fairly low vaccination rate in the population and that the waning of immunity hits austria now, six
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months after we started our vaccination programme, and that is unfortunately right at the beginning of the winter season, people are moving indoors. in of the winter season, people are moving indoors.— of the winter season, people are moving indoors. in germany, covid cases are also _ moving indoors. in germany, covid cases are also rising _ moving indoors. in germany, covid cases are also rising sharply. - moving indoors. in germany, covid cases are also rising sharply. the l cases are also rising sharply. the government is set to introduce restrictions for unvaccinated people in areas where hospital admissions exceed a certain level. as for the prospect of a full lockdown, the german government says nothing has been ruled out. in the uk yesterday, just over a4,000 new people tested positive for coronavirus. 0ver just over a4,000 new people tested positive for coronavirus. over the week, there was a 13% increase in cases compared to the previous seven days. between the ninth and 15th of november, just over 6000 people were admitted to hospital with covid. that's a fall off 4.5% compared to the previous seven days, at the moment, the uk is not witnessing the surge in cases being seen in some other countries. we surge in cases being seen in some other countries.— surge in cases being seen in some other countries. we have, i'm sure,
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the highest — other countries. we have, i'm sure, the highest levels _ other countries. we have, i'm sure, the highest levels of _ other countries. we have, i'm sure, the highest levels of an _ other countries. we have, i'm sure, the highest levels of an automatic l the highest levels of an automatic in europe, 90% in adults and approaching that level in children as well now so that is quite a different situation to many countries in europe, occluding austria and germany who did not have as bad first or second waves and did not have the significant altar wave yet either. not have the significant altar wave et either. . . ., , yet either. there are renewed calls for --eole yet either. there are renewed calls for peeple to _ yet either. there are renewed calls for peeple to get — yet either. there are renewed calls for people to get mr— yet either. there are renewed calls for people to get mrjobs _ yet either. there are renewed calls for people to get mrjobs if- yet either. there are renewed calls for people to get mrjobs if they i for people to get mrjobs if they are eligible —— delta. in the hope the uk can avoid the tougher restrictions being imposed elsewhere. ——to get boosterjabs. tim muffett, bbc news. us presidentjoe biden said he is angry after a teenager who shot dead two people was cleared of murder. kyle rittenhouse argued that he'd acted in self—defence when he killed two men and wounded another during racialjustice protests last year. 0ur washington correspondent nomia iqbal reports. the defendant will rise and face the jury and harken to its verdicts. a dangerous vigilante or someone acting in self—defence? after 26 hours,
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the jury decided kyle rittenhouse's fate. we, thejury, find the defendant, kyle h rittenhouse, not guilty. the 12 men and women of thejury accepted the teenager's claim he killed out of fear for his safety. somehow, some way, those 12 jurors found that he was innocent. yelling applause woo! 0utside court, the political divisions this case has caused were clear. you attack me, i have the right to defend myself! that's what kyle was on trial for and that's what kyle is now found acquitted of, 0k? so you're telling me if two guys come up to you and accost you, you can't defend yourself? that's what was on trial today! there is no way in a law — in a land of law where a person can shoot three people, kill two of them, and be acquitted. there'sjust no way. the shooting happened against the backdrop of nationwide protests over
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racism and police brutality following the murder of george floyd. in kenosha, another black man, named jacob blake, had been shot by police seven times and on the third night of riots, kyle rittenhouse entered the city. he said he came to provide security. in a series of confrontations, he shot dead joseph rosenbaum, who had chased after him into this car park. he then killed another man who ran after rittenhouse, thinking he was an active shooter. a third man survived. police later arrested the teenager and charged him with murder. people... sobs. at his trial, there were tears, challenges... and a controversial offence by his team in regards to the shooting of jacob lake.
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—— blake. other people in this community have shot somebody seven times and it's been found to be ok, and my client did it four times in three—quarters of a second to protect his life from mr rosenbaum. i'm sorry, but that's what happened. this not guilty verdict is seen as a referendum on an issue that polarises americans beyond kenosha, and that is the issue of gun ownership. for many conservative groups, kyle rittenhouse is now seen as a hero. but for many liberal groups, he is the face of a gun culture out of control and they're worried, by being cleared of the charges, what it might mean now for future protests. can americans turn up with a gun but not face any consequences? nomia iqbal, bbc news, kenosha. colin pitchfork, the man who killed two teenagers in the 1980s, is back in prison, less than two months after being released. it's understood he breached the terms of his licence but did not commit any further offences. he served 33 years for killing 15—year—olds lynda mann
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and dawn ashworth in leicestershire. single—use plastic plates, cutlery and polystyrene cups could all be banned in england. 4.25 billion items of throwaway cutlery, most of which are plastic, are used in england per year, but only 10% are recycled. a public consultation on the issue begins today. all materials have an environmental impact, whether they be wood, paper, glass, et cetera, and as we have just heard from the climate change summit, it is important we remember that the goods that we consume, the clothes we wear and the food we buy contribute nearly half of all global emissions. almost £40 million has been raised by the bbc children in need appeal. the show was jam—packed with the usual comedy sketches and star—studded performances, as our entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports. despite whatever is going on, that appeal attracts people's generosity, they are amazingly generous.
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for the first time in its 41 year history, children in need took place in the north at media city in salford and some familiar faces were happy to welcome pudsey. i will]! happy to welcome pudsey. i will alwa s happy to welcome pudsey. i will always love _ happy to welcome pudsey. i will always love you _ happy to welcome pudsey. i will always love you for _ happy to welcome pudsey. i will always love you for what - happy to welcome pudsey. i will always love you for what it's - happy to welcome pudsey. iw ii always love you for what it's worth. ed sheeran kick—started proceedings that it was not the most talked about musical performance of the evening. that belonged to the old—style poppet ensemble, covering starship classic. we old-style poppet ensemble, covering starship classic.— starship classic. we can build this dream together. _ starship classic. we can build this dream together. standing - starship classic. we can build this dream together. standing strong | dream together. standing strong forever. nothing's gonna stop us now. �* . forever. nothing's gonna stop us now. ~ ., ,, . ., , forever. nothing's gonna stop us now. ~ ., ,, .., ,., forever. nothing's gonna stop us now. and in a special news and sport eisode of now. and in a special news and sport episode of i — now. and in a special news and sport episode of i can _ now. and in a special news and sport episode of i can see _ now. and in a special news and sport episode of i can see your _ now. and in a special news and sport episode of i can see your voice, - now. and in a special news and sport episode of i can see your voice, the i episode of i can see your voice, the challenge was to work out if this was mike bushell�*s real singing voice. was mike bushell's real singing
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voice. _ was mike bushell's real singing voice._ turns l was mike bushell's real singing l voice._ turns out was mike bushell's real singing - voice._ turns out it voice. oooh. oh, baby. turns out it was not. voice. oooh. oh, baby. turns out it was not- i— voice. oooh. oh, baby. turns out it was not- i just _ voice. oooh. oh, baby. turns out it was not. i just want _ voice. oooh. oh, baby. turns out it was not. i just want you _ voice. oooh. oh, baby. turns out it was not. i just want you to - voice. oooh. oh, baby. turns out it was not. i just want you to dance i was not. i 'ust want you to dance with me was not. ijust want you to dance with me tonight. _ was not. ijust want you to dance with me tonight. hi! _ was not. ijust want you to dance with me tonight. hi! hi! - was not. ijust want you to dance with me tonight. hi! hi! east - was not. ijust want you to dancej with me tonight. hi! hi! east end was not. i just want you to dance i with me tonight. hi! hi! east end is met coronation street on first dates — met coronation street on first dates. ., , ., dates. you ever been married? you could say that. _ dates. you ever been married? you could say that, yeah. _ dates. you ever been married? you could say that, yeah. couple - dates. you ever been married? you could say that, yeah. couple of - could say that, yeah. couple of times then? — could say that, yeah. couple of times then? seven. _ could say that, yeah. couple of i times then? seven. mastermind's clive myrie _ times then? seven. mastermind's clive myrie tested _ times then? seven. mastermind's clive myrie tested her— times then? seven. mastermind's clive myrie tested her on - times then? seven. mastermind's clive myrie tested her on the - times then? seven. mastermind's clive myrie tested her on the life | clive myrie tested her on the life and times of graham norton. what clive myrie tested her on the life and times of graham norton. what is arand's and times of graham norton. what is grand's favourite _ and times of graham norton. what is grand's favourite film? _ and times of graham norton. what is grand's favourite film? clingfilm. - grand's favourite film? clingfilm. no, et. and _ grand's favourite film? clingfilm. no, et. and when _ grand's favourite film? clingfilm. no, et. and when when - grand's favourite film? clingfilm. no, et. and when when evans i grand's favourite film? clingfilm. - no, et. and when when evans found out 'ust no, et. and when when evans found outjust how — no, et. and when when evans found outjust how much _ no, et. and when when evans found outjust how much his _ no, et. and when when evans found outjust how much his 24-hour- no, et. and when when evans found | outjust how much his 24-hour drama outjust how much his 24—hour drama fon had raised. outjust how much his 24-hour drama fon had raised.— outjust how much his 24-hour drama fon had raised._ an - fon had raised. here we go... an incredible... _ fon had raised. here we go... an incredible... 3,000,601- fon had raised. here we go... an incredible... 3,000,60118. - fon had raised. here we go... an| incredible... 3,000,60118. thank you so— incredible... 3,000,60118. thank
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you so much! and incredible... 3,000,60118. thank you so much!— incredible... 3,000,60118. thank ou so much! �* ., , you so much! and that has helped the total money — you so much! and that has helped the total money raised _ you so much! and that has helped the total money raised on _ you so much! and that has helped the total money raised on the _ you so much! and that has helped the total money raised on the night - you so much! and that has helped the total money raised on the night to - total money raised on the night to reach... a, total money raised on the night to reach... �* ., ,, total money raised on the night to reach... �* ,':f~' :: f~ reach... a whopping 39,389,048 ounds. reach... a whopping 39,389,048 pounds- an _ reach... a whopping 39,389,048 pounds. an increase _ reach... a whopping 39,389,048 pounds. an increase of _ reach... a whopping 39,389,048 pounds. an increase of 2 - reach... a whopping 39,389,048 pounds. an increase of 2 million | reach... a whopping 39,389,048 l pounds. an increase of 2 million on last ear. colin paterson, bbc news. just a spectacular, isn't it? so generous and the number always goes up generous and the number always goes up as well. 50 generous and the number always goes u- as well. ., ~' generous and the number always goes u- as well. ., ~ i. generous and the number always goes u- as well. ., ~' i. ., up as well. so thank you, and we often show _ up as well. so thank you, and we often show kind _ up as well. so thank you, and we often show kind of— up as well. so thank you, and we often show kind of where - up as well. so thank you, and we often show kind of where the - up as well. so thank you, and we i often show kind of where the money is going and how it is being used and a variety of people are changing lives and so thank you very much. and well done, mike. indie lives and so thank you very much. and well done, mike.— and well done, mike. we will talk about that bit _ and well done, mike. we will talk about that bit later! _ and well done, mike. we will talk about that bit later! it _ and well done, mike. we will talk about that bit later! it is - and well done, mike. we will talk about that bit later! it is 11 - about that bit later! it is 11 minutes past six. let's take a look at some of today's papers. "pm demands migrant fix" is the lead headline in the times. the paper reports that borisjohnson is "exasperated" by his government's failure to stem the number of migrants crossing the channel, prompting him to order a cross—whitehall review. the guardian has spoken to lord bhikhu parekh, who wrote a key report on the future of multi—ethnic britain more than 20 years ago, about the racism
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scandal engulfing cricket. he says it's the result of successive governments failing to embrace multiculturalism. the daily mirror leads with double child killer colin pitchfork being recalled to prison. and social media has been reacting to the acquittal of kyle rittenhouse, the teenage vigilante who stood trial for murder after shooting dead two people in kenosha, wisconsin. the kenosha news was clearly on standby for violence in the wake of the verdict, but the paper tweeted that it was all quiet at 9pm. let's look inside, heading towards christmas of course. share let's look inside, heading towards christmas of course.— let's look inside, heading towards christmas of course.- ten | christmas of course. are we? ten da s christmas of course. are we? ten days away — christmas of course. are we? ten days away from — christmas of course. are we? ten days away from being _ christmas of course. are we? ten days away from being able - christmas of course. are we? ten days away from being able to - christmas of course. are we? ten | days away from being able to open your advent calendar. and a story about different kinds of calendars. paul a crackling, pig out with pork scratchings, if you really, not one for the vegetarian, but if you like
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a little savoury... share for the vegetarian, but if you like a little savoury. . ._ a little savoury... are pork scratchings _ a little savoury... are pork scratchings wrapped - a little savoury... are pork scratchings wrapped up i a little savoury... are pork scratchings wrapped up or| a little savoury... are pork i scratchings wrapped up or are a little savoury... are pork - scratchings wrapped up or are they in a box and are they all different? thejoy of an in a box and are they all different? the joy of an advent calendar is in every box, it is different. the? the joy of an advent calendar is in every box, it is different.- every box, it is different. they are different, according _ every box, it is different. they are different, according to _ every box, it is different. they are different, according to the - every box, it is different. they are different, according to the story. i j different, according to the story. i have never liked them, by the way, poor cracklings. 15 have never liked them, by the way, poor cracklings.— poor cracklings. 15 pounds, it has --eole, poor cracklings. 15 pounds, it has people. pigs _ poor cracklings. 15 pounds, it has people. pigs and _ poor cracklings. 15 pounds, it has people, pigs and blankets, i poor cracklings. 15 pounds, it has people, pigs and blankets, salt l poor cracklings. 15 pounds, it has i people, pigs and blankets, salt and indigo, black pepper... i5 people, pigs and blankets, salt and indigo, black pepper... is it crackling? _ indigo, black pepper... is it crackling? i— indigo, black pepper... is it crackling? i guess. - indigo, black pepper... is it crackling? i guess. 0r- indigo, black pepper... is it crackling? i guess. or is. indigo, black pepper... is it crackling? i guess. or is it. indigo, black pepper... is it| crackling? i guess. or is it a indigo, black pepper... is it- crackling? i guess. or is it a pig in a blanket? _ crackling? i guess. or is it a pig in a blanket? it— crackling? i guess. or is it a pig in a blanket? it is— crackling? i guess. or is it a pig in a blanket? it is a _ crackling? i guess. or is it a pig in a blanket? it is a pork- crackling? i guess. or is it a pig in a blanket? it is a pork based| in a blanket? it is a pork based advent calendar. _ in a blanket? it is a pork based advent calendar. but _ in a blanket? it is a pork based advent calendar. but is - in a blanket? it is a pork based advent calendar. but is the i in a blanket? it is a pork based i advent calendar. but is the weirdest advent calendar. but is the weirdest advent calendar... _ advent calendar. but is the weirdest advent calendar... bit _ advent calendar. but is the weirdest advent calendar. .. bit of— advent calendar. but is the weirdest advent calendar. .. bit of pork- advent calendar. but is the weirdest advent calendar... bit of pork every| advent calendar... bit of pork every day! advent calendar... bit of pork every da ! , ., , ., ., advent calendar... bit of pork every da! ,., .,, advent calendar... bit of pork every da! ,., ., , ., day! this goes on to list other ones, a cheese _ day! this goes on to list other ones, a cheese one. - day! this goes on to list other ones, a cheese one. i- day! this goes on to list other ones, a cheese one. i like i day! this goes on to list other i ones, a cheese one. i like cheese. an adult one- _ ones, a cheese one. i like cheese. an adult one. what _ ones, a cheese one. i like cheese. an adult one. what is _ ones, a cheese one. i like cheese. an adult one. what is that? i ones, a cheese one. i like cheese. an adult one. what is that? not i ones, a cheese one. i like cheese. | an adult one. what is that? not to be discussed at quarter past six! it goes into detail. the be discussed at quarter past six! it goes into detail.— goes into detail. the adult one is se arate goes into detail. the adult one is separate to _ goes into detail. the adult one is separate to the _ goes into detail. the adult one is separate to the pork _ goes into detail. the adult one is separate to the pork one, - goes into detail. the adult one is| separate to the pork one, guess? yes!
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here is sarah with a look at this morning's weather. it has been very mild, but it is set to get a little bit more chilly, i think. are you a fan of advent calendars? i think. are you a fan of advent calendars?— think. are you a fan of advent calendars? . , , calendars? i am, but i remember the ones when i — calendars? i am, but i remember the ones when i was _ calendars? i am, but i remember the ones when i was a _ calendars? i am, but i remember the ones when i was a child _ calendars? i am, but i remember the ones when i was a child and - calendars? i am, but i remember the ones when i was a child and all- calendars? i am, but i remember the ones when i was a child and all you i ones when i was a child and all you got inside was a different picture. you would be thinking today isabel. and when you got a tree you are getting closer to christmas. simpler days. b. getting closer to christmas. simpler da s. �* , ., getting closer to christmas. simpler da s. m ., . ., days. a bit of chocolate in mine and i will be days. a bit of chocolate in mine and i will be happy- _ days. a bit of chocolate in mine and i will be happy- it — days. a bit of chocolate in mine and i will be happy. it has— days. a bit of chocolate in mine and i will be happy. it has been - days. a bit of chocolate in mine and i will be happy. it has been very i i will be happy. it has been very mild. good morning to you. we have had temperatures well above average for much of november. we are ten days away from the start of meteorological winter but yesterday in aberdeen temperatures were up at 17 celsius. take a look at the change in temperatures, though. by the time we get to the middle part of the week we will see temperatures in aberdeen about four celsius, so you will really notice the change in the feel to the weather, a drop of
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13 degrees in less than a week. high pressure still not far away to the south but through the weekend this weather front will push its way south through today and that will open the doors for these cold northerly winds. the change in rare mass, the wind from the north during the day, and that will set us up for a much colder week ahead —— changing in hermas. enjoy the weather where you can, a little bit of sunshine breaking through at times when northern england, into wales. this weather front pushing out of scotland and northern ireland will bring some drizzly rain to northern england and north wales later in the day. that will be followed in the north by sunshine and scattered showers, looking at single figures this afternoon. further south, about ten to 13 degrees across southern parts of england and wales. into the evening and overnight, as the cloud clears away towards the south, we have the cold air moving in. we are likely to see a touch of frost, particularly in the north tonight. quite a chilly breeze coming into
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parts of northern scotland, down the east coast of england as well thing tomorrow, bringing us a few showers. some of the showers could be heavy, some hail and wintering us over the higher ground of scotland and heavy rain showers down the east coast of england as well. generally fewer showers further west but one or two close to irish sea coasts through the day. top temperature is about seven to 11 degrees but it will feel a touch colder than that in the east where you are exposed to the cold northerly wind. we have high pressure that will dominate our weather as we head on through next week. generally quite cold air with us but there will be something a little less cold for a time on monday into tuesday, just moving in from the north, and this weather front bringing more cloud to scotland and northern ireland by the time we get to monday. england and wales sticking with the sunshine but quite a chilly breeze coming from the north—east to east anglia. temperatures for some of us getting into double figures on monday, hires of about seven to 11 degrees, but do expect some morning frosts to return as we head through the course of next week. there could be some
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mistiness through the mornings as well. here is the outlook into next week, a little bit less cold for a time on monday and tuesday but by the end of the week we are all looking at those temperatures in mid single figures. certainly quite a wintry change coming over the next few days. let's find out what is on at the cinema. it's time for the film review, with mark kermode and victoria derbyshire. welcome to the film review on bbc news, to take us through this week �*s cinema releases is, as always, mark kermode. where are we starting this week, mark?— this week, mark? interestingly this week we have _ this week, mark? interestingly this week we have ghostbusters: i week we have ghostbusters: afterlife, which is a new ghostbusters film, we have petite maman, the new one by celine
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sciamma, and we have king richard, who is the father of venus and serena williams. ghostbusters, the sequel. it's not called that. no, ghostbusters afterlife. we've already had the sequel and we had the reboot. this is directed byjason reitman, whose father ivan reitman directed the original. the story is a single mum and her two kids are evicted from their home and they go out to an old farmhouse owned by her deceased father. paul rudd is out there. he's playing a seismologist teacher, who is out there because he is interested in the fact that there were lots of earthquakes although there were no fault lines. mckenna grace and finn wolfhard are the kids, who uncover a bunch of ghostbusting equipment which they fire up. here is a clip. fire it up. i've always wanted to do this.
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yes! uh...we should probably get out of here. you're an adult. yeah, and i'm liable. you know what this means, right? your grandfather was a ghostbuster. i'm quite glad that wait was worth it. was it — was it?
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was to me. two questions. you saw the original ghostbusters. did you love it? idid. have you seen it recently? it's not as good as you remember. is it not. jason reitman says this is a family affair, a story about family. he also said this is a film that gives ghostbusters back to the fans, which seems to be suggesting that after the 2016 female—led ghostbusters, which many of the fans were up in arms about — how dare they they have taken the thing i love and changed it in a way, to now we get this. this is basically a bit stranger things. for most of the movie the first half of it, nothing happens. the second half of the film everything happens, and everything that happens is "remember that bit from ghostbusters that you liked? here it is. remember that other bit from ghostbusters that you liked? well, here it is again. you remember that sort of riffy thing that you liked? here it is, but slightly different." my problem is this. firstly, at least the 2016 ghostbusters, i think, tried to do something new.
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some people did not like it, i actually thought it was fine, but at least it attempted to do something new. what this does is go, we all love ghostbusters. ghostbusters is to be revered. fine, it had its moments. but watching a movie thatjust plods through all the old tropes by going over — but this time we've got a connection to stranger things and this time it's a new generation, and this time it's about family. is it, or is it really that ghostbusters has run its course? and it's probably time to just go, ok, i think we've had enough of this now. the thing that troubles me about this is it's so ordinary. and you think of it as a big franchise with huge built—in audience, and what do you do with it? you just go, there. as i said, it's for the fans. well, the fans kind of deserve it in that case. ok, let's leave that and talk about petite maman.
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this is a new film from celia sciamma. i think it's already one of my favourite films of the year. if not, it is in my top three at the end of the year. a young girl, nelly, has lost her grandmother. and she goes with her mother to her grandmother's house to clean it out, the mother can't deal with the grief. nelly goes out into the woods and finds a heart to her about and find another young girl who shares the name of her mother, and seems to share many of the experiences that she knows her mother had. so on the one hand it's a fairy tale. 0n the other hand it's a ghost story. maybe a time travelling story. maybe it's back to the future without the delorean. it's beautiful — it's so natural and so well observed. it's about bridging the intergenerational gap, about parents and children and grandmothers and that. and it's really profound. but it's a u—certificate film. anyone can see this film. it's 72 minutes long. it is as close to a perfect film as i can remember seeing.
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it is absolutelyjust drop—dead astonishing, and i would encourage everyone to go and see it. if you say it's a children's film, that kind of does it an injustice. it is a children's film for children of all ages. parents will see one thing in it, children will see another thing. it is yet further evidence that celine sciamma really is amazing. just does not put a foot wrong. king richard is starring will smith, and this is all about richard williams, who is the father of venus and serena williams, who has been portrayed in the media as on one hand charismatic, inspirational, extraordinaryjob as a trainer, and on the other hand overbearing, self—serving. what the film does is spread by will smith — generally likeable, irascible, and certainly difficult to get on with, but attempting to do something under very difficult circumstances which not everyone approves of. here's a clip. what's going on? everybody 0k? they got a call, said _ there was trouble in the house. ok, you all need to look around?
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it's a little wet for practice, don't you think? don't the girls have schoolwork to do? now i don't even mind you saying we're hard on these kids. - you know why? because we are. that's ourjob — to keep them off the streets. i so the interesting thing about this is i think will smith is really good at playing this central role. and although it's serena and venus williams who gets executive producer credit, it's notjust something which says he's fabulous. it's something which says we get a terrific performance from the parent who has to stand up and say you have to talk to us, you have to make these decisions collectively. and also, as inspirational sports stories go, it's really is one of the best. but even i know the story and i thought it was told engagingly. yes, there is a certain amount of soft soaping some elements
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of it. but it is a portrait of someone who is driven and trying to do something — and bear in mind, trying to break into the privileged white enclaves of the us tennis scene, and therefore probably has to be as forceful as he is. you don't come out of it thinking saint, but you come out of it thinking ok, i can understand how that character was important in making all of this happen — even if at times there were arguments about enough is enough. i think that's down to will smith's performance. is this one of the best things he's done for a while? i like will smith in pretty much everything, even when his films are bad. the thing is, he is a very likeable screen presence. he made some very unlikable, terrible films, but i think this is pretty decent. right, let's talk about spencer. i heard you on 5live the other week absolutely raving about this. i loved it. have you seen it? you have to see it. i will. we are in that period
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where it's awards season, so all the great films are coming out now. kristen stewart is fabulous, absolutely fabulous as princess diana. three days over christmas at sandringham. it's a ghost story, a psychological thriller, a brilliant score byjohnny greenwood, and it is the absolute antithesis of that terrible film diana which came out some years ago and was just awful. this is brilliant, and if kristen stewart does not get award nominations and ifjohnny greenwood does not get award nominations, there is nojustice. in terms of streaming, what are you going to recommend? bruised is on netflix. it is directed by halle berry, who stars, and it's the story of a mixed martial arts fighter who left the ring some time ago, now is suddenly reunited with her child and discovers she has to get back into the ring. now, it's quite well directed. it's certainly got very, very gritty, punchy fight scenes.
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if there's a problem with it, and there is, it ticks every sport cliche in the book. but that said, there are things it does that are interesting. it's clearly very committed. during the fight scenes, there's an awful lot of rocky, and that's not necessarily a bad thing. it is not the most original film, given girlfight and more recently fighting with my family, but i thought it was fine. i think it's well directed, and certainly the fight scenes were very gritty and you can feel the fights. in terms of the every sport cliche, what do you mean? so you have to get into the ring because you have to win the match, but also what you have to do is win over your life, and you have to solve the problem for your child, and you have to deal with the issue... it is overburdened with stuff
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that has to be overcome, and also with no plot spoilers intended, rocky is the kind of thing that laid the template for all of these movies because rocky went, if you want to tell the story, this is how you do it. and it's almost as if someone has gone, i'll do it. how long ago was it that halle berry won her 0scar? some time, and what happened after that was that the great career resurgence did not then come immediately. the interesting thing was that it played as a work in progress in toronto in 2020, at which point i think it had a score by terence blanchard, which it now doesn't have. it has a score by someone else who had a really exciting composer at the moment but it's interesting. it's well directed and it's just carrying too much baggage. thank you very much. good to see you. that's it for this week. thank you for watching, and goodbye.
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hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and naga munchetty. we have lots to talk about in the
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programme. mike is with us and you have hotfooted it from children in need last night, and it was great and we will talk about that later. fantastic. fantastic. 0ne and we will talk about that later. fantastic. fantastic. one of the things in sport, we are concerned about the whereabouts of this chinese player who, and if we go backin chinese player who, and if we go back in the story of the week, she went missing, there are allegations that she had been abused, assaulted... that she had been abused, assaulted. . ._ that she had been abused, assaulted... ., , ., ., . assaulted... against a former vice president- — assaulted... against a former vice president. premier, _ assaulted... against a former vice president. premier, sorry. - assaulted... against a former vice president. premier, sorry. yes, i assaulted... against a former vice president. premier, sorry. yes, in china, we — president. premier, sorry. yes, in china, we did _ president. premier, sorry. yes, in china, we did not _ president. premier, sorry. yes, in china, we did not know— president. premier, sorry. yes, in china, we did not know where i president. premier, sorry. yes, in china, we did not know where she president. premier, sorry. yes, in i china, we did not know where she was and an e—mailappeared, china, we did not know where she was and an e—mail appeared, purported to be from her, darts —— doubts were cast upon that and people from the tennis world are now expressing their concern. the united in nations as well, —— united nations, the us need verifiable proof she is safe and well because this story, a global profile now with all of the big stars like serena williams and andy murray are speaking out and you think a bit of contact would put
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everyone's minds at rest but we have not had that as such, directly, between the player peng shuai and the women's tennis association which is what everyone wants to see emma to come everyone's nerves. as time goes on, still no contact. the women's tennis association, are stepping up the pressure. they have said "no amount of money" would stop them pulling events of china next year. peng made sexual assault allegations against a former china vice—premier two weeks ago. wta chairman steve simon told the bbc that he is "very, very concerned about her" and there will be no events in china next year without proof that peng is safe. let's just say we don't want to be in this position but at the end of the day, like i said, this is one of those decisions where compromises are not acceptable and we have to do what is right here and we will figure it out if we end up being in a position at the end of the day.
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staying with tennis and away from that story. confirmation that unvaccinated players will not be allowed to compete at the 2022 australian open. there had been a lot of confusion over the restrictions with contradictory statements from australian politicians. a large number of players remain unvaccinated, while defending men's champion novak djokovic has not revealed his vaccination status. confirmation, too, that the tournament will be played in front of capacity crowds in january. it's been a standout season for cameron norrie but it ended in a straight—sets defeat to world number one novak djokovic at the atp finals in turin. norrie became the british number one, climbed to 12th in the world rankings and won indian wells, but was outclassed by the 20—time grand slam champion djokovic, who he played for the first time. cricket bosses in england and wales say racism is a "blight" on our game and they "apologise unreservedly". that's in response to azeem rafiq's testimony to the dcms select committee on tuesday.
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the sport's top figures met at the 0val yesterday to come up with a plan of action, to try and tackle the issue, and a statement from them said that rafiq had shone a light on the game that had shocked, shamed and saddened them all. we will continue to listen, to make swift and positive change to the culture of the game. we will embrace and celebrate differences everywhere, knowing that with diversity, we are stronger. today is a game we discussed a series of tangible cricket to make likeable changes to make cricket a sport where everyone feels safe and everyone is included. we will now finalise the detail and publish these actions next week. our game must win back your trust. the premier league returns today with steven gerard taking charge of aston villa for the first time. and it was supposed to the start of a new era at newcastle united but new manger eddie howe will miss his side's game with brentford because of covid—19. howe tested positive during a routine test on friday, meaning that he won't be at the match that he was hoping
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would be his first in charge of newcastle. instead, assistant head coaches jason tindall and graemejones will take charge of the team at st james' park. manchester city's kevin de bruyne, is also missing after he tested positive for covid after returning from international duty with belgium. he'll isolate for 10 days, which means that he'll miss city's next three games, including their key champions league tie with paris saint—germain on wednesday. it's the grand finale of the golf season and rory mcilroy is still in contention at the dp world tour championship. he starts his third round injust a couple of hours' time. a double bogey on the 18th yesterday saw him slip back to nine under par, one shot off the lead. england's sam horsfield, john catlin of the usa and ireland's shane lowry are all on 10 under. it's the season—ending event on the women's tour, too, at the group tour championship in florida. england's georgia hall is tied for fifth, five shots off the lead after the second round. she birdied the 18th last night to stay just about within touching
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distance of celine boutier of france, who sits at the top of the leaderboard on 14 under par. what a finale we have in store, to the formula 1 season after lewis hamilton's astonishing win last weekend. three races to go and hamilton is 14 points within, or behind the leader, max verstappen. formula 1 is breaking new ground this weekend as it heads to qatar for the first time. third practice will get under way in a few hours, but valtteri bottas was quickest in second practice yesterday. pierre gasly was second, while max verstappen was third. lewis hamilton could only manage fourth. significantly, hamilton was wearing a special helmet with the rainbow flag on it as human rights remain a contentious issue in qatar — especially lg bt rights. london irish beat saracens in the premiership rugby cup at the brentford community stadium. they ran in three tries in the first half to lead 21—0 at the break, and then added another in the second through cillian redmond. sarries responded, but london irish held on to win by 29 points to 20.
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it's now two wins from two for them in a competition that had a two—year absence because of the pandemic. normally we would not get too excited about the grand slam of darts event. excited about the grand slam of darts event-— excited about the grand slam of darts event._ but i excited about the grand slam of. darts event._ but we darts event. wouldn't we? but we would this time. _ tonight, the history—making journey of fallon sherrock continues. i had ihada i had a chat to her before. she is great. i i had a chat to her before. she is areat. ., �* ~' , i had a chat to her before. she is i reat. ., �* 4' , ., i had a chat to her before. she is areat. ., �* ~ , ., ., great. i don't think she thought how far she would _ great. i don't think she thought how far she would goes _ great. i don't think she thought how far she would goes this _ great. i don't think she thought how| far she would goes this tournament. she is breaking new ground. it has been a historicjourney. she takes on former world champion peter wright in the quarterfinals of the grand slam of darts. she's gone further at this event than any woman in history and this is the latest in a growing list of ground—breaking milestones for sherrock in the last year. before this week's event, i went to meet her.
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wherever she goes to play now, mocro three will be revered after her trailblazing year. mi; three will be revered after her trailblazing year.— three will be revered after herj trailblazing year.- her trailblazing year. my turn. her historic run _ trailblazing year. my turn. her historic run at _ trailblazing year. my turn. her historic run at this _ trailblazing year. my turn. her historic run at this week i trailblazing year. my turn. her historic run at this week of i trailblazing year. my turn. herj historic run at this week of the grand slam of darts following on from her sister —— success earlier this autumn when she became the first woman to reach a televised final of the nordic masters and this after becoming the first woman to win a main draw much of the 2020 pvc world championship when she got to the third round. just world championship when she got to the third round.— the third round. just so over the moon, the third round. just so over the moon. like _ the third round. just so over the moon. like i _ the third round. just so over the moon, like i was _ the third round. just so over the moon, like i was speechless i the third round. just so over the i moon, like i was speechless because i did not know kind of how i felt, like there were so many emotions running through, i did not know whether to laugh, cry, running through, i did not know whetherto laugh, cry, dance. running through, i did not know whether to laugh, cry, dance. the atmosphere was like electric and it was amazing. it's totally changed it, the men respect the women and stuff like that, i mean, author of the time they were like we don't want to lose to a woman and now it is don't want to lose to that player, they are a good player. it has helped her and her twin sister also played darts since they were first gave it a go 11 years ago.
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always a competitive side and it's like 0k, right, so i know if i don't do well she is going to do well and she has always wanted to beat me and i have wanted to beat her so we had the killer instinct so it is helped when we go into competitions. i love the pressure, you have the adrenaline going and it's like right, you have the killer instinct. she has taken any pressure this year in her stride and says her secret is walking, escaping to the countryside. i walking, escaping to the countryside.— walking, escaping to the count side. ., , ., countryside. i think it is like me time. i countryside. i think it is like me time- i quite — countryside. i think it is like me time. i quite like _ countryside. i think it is like me time. i quite like you _ countryside. i think it is like me time. i quite like you know- countryside. i think it is like me time. i quite like you knowjust| countryside. i think it is like me i time. i quite like you knowjust you know getting away and just kind of having time to yourself and not having time to yourself and not having you know people around you because obviously my sport is very much people oriented, you always have people looking at you, you always are playing — there is always someone there so it is nice to sit there, get out and have your own time. �* , ., ., there, get out and have your own time. �* ,, ., ., there, get out and have your own time. �* i. ., ., , there, get out and have your own time. �* ., .,, time. and you have to be careful around trees _ time. and you have to be careful around trees don't _ time. and you have to be careful around trees don't you _ time. and you have to be careful around trees don't you because i time. and you have to be careful i around trees don't you because you ended up on one once. lode around trees don't you because you ended up on one once.— ended up on one once. we were in switzerland _ ended up on one once. we were in switzerland for _ ended up on one once. we were in switzerland for a _ ended up on one once. we were in switzerland for a dart _ ended up on one once. we were in switzerland for a dart open - switzerland for a dart open competition and there was about 1.5 hours break between the finals and
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everyone was like let's go up the tree, dave. so i was like if you dare me i will go up the tree so i climbed up the tree and got stuck. how high? climbed up the tree and got stuck. howhiah? .,,.,_ climbed up the tree and got stuck. how hiah? ., _ ., climbed up the tree and got stuck. how hiah? ., , , ., ., climbed up the tree and got stuck. howhiah? .,,.,_ ., ., how high? probably, i would not say riaht how high? probably, ! would not say riaht u- how high? probably, i would not say right up high — how high? probably, ! would not say right up high but— how high? probably, i would not say right up high but i — how high? probably, i would not say right up high but i got _ how high? probably, i would not say right up high but i got kind _ how high? probably, i would not say right up high but i got kind of... i right up high but i got kind of... enough to get to make and then i tried to get down and someone had to literally come and help me down. this was before a final?— literally come and help me down. this was before a final? yeah. she will be staying _ this was before a final? yeah. she will be staying away _ this was before a final? yeah. she will be staying away from - this was before a final? yeah. she will be staying away from the i this was before a final? yeah. she| will be staying away from the trees than before the quarterfinal but whatever happens, now her legacy is set. . . , whatever happens, now her legacy is set. .. , ., whatever happens, now her legacy is set. , ., ., set. the achievements have already hit tar: ets set. the achievements have already hit targets way _ set. the achievements have already hit targets way beyond _ set. the achievements have already hit targets way beyond the - set. the achievements have already hit targets way beyond the normal. hit targets way beyond the normal boundaries of the sport. she has changed the whole image of this game. 0pening it up to girls and players that would never have thought about taking it up before. i thought about taking it up before. i thought it was a bar thing, people go to bars and throw darts and i did not think of it as a proper sport. now i would actually consider doing it more as a hobby because it looks quite nice and relaxing. just because boys _ quite nice and relaxing. just because boys are _ quite nice and relaxing. just because boys are playing it it does
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not mean — because boys are playing it it does not mean that girls cannot, the girls— not mean that girls cannot, the girls know— not mean that girls cannot, the girls know that if they play they can become world champ as well. not man twins can become world champ as well. not many twins do sports together but her and _ many twins do sports together but her and her— many twins do sports together but herand her sister— many twins do sports together but herand her sister do— many twins do sports together but her and her sister do so _ many twins do sports together but her and her sister do so is - many twins do sports together but her and her sister do so is like i many twins do sports together but her and her sister do so is like me| her and her sister do so is like me and her_ her and her sister do so is like me and her thought— her and her sister do so is like me and her thought we _ her and her sister do so is like me and her thought we would - her and her sister do so is like me and her thought we would do- her and her sister do so is like me and her thought we would do it i and her thought we would do it logelhen — and her thought we would do it logelhen lt— and her thought we would do it to . ether. ., , ., and her thought we would do it touether. ., , ., ., together. it made it better to do it because obviously _ together. it made it better to do it because obviously we _ together. it made it better to do it because obviously we wanted i together. it made it better to do it because obviously we wanted to i together. it made it better to do it| because obviously we wanted to do together. it made it better to do it i because obviously we wanted to do it but it made us want to do it more because we have seen that they do it and they enjoyed together. she because we have seen that they do it and they enjoyed together.— and they en'oyed together. she has made a and they enjoyed together. she has made a massive _ and they enjoyed together. she has made a massive impact _ and they enjoyed together. she has made a massive impact on - and they enjoyed together. she has made a massive impact on those i and they enjoyed together. she has. made a massive impact on those you can see _ made a massive impact on those you can see from — made a massive impact on those you can see from the academy straightaway the girls are flooding in. before we have probably had drihs _ in. before we have probably had drihs and — in. before we have probably had dribs and drabs of one or two come and play— dribs and drabs of one or two come and play a — dribs and drabs of one or two come and play a little bit but now they're _ and play a little bit but now they're all really keen and they want _ they're all really keen and they want to— they're all really keen and they want to be the queen of the palace themselves. and want to be the queen of the palace themselves-— want to be the queen of the palace themselves. �* ., ., ~ , themselves. and thanks to the likes of fallon sherrock, _ themselves. and thanks to the likes of fallon sherrock, those _ themselves. and thanks to the likes of fallon sherrock, those coming i of fallon sherrock, those coming into the sport now like she did when she was 16 can aim straight for the top. i she was 16 can aim straight for the to -. ., ., ., ., she was 16 can aim straight for the to. ., ., ., ., top. i never thought a woman could make dinner _ top. i never thought a woman could make dinner a _ top. i never thought a woman could make dinner a living _ top. i never thought a woman could make dinner a living playing - top. i never thought a woman could make dinner a living playing darts l make dinner a living playing darts and then obviously as time has changed women have got more opportunities and prize money has got better and we've got and the opportunities to play with the men which is given us like a massive thing and now women can actually
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make a living playing darts. igame i game changer and it all means that peter ridd may face fallon sherrock tonight and will not think i am playing a female player, i am playing a female player, i am playing a female player, i am playing a wonderful opponent. that is how it should be. of course it should! mike, thank you. regular trains are returning to the dartmoor line in devon for the first time in almost 50 years. from today, great western railway services will run between 0kehampton and exeter. it's part of a government scheme to restore abandoned railway lines. john maguire reports. 0n the railway arrived in 0kehampton, the town through a huge street party to celebrate. that was 150 years ago. the next century saw crowds cover for other important occasions to name trains and to send the town's sounds off to war. and even the line's closure in 1972, part of the beaching cuts, was marked with some ceremony. today,
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the festivities continue. a scheduled passenger service returns, a reward for years of campaigning. backin a reward for years of campaigning. back in the summer, we filmed the new trucks being laid.— new trucks being laid. fantastic. this is the _ new trucks being laid. fantastic. this is the moment, _ new trucks being laid. fantastic. this is the moment, isn't - new trucks being laid. fantastic. this is the moment, isn't it, i this is the moment, isn't it, really, when the truck putdown, new trucks, and it will be shortly hopefully a train to exeter. remind me, how hopefully a train to exeter. remind me. how long _ hopefully a train to exeter. remind me, how long have _ hopefully a train to exeter. remind me, how long have you _ hopefully a train to exeter. remind me, how long have you been i me, how long have you been campaigning and working on this? i campaigning and working on this? i arrived in 0kehampton in 1975 and i saw it_ arrived in 0kehampton in 1975 and i saw it going derelict then so that was when — saw it going derelict then so that was when i first became interested in it _ was when i first became interested in it. , , , i, in it. the line is the very first to reo en in it. the line is the very first to reapen as _ in it. the line is the very first to reapen as part _ in it. the line is the very first to reopen as part of— in it. the line is the very first to reopen as part of the _ in it. the line is the very first to - reopen as part of the government's restoring your railway scheme but this week, it's in controversy and anger elsewhere with the scrapping of the h52 link to leeds and the northern power line between leeds and manchester. the restoration of the dartmoor line was made easier by the dartmoor line was made easier by the fact that after closing the passenger services, it has continued
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to be used for transporting railway ballast from a nearby quarry. it also ran as a heritage railway but now, it has been upgraded. it’s also ran as a heritage railway but now, it has been upgraded. it's not as easy as — now, it has been upgraded. it's not as easy as you _ now, it has been upgraded. it's not as easy as you think. _ now, it has been upgraded. it's not as easy as you think. it _ now, it has been upgraded. it's not as easy as you think. it has - now, it has been upgraded. it's not as easy as you think. it has not - as easy as you think. it has not beenin as easy as you think. it has not been in good condition but there is a huge amount of work that we have done kind of ii a huge amount of work that we have done kind of 11 miles of track installation in the last four weeks, and it's actually been one of the fastest truck installations in network rail history. this fastest truck installations in network rail history. this is the new track construction - network rail history. this is the | new track construction machine, network rail history. this is the . new track construction machine, an impressive piece of kit. about a quarter of a mile long and you can see what is happening. the grey bit other top runs but, grabs the sleepers, brings it to the front the train and then lays them in a perfectly straight line on the bed with the two metal trucks on top. it will run at a rate of about 400 metres per hour. and in the belly of the beast, it is ryan'sjob to keep the beast, it is ryan'sjob to keep the machine, well, on track. ma; the machine, well, on track. my osition the machine, well, on track. my position is _ the machine, well, on track. m position is to ensure the machine, well, on track. m1: position is to ensure that it is
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somewhere near and usually, i am pretty good, i have to constantly monitor the height of the clamps so they don't hit the sleepers of the spacing of the rail behind you and obviously the line itself. so it spacing of the rail behind you and obviously the line itself.— obviously the line itself. so it is a concentration _ obviously the line itself. so it is a concentration game? - obviously the line itself. so it is a concentration game? big - obviously the line itself. so it is. a concentration game? big time. after a week _ a concentration game? big time. after a week where _ a concentration game? big time. after a week where the - a concentration game? big time. i after a week where the government has been accused of reneging on promised rail improvements in the north of england, reopening this line may seem a small step but it is a giant leapfor line may seem a small step but it is a giant leap for people here, the passengers who will use it and the communities it will serve. spectacular. good to see it open again. spectacular. good to see it open aain. , i, i, i, i, again. there is a 'oy to a train journey. h again. there is a 'oy to a train journey. as h again. there is a 'oy to a train journey, as well,_ again. there is a joy to a train journey, as well, with - again. there is a joy to a train journey, as well, with those l journey, as well, with those gorgeous views and just a bit of piece. as gorgeous views and 'ust a bit of iece. �* i, i, gorgeous views and 'ust a bit of iece.�* i, i, gorgeous views and 'ust a bit of iece. i, i, i, piece. a lot of those cycleways have disappeared — piece. a lot of those cycleways have disappeared now. _ piece. a lot of those cycleways have disappeared now. i— piece. a lot of those cycleways have disappeared now. i wonder- piece. a lot of those cycleways have disappeared now. i wonder if- piece. a lot of those cycleways have disappeared now. i wonder if there l disappeared now. i wonder if there will be good views for a train journey or a walk today. gorgeous
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sky behind sarah.— journey or a walk today. gorgeous sky behind sarah. good morning to ou, sky behind sarah. good morning to you. roger— sky behind sarah. good morning to you. roger and _ sky behind sarah. good morning to you, roger and naga. _ sky behind sarah. good morning to you, roger and naga. quite - sky behind sarah. good morning to you, roger and naga. quite a - sky behind sarah. good morning to you, roger and naga. quite a lot. sky behind sarah. good morning to| you, roger and naga. quite a lot of fine and mild weather today but much colder and with some sunshine around tomorrow. this was yesterday in aberdeen, where we saw temperatures of 17 celsius, really well above average for the time of year. as we head through the coming week, a significant drop. by about friday we are looking at temperatures of only four degrees, so a 13 degrees drop in temperature. definitely time to dig out the winter coat through the course of the week. for the here and now we have high pressure not far away, sitting to the south. this weather front tracking its way through the uk today and tonight. by the time we get to tomorrow at the blue colours return to the map. these northerly winds, quite a windchill in the forecast for tomorrow as well. today if you are getting out and about a lot of dry weather for england and wales. sunshine for parts of northern england and northern wales, staying
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cloudy further south. scotland and northern ireland will have a weather front moving south through the morning, clearing to sunny spells and scattered showers this afternoon. temperatures around seven or eight across the north of scotland later on. we could see 12 or 13 across southern england. through the evening and tonight, that cloud in the south and this weak weather front fizzling out and moving its way south. clear skies working in, so it will be a colder night than we have seen recent knee. certain me a touch of frost, quite widespread frost on the north, temperatures five or six degrees evenin temperatures five or six degrees even in our towns and cities towards the south. a chilly start to the day and then we have this northerly wind importing some showers. there could be quite heavy and potentially thundery for parts of scotland, some wintering us over the high ground and plenty for the east coast of england as well. fewer showers further west but there could be a few around these irish sea coasts and temperatures tomorrow between seven and perhaps 11 degrees. feeling cooler where you are exposed to that chilly northerly wind. high pressure stays with us as we head on
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towards monday. something a bit less cold for a time working around that area of high pressure. that is a weather front which will bring a bit more cloud to scotland and northern ireland through the day on monday, not quite as cold. for england and wales we're with blue sky and the chilly field to the weather. the temperatures will be seven to 11 degrees on monday, quite breezy through the english channel as well. what we will see through the coming week is a return to some frosty mornings. could be some mist and fog patches lingering through the mornings as well. here is the outlook into next week and it is not quite as cold for monday and tuesday. some of us just about in double figures but look at the dropping temperature through the course of the week. four to six degrees by the time we get to friday, with some showers around as well. if you have the mild and dry weather today, get out and enjoy it because things will turn much more wintry from tomorrow onwards. henge wintry from tomorrow onwards. have ou ot wintry from tomorrow onwards. have you got your — wintry from tomorrow onwards. have you got your gloves _ wintry from tomorrow onwards. have you got your gloves out _ wintry from tomorrow onwards. have you got your gloves out yet? that is what i am thinking about, getting the gloves out now. i
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what i am thinking about, getting the gloves out now.— what i am thinking about, getting the gloves out now. i had a look for them this morning _ the gloves out now. i had a look for them this morning and _ the gloves out now. i had a look for them this morning and i _ the gloves out now. i had a look for them this morning and i thought. them this morning and i thought where have i put them? i have to search out the gloves, the scarf and hat. i haven't needed them yet. i have that kind of midway hat that is not quite woolly but enough to keep the head warm. the whiley one will come out this week. —— woolly one. time to get the latest technology news now. here's this week's click. on this programme, we see a lot of really useful technology, but some things are just solutions looking for problems. the first obvious place for vr
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was gaming, but once the technology had proved that it was properly immersive, we started to see signs that it really could take us to real places. it could put us in all sorts of situations, including education and even medicine. and sometimes, technology turns out to be most useful where you least expect it. i've seen vr used to help people overcome phobias. you've seen it used to teach students how to do surgery. but this has to be the most powerful use of vr i have ever seen. six—month—old archie was born with sagittal synostosis. you are a happy boy, aren't you? a condition where a baby's growth lines in the skull fuse too early. this means as the brain grows, the skull can't grow sideways to accommodate it, so it expands front and back, distorting the head shape. oh, that was nice! while it is not life—threatening, it leaves parents like amanda and judd faced with a difficult
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decision as to whether they opt for the risks of surgery or let nature take its course, with the physical and psychological impacts that follow. it's been quite overwhelming, hasn't it? like, there's been a lot of appointments and a lot of time away. so, when offered the chance to be the first to use a groundbreaking new ai platform that predicts the outcome of the operation in virtual reality, theyjumped at the chance. you are able to see your own child's condition or your own child's heart or head projected into this virtual environment, with a full feeling of what will happen in terms of the treatment to your own child. i've come here to great 0rmond street hospital to join the family for their consultation where, for the first time, they're
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going to get to see the virtual reality. you're about to see now what will hopefully be the final result. how are you feeling? excited. and obviously, there is always that worry about what he is going to have done. archie babbles. and that's what he thinks of it! you will be placed in an immersive lworld and you're going to be able | to interact with things using the controllers. | so here is archie's skull as it stands now that we have done the reconstruction using the ct scan. and as you can see, this is the side view. we've got the forehead here, the back of the head here, and these lines are the sutures — the ones that are working still, the growth lines. so the way we do the surgery is we make a small window in the bone, here. the algorithms needed to create these images have been made possible
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by the harnessing of data from 60 operations over the course of the last seven years. so here, the grey is the head shape as it's now, the green is the predicted head shape, so the first change that you can see is that the back of his head which, at the moment is sloping down, is pushed up a little and there's a more regular curvature to it. this immersive experience allows the parents to see from all angles a truly personalised picture of exactly how archie's head can be reshaped with surgery. would you like us to suggest anything about the head shape that you would like to see done differently? no, i think it's the back of the head that we are noticing the most. indeed, and that you should see within a week or two of surgery... wow, 0k. ..you can see the back going in.
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and, having confirmed their decision to go ahead, within a few weeks, the big day arrived. the theatre is just being prepared as, in a few minutes, archie is coming into his surgery where a spring like this is going to be inserted into his skull through a small cut. it will immediately expand and start to change the shape of his head, and then continue to do so over the next four weeks. at that point, it can be removed. invented by doctorjeelani 13 years ago, this technique has reduced operation time from three hours to 40 minutes, cut blood transfusions by 90% and provides more predictable outcomes. 0k, spring engaged. and it's that predictability that's made the data usable for visualisations with 90% accuracy. so we have just finished. the surgery�*s gone really well. the springs are in, we've seen an expansion on the table and we should meet our predictions
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over the next few weeks. what we've seen here is being created for one particular condition, but it could be applied to many different types of surgery in the future. what we have shown here is essentially proof of principle — that if you take a condition, an art form, make it granular enough that you can study it and put it on engineering and ai platforms, then you can actually predict the future with a reasonable degree of accuracy. what i would like to see as a surgeon in ten, perhaps 20 years' time, is that most surgeries — most surgical practice is done this way, where the control and the power is very much given to the parents and the patients. two weeks on from surgery and we visited archie and his family. we're quite relieved that we are over the other side now. archie's doing really well. so we've been told that obviously now he's had it done, there shouldn't be any concerns with development and things, so we're really with how it went.
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but having the opportunity of doing the vr really, really sort of reassured us that we were doing the right thing. i know that was something that did cross our mind at first, but being able to actually see the before and after was quite a relief of that pressure, wasn't it? it lifted that weight off our shoulders so, yeah, we're happy. the lost city of pompeii was destroyed by an eruption of mount vesuvius in the first century. while a lot of the site was remarkably preserved, many details of life here were lost, including some of the colourful frescoes of the buildings. above the main site is the cacina rustica, a storage place for thousands of fragments of two frescoes destroyed in the initial eruption and damaged further by bombing in world war ii.
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how many pieces do you think are here? i think here we get 10,000 pieces of fragments at the moment. this is only a little part because in other storerooms we have more and more in a box that never studied before. the fragments come in all sorts of sizes, from tiny bits of rubble to big pieces. so no—one knows exactly how these frescoes look like. there are lots of missing pieces. it's not like an ordinary puzzle. there will be a lot of holes in this fresco. these are three—dimensional pieces which are flat on one side. 0n the flat side, there is usually some decoration, some colour, and there is a kind of a three—dimensional structure, and these pieces do not match exactly, so it's a very difficult and challenging problem. the puzzle has remained unsolved for decades, and now, a team led by the ca'
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foscari university of venice, will create a robotic system to analyse and eventually piece together the frescoes. called repair, or reconstructing the past: artificial intelligence and robotics meet cultural heritage, it's the first time machine learning and artificial intelligence techniques will be used to take on a project of this scale. the robot is scanning a piece of fresco using polarised lenses and so, at the end of the process, the piece will be scanned in 3d. with the same infrastructure and the same type of technology, we can also scan the same piece using hyperspectral sensors that are able to collect information that the human eyes cannot see. this information includes the residual colours of pigments used by the romans which cannot be seen with the naked eye. what we can see here is basically, the light coming from our object at different wavelengths. we can select the wavelength that we want to look at,
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and this amount gave us initial information of our material of our sample. different points on the objects can be selected to examine closely, with information given about similarities and differences between pixels in the image. once all of the information is collected, an algorithm will suggest how it thinks the pieces fit together and what's missing, and run it past a human expert. if this works, i think it will have a huge potential in future projects, both in pompeii and elsewhere, for not only wall paintings but also pottery fragments, which is the majority of finds during most excavations. and there is a huge potential in reconstructing and,
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yeah, analysing these finds. the final piece of the puzzle is a robot that will be built to be able to handle and reconstruct the frescoes using soft hands. the robot will pick up with its hands all the fragments, grasping every single pieces, and i think this kind of robotic colleague is like — maybe internet before 19 years. yes! now it's new and i hope it will be very usual and common for us in the future to have this kind of help. how interesting was that? absolutely. that wasjen in pompeii. that is it for the shortcut of click. the full—length version is waiting for you right now on iplayer. as ever, you can keep up with the team on social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook, and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks for watching. we'll see you soon. bye—bye.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and rogerjohnson. 0ur headlines today: clashes in the netherlands as covid restrictions are tightened across mainland europe. and a clampdown in austria: a full lockdown from monday and compulsory vaccinations by february. we, thejury, find the defendant, kyle h rittenhouse, not guilty. us gun culture back under scrutiny after a teenage gunman, who shot dead two people during racial unrest, is cleared of murder. there's growing concern over
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the safety of chinese tennis star peng shuai, who has still not been in contact with the wta and now, the united nations says it wants proof of the player's whereabouts. # baby, you will never be lost on me! ed sheeran joins a host of stars and performers at this year's children in need. nearly £40 million were raised on the night. good morning. it's a mild start to the day today and most places should see quite a bit of dry weather but things are turning much colder through the weekend and we're going to see a chilly northerly wind developing tomorrow. i'll have all the details here on bbc breakfast. patrick baker, bbc news. it's saturday the 20th of november. our top story: dutch police have shot and wounded at least two people after rioting erupted in rotterdam over new covid—19 measures. coronavirus restrictions are being tightened in the netherlands and a number of other eu countries, in response to rising case numbers. austria faces a full lockdown from monday and compulsory vaccinations from next year.tim
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muffett has the latest. protesters in rotterdam responding to the partial lockdown imposed in the netherlands. police used water cannon and fired warning shots. at least two people were injured. restrictions here began on monday and are set to be in place for another two weeks at least. like many countries in europe, the netherlands has seen a sharp rise in covid cases. in austria, a 20—day lockdown will start this monday. people will be asked to work from home and non—essential shops will close. in february, covid vaccinations will become compulsory. what we experience in austria right now is, in my view, an unfortunate collusion of the fact that we have a fairly low vaccination rate in the population and that the waning of immunity hits austria now, six months after we started our vaccination
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programme, and that is unfortunately right at the beginning of the winter season, where people are moving indoors. in germany, covid cases are also rising sharply. the government is set to introduce restrictions for unvaccinated people in areas where hospital admissions exceed a certain level. as for the prospect of a full lockdown, the german government says nothing has been ruled out. in the uk yesterday, just over 44,000 new people tested positive for coronavirus. over the week, there was a 13% increase in cases compared to the previous seven days. between the ninth and 15th of november, just over 6000 people were admitted to hospital with covid — that's a fall of 4.5% compared to the previous seven days. at the moment, the uk is not witnessing the surge in cases being seen in some other countries. we have, i'm sure, the highest
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levels of overall immunity in europe — it's over 90% amongst adults and approaching that level in children as well now — so that is quite a different situation to many countries in europe, including austria and germany, who did not have as had first waves or second waves and did not have the significant delta wave yet, either. there are renewed calls for people to get boosterjabs if they are eligible in the hope the uk can avoid the tougher restrictions being imposed elsewhere. tim muffett, bbc news. let's speak to our europe correspondent nick beake. good morning to you in brussels. countries across the continent are really trying to stem the rise in infections. quite a bit stricter in many places than we have got in the uk at the moment. what's the reaction been? morning, roger. we have countries across europe, individual governments, kind to work out the
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best course of action for their population and as we saw there, they are taking various different responses to this. some measures are much stricter than others. in terms of the strongest reaction, it came in rotterdam overnight, those violent scenes we saw with the police shooting and winding two people and the police force in the city of rotterdam in the netherlands saying it was justified city of rotterdam in the netherlands saying it wasjustified because there was a genuine threat to life —— wounding two people. what seem to have sparked the protest last night that turn violent was the idea that people would not be able to use fireworks on new year's eve and also some people unhappy they have to show covid passes to get into restaurants and bars and other places which already will shut earlier so that sparked things there. i think people will be watching to see what the reaction is in austria, where they have gone much further than other countries because they are talking about this compulsory vaccination from the first of february and also this new lockdown which is going to last up
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to 20 days, we are told. and next door from austria in germany, they are talking about a national of care emergency in the state of bavaria in particular, they go further there, talking about a lockdown of the unvaccinated people so all of these countries are making lots of different positions and of course all of the time, british government is looking to what works, what people are tolerating, and what is the best way forward is as we move towards christmas.— the best way forward is as we move towards christmas. thank you indeed for speaking — towards christmas. thank you indeed for speaking to _ towards christmas. thank you indeed for speaking to us. _ nick beake. presidentjoe biden has said he is "angry" after a teenager who shot dead two people was cleared of murder. kyle rittenhouse argued that he'd acted in self—defence when he killed two men and wounded another during racialjustice protests last year. 0ur washington correspondent nomia iqbal reports. the defendant will rise and face the jury and harken to its verdicts. a dangerous vigilante or someone acting in self—defence? after 26 hours, thejury decided kyle rittenhouse's fate. we, thejury, find the defendant,
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kyle h rittenhouse, not guilty. the 12 men and women of the jury accepted the teenager's claim he killed out of fear for his safety. somehow, some way, those 12jurors found that he was innocent. yelling. applause. woo! outside court, the political divisions this case has caused were clear. you attack me, i have the right to defend myself! that's what kyle was on trial for and that's what kyle is now found acquitted of, 0k? so you're telling me if two guys come up to you and accost you, you can't defend yourself? that's what was on trial today! there is no way in a law — in a land of law where a person can shoot three people, kill two of them, and be acquitted. there'sjust no way. the shooting happened against the backdrop of nationwide protests over racism and police brutality following the murder of george floyd.
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in kenosha, another black man, named jacob blake, had been shot by police seven times and on the third night of riots, kyle rittenhouse entered the city. he said he came to provide security. in a series of confrontations, he shot dead joseph rosenbaum, who had chased after him into this car park. he then killed another man who ran after rittenhouse, thinking he was an active shooter. a third man survived. police later arrested the teenager and charged him with murder. people... sobs. at his trial, there were tears and a controversial offence —— defence by his team in regards to the shooting of jacob blake. other people in this community have shot somebody seven times and it's been found to be ok, and my client did it four times in three—quarters of a second
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to protect his life from mr rosenbaum. i'm sorry, but that's what happened. this not guilty verdict is seen as a referendum on an issue that polarises americans beyond kenosha, and that is the issue of gun ownership. for many conservative groups, kyle rittenhouse is now seen as a hero. but for many liberal groups, he is the face of a gun culture out of control and they're worried, by being cleared of the charges, what it might mean now for future protests. can americans turn up with a gun but not face any consequences? nomia iqbal, bbc news, kenosha. colin pitchfork, the man who killed two teenagers in the 1980s, is back in prison less than two months after being released. it's understood he breached the terms of his licence but did not commit any further offences. he served 33 years for killing 15—year—olds lynda mann and dawn ashworth in leicestershire. single—use plastic plates,
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cutlery and polystyrene cups could all be banned in england. 4.25 billion items of throwaway cutlery, most of which are plastic, are used in england per year, but only 10% are recycled. a public consultation on the issue begins today. almost £40 million has been raised by the bbc children in need appeal. you have raised, my friends, a whopping... 39 million the show was jammed packed with the usual comedy sketches and star—studded performances and ed sheeran their belt about his new single, and special editions of tv becomes like the wall and the repair shop. we will speak to some of those guys, sam and mark, who were on the wall, later in this programme. and more coming up. sarah has the weather and mike has the sport. a record number of people died
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while detained in england under the mental health act in the first year of the pandemic. the figures from the care quality commission have fuelled concerns that patient safety is being compromised by staff shortages. patrick baker reports. hgppy happy birthday, dear charlie. he was into everything. _ happy birthday, dear charlie. he was into everything, he _ happy birthday, dear charlie. he was into everything, he would _ happy birthday, dear charlie. he was into everything, he would give - into everything, he would give anything — into everything, he would give anything a go. help people. really kind~ _ anything a go. help people. really kind. really bubbly, outgoing. loved art. kind. really bubbly, outgoing. loved art he _ kind. really bubbly, outgoing. loved art. he used art as his therapy and he was _ art. he used art as his therapy and he was really good at it. sifter he was really good at it. after struggling _ he was really good at it. after struggling with _ he was really good at it. after struggling with his _ he was really good at it. after struggling with his mental- he was really good at it. ifiev struggling with his mental health throughout most of his teenage years, 17—year—old charlie millers became increasingly unwell during the second half of 2020. he became increasingly unwell during the second half of 2020.— the second half of 2020. he went downhill in _ the second half of 2020. he went downhill in the _ the second half of 2020. he went downhill in the july _ the second half of 2020. he went downhill in the july time. - the second half of 2020. he went downhill in the july time. he - the second half of 2020. he went downhill in the july time. he was | downhill in thejuly time. he was then sectioned. downhill in the july time. he was then sectioned.— downhill in the july time. he was then sectioned. charlie spent the next few months _ then sectioned. charlie spent the next few months in _ then sectioned. charlie spent the next few months in and - then sectioned. charlie spent the next few months in and out - then sectioned. charlie spent the next few months in and out of. then sectioned. charlie spent the | next few months in and out of the mental health unit at prestwick hospital in manchester. in early
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december last year, he returned to the ward following a night at home. dropped him off at 7:45 at night. he was in really good spirits. and then i got a phone call at quarter to 11 to say that they were doing cpr on him. , i i, , i, to say that they were doing cpr on him. , , i, i, him. during the course of that evenin: , him. during the course of that evening, charlie _ him. during the course of that evening, charlie had - him. during the course of that evening, charlie had made - him. during the course of that| evening, charlie had made four attempts on his life. the last of which proved fatal. the bbc have obtained a confidential nhs report into charlie's death. it highlighted staffing issues on the night, saying due to sickness absence being reported on the day, there was no qualified nurse rostered on duty for the night shift. the nurse in charge agreed to cover this shift. she had worked that day from 9—4 and returned at seven p.m.. in a statement, the nhs trust that managers prestwick hospital said:
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i think charlie miller's death is a tragic and sad moment in the history of mental health services. it highlights the extreme pressure that mental health services were under during the pandemic but it also is, sadly, a situation that is still the case as services are facing an increase in demand. irate case as services are facing an increase in demand.- case as services are facing an increase in demand. ~ i, i, i, , , increase in demand. we have analysed firures increase in demand. we have analysed figures from — increase in demand. we have analysed figures from the _ increase in demand. we have analysed figures from the care _ increase in demand. we have analysed figures from the care quality _ figures from the care quality commission which inspects the health sector. between 2012 and 2019, an average of 273 people died each year while detained in hospital or being supervised in the community under the mental health act in england. but, early estimates for the first year of the pandemic suggest a record high with 490 people dying between the start of march 2020 and the start of march 2021. the former conservative health secretaryjeremy conservative health secretary jeremy hunt conservative health secretaryjeremy hunt told me the government needs to bring in urgent changes to health
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——to how health staff are recruited. staff shortages are compromising patient safety in every part of the nhs at the moment. we have a workforce crisis. it is time we completely overhauled the way we decide how many doctors and nurses we are going to train for the future. we need an independent body that sits outside the department of health, sits outside the nhs and says looking ahead five years, ten years, 15 years, this is the number of doctors we need in mental health, in kansai, in every part of the nhs. charlie's mum samantha says she is still waiting for a clear explanation about how her son could've lost his life in the very place that was meant to keep them safe ——in cancer. are full inquest into charlie's death starts next year. patrick baker, bbc news. paul farmer, the chief executive of mind who you saw briefly in the piece, joins us now. good morning to you, paul. can you
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explain the context of these numbers? we have seen an increase in the number of deaths for the period, which covers the pandemic and the lockdown. what we are so aware of is that until health problems have increased and the treatment for those has been very difficult because of the pandemic. also, as there is across the care industry and the nhs, there is a shortage of staff as well. paint is a picture of what is happening. i staff as well. paint is a picture of what is happening.— what is happening. i think the number of — what is happening. i think the number of people _ what is happening. i think the number of people who - what is happening. i think the number of people who has . what is happening. i think the i number of people who has been sectioned is increasing. it has increased by 15% compared to the pre— pandemic period and that in itself is a sign of the scale and severity and acuity of people presenting with mental health problems. many peoplejust presenting with mental health problems. many people just didn't feel they could go to mental health services during the pandemic, so when they turned up they were much more ill and so they ended up being
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sectioned. on top of that we have extreme pressure in a&e. we have heard of people staying for up to three days in a&e waiting for a mental health bed and on top of that we have 1.6 million people who need mental health treatment right now who are on a waiting list to access help and support. we have growing pressure all the way across the mental health system, so really as a direct consequence of the pandemic. recruitment is also an issue.- recruitment is also an issue. that's ri . ht, recruitment is also an issue. that's riaht, and recruitment is also an issue. that's right. and in — recruitment is also an issue. that's right, and in addition _ recruitment is also an issue. that's right, and in addition to _ recruitment is also an issue. that's right, and in addition to that, - right, and in addition to that, although there has been an increase in mental health staff over the last five or ten years as a result of various government investment, what we are currently seeing is that that additional resources not enough to cope with the additional demand. we think we need around an additional 20,000 new staff into mental health services. i 20,000 new staff into mental health services. , i, i, , , services. i 'ust want to say because it fits in services. ijust want to say because it fits in right _ services. ijust want to say because it fits in right now, _ services. ijust want to say because it fits in right now, in _ services. ijust want to say because it fits in right now, in response - services. ijust want to say because it fits in right now, in response to l it fits in right now, in response to the staff shortages, the department of health and social care has told
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this programme that it is on track to deliver 50,000 more nurses by the end of this parliament and that they will be further investment and bringing forward plans to reform the mental health act to ensure everyone in a mental health crisis is treated with dignity and respect. and in a mental health crisis is treated with dignity and respect.— with dignity and respect. and last earthe with dignity and respect. and last year the government _ with dignity and respect. and last year the government put - with dignity and respect. and last year the government put in - with dignity and respect. and last year the government put in £500 | year the government put in £500 million _ year the government put in £500 million. the chancellor has said by the end _ million. the chancellor has said by the end of— million. the chancellor has said by the end of this parliament there will be — the end of this parliament there will be £44 billion more going into nrental— will be £44 billion more going into mental healthcare in england. are they not— mental healthcare in england. are they not doing the right things now in order— they not doing the right things now in order to — they not doing the right things now in order to solve it, albeit that there — in order to solve it, albeit that there might be a crisis now, but taking _ there might be a crisis now, but taking the — there might be a crisis now, but taking the right steps? the investment _ taking the right steps? the investment in _ taking the right steps? inez investment in mental health taking the right steps? ii9: investment in mental health services is a long story and we are trying to catch up on decades of underinvestment. that underinvestment. that underinvestment is being addressed, but what that additional £500 million for this financial year has done is create the additional capacity to cope with the pandemic effect on our mental health. that £500 million and is at the end of
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march and there is no clarity about additional money for mental health after march, beyond the pre— pandemic projections. there is not enoughin pandemic projections. there is not enough in the system to cope with the additional pressure that is being caused by the pandemic. so there is, as naga said, shortage of staff which is partly down to money and partly down to people not choosing to work in mental health as a career. what do you say to someone who is maybe thinking about it? people have to do a very difficult job and they do it to the best of their ability. what is attractive about the career for anyone who might want to think of doing it? first of all, i think people who work in mental health services do an incrediblejob, and they work in mental health services do an incredible job, and they do work in mental health services do an incrediblejob, and they do it work in mental health services do an incredible job, and they do it often incredible job, and they do it often in tough circumstances, but one of the things we have really noticed is as people become more interested in mental health as a subject, people are more interested in coming to work in mental health. some of those government numbers are correct, there has been an increase overall
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in people wanting to come and work. more people want to work with children, for example, in children's mental health services. we are beginning to see more and more people wanting to come in but what we have to create are the places for those people who do want to come in at work. it is an incredibly rewarding job. at work. it is an incredibly rewardingjob. making at work. it is an incredibly rewarding job. making a difference to a young person's life when they are at the depth of their despair and anxiety, at a moment where you could literally be saving their life and certainly saving their future... this is the message, isn't it? there will be someone watching this morning who is in mental health crisis or someone who knows someone who is struggling with a mental health crisis and needs help now. the message is don't be scared to ask for help, still. there are pressures but there are brilliant people out there who want to help. hugely important. if anyone is worried about their mental health or a friend orfamily member, reach out, talk to someone you trust, come
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to the mind website for information and call 111. there will be information available for you. lets have a look at how the weather is looking this morning. good morning, sarah.— is looking this morning. good morning, sarah. is looking this morning. good mornina, sarah. i, i, morning, sarah. good morning, roger and nara. morning, sarah. good morning, roger and naga- lt— morning, sarah. good morning, roger and naga. it will— morning, sarah. good morning, roger and naga. it will be _ morning, sarah. good morning, roger and naga. it will be turning _ and naga. it will be turning noticeably colder through the weekend, especially by the time we get to tomorrow and into next week. high pressure keeping things largely dry on the south, but today we have this weather front pushing its way slowly south and bringing some rain at times. it will also bring this colder air so by the time we get to tomorrow, the blue colours return. this is a colder air mass, and quite a windshield. today some pretty chilly weather. yes, it is fairly chilly. sunshine for northern england and north wales as well. scotland and northern ireland this morning brings patchy rain on that weather front. morning brings patchy rain on that weatherfront. that morning brings patchy rain on that weather front. that pushes south so later this afternoon sunny spells
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and scattered blustery showers. quite windy across the north of scotland with gusts about 40 mph and temperatures this afternoon between seven in stornoway and 12 or 13 in london. this evening at overnight, here is the weather front in the south. that clears away and we are left in the cold and clear ms a few scattered showers moving in from the north but temperatures in our towns and cities between about freezing and cities between about freezing and plus seven, a few degrees colder in the countryside. a frost around for many of us first tomorrow. those northerly winds bringing some showers, a little bit wintry with perhaps some hail and sleet over the higher grounds and the mountains. showers down the east coast of england as well. some sunshine around as well but only about seven to 11 degrees and you will notice that wind chill as well. back to you both. we've heard a lot this week about tensions on the border between poland and belarus, but that issue is part of a much longer and more complex power struggle between russia and the west.
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the bbc�*s ros atkins has been exploring it. many people watching eastern europe at the moment are asking one question: is russia going to invade ukraine? the question: is russia going to invade ukraine? i, , question: is russia going to invade ukraine? i, i i question: is russia going to invade ukraine? i, , , i, �* question: is russia going to invade ukraine? i, , , ~ i, ukraine? the answer is i don't know. i think we have _ ukraine? the answer is i don't know. i think we have to _ ukraine? the answer is i don't know. i think we have to be _ ukraine? the answer is i don't know. i think we have to be on _ ukraine? the answer is i don't know. i think we have to be on our- ukraine? the answer is i don't know. i think we have to be on our guard i i think we have to be on our guard and i think we have to make sure that deterrence prevails. the uk's most senior— that deterrence prevails. the uk's most senior military _ that deterrence prevails. the uk's most senior military officer- that deterrence prevails. the uk's| most senior military officer doesn't know. vladimir putin has the west guessing, but what everyone knows is that tension is rising. the eu and russia have been blaming each other for the migrant crisis on the belarus poland border. there has also been a major build—up of russian troops near the border with ukraine, and america is watching. taste ukraine, and america is watching. we do ukraine, and america is watching. 9 do continue to see unusual military activity and the concentration of forces in russia, but near ukrainian
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borders, and that remains consenting to us. we borders, and that remains consenting to us. ~ i, borders, and that remains consenting to us. 9 ii i, i, i, to us. we have also heard one ukrainian _ to us. we have also heard one ukrainian minister— to us. we have also heard one ukrainian minister warning - to us. we have also heard one ukrainian minister warning of| to us. we have also heard one i ukrainian minister warning of the high probability of destabilisation of the situation in ukraine this winter. vladimir putin calls those fears alarmist, though russia did invade georgia into thousand and eight and we know more broadly toutant does want to test the west. —— putin. to understand why and how he is doing that, ukraine is the place to start. it was once part of the soviet union, and even after independence in 1991, it remained an ally of russia's. the relationship frayed, and in 2014 russia annexed crimea from ukraine and made a military incursion into the east of ukraine to support separatists. for that, russia was booted out of the gs that, russia was booted out of the g8 group of countries and faced economic sanctions as well, but it did not back down. and now this year, this has been happening. first, in the spring, thousands of russian troops were sent towards the border with ukraine. now, in borderwith ukraine. now, in november, another build—up is happening and ukrainian officials
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estimate that 114,000 troops have been deployed. and vladimir putin will be well aware that the us continues to watch. we will be well aware that the us continues to watch.— will be well aware that the us continues to watch. we have seen in the ast continues to watch. we have seen in the past russia _ continues to watch. we have seen in the past russia a _ continues to watch. we have seen in the past russia a mass _ continues to watch. we have seen in the past russia a mass forces - continues to watch. we have seen in the past russia a mass forces on - the past russia a mass forces on ukraine's borders, claiming some kind of provocation by ukraine, and then invade and basically following through on something they were planning all along. that is what they did in 2014. if planning all along. that is what they did in 2014.— planning all along. that is what they did in 2014. if that is the us, ukraine also _ they did in 2014. if that is the us, ukraine also says _ they did in 2014. if that is the us, ukraine also says it _ they did in 2014. if that is the us, ukraine also says it has _ they did in 2014. if that is the us, ukraine also says it has learnt - ukraine also says it has learnt lessons. , , lessons. they did the same seven ears a u o lessons. they did the same seven years ago in _ lessons. they did the same seven years ago in crimea. _ lessons. they did the same seven years ago in crimea. they - lessons. they did the same seven l years ago in crimea. they snatched that peninsula from us and our 2 million _ that peninsula from us and our 2 million people. let that peninsula from us and our 2 million people.— million people. let me put new elections in _ million people. let me put new elections in 2014 _ million people. let me put new elections in 2014 would - million people. let me put new elections in 2014 would bring i elections in 2014 would bring sanctions and condemnation, but he had his reasons. we can see one of them in this article injuly. president putin wrote this.
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and certainly one of his motivations is a desire to maintain the alliances, influence and cultural connections that are rooted in russia's history. but for all that, this is also about security. have a look at this map from the website of the defence alliance nato. there is russia in the east and then the light blue coloured countries are all nato members. ukraine is not a nato member but it gets major military support from the us and others, and all of this is to close for comfort for putin. in his eyes, it requires a response. keep that in mind as we consider how the us is now connecting the current russian troop build—up and another escalating situation. here is a recent tweet from the secretary of state, anthony blinken. he describes a hybrid campaign on the poland belarus border which seeks to threaten security, so division and distract from russia's activities on
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the border with ukraine. and to understand why the americans are making that connection, we need to look at belarus. this story is a very human drama, but the backdrop — thatis very human drama, but the backdrop — that is geopolitics. that is the bbc�*s steve rosenberg and belarus this week. this country was also once part of the soviet union, but unlike ukraine, belarus remains an ally of russia. presidents lukashenko and putin know each other well. that is relevant as we look at the crisis on the border between holland and belarus. poland is in the european union and the eu accuses lukashenko of encouraging migrants to use belarus as a route into the eu. lukashenko denies that, but thousands have come in and in desperate conditions have tried to get into poland. other eu countries are affected as well. lithuania and latvia have also seen a rise in illegal crossings from belarus, and for the polish prime minister this isn't only about belarus and the eu. it is about russia.—
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it is about russia. translation: this attack. _ it is about russia. translation: this attack, which _ it is about russia. translation: this attack, which lukashenko - it is about russia. translation: this attack, which lukashenko is| this attack, which lukashenko is conducting, has its mastermind in moscow. the mastermind is president putin. i, i, , putin. now, others disagree with that, saying _ putin. now, others disagree with that, saying this _ putin. now, others disagree with that, saying this is _ putin. now, others disagree with that, saying this is simply - that, saying this is simply lukashenko taking revenge for eu sanctions on belarus. and whether russia is or isn't the mastermind, it is certainly involved in this crisis. latimertoutant it is certainly involved in this crisis. latimer toutant has spoken to angela merkel on the phone twice —— let me putin. perhaps mischievously, he is offering to mediate. and it is argued that is exactly where he wants to be. this is one possible explanation for prudent�*s approach. lithuania's president goes further. prudent's approach. lithuania's president goes further. translation: it is totally clear _ president goes further. translation: it is totally clear what _ president goes further. translation: it is totally clear what the _ it is totally clear what the lukashenko regime and their allies are seeking — to test the unity of
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the west. not that russia is having that. i, ' i ii the west. not that russia is having that. i i, , ,, that. one official dismissed the west's thinking _ that. one official dismissed the west's thinking as _ that. one official dismissed the west's thinking as keep - that. one official dismissed the west's thinking as keep calm i that. one official dismissed the i west's thinking as keep calm and blame russia. but russia does have a track record of testing the west. we did so in crimea, did so in georgia, it even did in space this week by destroying a satellite in a missile test, much to nato's irritation. and here in the uk, conservative mp tobias elwood sees another test coming. everyone is watching, and this isn't just about military might because to understand putin's plans, we also need to think about energy. this is the node stream to gas pipeline. it
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runs from russia all the way to western europe, but it is not switched on yet. in fact, germany has just delayed giving the ok. but here it is stretching underneath the baltic sea, and when it is on it will increase your�*s reliance on russian gas. to borisjohnson, that is a problem. its, russian gas. to boris johnson, that is a problem-— is a problem. a choice is shortly comint is a problem. a choice is shortly coming between _ is a problem. a choice is shortly coming between mainlining - is a problem. a choice is shortly | coming between mainlining ever is a problem. a choice is shortly - coming between mainlining ever more russian hydrocarbons in giant new pipelines or sticking up for ukraine and championing the cause of peace and championing the cause of peace and stability. and championing the cause of peace and stability-— and stability. reliance on russian as is one and stability. reliance on russian gas is one security _ and stability. reliance on russian gas is one security concern, - and stability. reliance on russian gas is one security concern, but l gas is one security concern, but there is another. nord stream two will reduce the volume of gas that is delivered to western europe via ukraine, and ukraine believe that is dangerous.
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as we are hearing, most issues in this part of europe have a security dimension. if nato is unimpressed with russia's actions, the feeling is mutual. : i, : 9 with russia's actions, the feeling is mutual. : i, ~ 9 i, is mutual. translation: we need to consider the — is mutual. translation: we need to consider the western _ is mutual. translation: we need to consider the western partners - consider the western partners worsening this situation. they deliver modern, lethal weapons to kyiv and have provocative exercises in the black sea and other regions close to our borders.— close to our borders. putin sees a serious challenge _ close to our borders. putin sees a serious challenge in _ close to our borders. putin sees a serious challenge in the _ close to our borders. putin sees a serious challenge in the west's i serious challenge in the west's military proximity. in part he views his actions as defensive, and if that helps us understand what he is doing, so does this from april. translation: i hope no—one will cross russia's redline, but in each case, we are the ones who decide where the red is. organisers of any provocation threatening our security will regret it, like they have not regretted anything for a longtime. here we see the aggressive dimension
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to putin's approach. he asserts that russia will set the rules and enforce them. and this all connects to the broader goal of putin's leadership — to establish russia as a globalforce. to do that, putin wants to test the limits of western power. what we don't know is what he wants to happen next. but was ros atkins looking at the situation in belarus. mike is looking at the sport and still bafflement as to where peng shuai is. 9 , i, ii, , bafflement as to where peng shuai is. when you consider the global arofile of is. when you consider the global profile of the _ is. when you consider the global profile of the story _ is. when you consider the global profile of the story and - is. when you consider the global profile of the story and the i is. when you consider the global| profile of the story and the lights of the white house and un and top players saying we just want to know that the chinese star peng shuai is safe. has been a development overnight in some pictures were so —— posted on the social media site with her holding bear and perhaps saying at the weekend but there is
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doubt over the authenticity of the photos. reportedly from her sight? yes. but we will come to that for a moment so let's recap. tennis player peng shuai is one of china's biggest sports stars and has been missing since alleging that she was sexually assaulted by a former senior minister in the chinese government. this week, tennis officials dismissed an e—mail supposedly sent by the player, which said the allegations weren't true and that she's fine. now, the women's tennis association is threatening to cancel all tennis events in china next year unless they get proof that peng is safe. our sports correspondent natalie pirks has the latest. she is a tennis star in china, a former doubles world number one who won wimbledon. receiving the trophy from the duke of kent. but now, the united nations has added its voice to the clamour of bodies all wanting to know the same thing — where is peng shuai? two weeks ago, in this social media post, peng shuai made serious sexual assault allegations against former vice premier zhang gaoli.
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"like an egg hitting a rock, or a moth to the flame courting self—destruction, i'll tell the truth about you," she said. within half an hour, the post had gone, and so had she. then, an e—mail surfaced, addressed to the chairman of the women's tennis association, claiming to be from her, saying she hadn't meant the allegations and was just "resting at home". but they're not buying it and are prepared to pull lucrative matches from china if they don't get proof she is safe. i don't want to see this get pushed under the rug or on the side, because at the end, there's bigger — maybe bigger issues in some people's minds as to what's going on. i think the focus has to be on peng in this situation. 23—time grand slam singles champion serena williams has tweeted she is "devastated and shocked", adding: "this must be investigated and we must not stay silent." she's not alone. we would like, actually, to hear,
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like, a video from her or something — like real proof that, yes, she's all right. the eyes of the world will be on beijing in february for the winter olympics. but so far, the international olympic committee is only saying this requires quiet diplomacy. the ioc must fulfil its claims and responsibilities in this case and demonstrate that athletes really are at the heart of sport. it has significant leverage and influence to exert in this case, especially with the beijing olympics just around the corner now. in a country where few are allowed to challenge senior authorities without paying the price, concern grows by the hour for peng shuai's safety. natalie pirks, bbc news. so overnight, three photos of peng shuai were posted on a wechat account under her name with the caption "happy weekend". she can be seen here posing with a cat and holding a panda soft toy. however, the authenticity of the post on the chinese instant messaging service
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has been questioned. it is direct contact but around the world authorities want. —— it is direct contact that around the world authorities want. staying with tennis, and confirmation that unvaccinated players will not be allowed to compete at the australian open in the new year. there had been a lot of confusion over the restrictions with conflicting statements from australian politicians. a significant number of players remain unvaccinated, while defending men's champion novak djokovic has not revealed his vaccination status. we have also had confirmation that the tournament will be played in front of capacity crowds in january. a standout season for british number one cameron norrie has come to an end with a straight—sets defeat to the world number one novak djokovic at the atp finals in turin. but norrie will look back on the year with real pride. as well as becoming britain's top male player, he climbed to 12th in the world and won indian wells. he will learned a lot from the masterclass from the 20—time grand slam champion djokovic, whom he was playing for the first time.
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better news for britain's joe salisbury and his american partner rajeev ram. they sealed their place in the last four in the doubles. they beat colombian pair juan sebastian cabal and robert farah to maintain their 100% record in turin. now to football, and while steven gerard will take charge of his first match as aston villa's new manager as the premier league returns today, the start of the new era at newcastle has been delayed and eddie howe will miss his side's game with brentford because of covid 19. howe tested positive during a routine test on friday, meaning that he won't be at the match that he and fans were hoping would be his first in charge of newcastle. instead, assistant head coaches jason tindall and graemejones will take charge of the team at st james' park. manchester city's kevin de bruyne is also missing after he tested positive for covid after returning from international duty with
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belgium. he'll isolate for 10 days, which means that he'll miss city's next three games, including their key champions league tie with paris saint—germain, on wednesday. just three races to go in the formula 1 season. after lewis hamilton's astonishing win last weekend, he's nowjust 14 points behind leader max verstappen. the race is in qatar for the first time. third practice will get under way in a few hours, but valtteri bottas quickest in second practice yesterday. pierre gasly was second, while max verstappen was third. lewis hamilton could only manage fourth. significantly, hamilton was wearing a special helmet with the rainbow flag, on it as human rights remain a contentious issue in qatar — especially lg bt rights. we have a look ahead to a big weekend of internationals, scotland— japan, england— south africa and wales— australia, with a lot to look forward to. then the grand prix. we
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need multiple screens. you are looking forward to it but we will looking forward to it but we will look back now on children in need. stay! do stay! you were great! your singing was good! i sat stay! do stay! you were great! your singing was good!— singing was good! i sat watching next to my _ singing was good! i sat watching next to my daughter _ singing was good! i sat watching next to my daughter and - singing was good! i sat watching next to my daughter and she i singing was good! i sat watching i next to my daughter and she donated to stop me singing. while watching it again last night which is a good policy! it again last night which is a good -oli ! i, i i, it again last night which is a good -oli ! i, i, i, policy! you could tell you had done strictly come _ policy! you could tell you had done strictly come dancing _ policy! you could tell you had done strictly come dancing because i policy! you could tell you had done strictly come dancing because you | strictly come dancing because you had those move —— moves. strictly come dancing because you had those move -- moves. improvised! i ho -e had those move -- moves. improvised! i hope carter— had those move -- moves. improvised! i hope carter was _ had those move -- moves. improvised! i hope carter was not _ had those move -- moves. improvised! i hope carter was not watching! - —— katya. now, where else are you going to see an eastenders and coronation street star going on a blind date, and ed sheeran being upstaged by a group of puppets? it could only happen on children in need and last night, the annual telethon delivered the goods. here are some of the highlights.
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pudsey! on your head, son. i will alwa s pudsey! on your head, son. i will always love _ pudsey! on your head, son. i will always love you _ pudsey! on your head, son. i will always love you for _ pudsey! on your head, son. i will always love you for what - pudsey! on your head, son. i will always love you for what it's i pudsey! on your head, son. i will always love you for what it's worth. ton _ always love you for what it's worth. two. three. — always love you for what it's worth. two, three, four... we always love you for what it's worth. two, three, four...— two, three, four... we are also arateful two, three, four... we are also grateful for _ two, three, four... we are also grateful for all _ two, three, four... we are also grateful for all of _ two, three, four... we are also grateful for all of the _ two, three, four... we are also grateful for all of the support i two, three, four... we are also i grateful for all of the support you have shown! mr; grateful for all of the support you have shown!— grateful for all of the support you have shown! ~ , i, i, i have shown! my dad got ill. we did not actually — have shown! my dad got ill. we did not actually see _ have shown! my dad got ill. we did not actually see him _ have shown! my dad got ill. we did not actually see him for— have shown! my dad got ill. we did not actually see him for any - have shown! my dad got ill. we did not actually see him for any of- have shown! my dad got ill. we did not actually see him for any of his l not actually see him for any of his time _ not actually see him for any of his time in _ not actually see him for any of his time in hospital because the whole country— time in hospital because the whole country was in lockdown. after he died _ country was in lockdown. after he died. i_ country was in lockdown. after he died. i did — country was in lockdown. after he died, i did not really know what to do. ii , i, , ,iii, do. the family have been supported b stars do. the family have been supported by stars bereavement _ do. the family have been supported by stars bereavement charity. i do. the family have been supported | by stars bereavement charity. these are very different... _ by stars bereavement charity. these are very different... anne-marie i by stars bereavement charity. these are very different... anne-marie is i are very different... anne-marie is are very different... anne-marie is a bereavement _ are very different. .. anne-marie is a bereavement counsellor- are very different... anne-marie is a bereavement counsellor and i are very different... anne-marie is a bereavement counsellor and she | are very different... anne-marie is i a bereavement counsellor and she is funded _ a bereavement counsellor and she is funded entirely— a bereavement counsellor and she is funded entirely by— a bereavement counsellor and she is funded entirely by your— a bereavement counsellor and she is funded entirely by your donations. i funded entirely by your donations. for you — funded entirely by your donations. foryoum for— funded entirely by your donations. foryou... foryour... _
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funded entirely by your donations. foryou... foryour... heidi- funded entirely by your donations. for you... for your. . .— funded entirely by your donations. for you... for your... how are you both feeling — for you... for your... how are you both feeling about _ for you... for your... how are you both feeling about seeing - for you... for your... how are you both feeling about seeing henry i both feeling about seeing henry again? — both feeling about seeing henry aiain? ii , i, , i again? really, really excited! hen ! again? really, really excited! henry! 0h. — again? really, really excited! henry! oh, billy! _ again? really, really excited! henry! oh, billy! oh, - again? really, really excited! henry! oh, billy! oh, baby! || again? really, really excited! i henry! oh, billy! oh, baby! ijust henry! oh, billy! oh, baby! i 'ust want ou henry! oh, billy! oh, baby! i 'ust want you to fl henry! oh, billy! oh, baby! i 'ust want you to dance i henry! oh, billy! oh, baby! i 'ust want you to dance with i henry! oh, billy! oh, baby! i 'ust want you to dance with me i henry! oh, billy! oh, baby! i just. want you to dance with me tonight. well— want you to dance with me tonight. we'll still— want you to dance with me tonight. we'll still have each other. nothing's _ we'll still have each other. nothing's gonna _ we'll still have each other. nothing's gonna stop- we'll still have each other. nothing's gonna stop us. we'll still have each other. i nothing's gonna stop us now. nothing's _ nothing's gonna stop us now. nothing's stop _ nothing's gonna stop us now. nothing's stop us _ nothing's gonna stop us now. nothing's stop us now. - nothing's gonna stop us now. nothing's stop us now.- nothing's gonna stop us now. nothing's stop us now. jump! jump! knock knock- _ nothing's stop us now. jump! jump! knock knock. who _ nothing's stop us now. jump! jump! knock knock. who is _ nothing's stop us now. jump! jump! knock knock. who is there? - nothing's stop us now. jump! jump! knock knock. who is there? i i nothing's stop us now. jump! jump! knock knock. who is there? i done i knock knock. who is there? i done up. i'd done up who?— knock knock. who is there? i done up. i'd done up who? you've done a to! here we — up. i'd done up who? you've done a to! here we go! _ up. i'd done up who? you've done a to! here we go! working _ up. i'd done up who? you've done a to! here we go! working 9-to-5. .. l to! here we go! working 9-to-5. .. bo s, to! here we go! working 9-to-5. .. boys. 3600 _ to! here we go! working 9-to-5. .. boys. 3600 on _ to! here we go! working 9-to-5. .. boys, 3600 on the _ to! here we go! working 9-to-5. .. boys, 3600 on the line. _ to! here we go! working 9-to-5. .. boys, 3600 on the line. for- to! here we go! working 9-to-5. .. boys, 3600 on the line. for the i boys, 3600 on the line. for the kids _ boys, 3600 on the line. for the kids. i, boys, 3600 on the line. for the kids. no! it's enough to drive you
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cra in kids.- it's enough to drive you crazy in your— kids. no! it's enough to drive you crazy in your head! 39,000,300. i kids. no! it's enough to drive you i crazy in your head! 39,000,300. it was iuite crazy in your head! 39,000,300. it was quite a — crazy in your head! 39,000,300. it was quite a night. _ let's now speak to rosie millard, chair of children in need. are you happy? very, amazing. the generosity of the british public is every year, it is remarkable and this year was fantastic. the money that they give. _ this year was fantastic. the money that they give, that _ this year was fantastic. the money that they give, that people - this year was fantastic. the money that they give, that people give i this year was fantastic. the money that they give, that people give so i that they give, that people give so generously every year, children in need takes it and then gives it out. we distribute it to over 2500 charities, often grassroots, tiny charities, often grassroots, tiny charities, which have enormous local impact, these charities, they are right across the uk. [10 impact, these charities, they are right across the uk.— impact, these charities, they are right across the uk. do not have the critical mass — right across the uk. do not have the critical mass to _ right across the uk. do not have the critical mass to raise _ right across the uk. do not have the critical mass to raise the _ right across the uk. do not have the critical mass to raise the kind i critical mass to raise the kind money themselves? ida. critical mass to raise the kind money themselves?- critical mass to raise the kind money themselves? no, and what children in need _ money themselves? no, and what children in need does, _ money themselves? no, and what children in need does, because i money themselves? no, and what| children in need does, because we scope who we are giving the money to we see how it is being spent, look at the impact, these are durational
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grants, for three years, so we really examined very careful about the charities we give our money too. it acts as a sort of kitemark of, it's a sort of, it shows the integrity of the charity and it basically encourages the charity to raise money from other sources so people say if children in need of funding it, it is bound to work, and so it really helps local charities. i know that you throw everything at this. i know, i have spoken to you kind of away from this so far and i know how much money —— how much work you put into this. tell me about a charity that has touched you that you thought this is what this is about? 9 i, i, i, about? well, i live in north london and 'ust about? well, i live in north london and just up — about? well, i live in north london and just up the _ about? well, i live in north london and just up the road _ about? well, i live in north london and just up the road from - about? well, i live in north london andjust up the road from me, i i and just up the road from me, i mean, you are never very farfrom abbc children in need funded charity, and up the road from me is a charity cold islington giving and
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they have a young people's grant panel. we fund a youth worker who connects with young people who are on this panel who are, young people from marginalised backgrounds, who are given real money to spend on projects in islington. they are put in positions of power and positions of responsibility and i went back to see how they were getting on the other day and it was remarkable, these young people who, you know, they were speaking in public and giving, you know, giving significant sums of money to spend on other projects that they had to examine, this is something which really, it's something that is a feather in the cap for these young people that gives them confidence and authority... gives them confidence and authority. . .— gives them confidence and authority... gives them confidence and authori ii �*, i, authority... that's them on the road. authority... that's them on the road- yeah. — authority... that's them on the road. yeah, yeah, _ authority... that's them on the road. yeah, yeah, yeah. i authority... that's them on the road. yeah, yeah, yeah. theyi authority... that's them on the i road. yeah, yeah, yeah. they can then -ut road. yeah, yeah, yeah. they can then put it _ road. yeah, yeah, yeah. they can then put it on _ road. yeah, yeah, yeah. they can then put it on their— road. yeah, yeah, yeah. they can then put it on their cv _ road. yeah, yeah, yeah. they can then put it on their cv or- road. yeah, yeah, yeah. they can i then put it on their cv or whatever. and they may not have had those positions of responsibility at school or in other spheres of their life and it was just delightful to see, to see them blossoming under this guidance of the youth worker
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who was funded by children in need. i spoke to addie adepitan over the past couple of days and he said obviously one of the presenters last night, three he said his first sports wheelchair was funded by children in need and that his life. he is an olympian. d0 children in need and that his life. he is an olympian.— children in need and that his life. he is an olympian. do you have any trouble getting _ he is an olympian. do you have any trouble getting people _ he is an olympian. do you have any trouble getting people on? - he is an olympian. do you have any trouble getting people on? you i he is an olympian. do you have any trouble getting people on? you got| trouble getting people on? you got one of the biggest stars in the world and sharing coming on. me world and sharing coming on. we don't. world and sharing coming on. we don't- they _ world and sharing coming on. we don't. they are _ world and sharing coming on. we don't. they are all— world and sharing coming on. we don't. they are all up _ world and sharing coming on. we don't. they are all up for- world and sharing coming on. we don't. they are all up for it. i don't. they are all up for it. peo-le don't. they are all up for it. people love _ don't. they are all up for it. people love children i don't. they are all up for it. people love children in - don't. they are all up for it. | people love children in need don't. they are all up for it. - people love children in need and it isjust, no, it is remarkable. people respond to pudsey. do they ever! i know. _ people respond to pudsey. do they ever! i know. i— people respond to pudsey. do they ever! i know, i know. _ people respond to pudsey. do they ever! i know, i know. people- people respond to pudsey. do they ever! i know, i know. people love i ever! i know, i know. people love him! grown _ ever! i know, i know. people love him! grown men _ ever! i know, i know. people love him! grown men go _ ever! i know, i know. people love him! grown men go all— ever! i know, i know. people love him! grown men go all silly - ever! i know, i know. people love him! grown men go all silly when | him! grown men go all silly when pudsey turns _ him! grown men go all silly when pudsey turns up! _ him! grown men go all silly when pudsey turns up! it's _ him! grown men go all silly when pudsey turns up! it's lovely. - him! grown men go all silly when pudsey turns up! it's lovely. did i pudsey turns up! it's lovely. did ou have pudsey turns up! it's lovely. did you have a _ pudsey turns up! it's lovely. did you have a highlight of the evening? the choir_ you have a highlight of the evening? the choir are always great. are amazing- _ the choir are always great. are amazing- for— the choir are always great. are amazing. for me, _ the choir are always great. site: amazing. for me, the the choir are always great. e: amazing. for me, the repair the choir are always great. e: amazing, for me, the repair shop, amazing. for me, the repair shop, seeing billy with his bare, the way
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that he articulated what the bear meant to him and how pleased he would be to have this friend, this member of the family back, and his mother, the reaction of his mother, seeing the bear. i mean, you know, there was not a dry eye in the auditorium, i can tell you. and the other thing was the singing, mike singing... we other thing was the singing, mike sinrain . .. ~ , other thing was the singing, mike sinauin...~ , :, ., , singing... we 'ust did not actually see our singing... we just did not actually see your reaction _ singing... we just did not actually see your reaction then _ singing... we just did not actually see your reaction then my - singing... we just did not actually see your reaction then my bosi, l singing... we just did not actually | see your reaction then my bosi, so here is mike and let's now cut to rosie's reaction. did he not serenade you as you cross the line? h did he not serenade you as you cross the line? ~ , , , the line? i think it is because i saw ou the line? i think it is because i saw you talking _ the line? i think it is because i saw you talking about - the line? i think it is because i saw you talking about it - the line? i think it is because i - saw you talking about it yesterday and you are going, i know he is fantastic. so i was sitting there in the auditorium talking to fellow trustees who were there and saying he is going to win. he will be fantastic. it is not him. honestly, if you lined up 100 people and said
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what is your worst fear, it would be singing in public. the fact that he did it... he singing in public. the fact that he did it... , ., :, ., , did it... he is game for anything. he was, did it... he is game for anything. he was. he _ did it... he is game for anything. he was, he was _ did it... he is game for anything. he was, he was game _ did it... he is game for anything. he was, he was game to - did it... he is game for anything. he was, he was game to be - did it... he is game for anything. i he was, he was game to be mocked nationally — he was, he was game to be mocked nationally. is he was, he was game to be mocked nationall . , , :, . :, nationally. is singing voice may not have suited — nationally. is singing voice may not have suited that _ nationally. is singing voice may not have suited that style _ nationally. is singing voice may not have suited that style of _ nationally. is singing voice may not have suited that style of singing, . have suited that style of singing, but i can tell you he has a nice voice. it but i can tell you he has a nice voice. :, , but i can tell you he has a nice voice. :, but i can tell you he has a nice voice. ., but i can tell you he has a nice voice. :,, :, . .,, but i can tell you he has a nice voice— as i but i can tell you he has a nice voice— as a i voice. it was a car crash. as a ruest voice. it was a car crash. as a guest on _ voice. it was a car crash. as a guest on this _ voice. it was a car crash. as a guest on this sofa, _ voice. it was a car crash. as a guest on this sofa, we - voice. it was a car crash. as a guest on this sofa, we will. voice. it was a car crash. as a | guest on this sofa, we will not voice. it was a car crash. as a - guest on this sofa, we will not have you disparage one of the breakfast family! it was a joy. i hope you get a little bit of rest.— a little bit of rest. thank you for our a little bit of rest. thank you for your support — a little bit of rest. thank you for your support as _ a little bit of rest. thank you for your support as well. _ a little bit of rest. thank you for your support as well. the - a little bit of rest. thank you for your support as well. the whole i a little bit of rest. thank you for - your support as well. the whole bbc and particularly this show. and owain did well— and particularly this show. fific 0wain did well with his and particularly this show. air. 0wain did well with his drums. and particularly this show. and - owain did well with his drums. and i have learnt — owain did well with his drums. and i have learnt so _ owain did well with his drums. and i have learnt so much _ owain did well with his drums. and i have learnt so much about _ 0wain did well with his drums. and i have learnt so much about drumming! he does— have learnt so much about drumming! he does go— have learnt so much about drumming! he does go on. you can watch the highlights of the show on bbc one, at 2:50 tomorrow afternoon. here's sarah with a look
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at this morning's weather. it was a very mild night yesterday evening for so many of us. i know it is going to change. that evening for so many of us. i know it is going to change.— is going to change. that is absolutely _ is going to change. that is absolutely right, - is going to change. that is absolutely right, it - is going to change. that is absolutely right, it has - is going to change. that is l absolutely right, it has been is going to change. that is - absolutely right, it has been very mild. good morning to you, and good morning at home as well. we have had temperatures well above average for november. things are about to change, it couldn't last forever. this is the picture of berwick—upon—tweed. a few clear spells. yesterday we had temperatures as high as 17 degrees in aberdeen, but look in at the drop in aberdeen, but look in at the drop in temperature. four degrees forecast for friday. a noticeable cooling down of the weather in the week ahead and it will happen quite quickly through tonight into tomorrow the as weather front pushes its way south across the uk. it will bring a little bit of rain but it is tending to fizzle out. you will notice it opens the doors for this cold air mass. the winds coming in from the north, the blue colours
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back on the map as we head through tomorrow and much the week ahead. today we have a mild day for much of england and wales. still quite cloudy but breaks in the cloud for northern england and north wales. scotland and northern ireland after the morning cloud and rain clears, we will be left with sunny spells and showers. temperatures somewhere between seven and 11 or 12 degrees, that it will turn colder than that through tonight into tomorrow. the clear skies affect all parts of the uk. we have a few showers coming in across the north and east, temperatures in our towns and cities just about freezing but in the countryside you can see frost first thing. more sunshine tomorrow than there is today, despite the cold weather on the cards. some wintry weather on the cards. some wintry weather in highland scotland and the odd bit of hail and thunder mixed in as well. further west you are looking at fewer showers around, but one or two in irish sea coasts and
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noticeably colder. seven to 10 degrees but you have the wind chill to add—on as well. high pressure very much still with us as we look into monday. something a little less cold for a time just working on around that area of high pressure. this week when front on monday will bring a bit more cloud to parts of scotland and northern ireland, a bit of rain in the far north. england and wales staying dry and sunny, quite breezy for east anglia and the south—east. temperature is about seven to 11 degrees or so, significantly cooler than it has been recently, and we are likely to see a return to some frost and some mist and fog patches. perhaps not quite as cold through the course of monday and tuesday, some of us reaching double figures. from mid week onwards another cold front comes plunging into. temperatures on thursday and friday five to seven degrees with the northerly wind as well. we have been spoiled so far but things are turning colder through the remainder of november. that is thejoy through the remainder of november. that is the joy of seasons, though. that is the joy of seasons, though. that is the joy of seasons, though. that is what we get in the uk. we
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have the joy of seasons, so we should embrace it with woolly hats. time now for this week's newswatch. hello, and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. should the bbc have broadcast in full the racist language this cricketer experienced? and after sunday's attack in liverpool, should the bbc have shown repeatedly the moment the bomber died in the blast? select committee sessions in parliament can be dry affairs, but the evidence given on tuesday by the former cricketer azeem rafiq to a group of mps was anything but. over the course of two hours of often emotional testimony, he related his experience of racism at yorkshire cricket club, including the offensive names he'd been called. the latter were broadcast in full as the hearing was shown live on bbc television, prompting occasional interventions like this from the presenter in the studio.
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it's... it's pretty clear. it's there. some people are still pretty scared, and they are... apologies for the language there that you heard. we did warn that there would be some offensive language most likely to be heard in this live hearing. obviously some swearing there. azeem rafiq recounting something he says was said, so apologies for that if that caused offence to you. chris mitchell thought it was... but ed round objected to the broadcast of one particular racial epithet. subsequent news reports bleeped out
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some of the racist words used by azeem rafiq, though what he could be heard to say was still harrowing. how are you feeling, azeem? his allegations have already plunged yorkshire cricket into crisis. today, azeem rafiq brought them to westminster, laying bare the ordeal he says he and other asian players were subjected to at his former club, including a racist term aimed at his pakistani heritage. it was comments such as, "you lot over there near the toilets." elephant—washers. the word bleep was used constantly. that practice led hilary price to comment... clearly a difficult area
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for broadcasters, and to discuss it i'm joined byjamie angus, the controller of bbc news. the evidence was harrowing, but hearing those racist words has caused distress and offence, too. you must�*ve known that we would happen by showing the hearing live. that's absolutely right, and let's be clear, there's no single view on this that is going to keep all parts of the audience happy. this is controversial and difficult language, and many different parts of the audience have different views about how it should be treated. in the context of the live broadcast, we really took the view that there was a case to hear the language used in the raw. this was a live parliamentary testimony, and as some of your correspondents have said, it was important at that stage, as the events were unfolding live, to hear azeem rafiq in his own words. so, that's why during the live broadcast, we did carry the testimony without a delay
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and without bleeping. but we did feel it appropriate that at that stage to warn people that there was racially offensive and other offensive language recurring during the hearing and to apologise on occasion for instances where that was heard. of course, at times, this testimony was being broadcast notjust in the uk, but around the world and glibly on our global news services. some viewers were actually annoyed by the apologies. they felt it undermined what azeem rafiq was saying. indeed, and i understand that, but i think we have to try and take into account the different expectations of different groups of people tuning in perhaps unexpectedly to this broadcast. not everyone tuning in to the bbc news channel between 9—10:30am on a weekday morning would even be aware that the hearing was taking place or would be expecting to hear this very inflammatory and difficult language, so i feel for that reason that offering an apology
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was genuinely meant and intended to help the audience navigate what could've been unexpected content for that time of day. so, once the live hearing finished, any news reports bleeped out the racist words, and some viewers felt the bleeping actually watered down the impact of his evidence. what do you say? well, we decided to draw a distinction, samira, between as you said the live transmission of parliamentary testimony and the subsequent packaging of that material into news packages later in the day. and to that end, we took the view that we were quite a long way into the story, the story had been running for a large number of days, and we felt it was more likely than not that most people in the audience would be aware what the language specifically was. and then therefore the need to repeat it in multiple outlets and at multiple times of the day across the rest of the day was not justifiable given the offensiveness of the language used, and that's why we decided while we weren't using the material live, to bleep it to avoid giving needless offence. by from your own listener comments the written into newswatch
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and indeed across a range of views in our own newsroom, there is no single hard and fast way of reaching these decisions that will please all sections of the audience. we just tried to balance the need for the audience to understand the story and understand what was being said and alluded to with the need to avoid giving offence by repeatedly using the language across multiple outlets across the rest of that day, because as it was a fact that this was the lead story and was covered very heavily across all bbc news outlets. given that this could be an ongoing issue, does the bbc have a policy of always consulting journalists who are people of colour about racist language in the news? well, interesting you mention that because of course we do take soundings and hold discussions in our own newsroom with our own staff, and we also look at evidence from audience research collated by our own editorial policy department as to what level of offence people attach to particular language and particular words.
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so, we do try to take dynamic decisions over time which reflect the context of a story and the frequency of use essentially of a word across a day. so, there is not a hard and fast rule for these most offensive words, particularly to do with a racial swear words, but our editorial policy guidance is that they can be used on occasion where there is a strong justification for doing so. but they should be used with a great deal of care, and i think is probably a fair summary of the position we reached earlier this week. do stay with us, jaime, but for now, thank you. details have been emerging during the course of the week about the bomb blast that took place in liverpool on sunday. here'sjune kelly on tuesday's news at six. at the women's hospital, while staff look after patients inside, outside the police are continuing their work, gathering any potential evidence.
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and liverpool is learning more about this man, the asylum—seeker who launched the attack on his adopted city. the image that followed that was one which has been seen frequently, sometimes two or three times in the same report over the past few days. the moment the attacker pulled up in a taxi outside the hospital and his bomb exploded, killing him and causing injuries to his driver. john griffiths was one of those concerned about the use of those pictures, and he recorded this video for us. did bbc news have to repeatedly show the cctv footage of the moment the taxi exploded outside of the liverpool women's hospital killing a passenger and injuring the driver? i can understand why it would be shown, but to show the same footage repeatedly in the same report seems to be excessive and adds nothing to the reporting of the story. whatever the circumstances may have been, this was the moment a person died and another was seriously
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injured and should've been treated with some dignity and respect. well, jaime angus is still with me. jamie, what is the bbc�*s policy on showing the moment of death? 0ur editorial policy guidelines say we should be very cautious about showing the moment of anyone's death, but of course sadly we live in a world where terrorist action, warfare and other violence does mean that there are important news events where we have to consider the value of showing newsworthy pictures against that guidance for caution. and this was indeed one of those events. it's worth adding that in the early hours after this incident, it wasn't at all clear what had actually happened at the hospital, and some of the information circulating subsequently, as demonstrated by these pictures, turned out to be false. so, we felt that there was a strong public interest in showing the pictures in orderfor people to understand what had actually
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happened, also because they showed the escape from the vehicle of the taxi driver and the presence of eyewitnesses who we were subsequently able to interview and gather their own testimony. those images were shown multiple times this week, including in headlines, so how do you answer those viewers who said it's just not decent to show that moment of death repeatedly? as i say, we have to strike a balance between public sensitivity around difficult and distressing images and the need for those images to be understood by the audience in order to interpret events that have happened. so, we have tried to use these pictures proportionately. if people had been upset by their use in headlines orfeel that their use has been overly repetitive, then i'm sorry about that. it's a conversation that we take very seriously in the newsroom. we spend a lot of time thinking about, and i think broadly we reached the right decision about the news value that these pictures and the need for the audience to see them with appropriate context in order to understand the story. jamie angus, thank you.
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and thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions about what you see or hear or read on bbc news, on tv, radio, online or on social media, e—mail newswatch@bbc.co.uk or you can find us on twitter @newswatchbbc. you can call us on 0370 010 6676, and do have a look at previous interviews on our website, bbc.co.uk/newswatch. that's all from us. we'll be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. good morning, welcome to breakfast — with naga munchetty and rogerjohnson. 0ur headlines today: clashes in the netherlands over new covid measures — as restrictions are tightened across mainland europe. and a clampdown in austria — a full lockdown from monday and compulsory vaccinations by february.
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we find the defendent not guilty. us gun culture back under scrutiny — after a teenager who shot dead two people during racial unrest is cleared of murder. there's growing concern, over the whereabouts of chinese tennis star, peng shuai — new pictures are posted of the missing player overnight, but the us and united nations are among those calling for verifiable proof she is safe. in the first scheme in eight new initiative, known as restoring your railways, this line is opening this morning for the very first time. it is a mild start to the day to day, back row should see a bit of cold weather. we will see a chilly anomaly when developing tomorrow. i
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will have all the details. are it's saturday, november 20. our top story — dutch police have shot and wounded at least two people after rioting erupted in rotterdam over new covid—19 measures. coronavirus restrictions are being tightened in the netherlands and a number of other eu countries in response to rising case numbers. austria faces a full lockdown from monday and compulsory vaccinations from next year. tim muffett has the latest. protesters in rotterdam responding to the partial lockdown imposed in the netherlands. police used water cannon and fired warning shots. at least two people were injured. restrictions here began on monday and are set to be in place for another two weeks at least. like many countries in europe, the netherlands has seen a sharp rise in covid cases. in austria, a 20—day lockdown
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will start this monday. people will be asked to work from home and non—essential shops will close. in february, covid vaccinations will become compulsory. what we experience in austria right now is, in my view, an unfortunate collusion of the fact that we have a fairly low vaccination rate in the population and that the waning of immunity hits austria now, six months after we started our vaccination programme, and that is unfortunately right at the beginning of the winter season, where people are moving indoors. in germany, covid cases are also rising sharply. the government is set to introduce restrictions for unvaccinated people in areas where hospital admissions exceed a certain level. as for the prospect of a full lockdown, the german government says nothing has been ruled out. in the uk yesterday, just over lili,000 new people tested positive for coronavirus.
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over the week, there was a 13% increase in cases compared to the previous seven days. between the 9th and 15th of november, just over 6000 people were admitted to hospital with covid — that's a fall of 4.5% compared to the previous seven days. at the moment, the uk is not witnessing the surge in cases being seen in some other countries. we have, i'm sure, the highest levels of overall immunity in europe — it's over 90% amongst adults and approaching that level in children as well now — so that is quite a different situation to many countries in europe, including austria and germany, who did not have as bad first waves or second waves and did not have the significant delta wave yet, either. there are renewed calls for people to get boosterjabs if they are eligible in the hope the uk can avoid the tougher restrictions being imposed elsewhere. tim muffett, bbc news.
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0ur correspondent, bethany bell, joins us now. bethany, many people in austria have refused to get vaccinated. what's been the reaction to the news that they now have to get the jab? yes, austria is the first country in europe to make plans for compulsory vaccination. it’s europe to make plans for compulsory vaccination. �* , :, europe to make plans for compulsory vaccination. �*, ., :, , ., vaccination. it's a controversial step here- _ vaccination. it's a controversial step here. many _ vaccination. it's a controversial step here. many austrians - vaccination. it's a controversial step here. many austrians say| vaccination. it's a controversial. step here. many austrians say it vaccination. it's a controversial - step here. many austrians say it is high time everybodyjust got vaccinated. when the chancellor announced these moves, he said it is legal under austria's constitution to bring in mandatory vaccination. but a lot of other people here say this is a very difficult step when it comes to the question of civil liberties. the far right freedom party, which has campaigned very much on a platform of vaccine
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scepticism, says it is calling for protests against these moves. there have been a number of demonstrations called for in the ni today. that party says the government is following the constitution overboard and leaving the country into a dictatorship. the chancellor though says they have had vaccine mandates in austria before, notably with vaccinations against smallpox for example. other austrians say they are just so fed up with the pandemic, they want everybody to get vaccinated as soon as they can. this is an issue dividing the country,. around two thirds of austrians are vaccinated, one of the lowest rates in europe. presidentjoe biden has said he is "angry" after a teenager who shot dead two people was cleared of murder. kyle rittenhouse argued that he'd acted in self—defence when he killed two men and wounded another during racialjustice protests last year.
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our washington correspondent, nomia iqbal, reports. the defendant will rise and face i the jury and harken to its verdicts. a dangerous vigilante, or someone acting in self—defence? after 26 hours, thejury decided kyle rittenhouse's fate. we the jury find the defendant, kyle h rittenhouse, not guilty. the 12 men and women of the jury accepted the teenager's claim he killed out of fear for his safety. somehow, some way, those 12jurors found that he was innocent. outside court, the political divisions this case has caused were clear. you attack me, i have the right to defend myself, that's what kyle was on trial for, that's what he was acquitted for. are you telling me that if two guys come up to you and accost you, you can't defend yourself?
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that's what was on trial today. there is no way in a land of law where a person can shoot three people, kill two of them, and be acquitted. there'sjust no way. the shooting happened against the backdrop of nationwide protests over racism and police brutality, following the murder of george floyd. in kenosha, another black man, named jacob blake, had been shot by police seven times, and on the third night of riots kyle rittenhouse entered the city. he said he came to provide security. in a series of confrontations, he shot dead joseph rosenbaum, who had chased after him into this car park. he then killed another man, who ran after rittenhouse, thinking he was an active shooter. a third man survived. police later arrested the teenager and charged him with murder.
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at his trial, there were tears and a controversial defence by his team, in regards to the shooting of jacob blake. other people in this community have shot somebody seven times and it's been found to be ok. my client did it four times in three—quarters of a second to protect his life from mr rosenbaum. i'm sorry, but that's what happened. this not guilty verdict is seen as a referendum on an issue that polarises americans beyond kenosha, and that is the issue of gun ownership. for many conservative groups, kyle rittenhouse is now seen as a hero. but for many liberal groups, he is the face of a gun culture out of control, and they are worried by being cleared of the charges what it might mean now for future protests. can americans turn up with a gun but not face any consequences? nomia iqbal, bbc news, kenosha.
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in response to the case, presidentjoe biden said: he went on to say, "i urge everyone to express their views peacefully, consistent with the rule of law. violence and destruction of property have no place in our democracy." almost £40 million has been raised by the bbc children in need appeal. you have raised a whopping 569,389,048. the show was jam—packed with the usual comedy sketches and star—studded performances. ed sheeran belted out his new single and there were special editions of tv programmes, like the wall and the repair shop.
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we are going to be talking about some of those programmes a little later on. single—use plastics — such as plates and cutlery, as well as polystyrene cups — could all be banned in england under new plans being considered by the government. it is estimated that only 10% of such items a re currently recycled. let's take you through the scale of the problem. according to estimates, in england alone, we get through 1.1 billion single—use plates every year. in addition to that, 4.25 billion single use pieces of cutlery, the vast majority of which are plastic, are also used. disposable coffee cups have been a long—standing issue and the uk as a whole throws away 2.5 billion of those every year. we can speak now to helen bird from the waste reduction charity, wrap. we have spoken about this for so long. why is this still a
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consultation phase? why is it not happening? i consultation phase? why is it not happening?— consultation phase? why is it not haueninu? ., , : : happening? i think very much we are welcomin: happening? i think very much we are welcoming these _ happening? i think very much we are welcoming these proposals, - happening? i think very much we are welcoming these proposals, but - happening? i think very much we arei welcoming these proposals, but they do take time. an important point is that while we need government to take action, and they will if they have to, we actually don't have to wait for government regulations. business is able to make these changes and we are some of that happening, but of course we need to go further. happening, but of course we need to no further. ~ : , happening, but of course we need to no further. ~ :, , ., go further. what is at the uk lastic go further. what is at the uk plastic packed? _ go further. what is at the uk plastic packed? it _ go further. what is at the uk plastic packed? it brings - go further. what is at the uk - plastic packed? it brings together some of the _ plastic packed? it brings together some of the biggest _ plastic packed? it brings together some of the biggest companies i plastic packed? it brings together - some of the biggest companies across the uk. they are signed up to eliminate problematic and unnecessary packaging by 2025, they could all recyclable. really importantly, incorporate recyclable material back into packaging. there are issues in _ material back into packaging. there are issues in terms _ material back into packaging. there are issues in terms of— material back into packaging. there are issues in terms of how -
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material back into packaging. there are issues in terms of how we - material back into packaging. there are issues in terms of how we as a world adopt the issue of plastic. for example, reusable bags, bags for life, that has been a bit of chewing and throwing of it were that they should be at shop counters and tills, and whether or not we are using those properly.— tills, and whether or not we are using those properly. what we have seen as government _ using those properly. what we have seen as government taking - using those properly. what we have seen as government taking action l using those properly. what we have | seen as government taking action to introduce charges to try to reduce the use of single—use plastic bags. to a large extent, we have seen significant reductions over the last few years. a good number of us, around 70% of us, are still forgetting to take our bags when we go shopping. —— around 20% of us. we really need to get into more habits to take our bags. another point is that it to take our bags. another point is thatitis to take our bags. another point is that it is not good enough to simply substitute one material for another. single—use plastic, single use paper, all these materials will have
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an environmental impact. we really need to think about how we can move away from single use and throw a ways society. the goods that we consume, the clothes we wear, the food we eat. all of those contributing nearly half of all global emissions. me contributing nearly half of all global emissions.— contributing nearly half of all global emissions. contributing nearly half of all rlobal emissions. ~ ., :, ., global emissions. we are told what we should do. _ global emissions. we are told what we should do, most _ global emissions. we are told what we should do, most of— global emissions. we are told what we should do, most of us - global emissions. we are told what we should do, most of us have - global emissions. we are told what we should do, most of us have an i we should do, most of us have an idea, but sometimes it isjust we should do, most of us have an idea, but sometimes it is just not that easy. should it be made more difficult to have access to single—use plastics by retailers, workplaces, for example, so that actually we struggle with inconvenience until we are forced to change? inconvenience until we are forced to chance? : inconvenience until we are forced to chane? ., change? that said. government will take action if _ change? that said. government will take action if they _ change? that said. government will take action if they absolutely - change? that said. government will take action if they absolutely have i take action if they absolutely have to, but they shouldn't have to. an area we are starting to look more into at the moment under the plastic pact is packaging unnecessary use around fruit and vegetables. our latest research we are publishing
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ratio looks at the correlation between footways in the household, where the majority of food waste exists, and that is absolutely damaging for the environment and plastic packaging. we believe there are many opportunities to remove plastic packaging and save food waste. for example, we threw away 4.4 million potatoes in the bin every day. the carbon impact of that is astronomical. the reason we feel these things away is because we are buying too many. that's because we are so dumb in a plastic packaging. so there is opportunity for us to kneel away from that. we as individuals have an important role to play. in many instances, we have a choice. supermarkets need to offer us more choice, packaging free. we also need to take them up on that.
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thank you very much. we are seeing thejoys of zoom thank you very much. we are seeing the joys of zoom and the technological difficulties we are all facing. do you remember the old days, when you go to the grocers, or you would pick up individual items and paper bags? which i always think i would have for mushrooms and herbs. and the have for mushrooms and herbs. a"ic the environment have for mushrooms and herbs. air. the environment possibly. have for mushrooms and herbs. and the environment possibly. sarah, i i the environment possibly. sarah, i saw ou the environment possibly. sarah, i saw you nodding — the environment possibly. sarah, i saw you nodding there. _ the environment possibly. sarah, i saw you nodding there. you - the environment possibly. sarah, i - saw you nodding there. you remember those days, when you actually pick your foot. those days, when you actually pick yourfoot. there those days, when you actually pick your foot. there are still plenty of shops out there that provide that, don't they? it’s shops out there that provide that, don't they?— don't they? it's all about our habits, getting _ don't they? it's all about our habits, getting used - don't they? it's all about our habits, getting used to - don't they? it's all about our| habits, getting used to going don't they? it's all about our - habits, getting used to going and picking up a couple of karats rather than a plastic bag full of carrots.
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the weather will be changing quite significantly over the next 24—hour do so. certainly turning colder as we head through the course of the weekend. mild weather out there today, get out and enjoy it. by there today, get out and enjoy it. by tomorrow, this cold northerly flow of air comes in. we are importing this colder air mass from the north. still quite cloudy today across england and wales. for scotland and northern ireland, it is also quite cloudy. a weather front bringing patchy rain slip south, bringing patchy rain slip south, bringing sunny spells blustery showers. temperatures in stornoway, just 7 degrees this afternoon, but
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further south we could see 12 or 13 celsius. this evening and overnight, the weather front clears to the south, so we are all within thinness colder, clearerair south, so we are all within thinness colder, clearer air mass. temperatures just about staying above freezing in most towns and cities, but it will be colder than that in the countryside. quite a cold northerly wind blowing showers in across parts of scotland, some snow over mountains. fewer showers further west, snow over mountains. fewer showers furtherwest, more snow over mountains. fewer showers further west, more sunshine tomorrow than today despite the cold there feel to the weather. you will certainly notice that when the child tomorrow. amid all the talk this week about rail services for parts of the midlands and northern england there's been good new for one community in the south west. this weekend sees the first regular train services for nearly 50 years between exeter and the town of 0kehampton near dartmoor. our reporterjohn maguire
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is there for us this morning. john, i imagine many people are excited about having this service back? : ~ , back? huge excitement. when we first came here to — back? huge excitement. when we first came here to 0kehampton _ back? huge excitement. when we first came here to 0kehampton in - back? huge excitement. when we first came here to 0kehampton in march i back? huge excitement. when we first| came here to 0kehampton in march and talked about this project, they were saying it would maybe take a year, but it is coming much earlier. this has been a heritage railway line for a few years and hasn't been in regular service for almost 50 years. but today it has been reopened, the first train ran this morning, it was absolutely packed. i've never seen someone get off a chain and fist pump the air, that is the level of excitement around this service. it will take people from here to exeter in the weekday, students and
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commuters, you can get to here to london in around three hours. try and do that in a car, it is going to take more than four. it is going to be a huge boost to the local economy here and the people, and that is a good deal of excitement for what is a very historic line. when the railway arrived in 0kehampton, the town threw a huge street party to celebrate. that was 150 years ago. the next century saw crowds gather for other important occasions to name trains and to send the town's sons off to war. and even the line's closure in 1972, part of the beeching cuts, was marked with some ceremony. today, the festivities continue as scheduled passenger service returns, a reward for years of campaigning. back in the summer, we filmed the new tracks being laid. fantastic. this is the moment, isn't it,
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really, when the track gets put down, the new track, and it'll be shortly, hopefully, a train to exeter. just remind me, how long have you been campaigning and working on this? well, i arrived in 0kehampton in 1975 and i saw it going gradually derelict then, so that was when i first became interested in it. the line is the very first to reopen as part of the government's restoring your railway scheme but this week, it's seen controversy and anger elsewhere with the scrapping of the hs2 link to leeds and the northern powerhouse line between leeds and manchester. the restoration of the dartmoor line was made easier by the fact that after closing to passenger services, it's continued to be used for transporting railway ballast from a nearby quarry. it also ran as a heritage railway but now, it's been upgraded. it's not as easy as you think. it hasn't been in good condition but there is a huge amount of work.
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we've done kind of 11 miles of track installation in the last four weeks. it's actually been one of the fastest track installations in network rail history. well, this is the new track construction machine. it's an impressive piece of kit, about a quarter of a mile long. you can see what's happening. the grey pod at the top runs back, grabs the sleepers, brings them to the front the train and then lays them in a perfectly straight line on the bed with the two metal tracks on top. it'll run at a rate of about 400 metres per hour. and in the belly of the beast, it is ryan'sjob to keep the machine, well, on track. my position is to ensure that it's somewhere near — and usually, i'm pretty good. so you have to constantly monitor the height of your clamps so they don't hit the sleepers, the spacing of the rail behind you and obviously, the line itself. so it's a concentration game? yeah, big time. after a week where the government's
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been accused of reneging on promised rail improvements in the north of england, reopening this line may seem a small step, but it is a giant leap for people here, the passengers who will use it and the communities it will serve. john maguire, bbc news, devon. those are the views you can have. the line which was mothballed in 1972, now seven days a week will be taking passages from today. it is interesting. _ taking passages from today. it is interesting, it _ taking passages from today. it is interesting, it is _ taking passages from today. it 3 interesting, it is a reversal of the beeching cuts. it would be great at this time when we need more public transport if we could reverse more of them, but of course many of those lines have disappeared. thea;r of them, but of course many of those lines have disappeared.— lines have disappeared. they have comletel lines have disappeared. they have completely gone. _ if you're out on a run this weekend, you might have thought about going an extra mile, but probably not 101 miles in 24 hours.
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that's the challenge awaiting former rugby league star kevin sinfield who will set off on his toughest challenge yet to raise funds for research into motor neurone disease, inspired by his close friend and team—mate rob burrow who is living with mnd. tigers, to headingly, kevin will run from his current club, leicester tigers, to headingly, the home of his and rob's beloved leeds rhinos. let's have a look at how the preparations have been going. this could be the biggest challenge that he will ever have to do. this is 'ust that he will ever have to do. this isjust extraordinary, _ that he will ever have to do. this isjust extraordinary, isn't it? 101 miles_ isjust extraordinary, isn't it? 101 miles and — isjust extraordinary, isn't it? 101 miles and 24 hours, it's beyond belief —
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miles and 24 hours, it's beyond belief i — miles and 24 hours, it's beyond belief. ~' :, miles and 24 hours, it's beyond belief. ~ ., �* , ., ., miles and 24 hours, it's beyond belief. ~ ., �*, ., ., , belief. i know it's going to be horrific. belief. i know it's going to be horrific- i _ belief. i know it's going to be horrific. i know— belief. i know it's going to be horrific. i know it's _ belief. i know it's going to be horrific. i know it's going i belief. i know it's going to be horrific. i know it's going to l belief. i know it's going to be i horrific. i know it's going to be really, really tough. but it's supposed to be.— really, really tough. but it's supposed to be. really, really tough. but it's su osed to be. ., , really, really tough. but it's su osed to be. .,, ., supposed to be. one thing he has got is a mental toughness _ supposed to be. one thing he has got is a mental toughness and _ supposed to be. one thing he has got is a mental toughness and he - supposed to be. one thing he has got is a mental toughness and he can i is a mental toughness and he can take it _ is a mental toughness and he can take it to— is a mental toughness and he can take it to the next level, unbelievable.— take it to the next level, unbelievable. , �* . unbelievable. doesn't say too much, but when he — unbelievable. doesn't say too much, but when he speaks _ unbelievable. doesn't say too much, but when he speaks you _ unbelievable. doesn't say too much, but when he speaks you know - unbelievable. doesn't say too much, but when he speaks you know you i unbelievable. doesn't say too much, i but when he speaks you know you have .ot but when he speaks you know you have got to _ but when he speaks you know you have got to listen _ but when he speaks you know you have got to listen is~ — but when he speaks you know you have got to listen is. since _ but when he speaks you know you have got to listen is. since i— but when he speaks you know you have got to listen is. since i met— but when he speaks you know you have got to listen is. since i met curve, i got to listen is. since i met curve, he has _ got to listen is. since i met curve, he has idly— got to listen is. since i met curve, he has icily made _ got to listen is. since i met curve, he has icily made me _ got to listen is. since i met curve, he has icily made me feel- got to listen is. since i met curve, he has icily made me feel really. got to listen is. since i met curve, i he has icily made me feel really bad about— he has icily made me feel really bad about myself — he has icily made me feel really bad about myself. he— he has icily made me feel really bad about myself-— about myself. he is a pretty good man, about myself. he is a pretty good man. isn't — about myself. he is a pretty good man. isn't he? — about myself. he is a pretty good man, isn't he? he _ about myself. he is a pretty good man, isn't he? he is _ about myself. he is a pretty good man, isn't he? he is pretty- about myself. he is a pretty good l man, isn't he? he is pretty special. there are so many unknowns in this, so many— there are so many unknowns in this, so many uncertainties. but people with nn _ so many uncertainties. but people with nn d — so many uncertainties. but people with nn d don't have a choice. we don't _ with nn d don't have a choice. we don't have — with nn d don't have a choice. we don't have a — with nn d don't have a choice. we don't have a choice when we start on monday _ don't have a choice when we start on monday. that's the reason we are
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running _ we're joined now by former wigan and great britain legend ellery hanley, who was one of kev�*s heroes growing up and is now a good friend. we're also joined by professor ben jones from leeds beckett university who is part of the team getting kevin ready for this challenge. we were just talking their while we were admiring what is going to be done. it is so ironic, because you said i'm listening to my body and taking it easy. not something happening over there.- taking it easy. not something happening over there. kevin is absolutely _ happening over there. kevin is absolutely remarkable, - happening over there. kevin is absolutely remarkable, what i happening over there. kevin is i absolutely remarkable, what he's doing is flabbergasted. everyone is completely behind him. what a human being, he is absolutely remarkable. it is a feed and a challenge in itselfjust it is a feed and a challenge in itself just talking about it is a feed and a challenge in itselfjust talking about it, never
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mind putting one foot in front of the other foot. mind putting one foot in front of the otherfoot. he is mind putting one foot in front of the other foot. he is a mind putting one foot in front of the otherfoot. he is a real warrior. the other foot. he is a real warrior-— the other foot. he is a real warrior. : , , ., ., warrior. and using his platform, and raising funds — warrior. and using his platform, and raising funds for _ warrior. and using his platform, and raising funds for mnd. _ warrior. and using his platform, and raising funds for mnd. i _ warrior. and using his platform, and raising funds for mnd. ithink- warrior. and using his platform, and raising funds for mnd. i think it's i raising funds for mnd. i think it's wonderful- _ raising funds for mnd. i think it's wonderful. he _ raising funds for mnd. i think it's wonderful. he as _ raising funds for mnd. i think it's wonderful. he as looked - raising funds for mnd. i think it's wonderful. he as looked at i raising funds for mnd. i think it's wonderful. he as looked at the l wonderful. he as looked at the broader picture and looked out the whole profile of this terrible disease. our lovely, wonderful friend, rob burrow, he has done it for everybody. that is just wonderful. for everybody. that is 'ust wonderful.i for everybody. that is 'ust wonderful. ., , wonderful. kevin died at seven marathons _ wonderful. kevin died at seven marathons in _ wonderful. kevin died at seven marathons in seven _ wonderful. kevin died at seven marathons in seven days i wonderful. kevin died at seven i marathons in seven days previously, he said that this is going to be his toughest challenge. is it harder than what he did before? if so, why? kevin is doing for marathons in 24 hours _ kevin is doing for marathons in 24 hours essentially. whilst we shouldn't underestimate how hard seven _ shouldn't underestimate how hard seven and — shouldn't underestimate how hard seven and seven was, that was for hours _ seven and seven was, that was for hours on _ seven and seven was, that was for hours on with 24 hours at rest. and
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this one. _ hours on with 24 hours at rest. and this one. he — hours on with 24 hours at rest. and this one, he has got to do it with only— this one, he has got to do it with only 20 — this one, he has got to do it with only 20 minutes rest repeatedly for that 24—hour is. in terms of the amount— that 24—hour is. in terms of the amount of— that 24—hour is. in terms of the amount of work he has to get through in the _ amount of work he has to get through in the space _ amount of work he has to get through in the space of time, this is definitely— in the space of time, this is definitely more challenging. is that the were definitely more challenging. is that they were he _ definitely more challenging. is that they were he is _ definitely more challenging. is that they were he is going _ definitely more challenging. is that they were he is going to _ definitely more challenging. is that they were he is going to do - definitely more challenging. is that they were he is going to do it? in l definitely more challenging. is that they were he is going to do it? in a i they were he is going to do it? in a box of seven kilometres each hour, is that right? he box of seven kilometres each hour, is that right?— is that right? he is going to run seven kilometres _ is that right? he is going to run seven kilometres every - is that right? he is going to run seven kilometres every hour, i is that right? he is going to run| seven kilometres every hour, he is that right? he is going to run i seven kilometres every hour, he will be aiming _ seven kilometres every hour, he will be aiming fora seven kilometres every hour, he will be aiming for a place where he gets approximately 20 minutes rest at the end of— approximately 20 minutes rest at the end of each— approximately 20 minutes rest at the end of each hour. 30 approximately 20 minutes rest at the end of each hour.— end of each hour. so he won't be movin: end of each hour. so he won't be moving for— end of each hour. so he won't be moving for 24-hour _ end of each hour. so he won't be moving for 24-hour hours? i end of each hour. so he won't be moving for 24-hour hours? he . end of each hour. so he won't be i moving for 24-hour hours? he will effectively be _ moving for 24-hour hours? he will effectively be running _ moving for 24-hour hours? he will effectively be running in _ moving for 24-hour hours? he will effectively be running in intervals, | effectively be running in intervals, for that— effectively be running in intervals, for that 40 — effectively be running in intervals, for that 40 minute period, resting, then it _ for that 40 minute period, resting, then it going again. you for that 40 minute period, resting, then it going again.— for that 40 minute period, resting, then it going again. you know what it takes to have _ then it going again. you know what it takes to have a _ then it going again. you know what it takes to have a certain _ then it going again. you know what it takes to have a certain mindset i it takes to have a certain mindset when the chips are down. in terms of communication with him, what have you said in terms of low points,
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high points, how prepare mentally? there is one thing about kevin, and anyone who knows him and has the privilege to be in his company even for the shortest period of times, he has quality and great values. he has had that throughout his career as a player. he has been able to transfer it off the field as well as a beautiful human being to encompass everybody in regards to helping everybody in regards to helping everybody with mnd the. his mental strength is so tough and is at the highest level. i have no doubt whatsoever he will make this challenge. it will be difficult at some period of time. i think you will look back and look at his childhood player he has played with since the age of 12, 13, rob burrow, and i think rob is in a situation of
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their 24 also a day. he only has to do it for one day. it is their 24 also a day. he only has to do it for one day.— do it for one day. it is the psychology _ do it for one day. it is the psychology of _ do it for one day. it is the psychology of this. i do it for one day. it is the psychology of this. we i do it for one day. it is the i psychology of this. we talk about it and are in all, but i don't know if thatis and are in all, but i don't know if that is always helpful for the person doing the challenge. kevin is over coming — person doing the challenge. kevin is over coming barrier _ person doing the challenge. kevin is over coming barrier is _ person doing the challenge. kevin is over coming barrier is his _ person doing the challenge. kevin is over coming barrier is his whole i over coming barrier is his whole career~ — over coming barrier is his whole career. psychologically, he is one of the _ career. psychologically, he is one of the most — career. psychologically, he is one of the most positive people i have ever met — of the most positive people i have ever met. we have two consider the psychological challenge, especially when it _ psychological challenge, especially when it gets dark, when he was running — when it gets dark, when he was running throughout the night, no sleep. _ running throughout the night, no sleep. he — running throughout the night, no sleep, he is going to be fitted. the back end _ sleep, he is going to be fitted. the back end of— sleep, he is going to be fitted. the back end of the run will be hugely challenging. gne back end of the run will be hugely challenging-— challenging. one thing you have talked about _ challenging. one thing you have talked about is _ challenging. one thing you have talked about is his _ challenging. one thing you have talked about is his humility. i challenging. one thing you have| talked about is his humility. you were in contact with him yesterday, trying to motivate him, and hejust turned it round straight back on you? it
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turned it round straight back on ou? , ., , ., , ., you? it is remarkable, that is what he is all about. _ you? it is remarkable, that is what he is all about. you _ you? it is remarkable, that is what he is all about. you will _ you? it is remarkable, that is what he is all about. you will give i you? it is remarkable, that is what he is all about. you will give him i he is all about. you will give him all these wonderful compliments and so on, but he almost disregards it and turns it back on you. he is so nice. when you do a challenge like this, i think you have got to taper off at some point in terms of when you get down to the one, two days before you do your challenge, not too much information. kevin knows what to do. he has been in tight situations where he has been tough and mentally challenging as well. when he turned it back on you, he just said that you wear his hero. yeah, he is my hero as well. he is a wonderful human being. if i could, i would physically be
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7 ?it ? it will be a 7 it will be a combination of break ? it will be a combination of break this u- ? it will be a combination of break this up into _ ? it will be a combination of break this up into the _ ? it will be a combination of break this up into the physical— ? it will be a combination of break| this up into the physical challenge, is he _ this up into the physical challenge, is he fuelling right? can he take off to _ is he fuelling right? can he take off to time you then look at the biomechanical strength and we do not want injured. we do not want him to .et want injured. we do not want him to get tissue _ want injured. we do not want him to get tissue damage and we need to protect— get tissue damage and we need to protect as — get tissue damage and we need to protect as well into running through sleep _ protect as well into running through sleep and _ protect as well into running through sleep and that is what the challenge will be _
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sleep and that is what the challenge will be. �* , :, sleep and that is what the challenge will be. �*, ., ., , ., will be. let's not forget there is a treat will be. let's not forget there is a great behind _ will be. let's not forget there is a great behind him, _ will be. let's not forget there is a great behind him, you _ will be. let's not forget there is a great behind him, you included, i will be. let's not forget there is a i great behind him, you included, and kevin has always been very clear about that. kevin has always been very clear about that-— about that. yes, but kevin leads this team as _ about that. yes, but kevin leads this team as well. _ about that. yes, but kevin leads this team as well. he _ about that. yes, but kevin leads this team as well. he absolutelyi this team as well. he absolutely drives— this team as well. he absolutely drives them along. we as a support team _ drives them along. we as a support team and _ drives them along. we as a support team and do everything we can to help him — team and do everything we can to help him succeed in this challenge and help— help him succeed in this challenge and help him succeed for the reasons we have _ and help him succeed for the reasons we have spoken about. we have supported — we have spoken about. we have supported kevin, we are prepared for the unknown is because there are a lot of— the unknown is because there are a lot of unknowns. this is an off—the—shelf challenge that a lot off—the—shelf challenge that a lot of people have done, and there is an off—the—shelf recipe to support him with _ off—the—shelf recipe to support him with we _ off—the—shelf recipe to support him with. we have got various strategies we have _ with. we have got various strategies we have discussed and combinations of things— we have discussed and combinations of things we can respond to. part of those _ of things we can respond to. part of those are _ of things we can respond to. part of those are around what happens at night _ those are around what happens at night when he is tired and when he is fatigued — night when he is tired and when he is fatigued after all those miles. we have — is fatigued after all those miles. we have got different strategies in terms _ we have got different strategies in terms of— we have got different strategies in terms of how we can support him there _ terms of how we can support him there. , : ,
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there. give me a little insight when ou are there. give me a little insight when you are playing _ there. give me a little insight when you are playing and _ there. give me a little insight when you are playing and you _ there. give me a little insight when you are playing and you are - there. give me a little insight when you are playing and you are getting i you are playing and you are getting nowhere and you are physically battered and you just couldn't break through, where did you go? for strenath through, where did you go? for strength i— through, where did you go? fr?“ strength i was very fortunate that i played with wonderful players. you never struggle to break through, i remember watching it. at}! never struggle to break through, i remember watching it.— remember watching it. of course there were _ remember watching it. of course there were difficult _ remember watching it. of course there were difficult games i remember watching it. of course there were difficult games for. remember watching it. of course there were difficult games for us| there were difficult games for us and a lot of it is to do with patients as well. and also it is having the consistency and the discipline as well in regards to being able to stay in the game that particular 80 minutes. with kevin without a shadow of a doubt he will do that all the way through this challenge. do that all the way through this challenue. :, challenge. you were fine here, weren't you? _ challenge. you were fine here, weren't you? i _ challenge. you were fine here, weren't you? i can't _ challenge. you were fine here, weren't you? i can't believe i challenge. you were fine here, | weren't you? i can't believe you have brought — weren't you? i can't believe you have brought this _ weren't you? i can't believe you have brought this up. _ weren't you? i can't believe you have brought this up. i - weren't you? i can't believe you have brought this up. i did i weren't you? i can't believe you have brought this up. i did ask. have brought this up. i did ask yesterday, please keep it in the archives. :, yesterday, please keep it in the archives. ., ., ., ., , archives. you have got to tell us what we have — archives. you have got to tell us what we have just _ archives. you have got to tell us what we have just seen. - archives. you have got to tell us what we have just seen. first i
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archives. you have got to tell us what we have just seen. first of| what we have 'ust seen. first of all, i what we have 'ust seen. first of an. r was — what we have just seen. first of all. i was very _ what we have just seen. first of all, i was very fortunate - what we have just seen. first of all, i was very fortunate to i what we have just seen. first of all, i was very fortunate to play| all, i was very fortunate to play with some great players. we were playing against new zealand. but you are playing for great britain. there are some knocks. that was a good — britain. there are some knocks. that was a good catch. _ britain. there are some knocks. triagit was a good catch. to be honest, i have got to give probably all the credit to my fellow players as well. they put me in those positions. you are 'ust they put me in those positions. you are just like — they put me in those positions. you are just like kevin sinfield. there arejust like kevin sinfield. there is a great team behind him and kevin is a great team behind him and kevin is eating it. we wish him all the best. legend. and professor ben jones who has been working with kevin as well. good luck. we will follow it on monday on bbc
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breakfast. let's catch up with the sport. mike is here with us this morning and there is a serious top story. this is the image that seen by millions around the world with the hashtag where is peng shuai? there hashtag where is peng shuai? there has been no direct contact with her, one of the biggest sports stars in china, and the various tennis authorities who are calling for her to make some kind of contact. overnight, three photos of peng shuai were posted on a wechat account, under her name with the caption "happy weekend". she can be seen here posing with a cat, and holding a panda soft toy, and yet no reference at all to the story that has got the rest of the world worried from the united nations to the us, and the authenticity of the post on the chinese instant messaging service, has been questioned just like an email which surfaced earlier in the week.
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peng hasn't been seen since she made sexual assault allegations, against a former china vice—premier two weeks ago. the head of the women's tennis association, told the bbc that he is "very, very concerned about her" and that there would be no tennis events in china next year without proof that peng is safe. let's just say we don't want to be in this position but, at the end of the day, like i said, this is one of those decisions where compromises are not acceptable and we have to do what's right here and we'll figure that out if we end up being in that position at the end of the day. now, the other story relating to tennis is the confirmation that un—vaccinated players, will not be allowed to compete at the australian open in the new year. there had been a lot of confusion over the restrictions with conflicting statements from australian politicians. a significant number of players remain un—vaccinated, while defending men's champion novak djokovic has not revealed his vaccination status.
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we have also had confirmation that the tournament will be played in front of capacity crowds in january. it's been a standout season for cameron norrie but it ended in a straight sets defeat to world number one novak djokovic at the atp finals in turin. norrie became the british number one, climbed to 12th in the world rankings and won indian wells, but was outclassed by the 20—time grand slam champion djokovic who he played for the first time. better news for britain'sjoe salisbury, and his american partner, rajeev ram. they sealed their place in the last four in the doubles. they beat colombian pair huan sebastian cabal and robert farah to maintain their 100 per—cent record in turin. "shocked, shamed and saddened", the words of cricket bosses in england and wales, who said racism is a "blight" on our game, and they "apologised un—reservedly". that's in response to azeem rafiq's testimony to the dcms select committee on tuesday. the sport's top figures met
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at the oval yesterday to come up with a plan of action to try and tackle the issue. we will continue to listen, to make swift and positive change to the culture of the game. we will embrace and celebrate differences everywhere, knowing that with diversity we are stronger. today is a game we discussed a series of tangible commitments to make cricket a sport where everyone feels safe and everyone is included. we will now finalise the details and publish these actions next week. our game must win back your trust. our game must win back your trust. now to football, and while it's first matches in charge today at new clubs for steven gerard at aston villa and dean smith at norwich, the start of the new era at newcastle has been delayed with eddie howe missing his side's game with brentford because of covid—19. howe tested positive during a routine test on friday, meaning that he won't be at the match that he and fans were hoping would be his first game
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in the newcastle dug out. he is fine, he has posted. instead assistant head coaches jason tindall and graemejones will take charge of the team at st james park. manchester city's kevin de broiner is also missing after he tested positive for covid after returning from international duty with belgium. he'll isolate for 10 days which means that he'll miss city's next three games including their key champions league tie with paris st germain on wednesday. the formula one world championship is in qatar for the first time this weekend with all eyes on whether lewis hamilton can repeat his heroics of last weekend as he looks to trim the 14—point lead of max verstappen even further. in second practice both had to settle for suporting roles behind valteri bottas who was quickest and also piere gasly. verstappen was third and lewis hamilton could only manage fourth. significantly hamilton was wearing a special helmet with the rainbow flag on it as human rights remain a contentious issue in qatar especially lg bt rights. third practice is less
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than three hours away. london irish beat saracens in the premiership rugby cup at the brentford community stadium. they ran in three tries in the first half to lead 21—0 at the break and then added another in the second through killian redmond. sarries responded, but london irish held on to win by 29 points to 20. it's now two wins from two for them in a competition that had a two—year absence because of the pandemic. talking of rugby, a huge day in the autumn internationals. scotland against japan autumn internationals. scotland againstjapan and england against south africa. the weather is nice outside. it south africa. the weather is nice outside. ., , the weather is nice outside. it has been barmy _ the weather is nice outside. it has been barmy recently. _ the weather is nice outside. it has been barmy recently. maybe i the weather is nice outside. it has been barmy recently. maybe you i the weather is nice outside. it has i been barmy recently. maybe you have a choice of taking _ been barmy recently. maybe you have a choice of taking a _ been barmy recently. maybe you have a choice of taking a screen _ been barmy recently. maybe you have a choice of taking a screen out i been barmy recently. maybe you have a choice of taking a screen out with i a choice of taking a screen out with you to watch the sport this weekend. there is too much going on. i am not going to complain. it is
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there is too much going on. i am not going to complain-— going to complain. it is warm, i put on a thick coat _ going to complain. it is warm, i put on a thick coat because _ going to complain. it is warm, i put on a thick coat because it _ going to complain. it is warm, i put on a thick coat because it was i on a thick coat because it was chilly— on a thick coat because it was chilly last _ on a thick coat because it was chilly last night, but even at four o'clock— chilly last night, but even at four o'clock this — chilly last night, but even at four o'clock this morning when i was getting — o'clock this morning when i was getting in— o'clock this morning when i was getting in the car, it was quite pleasant, _ getting in the car, it was quite pleasant, sarah. temperatures have been well above average over the past few weeks and november has been a mild month, but there is change coming and it will be a shock to the system as things turned colder over the weekend. it is a beautiful start to the day in dunbar in east lothian. through the weekend there will be rain sweeping southwards and things will turn colder, all down to this weather front. that is pushing south today and tonight and by tomorrow it will have cleared the south coast. that will leave the door is open for this cold, northerly flow of air, bringing this much colder air mass by the time we get to tomorrow. enjoy the mild weather out there today if you have got it. fairly
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cloudy, but sunshine for northern england and wales in the afternoon. this patchy rain is clearing out of southern scotland and northern ireland. followed by sunshine and showers in scotland and northern ireland. 7 degrees in stornoway and 12 or 13 in the south. this evening and overnight that is where the weather front pushes its way off the south coast, leaving us all in the clear for colder weather tomorrow morning. most towns and cities just above freezing, but in the countryside colder than that. there will be more sunshine despite the colder weather, will be more sunshine despite the colderweather, but will be more sunshine despite the colder weather, but these northerly winds bring wintry showers to the higher ground of scotland and some hail showers in eastern and south—eastern parts of england. fewer showers further west, perhaps one or two in the irish sea coasts. feeling colder when you add on the wind chill. perhaps it is time to dig out that winter coat for the coming week.
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i have got my winter coat with me. i might be carrying it back to the car park. might be carrying it back to the car ark. : ., might be carrying it back to the car ark. :, ~' ,, might be carrying it back to the car ark. ., ~ i. ., it's ok to talk — that's the message from one young man, after a video of him standing with a sign at leeds railway station went viral this week. ben ogden and his friend, matt payne, are using their youtube channel to encourage people to talk about their mental health. let's take a look. my heart is beating so fast right now. i'm shaking like mad. ah... thanks, mate, thank you.
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thanks, buddy, thank you. have a good day. thank you very much. ah, i hate this. thank you very much. what's that? thank you. really proud of you. thank you very much. honestly, i never see this, and i think it's so nice. yeah, it needs to be talked about, doesn't it? yeah, 100%. i went to counselling. you find it tough? obviously, i don't know your situation. talk to people, yeah. talk to people.
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it is powerful. ben ogden and matt paynejoin us now. how are you feeling? good. take us throuuh how are you feeling? good. take us through the — how are you feeling? good. take us through the story — how are you feeling? good. take us through the story about _ how are you feeling? (rrr take us through the story about why and how it started and how you two got together. it it started and how you two got touether. : , it started and how you two got touether. .,, , ., , , it started and how you two got touether. , , ., ., together. it was probably about a few months _ together. it was probably about a few months ago _ together. it was probably about a few months ago we _ together. it was probably about a few months ago we decided i together. it was probably about a few months ago we decided to i together. it was probably about a i few months ago we decided to create a youtube channel where basically we pushed ourselves doing physical challenges. it started off with a bear crawl up mount snowdon crawling on your hands and feet, so it was quite intense. we also did mental challenges as well. by doing these different challenges we ended up talking to each other about our own mental health and how we had been affected by it in different ways. that is how we got the conversation started between us both. [30 that is how we got the conversation started between us both.— that is how we got the conversation started between us both. do you feel comfortable — started between us both. do you feel comfortable talking _ started between us both. do you feel comfortable talking about _ started between us both. do you feel comfortable talking about some i started between us both. do you feel comfortable talking about some of i comfortable talking about some of the things you both spoke about? at}! the things you both spoke about? of course. well... sorry. i never
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wanted — course. well... sorry. i never wanted to— course. well... sorry. i never wanted to speak about my mental health— wanted to speak about my mental health in— wanted to speak about my mental health in the past but when me and ben had _ health in the past but when me and ben had a _ health in the past but when me and ben had a conversation about it it opened _ ben had a conversation about it it opened up — ben had a conversation about it it opened up so many doors and it was so positive _ opened up so many doors and it was so positive for me. so we thought we wanted _ so positive for me. so we thought we wanted to— so positive for me. so we thought we wanted to share that it is ok to talk because the benefits have been unreat _ talk because the benefits have been unreal. ~ : , : , talk because the benefits have been unreal. . ., ,, ,, , talk because the benefits have been unreal. ~ ., ,, ,, ,., unreal. was that 'ust pressures of life was throwing— unreal. was thatjust pressures of life was throwing at _ unreal. was thatjust pressures of life was throwing at you? - unreal. was thatjust pressures of life was throwing at you? yes, i unreal. was thatjust pressures of life was throwing at you? yes, for me it was — life was throwing at you? yes, for me it was mainly _ life was throwing at you? yes, for me it was mainly in _ life was throwing at you? yes, for me it was mainly in lockdown, i i life was throwing at you? yes, for i me it was mainly in lockdown, i kind of started to feel depressed. i didn't feel 100% me, if that makes sense. at}! didn't feel 100% me, if that makes sense. : :, , didn't feel 100% me, if that makes sense-_ since _ didn't feel 100% me, if that makes sense._ since then i i didn't feel 100% me, if that makes i sense._ since then i found sense. of course. since then i found it hard to open _ sense. of course. since then i found it hard to open up _ sense. of course. since then i found it hard to open up about _ sense. of course. since then i found it hard to open up about that i sense. of course. since then i found it hard to open up about that and i it hard to open up about that and not really knowing what matt was feeling as well. you had quite bad anxiety as well. not knowing that he had bad anxiety as well we started that conversation and i realise i am not alone in this, if that makes sense. there are people out there who feel the same things as i do. it is so important to know there is someone else who gets it and who is
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willing to talk. someone else who gets it and who is willing to talk-— willing to talk. there is a sense of relief and when _ willing to talk. there is a sense of relief and when we _ willing to talk. there is a sense of relief and when we had _ willing to talk. there is a sense of relief and when we had that i relief and when we had that conversation it was almost like a weight— conversation it was almost like a weight had been lifted off my shoulder. :, , :, weight had been lifted off my shoulder. ., , ., , weight had been lifted off my shoulder. :, , :, , , shoulder. for young men this can be a big problem _ shoulder. for young men this can be a big problem and _ shoulder. for young men this can be a big problem and smaller— shoulder. for young men this can be a big problem and smaller issues i shoulder. for young men this can be| a big problem and smaller issues can become bigger issues. many people suffer with mental health in issues, especially young men, but what response did you get on the railway station? igate response did you get on the railway station? ~ : response did you get on the railway station? ~ ., , ., , response did you get on the railway station? ~ ., , .,, .., , response did you get on the railway station? ~ ., , , ., station? we had people coming up to us sa inc , station? we had people coming up to us saying. well— station? we had people coming up to us saying, well done, _ station? we had people coming up to us saying, well done, we _ station? we had people coming up to us saying, well done, we love i station? we had people coming up to us saying, well done, we love what i us saying, well done, we love what you are doing, keep it up. we also had some people come up to us and kind of breakdown and actually have a full conversation with us about their experiences with their mental health and how it has affected them, their family and friends. it was quite intense and quite overwhelming. but i was really shocked by the variety of people we had coming up to us. we had a lad is our age coming had coming up to us. we had a lad is ourage coming up had coming up to us. we had a lad is our age coming up to us, girls our
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age, and 70—year—old man as well, so it was a variety of different people of all ages and genders. it is makin: of all ages and genders. it is making that _ of all ages and genders. it is making that first _ of all ages and genders. it is making that first step to start. that is the hardest part. once you have _ that is the hardest part. once you have broken down that barrier it is amazing — have broken down that barrier it is amazing. my have broken down that barrier it is amazin. g ., ,, ., ., have broken down that barrier it is amazinu. g ., ., , have broken down that barrier it is amazinu. g ., ., ., amazing. my observation is you are uuite amazing. my observation is you are quite confident _ amazing. my observation is you are quite confident about _ amazing. my observation is you are quite confident about talking i amazing. my observation is you are quite confident about talking about| quite confident about talking about this stuff and, matt, you are a little bit less.— this stuff and, matt, you are a little bit less.- that i this stuff and, matt, you are a i little bit less.- that was little bit less. nervous. that was reflected when _ little bit less. nervous. that was reflected when you _ little bit less. nervous. that was reflected when you are _ little bit less. nervous. that was reflected when you are working i little bit less. nervous. that was i reflected when you are working with each other because you decided you did not want to go in front of the camera at all. i did not want to go in front of the camera at all.— did not want to go in front of the camera at all. i never wanted to go in front of— camera at all. i never wanted to go in front of the _ camera at all. i never wanted to go in front of the camera. _ camera at all. i never wanted to go in front of the camera. well, i camera at all. i never wanted to go| in front of the camera. well, tough, ou are in front of the camera. well, tough, you are now— in front of the camera. well, tough, you are now this _ in front of the camera. well, tough, you are now this morning. - in front of the camera. well, tough, you are now this morning. but i in front of the camera. well, tough, you are now this morning. but it i in front of the camera. well, tough, | you are now this morning. but it was these reactions that you saw that ben was getting that made you think perhaps this is a good thing. it was uncomfortable.— uncomfortable. when i saw the res - onse uncomfortable. when i saw the response and — uncomfortable. when i saw the response and how _ uncomfortable. when i saw the response and how it _ uncomfortable. when i saw the response and how it had i uncomfortable. when i saw the| response and how it had helped uncomfortable. when i saw the i response and how it had helped other people _ response and how it had helped other people i_ response and how it had helped other people i thought, it is ok to talk. what _ people i thought, it is ok to talk. what did — people i thought, it is ok to talk. what did that first step for you feel like? it what did that first step for you feel like? : , what did that first step for you feel like? ., , , what did that first step for you feel like? .,, , , . .,
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feel like? it was 'ust such a relief to finallyiust — feel like? it was 'ust such a relief to finallyiust go— feel like? it wasjust such a relief to finallyjust go and _ feel like? it wasjust such a relief to finallyjust go and do - feel like? it wasjust such a relief to finallyjust go and do it. i feel like? it wasjust such a relief to finallyjust go and do it. now. feel like? it wasjust such a relief. to finallyjust go and do it. now do to finally 'ust go and do it. now do ou feel to finallyjust go and do it. now do you feel totally — to finallyjust go and do it. now do you feel totally unburden? - to finallyjust go and do it. now do you feel totally unburden? i i to finallyjust go and do it. now do you feel totally unburden? i am i to finallyjust go and do it. now do you feel totally unburden? i am so much more _ you feel totally unburden? i am so much more confident _ you feel totally unburden? i am so much more confident in _ you feel totally unburden? i am so much more confident in myself. i i much more confident in myself. i never— much more confident in myself. i never had — much more confident in myself. i never had too much confidence, but since _ never had too much confidence, but since i_ never had too much confidence, but since i have — never had too much confidence, but since i have been out there, it has changed — since i have been out there, it has chanced. :, :, since i have been out there, it has chanced. :, ., , changed. you are sitting here talkin: changed. you are sitting here talking to _ changed. you are sitting here talking to us _ changed. you are sitting here talking to us and _ changed. you are sitting here talking to us and many i changed. you are sitting here| talking to us and many people changed. you are sitting here i talking to us and many people at home will feel very grateful for this. what are you going to do with this? you have started something there and it is bigger than crawling like a bear up snowdon, which is very impressive, but this is bigger than that and it is touching other people and they are notjust observing, they are engaging. what do you want to do with it? the observing, they are engaging. what do you want to do with it?— do you want to do with it? the plan is to make — do you want to do with it? the plan is to make it _ do you want to do with it? the plan is to make it global _ do you want to do with it? the plan is to make it global and _ do you want to do with it? the plan is to make it global and to - do you want to do with it? the plan is to make it global and to spread i is to make it global and to spread this message as far as we can to everyone who wants to listen and to was in a similar situation to what we were in where we did not want to talk about it. from the responses i have been getting on social media we have been getting on social media we have had people from south korea to
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india messaging me saying, you are doing a greatjob, we are watching you, thanks for sharing this message. that is the goal, to make it so other people do it.— it so other people do it. really well done. _ it so other people do it. really well done, kiefer _ it so other people do it. really well done, kiefer coming i it so other people do it. really well done, kiefer coming in. i it so other people do it. really i well done, kiefer coming in. how does it feel now it is over? this bit is over. all]! does it feel now it is over? this bit is over-— if you've been affected by any of the issues raised you can find help and information on the bbc action line. you will find a list of organisations which can help. from an inspiring story to a really remarkable and inspiring story. if it hadn't been for mere millimetres, it could have been a whole different story for farmerjonathan willis, who was impaled by his
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own forklift truck. we will describe it, but be warned. the three foot spike miraculously missed all his vital organs, and he's now raised thousands for the air ambulance service to say thank you to those who helped him. helen mulroy reports. it must have pushed things out of the way as it went through. this steel prong, known as a tine, used to be part ofjonathan willis' truck. the last time he saw it, it was protruding from his abdomen after he was impaled in a freak farming accident. the farmer from wisbech was unloading straw bales last december when the vehicle rolled into him. stunned wife wendy was alerted byjonathan's shouts from the yard. she called the ambulance. seeing somebody stand up there with quite a chunky spike coming right through their body, anybody would have said there is no way anybody could possibly survive this. and, unfortunately, that is how i felt. it was terrifying, it was really terrifying. emergency services, including
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the air ambulance, arrived within seven minutes. but it took an hour for the teams to cut the tine from the forklift, withjonathan awake and standing throughout. jonathan was then transferred to addenbrooke's hospital by road ambulance, with paramedics having to take the weight of the one stone tine throughout the hour—long journey. when he arrived, a team of 30 worked on removing it during a seven—hour operation. i couldn't quite believe what i was hearing, i thought i'd misheard. the spike had somehow found this amazing trajectory, i have described it as eye of the needle trajectory. yes, it transfixed a few parts of the intestine, but it really missed all of the vital structures, including those major blood vessels. an extraordinary situation, really. that was dr emmanuel
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huguet a surgeon from addenbrooke's hospital, ending that report. and we'rejoined now byjonathan willis and dr nathan howes from the east anglian ambulance service who helped to save his life. jonathan, have you had a chance to say thank you in person? yes. jonathan, have you had a chance to say thank you in person?— jonathan, have you had a chance to say thank you in person? yes, i have met them a — say thank you in person? yes, i have met them a couple _ say thank you in person? yes, i have met them a couple of— say thank you in person? yes, i have met them a couple of times - say thank you in person? yes, i have met them a couple of times and i say thank you in person? yes, i have met them a couple of times and we i met them a couple of times and we have spoken regularly and i am so grateful to them.— have spoken regularly and i am so grateful to them. jonathan, perhaps the should grateful to them. jonathan, perhaps they should have _ grateful to them. jonathan, perhaps they should have been _ grateful to them. jonathan, perhaps they should have been my _ grateful to them. jonathan, perhaps they should have been my first i they should have been my first question, how are you? i they should have been my first question, how are you?- they should have been my first question, how are you? i am fine, thank you — question, how are you? i am fine, thank you very _ question, how are you? i am fine, thank you very much. _ question, how are you? i am fine, thank you very much. everything i question, how are you? i am fine, | thank you very much. everything is aood. thank you very much. everything is good- how— thank you very much. everything is good- how are _ thank you very much. everything is good. how are the _ thank you very much. everything is good. how are the injuries - thank you very much. everything is good. how are the injuries and i thank you very much. everything is| good. how are the injuries and how are you getting about and recovering?— are you getting about and recoverin: ? , ., , ., , ., recovering? there is no problem at all, the recovering? there is no problem at all. they did _ recovering? there is no problem at all. they did a _ recovering? there is no problem at all, they did a great _ recovering? there is no problem at all, they did a great job _ recovering? there is no problem at all, they did a great job and - recovering? there is no problem at all, they did a great job and i - recovering? there is no problem at all, they did a great job and i am i all, they did a greatjob and i am back to work since early january, december. we are fine, thank you very much. december. we are fine, thank you very much-— very much. nathan, let's talk to ou. very much. nathan, let's talk to yom jonathan — very much. nathan, let's talk to you. jonathan will _ very much. nathan, let's talk to you. jonathan will know - very much. nathan, let's talk to you. jonathan will know this, i very much. nathan, let's talk to | you. jonathan will know this, but many farmers work on their own as jonathan was and his wife was in the farm at the time. presumably you are
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called out, sadly, because it is a very dangerous job, to called out, sadly, because it is a very dangerousjob, to incidence called out, sadly, because it is a very dangerous job, to incidence all the time, but this one must have been somewhat unusual nonetheless? that is very true, roger. we tend to .et that is very true, roger. we tend to get limited — that is very true, roger. we tend to get limited information at the beginning after the 999 call comes in because we want to make our way to scenes _ in because we want to make our way to scenes if— in because we want to make our way to scenes if we are needed early on. i have _ to scenes if we are needed early on. i have been— to scenes if we are needed early on. i have been to a lot of trapped patients— i have been to a lot of trapped patients in agricultural incidents but normally the worst case scenario is a mill_ but normally the worst case scenario is a mill in_ but normally the worst case scenario is a mill in chapman on a farm or somebody— is a mill in chapman on a farm or somebody trapped in a car accident. but this— somebody trapped in a car accident. but this was— somebody trapped in a car accident. but this was a surprise for everyone. but this was a surprise for everyone-— but this was a surprise for eve one. ~ . ~' , everyone. what was the key thing that ou everyone. what was the key thing that you had _ everyone. what was the key thing that you had to — everyone. what was the key thing that you had to do _ everyone. what was the key thing that you had to do to _ everyone. what was the key thing that you had to do to get - everyone. what was the key thing that you had to do to get him - everyone. what was the key thing that you had to do to get him off. that you had to do to get him off the spike? it must have been a very delicate thing to do.— delicate thing to do. indeed. the risk is that _ delicate thing to do. indeed. the risk is that an _ delicate thing to do. indeed. the risk is that an organ _ delicate thing to do. indeed. the risk is that an organ or _ delicate thing to do. indeed. the risk is that an organ or a - delicate thing to do. indeed. the risk is that an organ or a major i risk is that an organ or a major blood — risk is that an organ or a major blood vessel has been involved in the track—
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blood vessel has been involved in the track of the spike. if that becomes— the track of the spike. if that becomes loosened or removed it may cause _ becomes loosened or removed it may cause any— becomes loosened or removed it may cause any internal bleeding to become — cause any internal bleeding to become torrential and life—threatening. jonathan did the film life—threatening. jonathan did the right thing by holding still from the very— right thing by holding still from the very beginning and that made our 'ob the very beginning and that made our job that _ the very beginning and that made our job that little bit easier because it took— job that little bit easier because it took the expertise and consideration of all of the emergency services on scene with the fire and _ emergency services on scene with the fire and rescue service, the ambulance service and the health of the police _ ambulance service and the health of the police in order to figure out how to — the police in order to figure out how to fix — the police in order to figure out how to fix the situation and do it quickly— how to fix the situation and do it quickly because we needed to remove the spike _ quickly because we needed to remove the spike from the forklift, but not move _ the spike from the forklift, but not move jonathan on it and get him to hospital— move jonathan on it and get him to hospital as — move jonathan on it and get him to hospital as quickly and as safely as possible _ hospital as quickly and as safely as ossible. , ., ., ., ., , , ., possible. jonathan, as we listen to this and this _ possible. jonathan, as we listen to this and this extraordinary - possible. jonathan, as we listen to this and this extraordinary thing i this and this extraordinary thing that has happened to you, you stayed calm and still. tell me about yourself and tell me how someone does not panic in that situation. well, i suppose there was nothing
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else i could do. i couldn't go anywhere, so i realised i had to stay calm for my wife to work alongside the emergency services who were excellent and the very first ones to arrive. they reassured me. i have good faith and it is just something where that calmness came through me and i was more than happy when the air ambulance arrived. with the knowledge them fellows have it is unreal and how they helped to keep me calm and they talked me through everything that they were going to do. that is basically how it all panned out. you going to do. that is basically how it all panned out.— going to do. that is basically how it all panned out. you are making this all seems _ it all panned out. you are making this all seems so _ it all panned out. you are making this all seems so matter - it all panned out. you are making this all seems so matter of - it all panned out. you are making this all seems so matter of fact. l this all seems so matter of fact. 0h, this all seems so matter of fact. oh, yes, these things happen. nathan, he was keeping his sense of humour while he was being treated and up the way to the operating theatre. that must have surprised you. it
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theatre. that must have surprised ou. . , theatre. that must have surprised ou, ., , . , theatre. that must have surprised ou. ., , . , ., , theatre. that must have surprised ou. . , you. it was incredible. he was stoic from the first _ you. it was incredible. he was stoic from the first point _ you. it was incredible. he was stoic from the first point that _ you. it was incredible. he was stoic from the first point that we - you. it was incredible. he was stoic from the first point that we arrived | from the first point that we arrived and that— from the first point that we arrived and that also goes for wendy as welt _ and that also goes for wendy as welt so— and that also goes for wendy as well. so much so that we did not think— well. so much so that we did not think it _ well. so much so that we did not think it was _ well. so much so that we did not think it was that bad until we walked — think it was that bad until we walked around the other side of jonathan — walked around the other side of jonathan and found that the spike had an— jonathan and found that the spike had an exit wound as well as an entry— had an exit wound as well as an entry wound. but he managed to stand there for— entry wound. but he managed to stand there for an _ entry wound. but he managed to stand there for an hour until we safely retrieve — there for an hour until we safely retrieve him and i will never forget on the _ retrieve him and i will never forget on the way— retrieve him and i will never forget on the way to the hospital that he knew— on the way to the hospital that he knew the — on the way to the hospital that he knew the roads so well that when he felt as— knew the roads so well that when he felt as approach a roundabout he was telling _ felt as approach a roundabout he was telling us _ felt as approach a roundabout he was telling us what services were available in case we wanted some food because it had been a long shift _ food because it had been a long shift i— food because it had been a long shift. i also major we did not touch any wet _ shift. i also major we did not touch any wet paint as we made our way down _ any wet paint as we made our way down the — any wet paint as we made our way down the corridor to the operating department. it is not every day that we get _ department. it is not every day that we get ted — department. it is not every day that we get led by a patient, let alone one with — we get led by a patient, let alone one with a — we get led by a patient, let alone one with a serious injury. in “i5 one with a serious in'ury. in 15 seconsd you _ one with a serious in'ury. in 15 seconds, you have _ one with a serious injury. in 15 seconds, you have raised - one with a serious injury. in 15 seconds, you have raised a i one with a serious injury. in it}; seconds, you have raised a lot of money in the time since, £45,000 for the air ambulance service. what you
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said to them when you first had the opportunity to say thank you? obviously, we cannot thank them enough and we thank all the services. what people do not realise is the air ambulance is self—funded and to keep them up in the air we need to raise money for them because there are no words that can describe it. ~ there are no words that can describe it. . ., , ., ., there are no words that can describe it. we are seeing at the moment you said thank yom _ it. we are seeing at the moment you said thank you. it _ it. we are seeing at the moment you said thank you. it is _ it. we are seeing at the moment you said thank you. it is a _ it. we are seeing at the moment you said thank you. it is a brilliant - said thank you. it is a brilliant story, it is a frightening and horrific story, but it has a happy ending and for that we are delighted. jonathan, good luck when you do get back to work on the farm and maybe keep the phone and keep your wife wendy calm as well so that she knows you are safe. thank you so much, doctor nathan, a brilliant tell, but more importantly your colleagues are doing fantastic work. thank you for looking after all of us and take care. stay with us, the
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headlines are on the way. good morning, welcome to breakfast — with naga munchetty and rogerjohnson. our headlines today: clashes in the netherlands over new covid measures — as restrictions are tightened across mainland europe. and a clampdown in austria — a full lockdown from monday and compulsory vaccinations by february. we the jury find the defendant, kyle h rittenhouse, not guilty.
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us gun culture back under scrutiny after a teenager who shot dead two people during racial unrest is cleared of murder. there's growing concern over the whereabouts of chinese tennis star peng shuai. new pictures are posted of the missing player overnight, but the us and united nations are among those calling for verifiable proof she is safe. ed sheeranjoins a host of stars and performers this year's children in need — nearly $40 million was raised on the night. good morning. it's a mild start to the day today and most places should see quite a bit of dry weather but things are turning much colder through the weekend and we're going to see a chilly northerly wind developing tomorrow. i'll have all the details here on bbc breakfast. it's saturday, november 20. our top story — dutch police have shot and wounded at least two people
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after rioting erupted in rotterdam over new covid—i9 measures. coronavirus restrictions are being tightened in the netherlands and a number of other eu countries in response to rising case numbers. austria faces a full lockdown from monday and compulsory vaccinations from next year. tim muffett has the latest. protesters in rotterdam responding to the partial lockdown imposed in the netherlands. police used water cannon and fired warning shots. at least two people were injured. restrictions here began on monday and are set to be in place for another two weeks at least. like many countries in europe, the netherlands has seen a sharp rise in covid cases. in austria, a 20—day lockdown will start this monday. people will be asked to work from home and non—essential shops will close.
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in february, covid vaccinations will become compulsory. what we experience in austria right now is, in my view, an unfortunate collusion of the fact that we have a fairly low vaccination rate in the population and that the waning of immunity hits austria now, six months after we started our vaccination programme, and that is unfortunately right at the beginning of the winter season, where people are moving indoors. in germany, covid cases are also rising sharply. the government is set to introduce restrictions for unvaccinated people in areas where hospital admissions exceed a certain level. as for the prospect of a full lockdown, the german government says nothing has been ruled out. in the uk yesterday, just over 44,000 new people tested positive for coronavirus. over the week, there was a 13% increase in cases compared to the previous seven days.
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between the 9th and 15th of november, just over 6000 people were admitted to hospital with covid — that's a fall of 4.5% compared to the previous seven days. at the moment, the uk is not witnessing the surge in cases being seen in some other countries. we have, i'm sure, the highest levels of overall immunity in europe — it's over 90% amongst adults and approaching that level in children as well now — so that is quite a different situation to many countries in europe, including austria and germany, who did not have as bad first waves or second waves and did not have the significant delta wave yet, either. there are renewed calls for people to get boosterjabs if they are eligible in the hope the uk can avoid the tougher restrictions being imposed elsewhere. tim muffett, bbc news. presidentjoe biden has said he is "angry" after a teenager who shot dead two people, was cleared of murder. kyle rittenhouse argued that he'd
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acted in self—defence when he killed two men and wounded another during racialjustice protests last year. our washington correspondent, nomia iqbal, reports. the defendant will rise to face - the jury and harken to its verdicts. a dangerous vigilante, or someone acting in self—defence? after 26 hours, thejury decided kyle rittenhouse's fate. we the jury find the defendant, kyle h rittenhouse, not guilty. the 12 men and women of the jury accepted the teenager's claim he killed out of fear for his safety. somehow, some way, those 12jurors found that he was innocent. outside court, the political divisions this case has caused were clear. you attack me, i have the right to defend myself, that's what kyle was on trial for, that's what he was acquitted for. are you telling me that if two guys come up to you and accost you,
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you can't defend yourself? that's what was on trial today. there is no way in a land of law where a person can shoot three people, kill two of them, and be acquitted. there'sjust no way. the shooting happened against the backdrop of nationwide protests over racism and police brutality, following the murder of george floyd. in kenosha, another black man, named jacob blake, had been shot by police seven times, and on the third night of riots kyle rittenhouse entered the city. he said he came to provide security. in a series of confrontations, he shot dead joseph rosenbaum, who had chased after him into this car park. he then killed another man, who ran after rittenhouse, thinking he was an active shooter. a third man survived. police later arrested the teenager
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and charged him with murder. at his trial, there were tears and a controversial defence by his team, in regards to the shooting of jacob blake. other people in this community have shot somebody seven times and it's been found to be ok. my client did it four times in three—quarters of a second to protect his life from mr rosenbaum. i'm sorry, but that's what happened. this not guilty verdict is seen as a referendum on an issue that polarises americans beyond kenosha, and that is the issue of gun ownership. for many conservative groups, kyle rittenhouse is now seen as a hero. but for many liberal groups, he is the face of a gun culture out of control, and they are worried by being cleared of the charges what it might mean now for future protests. can americans turn up with a gun but not face any consequences? nomia iqbal, bbc news, kenosha.
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in response to the case, presidentjoe biden said: he went on to say: colin pitchfork, the man who killed two teenagers in the 1980s, is back in prison less than two months after being released. it's understood he breached the terms of his licence, but did not commit any further offences. he served 33 years for killing 15—year—olds lynda mann and dawn ashworth in leicestershire. single—use plastic plates, cutlery and polystyrene cups could all be banned in england. billions of these items, most of which are plastic, are used in england every year, but only 10% are recycled.
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a public consultation on the issue begins today. campaign groups have welcomed the proposals, but say more can be done. i think very much we are welcoming these proposals, but they do take time. an important point is that while we need government to take action, and they will if they have two, we actually don't have to wait for government regulations. business is able to make these changes, and we are seeing some of that happening under the uk plastics pact, but of course it needs to go further. almost £40 million has been raised by the bbc children in need appeal. the show was jam—packed with the usual comedy sketches and star—studded performances — as our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson, reports. for the first time in its 41—year history, children in need took place in the north — at media city in salford. some familiar faces
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were on duty to welcome pudsey. # i will always love you...# talked about music performance of the evening. that belong to the all—star puppet ensemble, covering a starship classic. # and we can build this bridge together. # standing strong for ever # nothing is going to stop us now...# and in a special news and sports episode of i can see your voice, the challenge was to work out if this was my mike bushell�*s real singing voice. turns out it wasn't. hi. eastenders' janine butcher met coronation street's steve mcdonald on first dates. you ever been married? uh, well, you could say that, yeah.
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a couple of times, then? seven. mastermind's clive myrie tested mel giedroyc on the life and times of her co—host, graham norton. what is graham's favourite film? clingfilm. no, et. and owain wyn evans found outjust how much his 24—hour drumathon had raised. an incredible 5,601,138! thank you so much. and that helped the total money raised on the night reach... a whopping 59,389,048! an increase of 2 million on last year. colin paterson, bbc news, salford.
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you can watch the highlights of the show on bbc one at 2:50 tomorrow afternoon. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. see how it looks for the day ahead if you're planning day outside. this is the picture this morning in aberdeen, some beautiful glimpses of blue sky around there, still reasonably mild at the moment, but things are going to turn colder. rain on the way, showers pushed in from the north. in aberdeen yesterday, we saw temperatures up to 17 celsius, about 10 degrees above i7 celsius, about 10 degrees above average for aberdeen yesterday. fast forward a week later, we are looking at temperatures no higher than about 4 degrees layer. a significant drop
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on the way. the high pressure bringing is all that weather a sitting to the south now, bringing the colder air mass right across the uk. cold northerly winds are developing, quite a wind chill. one last mild they across england and wales, some sunny spells for a link wales. scotland and northern ireland after the morning cloud and rain, there will be sunshine and blustery showers. as we move through this evening and overnight, mild air to get swept away to the south, so we are all in the colder clearer air first thing tomorrow morning. temperatures in our towns and cities will be a few degrees above freezing. a frosty start sunday morning for many, particularly across the northern half of the uk.
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through tomorrow, more sunshine than today despite the weather around. rain and perhaps some hail showers across parts of eastern england. generally fewer showers further west, but perhaps one or two around irish sea coast. for most places we could see double figures towards the south—west. perhaps something a little bit less cold on monday around that high pressure. a week with a front on monday pushes rain and a few spots of rain into scotland. england and wales having a dry and sunny day. we are looking at a return to some frosty mornings as we head through the middle part of the week. notjust for us but mist and fog as possible through the mornings as well. many places getting into double figures at the beginning of the week, but then it turns colder from midweek on words.
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aberdeenjust 4 degrees turns colder from midweek on words. aberdeen just 4 degrees by the time we get to friday. a few have got the mild and the doubt weather for odd last day to day, get out and enjoy it. —— mild weather. as we've been hearing this morning, some european countries are introducing tighter covid restrictions as cases of the virus escalate. let's take you through what this means in the uk and across the continent. latest figures from the office of national statistics suggests that in england last week, i in 65 people had the virus — that's lower than the previous week. it was also down in wales, with i in 55 infected. cases were broadly level in scotland with i in 95 people with covid. the trend is said to be uncertain in northern ireland, with i in 65 people infected. so, while uk daily cases relative to the population haven't surged, elsewhere in europe, the netherlands and austria, have imposed different forms of lockdown as their infection
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rates have soared. we can unpick this with chris smith and linda bauld. good morning to you both. linda, can you tell us why mainland europe is seeing this increase in cases? then we will talk about how various countries are reacting.- we will talk about how various countries are reacting. there seems to be a number— countries are reacting. there seems to be a number of— countries are reacting. there seems to be a number of different - to be a number of different potential factories. to be a number of different potentialfactories. we to be a number of different potential factories. we can't point to one thing. this first thing i will stay is if we look back to the middle of the year when delta became dominant in the uk, by the end of june accounted for the vast majority of our cases, many countries in europe were faced with delta a little bit lighter and some of them opened up slightly later than we did. the second point is that our
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differences in vaccines. there are high levels of non—uptake in some european countries. the other thing is, dosing regime is for setting vaccines, there is shorter durations between first and second doses meaning waning immunity might be hitting those communities hearties. the uk has had high levels of infection in the past, therefore it is likely we have built up high levels of immunity than, for example, germany. the final point, although this is probably less easy to defend, that may be a weather feature here in that some of the country is particularly hard hit are really in the colder months now and people are interacting indoors. those are all potential explanations.- those are all potential explanations. those are all potential ex-lanations. , ., , explanations. chris, what people will be concerned _ explanations. chris, what people will be concerned about - explanations. chris, what people will be concerned about is - explanations. chris, what people i will be concerned about is mainland europe is not so far, travel has opened up, should we be concerned
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about eventually coming into the uk? as that is a natural progression? one view is that actually europe is catching _ one view is that actually europe is catching up with where we have been and where _ catching up with where we have been and where we are going. we opened up our hit— and where we are going. we opened up our bit sooner, we saw surges eartier~ — our bit sooner, we saw surges eartier~ we _ our bit sooner, we saw surges earlier. we also so surges in kids sooner~ _ earlier. we also so surges in kids sooner~ it — earlier. we also so surges in kids sooner. it could be that because countries — sooner. it could be that because countries in europe opened up a bit later they— countries in europe opened up a bit later they have begun to mix more, they had _ later they have begun to mix more, they had begun to spread the virus more, _ they had begun to spread the virus more. that— they had begun to spread the virus more, that now we are on the downturn. _ more, that now we are on the downturn, which is why we have got reduce _ downturn, which is why we have got reduce cases, an art value at less than _ reduce cases, an art value at less than one. — reduce cases, an art value at less than one, and they are just catching up than one, and they are just catching up now _ than one, and they are just catching up now. models are productive and we will see _ up now. models are productive and we will see a _ up now. models are productive and we will see a reduction in cases. i think— will see a reduction in cases. i think we — will see a reduction in cases. i think we will go into the rest of winter. — think we will go into the rest of winter. as— think we will go into the rest of winter, as long as we continue with the present— winter, as long as we continue with the present trajectory, i think we will actually be in quite good shape — will actually be in quite good shape. europe is seeing where we are and entering — shape. europe is seeing where we are and entering a design that we were a
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couple _ and entering a design that we were a couple of— and entering a design that we were a couple of months ago. is and entering a design that we were a couple of months ago.— couple of months ago. is interesting that austria. — couple of months ago. is interesting that austria, as _ couple of months ago. is interesting that austria, as from _ couple of months ago. is interesting that austria, as from february, - couple of months ago. is interesting that austria, as from february, has | that austria, as from february, has become the first country in europe to make it compulsory for people to have a vaccination. that raises all sorts of questions, and it's something, given the way things have gone here and the resistance that some people have had the vaccines, it is likely to be resisted in austria as well. it's a difficult psychological one of our people, isn't it? psychological one of our people, isn'tit? ., ., ., , , isn't it? behaviourally, it is complicated. _ isn't it? behaviourally, it is complicated. we _ isn't it? behaviourally, it is complicated. we need - isn't it? behaviourally, it is complicated. we need to l isn't it? behaviourally, it is| complicated. we need to be isn't it? behaviourally, it is- complicated. we need to be careful to try to understand what it means in at the austrian context. mandating a vaccine means different things around the world. in the us, it means a state has a duty to provide and make it available on what is allowed under health insurance. in italy, some childhood vaccines are mandated. how that is enforced differs. if this really is everybody has to get it, that is
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quite unprecedented for a whole population in europe. we do not already for setting occupational groups, we are doing that in the uk for example full stop so it's tough and i think we will watch what is happening in austria with interest. in terms of the literature on this, there is a group of people who will be very resistant to this. in fact, the evil view mandating, if it really is a proper foundation, as something that sets them up against taking the vaccine more vehemently than they currently are. it other words, it will harden their resistance was up in the uk, we should continue to provide good information and answer people plus 's questions, and really use that as the mechanism to encourage vaccine take—up, including the boosters. that idea of dividing people and making their views more entrenched. in austria they have announced a
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partial lockdown for people who are unvaccinated. again, you are marginalising people, but obviously there is a reason why the are doing it. . ., ., , there is a reason why the are doing it. what i found interesting about 0stia's proposals _ it. what i found interesting about 0stia's proposals is _ it. what i found interesting about 0stia's proposals is that - it. what i found interesting about 0stia's proposals is that they're l 0stia's proposals is that they're not going — 0stia's proposals is that they're not going to mandate vaccination for pregnant— not going to mandate vaccination for pregnant women. this i think you'd be quite _ pregnant women. this i think you'd be quite a — pregnant women. this i think you'd be quite a bad shot in the foot because — be quite a bad shot in the foot because one of the groups we have seen _ because one of the groups we have seen particularly vulnerable in at the uk, — seen particularly vulnerable in at the uk, with some cases hundreds of women _ the uk, with some cases hundreds of women a _ the uk, with some cases hundreds of women a week ending up in icu because — women a week ending up in icu because they are not vaccinated. pregnancy— because they are not vaccinated. pregnancy is a big risk factor with any infection, but especially coronavirus. i would say encouraging pregnant— coronavirus. i would say encouraging pregnant women to get vaccinated is a really— pregnant women to get vaccinated is a really important message, because that is— a really important message, because that is one _ a really important message, because that is one group of people who would _ that is one group of people who would otherwise be at very low risk because _ would otherwise be at very low risk because by— would otherwise be at very low risk because by and large they are younger— because by and large they are younger people. all of the risks of prematurity and childbirth are also magnified by catching coronavirus.
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so i think— magnified by catching coronavirus. so i think that is a rather strange decision— so i think that is a rather strange decision that they are making there, i don't _ decision that they are making there, i don't know— decision that they are making there, i don't know why they are going down that path _ i don't know why they are going down that nath. ., ~ i don't know why they are going down that nath. . ~ i. i don't know why they are going down that nath. ., ~' ,, ., ., ,, i don't know why they are going down that nath. ., ~ ,, ., ., ~ , that path. thank you for taking us throuoh that path. thank you for taking us through that- _ that path. thank you for taking us through that. we _ that path. thank you for taking us through that. we have _ that path. thank you for taking us through that. we have questionsl through that. we have questions about the actual buyer is about how it is progressing and developing linda, i know scientists are keeping an eye on mutations of the virus. brian has sent in a question. he wants to know if vaccines work against the new mutation of delta, known as ay4.2?— against the new mutation of delta, known as ay4.2? there are briefings, weekl or known as ay4.2? there are briefings, weekly or every _ known as ay4.2? there are briefings, weekly or every couple _ known as ay4.2? there are briefings, weekly or every couple of— known as ay4.2? there are briefings, weekly or every couple of weeks, - known as ay4.2? there are briefings, weekly or every couple of weeks, of. weekly or every couple of weeks, of what is cold a risk register, looking at variants of concern, and they have colours of concern that you can see transmissibility for
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ay4.2, there is evidence that air is slightly more transmissible that even the original delta. i think ay4.2 now accounts for about 14.7% of cases sequence in england, so it is catching up. when you look at if it evades vaccines, that box is green. in other words, there is no evidence at the moment that the vaccines we are using is not effective in the face of ay4.2. in the world study all the studies suggest there to protect against severity, hospitalisation and mortality. i think brian can be reassured that the vaccines he has received, even with this new member of the delta family, are still working. of the delta family, are still workino. ., , of the delta family, are still workino. .,, ., ,, ., of the delta family, are still workin.. .,, ., ,, ., ., working. people take the time to ask the question — working. people take the time to ask the question and _ working. people take the time to ask the question and we _ working. people take the time to ask the question and we often _ working. people take the time to ask the question and we often say - working. people take the time to ask the question and we often say a - working. people take the time to ask the question and we often say a fewl the question and we often say a few are thinking ahead, it is not a stupid question. it is always useful
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because these things are developing all the time. chris, this is a question from helen. just on brian's question, the other point _ just on brian's question, the other point to— just on brian's question, the other point to add to that is that the vaccine — point to add to that is that the vaccine manufacturers are breezy considering updates and testing updates— considering updates and testing updates to the vaccines to better reflect _ updates to the vaccines to better reflect the circulating strength, and that — reflect the circulating strength, and that may well be part of a booster— and that may well be part of a booster programme. at the moment, we are sticking _ booster programme. at the moment, we are sticking with the booster and vaccines — are sticking with the booster and vaccines we have because they do work— vaccines we have because they do work reliably well. in terms of weather — work reliably well. in terms of weather or not having investor and then instantly catching coronavirus, then instantly catching coronavirus, the likelihood this is not going to make _ the likelihood this is not going to make a _ the likelihood this is not going to make a huge difference to you unfortunately. the reason is, when
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we have _ unfortunately. the reason is, when we have any— unfortunately. the reason is, when we have any kind of vaccine or a booster, — we have any kind of vaccine or a booster, you are basically re—stimulating your immune response, you are _ re—stimulating your immune response, you are dipping into a a main memory you are dipping into a a main memory you have _ you are dipping into a a main memory you have formed having seen something before and encouraging it to meet— something before and encouraging it to meet all of the things that the immune — to meet all of the things that the immune system makes when it fights off an _ immune system makes when it fights off an infection, but that takes time — off an infection, but that takes time you _ off an infection, but that takes time. you don't reach peak protection until probably after two weeks _ protection until probably after two weeks you have been exposed to the booster~ _ weeks you have been exposed to the booster~ a _ weeks you have been exposed to the booster. a two—day gap is a bit low. the likelihood is it will make a very— the likelihood is it will make a very trivial _ the likelihood is it will make a very trivial difference of any. chiles — very trivial difference of any. chiles is _ very trivial difference of any. chiles is a _ very trivial difference of any. chiles is a different story. her cuestion chiles is a different story. her question was _ chiles is a different story. his: question was wilshire then need another booster, but presumably that wouldn't be offered? you another booster, but presumably that wouldn't be offered?— wouldn't be offered? you wouldn't need another _ wouldn't be offered? you wouldn't need another booster, _ wouldn't be offered? you wouldn't need another booster, because . need another booster, because effective — need another booster, because effective that you have bested yourself — effective that you have bested yourself quite well. you have caught the affection and how the boosters, though _ the affection and how the boosters, though. we like your immune system quite nicely— though. we like your immune system quite nicely and both will result in a rise _ quite nicely and both will result in a rise in— quite nicely and both will result in a rise in antibody levels and will protect— a rise in antibody levels and will protect you for the foreseeable
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future — protect you for the foreseeable future. but they will drop off of time _ future. but they will drop off of time so — future. but they will drop off of time so it— future. but they will drop off of time so it doesn't rule out future boosters — time so it doesn't rule out future boosters. on this occasion, it doesn't — boosters. on this occasion, it doesn't mean you need one instantly. mike may— doesn't mean you need one instantly. mike may be slightly stupid question i was to ask follows on from the boosters. if over time the vaccine resistance starts to wane, hence the need for the boosters, at some point down the track are we going to keep needing more and more boosters as the years go by? we needing more and more boosters as the years go by?— the years go by? we don't know the answer to this _ the years go by? we don't know the answer to this question, _ the years go by? we don't know the answer to this question, and - the years go by? we don't know the answer to this question, and we - answer to this question, and we don't _ answer to this question, and we don't know— answer to this question, and we don't know the answer for different ages _ don't know the answer for different ages the — don't know the answer for different ages. the trend that has emerged is that the _ ages. the trend that has emerged is that the older you are the more quickly— that the older you are the more quickly you lose the immunity to your vaccine. quickly you lose the immunity to yourvaccine. it quickly you lose the immunity to your vaccine. it may well be that boosters — your vaccine. it may well be that boosters need to be delivered on different — boosters need to be delivered on different cycles for different age groups — different cycles for different age groups. that may reflect the overall risk from _ groups. that may reflect the overall risk from coronavirus, which is of course _ risk from coronavirus, which is of course higher in older people. this winter— course higher in older people. this winter will— course higher in older people. this winter will very much be a learning experience. — winter will very much be a learning experience, we will see what the
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impact _ experience, we will see what the impact of— experience, we will see what the impact of the boosters is. with some vaccine _ impact of the boosters is. with some vaccine programmes, you don't need to boost— vaccine programmes, you don't need to boost multiple times, one mist is often _ to boost multiple times, one mist is often enough to give you enduring immunity — often enough to give you enduring immunity. but this is a moving target, — immunity. but this is a moving target, the virus is evolving and changing — target, the virus is evolving and changing. it may be we have to update — changing. it may be we have to update lieberstod in future. on the other— update lieberstod in future. on the other hand — update lieberstod in future. on the other hand we might not have to for everybody — other hand we might not have to for everybody. they will be watching very closely respond to the. it very closely respond to the. sounds very closely respond to the. it sounds obvious that we would always be listed. and ruth wants to know the answer to this. this is probably one of the most common questions of the day, to other try to be brief. we keep forgetting that vaccines do help prevent infection. with one with
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people involved in the ons infection a survey looking at the delta group, the vaccines were still between 65-80% the vaccines were still between 65—80% effective in preventing you from getting infected. but you can have breakthrough infections, that means that means that the vaccinated person can still pass it on. although they may be carrying the virus for a shorter period, that is the important thing to say. there are studies that suggest that even within a household double but soon he people are less likely to pass it on to their household members, those risks are registered. vaccines do not completely eliminate transmission, but they do reduce risks. that's like countries around europe have asked people to show proof of vaccination.— proof of vaccination. thank you both. proof of vaccination. thank you both- take _ proof of vaccination. thank you both. take care, _ proof of vaccination. thank you both. take care, had _ proof of vaccination. thank you both. take care, had a - proof of vaccination. thank you both. take care, had a good i proof of vaccination. thank you i both. take care, had a good week. we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, when matt takes over
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in the saturday kitchen. hejoins us now. good morning. our s-ecial he joins us now. good morning. cl" special guest today is rader dj and author, she keeps us entertained every day with her drivetime show— sara cox. every day with her drivetime show- sara cox. ., ~ every day with her drivetime show- sara cox. ., ,, , ., , . sara cox. thank you very much. i will dive sara cox. thank you very much. i will give you _ sara cox. thank you very much. i will give you £5 _ sara cox. thank you very much. i will give you £5 for _ sara cox. thank you very much. i will give you £5 for saying - sara cox. thank you very much. i will give you £5 for saying i i sara cox. thank you very much. i will give you £5 for saying i keep | will give you £5 for saying i keep you entertained every day. when i'm cookin: , you entertained every day. when i'm cooking. bottle _ you entertained every day. when i'm cooking, bottle of _ you entertained every day. when i'm cooking, bottle of wine. _ you entertained every day. when i'm cooking, bottle of wine. five - cooking, bottle of wine. five o'clock, that's _ cooking, bottle of wine. five o'clock, that's quite - cooking, bottle of wine. five o'clock, that's quite early. i cooking, bottle of wine. five l o'clock, that's quite early. we cooking, bottle of wine. five i o'clock, that's quite early. we will be catching _ o'clock, that's quite early. we will be catching up _ o'clock, that's quite early. we will be catching up with _ o'clock, that's quite early. we will be catching up with your - o'clock, that's quite early. we will be catching up with your book, i o'clock, that's quite early. we willl be catching up with your book, etc. food heaven, food hell?— food heaven, food hell? heaven, i love a cauliflower— food heaven, food hell? heaven, i love a cauliflower and _ food heaven, food hell? heaven, i love a cauliflower and i _ food heaven, food hell? heaven, i love a cauliflower and i love - food heaven, food hell? heaven, i love a cauliflower and i love curry, | love a cauliflower and i love curry, but i _ love a cauliflower and i love curry, but i can _ love a cauliflower and i love curry, but i can never bring them together well _ but i can never bring them together well you _ but i can never bring them together well. you don't need to know about the hell. _ well. you don't need to know about the hell. it's— well. you don't need to know about the hell, it's fine, let's move on. it's a _ the hell, it's fine, let's move on. it's a format,! the hell, it's fine, let's move on. it's a format. !—
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the hell, it's fine, let's move on. it's a format,! hell- you know those smooth soups _ it's a format,! hell- you know those smooth soups that _ it's a format,! hell- you know those smooth soups that have _ it's a format,! hell- you know those smooth soups that have been i it's a format,! hell- you know those i smooth soups that have been blended? particularly— smooth soups that have been blended? particularly league and potato, creamy — particularly league and potato, creamy soups. i cannot never get on with a _ creamy soups. i cannot never get on with a purpose, i have tried. —— a pepper~ _ with a purpose, i have tried. -- a .e. er, . ., ., ,., with a purpose, i have tried. -- a neuer, . ., ., with a purpose, i have tried. -- a .e. er, . ., ., .,~' �* pepper. what are you making? i'm aooin to pepper. what are you making? i'm going to be — pepper. what are you making? i'm going to be making _ pepper. what are you making? i'm going to be making a _ pepper. what are you making? i'm going to be making a very - pepper. what are you making? i'm| going to be making a very delicious sticky cranes basic chicken with vermicelli on the side. good way to use up the quins. we always buy it. theo, what have you got? i’m use up the quins. we always buy it. theo, what have you got? i'm making a very extravagant _ theo, what have you got? i'm making a very extravagant beef _ theo, what have you got? i'm making a very extravagant beef dish - theo, what have you got? i'm making a very extravagant beef dish roasted i a very extravagant beef dish roasted with lots _ a very extravagant beef dish roasted with lots of— a very extravagant beef dish roasted with lots of butter. _ a very extravagant beef dish roasted with lots of butter. i'm _ a very extravagant beef dish roasted with lots of butter. i'm doing - with lots of butter. i'm doing celeriac— with lots of butter. i'm doing celeriac made _ with lots of butter. i'm doing celeriac made with _ with lots of butter. i'm doing celeriac made with and - with lots of butter. i'm doing i celeriac made with and they're with lots of butter. i'm doing - celeriac made with and they're only whining _ celeriac made with and they're only whining iiiill— celeriac made with and they're only whinina. ~ , ., , celeriac made with and they're only whinina. . , ., , ., celeriac made with and they're only whinina. . , .,, ., , ., whining. will i be able to steal the reci ne? whining. will i be able to steal the reci-e? of whining. will i be able to steal the recipe? of course _ whining. will i be able to steal the recipe? of course you _ whining. will i be able to steal the recipe? of course you can. - whining. will i be able to steal the recipe? of course you can. how. whining. will i be able to steal the| recipe? of course you can. how did ou net recipe? of course you can. how did you get on — recipe? of course you can. how did you get on with _
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recipe? of course you can. how did you get on with the _ recipe? of course you can. how did you get on with the one _ recipe? of course you can. how did you get on with the one this - recipe? of course you can. how did you get on with the one this week? i recipe? of course you can. how did l you get on with the one this week? a joy you get on with the one this week? a joy. we have got all the colours this week _ joy. we have got all the colours this week. bringing out a big gun as well for— this week. bringing out a big gun as well for that beef dish, which i'm very excited about. i well for that beef dish, which i'm very excited about.— very excited about. i can tell. what's sarah, i'm with you. we have tea for a reason, we don't need liquefied fit. ~ ., , fit. we will get there eventually. let's enjoy _ first, we need to talk about sport and this mystery, which is not a joyful mystery. it is really concerning. we are talking about peng shuai, the tennis player, and a lot of people saying we need to know. there has been another development overnight, and she is one of the biggest stars in china. that is the
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image that has been shared by thousands of different people, seen around the world millions of times. and yet still no direct contact between the player and the various authorities. this is why it seems so strange. overnight, three photos of peng shuai were posted on a wechat account under her name with the caption "happy weekend". she can be seen here posing with a cat, and holding a panda soft toy and yet no reference at all to the story that has got and the authenticity of the post on the chinese instant messaging service, has been questioned just like an email which surfaced earlier in the week. peng hasn't been seen since she made sexual assault allegations against a former china vice—premier two weeks ago. the head of the women's tennis association told the bbc that he is "very, very concerned about her" and that there would be no tennis events in china next year without proof that peng is safe. world number one novak djokovic says he supports the move. i am
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world number one novak d'okovic says he supports the move._ he supports the move. i am really lad that he supports the move. i am really glad that there — he supports the move. i am really glad that there was _ he supports the move. i am really glad that there was a _ he supports the move. i am really glad that there was a kind - he supports the move. i am really glad that there was a kind of- glad that there was a kind of initiated reaction from both the atp and wta chairman and it is important because this is horrifying. i mean, a person is missing. i don't know what i say previously if it is true or not, that she is found, and i really hope so. this is necessary for us to take whatever action. i heard just now that the wta is willing to pull out from china. with all the tournaments unless this is resolved, i support it 100%. novak d'okovic resolved, i support it 100%. novak djokovic echoing _ resolved, i support it 100%. novak djokovic echoing the _ resolved, i support it 100%. novak djokovic echoing the thoughts i resolved, i support it 100%. novak djokovic echoing the thoughts of l djokovic echoing the thoughts of players across the world. now, the other story relating to tennis is the confirmation that un—vaccinated players will not be allowed to compete at the australian open in the new year. there had been a lot of confusion and conflicting statements over the restrictions. latest figures show 80 of the top 100 men's players have been vaccinated against covid—i9. defending champion novak djokovic has not revealed his vaccination status and the wta is yet to provide
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figures for its female players. we have also had confirmation that there will be capacity crowds at the tournament in january. shocked, shamed and saddened, the words of cricket bosses in england and wales who said racism is a "blight" on our game and they "apologised un—reservedly". that's in response to azeem rafiq's testimony to the, dcms select committee on tuesday. the sport's top figures met at the oval yesterday to come up with a plan of action, to try and tackle the issue. we will continue to listen, to make swift and positive change to the culture of the game. we will embrace and celebrate differences everywhere, knowing that with diversity we are stronger. today, as a game, we discussed a series of tangible commitments to make cricket a sport where everyone feels safe and everyone is included. we will now finalise the details and publish these actions next week. our game must win back your trust.
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now, as football returns after the world cup qualifiers it's the first day in charge today for steven gerard at aston villa and dean smith at norwich and tomorrow, rangers' new boss giovanni van bronkhurst will at least be watching his new team against hibs in the league cup from the stands, but at newcastle their new manager eddie howe tested positive for covid—i9 yesterday and so will miss this afternoon's match against brentford as he now isolates for ten days. he says he's feeling fine so assistant head coaches jason tindall and graemejones will take charge of the team at st james park. manchester city's kevin de broiner is also missing after he tested positive for covid after returning from international duty with belgium. he'll isolate for 10 days which means that he'll miss city's next three games, including their key champions league tie with paris st germain on wednesday. the formula one world championship is in qatar for the first time this weekend, with all eyes on whether lewis hamilton can repeat his heroics of last weekend, as he looks to trim
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the i4—point lead of max verstappen even further. in second practice both had to settle for suporting roles behind valteri bottas who was quickest, and also piere gasly. verstappen was third and lewis hamilton could only manage fourth. significantly hamilton was wearing a special helmet with the rainbow flag on it as human rights remain a contentious issue in qatar, especially lg bt rights. third practice is less than three hours away. tonight the history—making journey of fallon sherrock continues as she takes on former world champion peter wright in the quarter finals of the grand slam of darts. she s gone further at this event than any woman in history, and this is the latest in a growing list of ground—breaking milestones for sherrock in the last year. before this week's event i went to meet her. wherever she goes to play now, fallon sherrock will be revered after her trailblazing year. my turn. her historic run at this week's grand slam of darts
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following on from her success earlier this autumn when she became the first woman to reach a televised pdc final at the nordic masters, and this after becoming the first woman to win a main draw match of the 2020 pdc world championship, when she got to the third round. just so over the moon. like, i was just speechless because i didn't know kind of how i felt. like, there were so many emotions running through — i did not know whether to laugh, cry, you know, dance. the atmosphere was just, like, electric. it was just amazing. it's totally changed now. the men respect the women and stuff like that. i mean, granted, i mean, a lot of the time, they were like "we don't want to lose to a woman". now it's "we don't want to lose to that player", like they're are a good player. it has helped fallon that her twin sister felicia has also played darts since they first gave it a go 11 years ago. there's always a competitive side and it's like "ok, right, so i know if i don't do well, she is going to do well" and she has always wanted to beat me and i'm always wanting to beat her,
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so we've always had, like, the killer instinct, so it has always helped, like, when we go into competitions. i love the pressure. you have the adrenaline going and it's like "right, you have the killer instinct". she has taken any pressure this year in her stride and says her secret is walking, escaping to the countryside. ithink it is like, you know, like me time. like, i quite like, you know, just, you know, just getting away and just kind of having time to yourself and not having, you know, people around you because obviously my sport is very much people—oriented, you've always have people looking at you, you're always playing, there's always someone there, so it is really nice to sit there, get out and have your own time. and you have to be careful around trees, fallon, haven't you? because you ended up one once. yeah, we were in switzerland for a dart open, like, competition and there was about 1.5 hours break between the finals and everyone was like "oh, dare you to go up the tree! dare you to go up the tree!" so i was like "if you're gonna dare me, i'm gonna go up the tree" so yeah,
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no, i climbed up the tree and got stuck. how high? probably — i would not say right up high but i got kind of... enough to give them all kittens? and then i tried to get down and i couldn't get down, and someone had to literally come and help me down. like, i couldn't get down. and this was before a final? yeah! she will be staying away from the trees, then, before tonight's quarter—final but whatever happens, now her legacy is set. fallon's achievements have already hit targets way beyond the normal boundaries of the sport. she's changed the whole image of this game, opening it up to girls and players that would never have thought about taking it up before. i thought it was a bar thing — people go to bars, throw darts. i did not quite think of it as a proper sport. now, i would actually consider doing it more as a hobby because it looks quite nice and relaxing. just because boys are playing, i it does not mean that girls cannot. girls know that if they play, _ they can become world champ as well. not many twins do sports together but her and her sister do
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so it was like like me and freja thought, "oh, that's cool", so we'll do it together. it made it, like, better to be able do it because, obviously, we wanted to do it but it made us want to do it more because we have seen that they do it and, like, they enjoy it together. fallon's made a massive impact. as you can see from the academy, straight away, the girls are flooding in. before, we'd have probably had dribs and drabs — one or two come, play a little bit. now they're all really keen. they want to be that — they want to be the queen of the palace themselves! and thanks to the likes of fallon sherrock, those coming into the sport now, like she did when she was 16, can aim straight for the top. i never thought a woman could make, you know, a living playing darts and then obviously, as times changed, women have got more opportunities, the prize money has then got better and we've got the opportunities to play in with the men, which has given us, like, a massive thing and now, women can actually make a living playing darts.
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just brilliant, and maybe it was meant to be and i asked what she would have done if not darts, and she said she would have gone into forensic science. or hairdressing. they all fit, the precise angles, the fine detail.— they all fit, the precise angles, the fine detail. talk about children in need. what _ the fine detail. talk about children in need. what are _ the fine detail. talk about children in need. what are you _ the fine detail. talk about children in need. what are you up - the fine detail. talk about children in need. what are you up doing i in need. what are you up doing anything last night betty mark hiding from the telly? i did donate to sto- hiding from the telly? i did donate to stop the — hiding from the telly? i did donate to stop the make _ hiding from the telly? i did donate to stop the make me _ hiding from the telly? i did donate to stop the make me singing i hiding from the telly? i did donate| to stop the make me singing again. hiding from the telly? i did donate i to stop the make me singing again. i defended you, i thought you were marvellous. you were marvellous. you had a combination of mike singing, east enders and coronation street star is going on a blind date and ed sheeran being upstaged by a group of puppets.
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it could only happen on children in need, and last night the annual telethon delivered the goods. one duo that took part are presenters sam and mark, let's see what they got up to. happy happy with that? you are the crown. sorry— happy with that? you are the crown. sorry to _ happy with that? you are the crown. sorry to put — happy with that? you are the crown. sorry to put that on you, you are the one _ sorry to put that on you, you are the one who — sorry to put that on you, you are the one who watches the crown. it! did the one who watches the crown. did not the one who watches the crown. it did not sound like olivia colman to me. �* , did not sound like olivia colman to me. n,, ,': ~:: 1: did not sound like olivia colman to me. �*, ,': ~:: 1: ., did not sound like olivia colman to me. ,': ~:::: ., ., me. boys, 3600 in a line for the kids. me. boys, 3600 in a line for the kids- come _ me. boys, 3600 in a line for the kids. come on. _ me. boys, 3600 in a line for the kids. come on. you _ me. boys, 3600 in a line for the kids. come on. you have - me. boys, 3600 in a line for the kids. come on. you have got i me. boys, 3600 in a line for the i kids. come on. you have got three grand _ kids. come on. you have got three grand sitting — kids. come on. you have got three grand sitting there. _ kids. come on. you have got three grand sitting there. you _ kids. come on. you have got three grand sitting there. you could i kids. come on. you have got three grand sitting there. you could be l grand sitting there. you could be wiped _ grand sitting there. you could be wiped out— grand sitting there. you could be wiped out early _ grand sitting there. you could be wiped out early. here _ grand sitting there. you could be wiped out early. here we - grand sitting there. you could be wiped out early. here we go. i grand sitting there. you could be i wiped out early. here we go. were they right? — wiped out early. here we go. were they right? or— wiped out early. here we go. were they right? or were _ wiped out early. here we go. were they right? or were they— wiped out early. here we go. were they right? or were they wrong? i wiped out early. here we go. were i they right? or were they wrong? 0h, they right? or were they wrong? oh, no! here we — they right? or were they wrong? oh, no! here we go. _ they right? or were they wrong? oh, no! here we go, we _ they right? or were they wrong? oh, no! here we go, we are _ they right? or were they wrong? oh, no! here we go, we are back- they right? or were they wrong? oh, no! here we go, we are back to i no! here we go, we are back to nothina , no! here we go, we are back to nothing. it _ no! here we go, we are back to nothing. it is — no! here we go, we are back to nothing, it is ok. _ no! here we go, we are back to nothing, it is ok. question i no! here we go, we are back to i nothing, it is ok. question three... sam _ nothing, it is ok. question three... sam and _
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nothing, it is ok. question three... sam and mark— nothing, it is ok. question three... sam and mark are _ nothing, it is ok. question three... sam and mark are with _ nothing, it is ok. question three... sam and mark are with us - nothing, it is ok. question three... sam and mark are with us now. i nothing, it is ok. question three... i sam and mark are with us now. good to see you both. thank you very much. how danny is brilliant, so good at it. he much. how danny is brilliant, so good at it— good at it. he is so good, i will never live _ good at it. he is so good, i will never live that _ good at it. he is so good, i will never live that question - good at it. he is so good, i will never live that question down. | good at it. he is so good, i will| never live that question down. i think— never live that question down. i think i_ never live that question down. i think i will— never live that question down. i think i will have to rewatch from a crown _ think i will have to rewatch from a crown. ., . , think i will have to rewatch from a crown. ., ., , it think i will have to rewatch from a crown-_ it was - crown. how was it? it was nerve-racking _ crown. how was it? it was nerve-racking and - crown. how was it? it was. nerve-racking and anything crown. how was it? it was i nerve-racking and anything like crown. how was it? it was - nerve-racking and anything like that nerve—racking and anything like that when you are playing for charity, especially like children in need, it is nerve—racking. and that wall is genuinely the biggest thing i have ever seen. genuinely the biggest thing i have everseen. i genuinely the biggest thing i have ever seen. i don't know how they fit it into a studio, it was terrifying. how are you preparing for it? figs it into a studio, it was terrifying. how are you preparing for it? as you can see, i how are you preparing for it? as you can see. i do — how are you preparing for it? as you can see. i do a _ how are you preparing for it? as you can see, i do a lot— how are you preparing for it? as you can see, i do a lot of— how are you preparing for it? as you can see, i do a lot of training. i i can see, i do a lot of training. i was— can see, i do a lot of training. i was fine — can see, i do a lot of training. i was fine my— can see, i do a lot of training. i was fine. my body strength was not an issue _ was fine. my body strength was not an issue at — was fine. my body strength was not an issue at all. it was the issue that— an issue at all. it was the issue that i_ an issue at all. it was the issue that i could _ an issue at all. it was the issue that i could not get the questions right~ _ that i could not get the questions rioht. , ., ,., , ,
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right. the big thing about this is it is all for— right. the big thing about this is it is all for a _ right. the big thing about this is it is all for a really _ right. the big thing about this is it is all for a really good - right. the big thing about this is it is all for a really good cause. l it is all for a really good cause. like mike with his singing, you guys taking part, you don't mind making a bit of a full of yourself because you are raising money for a great cause. . , y you are raising money for a great cause. . , , ., , you are raising money for a great cause. absolutely not. it is such a hue art cause. absolutely not. it is such a huge part of— cause. absolutely not. it is such a huge part of our— cause. absolutely not. it is such a huge part of our life, _ cause. absolutely not. it is such a huge part of our life, children i cause. absolutely not. it is such a huge part of our life, children in i huge part of our life, children in need. _ huge part of our life, children in need. and — huge part of our life, children in need, and it is like a date in the diary— need, and it is like a date in the diary every— need, and it is like a date in the diary every november. from since being _ diary every november. from since being at— diary every november. from since being at school, school always get involved _ being at school, school always get involved with it, and i remember getting _ involved with it, and i remember getting involved with it when i was at school — getting involved with it when i was at school i— getting involved with it when i was at school. i have got kids and they all went _ at school. i have got kids and they all went to — at school. i have got kids and they all went to school yesterday in their— all went to school yesterday in their pyjamas and got money for it. it is their pyjamas and got money for it. it is such— their pyjamas and got money for it. it is such a — their pyjamas and got money for it. it is such a lovely charity and i am lucky— it is such a lovely charity and i am lucky to— it is such a lovely charity and i am lucky to take part in it and have done _ lucky to take part in it and have done for— lucky to take part in it and have done for many years, so it is lovely to be _ done for many years, so it is lovely to be always — done for many years, so it is lovely to be always asked to take part and try and _ to be always asked to take part and try and help out a bit. i am to be always asked to take part and try and help out a bit.— try and help out a bit. i am looking at our try and help out a bit. i am looking at your faces _ try and help out a bit. i am looking at your faces when _ try and help out a bit. i am looking at your faces when the _ try and help out a bit. i am looking at your faces when the wall - try and help out a bit. i am looking at your faces when the wall went i at your faces when the wall went red. you can't see each other and you are both hanging your heads in shame. it you are both hanging your heads in shame. , ., ,
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you are both hanging your heads in shame-_ did - you are both hanging your heads in shame._ did you i shame. it is really bad. did you have that _ shame. it is really bad. did you have that brain _ shame. it is really bad. did you have that brain freeze - shame. it is really bad. did you have that brain freeze then? i i shame. it is really bad. did you i have that brain freeze then? i don't know when you are watching it back, i often do not watch any of these things back, ifind it safer that way, but when you watch it back, will you go i know that answer? the actual questions were not that difficult, — actual questions were not that difficult, it is the fact that the balls — difficult, it is the fact that the balls came down the wall so quickly and having — balls came down the wall so quickly and having watched it a couple of times _ and having watched it a couple of times i_ and having watched it a couple of times i knew it was stressful. but when _ times i knew it was stressful. but when there — times i knew it was stressful. but when there is money on the line for children— when there is money on the line for children in— when there is money on the line for children in need the pressure went up children in need the pressure went up slightly. hopefully we did enough. it up slightly. hopefully we did enouah. , ., ~ , , enough. it is for the kids every time. thanks, _ enough. it is for the kids every time. thanks, mate. _ enough. it is for the kids every time. thanks, mate. those i enough. it is for the kids every i time. thanks, mate. those poor children that _ time. thanks, mate. those poor children that you _ time. thanks, mate. those poor children that you didn't - time. thanks, mate. those poor children that you didn't raise i time. thanks, mate. those poor. children that you didn't raise money for. we children that you didn't raise money for. ~ , ., , ., for. we did the triple to be fair. ma be for. we did the triple to be fair. maybe you _ for. we did the triple to be fair. maybe you have _ for. we did the triple to be fair. maybe you have sympathy i for. we did the triple to be fair. maybe you have sympathy for i for. we did the triple to be fair. i maybe you have sympathy for people you put in the hot seat now. i maybe you have sympathy for people you put in the hot seat now.- you put in the hot seat now. i have no idea what _ you put in the hot seat now. i have no idea what you _ you put in the hot seat now. i have no idea what you are _ you put in the hot seat now. i have no idea what you are talking i you put in the hot seat now. i have |
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no idea what you are talking about. maybe i should leave that out? we don't have any video evidence of that. we are talking about you and just how well you did with the wall yesterday and how you are basking in the glory of your brilliance yesterday. tell us more about that. to be just a small token of the 39 million that was raised is so amazing, sam has touched upon it, but being involved in it is something we love doing every year and to be a little part of it is just fantastic.— and to be a little part of it is just fantastic. sam, nearly £40 million. obviously _ just fantastic. sam, nearly £40 million. obviously you - just fantastic. sam, nearly £40 million. obviously you had i just fantastic. sam, nearly £40i million. obviously you had your just fantastic. sam, nearly £40 i million. obviously you had your head in your hands and you were watching through yourfingers, in your hands and you were watching through your fingers, for your bit, did you see any of the rest of the show? what did you enjoy? it was great to see an audience back there as well. i great to see an audience back there as well. ., ., , , . ., , as well. i love all the specials the nut as well. i love all the specials they put on- _ as well. i love all the specials they put on. ever— as well. i love all the specials they put on. ever since i as well. i love all the specials they put on. ever since being | as well. i love all the specials. they put on. ever since being a as well. i love all the specials i they put on. ever since being a kid, when _ they put on. ever since being a kid, when you _ they put on. ever since being a kid, when you see shows that you are
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familiar— when you see shows that you are familiar with and celebrities get involved — familiar with and celebrities get involved with it in the first clip they— involved with it in the first clip they did. _ involved with it in the first clip they did, it was just brilliant. what — they did, it was just brilliant. what a — they did, it was just brilliant. what a fantastic idea. i am sure millions— what a fantastic idea. i am sure millions of— what a fantastic idea. i am sure millions of people watching at home feel the _ millions of people watching at home feel the same when you see a familiar— feel the same when you see a familiar brand and then you get somebody you would not normally see in that _ somebody you would not normally see in that situation. that is when it is best — in that situation. that is when it is best. ~ ., in that situation. that is when it is best. . ., .,, in that situation. that is when it is best. . ., ~ ., in that situation. that is when it is best. ., ~ ., ., is best. we had rosie millard on earlier. is best. we had rosie millard on earlier- she _ is best. we had rosie millard on earlier. she was _ is best. we had rosie millard on earlier. she was talking - is best. we had rosie millard on earlier. she was talking about i is best. we had rosie millard on i earlier. she was talking about how brilliant wayne has been and how brilliant wayne has been and how brilliant you guys have been, she was not a massive fan of mike singing, but she made a point that everyone knows some way how people have benefited from children in need and you took part. you know how important this is. we see those videos and films reminding us of how important this is.— important this is. massively, and it is so important _
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important this is. massively, and it is so important to _ important this is. massively, and it is so important to give _ important this is. massively, and it is so important to give back, i important this is. massively, and it is so important to give back, that l is so important to give back, that is so important to give back, that is the wrong word, but to be involved in a fantastic charity like children in need and to see where the money goes and how it makes people smile and families happier is what it is all about. to put celebrities not in their comfort zone, if that is a little thing that we can do to raise some money, then i am up for that. i we can do to raise some money, then i am up format-— i am up for that. i am up for that. mark and — i am up for that. i am up for that. mark and sam, _ i am up for that. i am up for that. mark and sam, thank _ i am up for that. i am up for that. mark and sam, thank you - i am up for that. i am up for that. mark and sam, thank you for - i am up for that. i am up for that. i mark and sam, thank you for talking to us this morning. well done last night. watch it back, you were great. film. well done last night. watch it back, you were great-— you were great. 0h, bless, thank ou. the you were great. 0h, bless, thank you. the highlights _ you were great. 0h, bless, thank you. the highlights are _ you were great. 0h, bless, thank you. the highlights are on - you were great. 0h, bless, thank you. the highlights are on bbc. you were great. 0h, bless, thank. you. the highlights are on bbc one at ten to three _ you. the highlights are on bbc one at ten to three tomorrow _ you. the highlights are on bbc one | at ten to three tomorrow afternoon. everyone in the whole country can watch how well you did tomorrow afternoon. ., ., ., ., afternoon. tomorrow afternoon, i will aet it afternoon. tomorrow afternoon, i will get it sorted. _ afternoon. tomorrow afternoon, i will get it sorted. such _ afternoon. tomorrow afternoon, i will get it sorted. such good - will get it sorted. such good
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sorts. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. here i am. what is happening? good morning. it is a fine day out there for some of us. we have got the skies above sheffield with beautiful blue skies for now with sunshine around, but the weather will be changing over the weather will be changing over the weekend. it has been really mild for much of november so far but winter is around the corner. ten days until the start of the meteorological winter and it is turning colderfor all of meteorological winter and it is turning colder for all of us. meteorological winter and it is turning colderfor all of us. a change in the weather over the next 24 change in the weather over the next 2a hours or so. this weather front is sweeping south tonight and into tomorrow. by the time we get to tomorrow. by the time we get to tomorrow morning we will have the cold air mass right across the uk and these chilly northerly winds as well. forthe and these chilly northerly winds as
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well. for the rest of the day across england and wales you have got quite a bit of clout and there is sunshine in northern england and into north wales. patchy rain is clearing out of southern scotland and northern ireland and that will be followed by sunshine and a few blustery showers early on. temperatures between seven to ii early on. temperatures between seven to 11 towards the south, but some of the showers will be quite heavy with gusty winds up to 45 miles an hour blowing in the showers. by the time we get to tomorrow morning we are all in the clearer skies. temperatures a few degrees above freezing for some of us, but in the rural sports cold and misty. we are expecting some frost tomorrow morning, particularly in scotland. tomorrow, more sunshine than today, but wintry across the mountains of scotland and we could see some hail and showers in eastern england as well. fewershowers and showers in eastern england as well. fewer showers further west, perhaps a few in the irish sea coast. temperatures between seven to
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ii coast. temperatures between seven to 11 degrees, but add on the wind chill and it will feel colder than that, particularly in the east. high pressure is with us on monday and something a little less cold and a weak front that will bring cloud to scotland and northern ireland. but much of the uk keeps the clear skies, so sunshine and it will feel cooler than it has done recently. seven to ii cooler than it has done recently. seven to 11 degrees and a brisk breeze in east anglia and through the english channel as well. we are expecting a return of widespread frosty mornings and there may well be mist and fog patches to content with this week. we are likely to get a few places into double figures on monday and tuesday, but from mid week onwards another northerly blast of air. turning significantly colder, just three degrees in inverness. time to dig out the winter woollies, inverness. time to dig out the winterwoollies, it inverness. time to dig out the winter woollies, it will feel quite different through the week ahead. sarah, thank you very much. enjoy your day.
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it's musicals week on strictly tonight as the pairs head into week 9, but it's all change at the top table as judge craig revel—horwood is replaced whilst he recovers from covid. and if that wasn't enough reality tv for you, i'm a celebrity, get me out of here kicks off tonight. so who better to talk to than professional dancers and brothers aj and curtis pritchard. you know both shows. good morning. how are you? — you know both shows. good morning. how are you? good, _ you know both shows. good morning. how are you? good, how— you know both shows. good morning. how are you? good, how are - you know both shows. good morning. how are you? good, how are you? - you know both shows. good morning. i how are you? good, how are you? very well and excited _ how are you? good, how are you? very well and excited for _ how are you? good, how are you? very well and excited for this _ how are you? good, how are you? very well and excited for this weekend - how are you? good, how are you? very well and excited for this weekend of - well and excited for this weekend of show business. strictly is ramping up show business. strictly is ramping up and going from a week where we saw rows making an impact on the whole nation and we were all in floods of tears watching it. it was ma . ic. as floods of tears watching it. it was magic as soon — floods of tears watching it. it was magic. as soon as _ floods of tears watching it. it was magic. as soon as the _ floods of tears watching it. it was magic. as soon as the music- floods of tears watching it. it was - magic. as soon as the music stopped. they had _ magic. as soon as the music stopped. they had their rumba, dancing it beautifully and it was normal with the music— beautifully and it was normal with the music on, rose and giovanni, and all of— the music on, rose and giovanni, and all of a _ the music on, rose and giovanni, and all of a sudden the music gets cut and they— all of a sudden the music gets cut and they continue dancing in silence _ and they continue dancing in silence i_ and they continue dancing in silence. i am and they continue dancing in silence. lam notjoking, my hairas it stood _ silence. iam notjoking, my hairas it stood up— silence. lam notjoking, my hairas it stood up when i happened and it
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was magical and it was a moment i will always— was magical and it was a moment i will always remember, notjust for the dancing, but it made you experience it and realise it in a different— experience it and realise it in a different way.— experience it and realise it in a different way. rose is deaf and until ou different way. rose is deaf and until you say — different way. rose is deaf and until you say that _ different way. rose is deaf and until you say that to _ different way. rose is deaf and until you say that to somebodyj different way. rose is deaf and - until you say that to somebody and when you say, actually this is the situation, this is what she hears and feels and for us to be put in the same situation as her, it heightened our senses. when the music faded back into end the routine you were gone. it is really nice when you watch a performance like that. you don'tjudge it as a professional dancer, you become a part of it. when you make that moment and that impact on strictly, it will last forever. when they come to the final, and i believe they will go to the final, when they are able to choose a dance that they can do again, and they choose that dance, who can say any more than that? ~ ., .,, ., .,, .,
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that? what rose has done, aside from her disability. — that? what rose has done, aside from her disability, as _ that? what rose has done, aside from her disability, as a _ that? what rose has done, aside from her disability, as a professional- her disability, as a professional dancer you would have been proud of her performance because she is so good. her performance because she is so aood. ~ . , her performance because she is so mad, . ., , . her performance because she is so iood, . ., , . her performance because she is so iood. . ., , . , her performance because she is so ood. ., , . good. what is nice with her is you see the improvement. _ good. what is nice with her is you see the improvement. every - good. what is nice with her is you | see the improvement. every week good. what is nice with her is you - see the improvement. every week she takes on board the constructive criticism, giovanni really pushing her, and you can see him lifting her up her, and you can see him lifting her up and it is nice to see and she performs well under pressure. giovanni loves it dancing with her. we better— giovanni loves it dancing with her. we better talk about the others. in musicals week what should we look forward to? it is in musicals week what should we look forward to? , ., ., , , forward to? it is amazing because --eole forward to? it is amazing because people love _ forward to? it is amazing because people love musicals _ forward to? it is amazing because people love musicals and - forward to? it is amazing because people love musicals and if - forward to? it is amazing because people love musicals and if you i forward to? it is amazing because. people love musicals and if you get a musicai— people love musicals and if you get a musical that you love at heart you will perform — a musical that you love at heart you will perform ten times better because _ will perform ten times better because you get really invested. which _ because you get really invested. which was one of your favourite? lion king. we did a salsa. this week allows them — lion king. we did a salsa. this week allows them to _ lion king. we did a salsa. this week allows them to release _ lion king. we did a salsa. this week allows them to release their - allows them to release their shackles. i want to see the emotions. i don't want them to be thinking, i want to see a story and
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musicals is about telling a beginning, middle and an end. tam beginning, middle and an end. tom fletcher's dancer _ beginning, middle and an end. tom fletcher's dancer is so clean. but i fletcher's dancer is so clean. but to clean can _ fletcher's dancer is so clean. pm to clean can become a bit robotic and wooden. i to clean can become a bit robotic and wooden-— to clean can become a bit robotic and wooden. ~ , ., and wooden. i feel like he needs to smile a bit — and wooden. i feel like he needs to smile a bit more _ and wooden. i feel like he needs to smile a bit more and _ and wooden. i feel like he needs to smile a bit more and let _ and wooden. i feel like he needs to smile a bit more and let loose. - and wooden. i feel like he needs to smile a bit more and let loose. it . smile a bit more and let loose. iii is not smile a bit more and let loose. is not easy smile a bit more and let loose. it is not easy because you want to get it right for your partner and when you are in rehearsals you are struggling with the moves and everything. and to perform as well, for some it comes more naturally than others. for some it comes more naturally than others-_ than others. rees and john? his eneri than others. rees and john? his men in than others. rees and john? his energy in the — than others. rees and john? his energy in the charleston, - than others. rees and john? his energy in the charleston, you i than others. rees and john? his i energy in the charleston, you could not give more energy. he did one little slip, but still it was a ten through and through. it is amazing to see him perform because his expressions are amazing. thenjohn and johannes, whatever the steps are, the harder the dance, the more
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he put into it. as a professional dancer it is rewarding to watch. i am like, if you can give that much energy and that power in such a small, subtle step, i can give more. we want to ask you about i'm a celebrity. a quick word on dan still doing brilliantly. he celebrity. a quick word on dan still doing brilliantly.— doing brilliantly. he is still there and doini doing brilliantly. he is still there and doing fantastic— doing brilliantly. he is still there and doing fantastic and - doing brilliantly. he is still there and doing fantastic and we i doing brilliantly. he is still there and doing fantastic and we want| doing brilliantly. he is still there i and doing fantastic and we want to keep him _ and doing fantastic and we want to keep him there. just go for it. as the weeks — keep him there. just go for it. as the weeks go on and you need to keep pushing _ the weeks go on and you need to keep pushing yourself. go in smiling and enjoy— pushing yourself. go in smiling and enjoy it _ pushing yourself. go in smiling and enjoy it because the audience are the people who vote and if you are enjoying _ the people who vote and if you are enjoying it. — the people who vote and if you are enjoying it, they are enjoying it. louise _ enjoying it, they are enjoying it. louise minchin, formerly of this sofa, will be in the castle in i'm a celebrity. you know what it is like. i can't wait to see her in death. we know her and love her, but we don't see her personality often. you know her and love her, but we don't see her personality often.— see her personality often. you know she is a triathlete _ see her personality often. you know she is a triathlete and _ see her personality often. you know she is a triathlete and she _ see her personality often. you know she is a triathlete and she has i she is a triathlete and she has represented team gb. she will
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coniuer represented team gb. she will conquer everything. _ represented team gb. she will conquer everything. what i i represented team gb. she will. conquer everything. what i have heard behind—the—scenes because of covid when we were doing the show we were not able to do such big heights and waterways and i believe all that has been put back in there and she will thrive under that pressure. you did love island, _ will thrive under that pressure. you did love island, is it tough being incarcerated for want of a better word? it incarcerated for want of a better word? , ,., ' ., word? it is so different than the normal world. _ word? it is so different than the normal world. you _ word? it is so different than the normal world. you get - word? it is so different than the normal world. you get all i word? it is so different than the normal world. you get all your. normal world. you get all your social— normal world. you get all your social media and electronic devices gone _ social media and electronic devices gone it_ social media and electronic devices gone it is— social media and electronic devices gone. it is amazing, i loved it. all you are _ gone. it is amazing, i loved it. all you are doing is talking to people and you _ you are doing is talking to people and you get to know people so fast. that is _ and you get to know people so fast. that is how — and you get to know people so fast. that is how they say one day in a place _ that is how they say one day in a place like — that is how they say one day in a place like that is one week in normal— place like that is one week in normal life because you get to know each other— normal life because you get to know each other inside and out. you see people _ each other inside and out. you see people breaking down and all the stories— people breaking down and all the stories come out because they open up stories come out because they open up and _ stories come out because they open up and gel — stories come out because they open up and get invested in each other. when _ up and get invested in each other. when you — up and get invested in each other. when you both did it did you learn anything about each other that you did not know?— anything about each other that you did not know? when you strip away the distractions _ did not know? when you strip away the distractions you _ did not know? when you strip away the distractions you come - did not know? when you strip away
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the distractions you come back- did not know? when you strip away the distractions you come back to l the distractions you come back to what _ the distractions you come back to what is _ the distractions you come back to what is important to you, your loved ones _ what is important to you, your loved ones and _ what is important to you, your loved ones and your family.— ones and your family. doing something _ ones and your family. doing something like _ ones and your family. doing something like that - ones and your family. doing something like that is i ones and your family. doing something like that is what | ones and your family. doing l something like that is what it ones and your family. doing - something like that is what it comes down to. in strictly and tie, i'm a celebrity it is that build—up to christmas and the excitement. we can say it now, we are doing a pantomime. say it now, we are doing a pantomime-— say it now, we are doing a -antomime. . ., ., , pantomime. excellent, no doubt we will chat again. _ pantomime. excellent, no doubt we will chat again. where'd _ pantomime. excellent, no doubt we will chat again. where'd you - pantomime. excellent, no doubt we will chat again. where'd you the i will chat again. where'd you the tickets from?— and you can watch strictly tonight at 6.35pm on bbc one. that's all from us this morning, breakfast will be back from 6 tomorrow morning. have a good weekend.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. anger in the netherlands over new covid restrictions — dutch police have shot and wounded at least two people during rioting, as coronavirus infection rates rise across europe. translation: on several occasions, police officers had _ translation: on several occasions, police officers had to draw— their weapons to defend themselves. some aimed shots were fired and people got hurt as a result. in australia, rallies and protests against lockdowns and vaccine mandates there have taken place across the country. joe biden says he's angry after a teenager who shot two people dead during racial unrest is cleared of murder. protests took place in new york following the divisive verdict — the president says it should be respected.
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i stand by what the jury has concluded. the jury system works and we have to abide by it.

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